EAGLES CAN CARRY HOW MUCH WEIGHT?

A LITTLE BIRD TRIVIA AROUND THE DINING TABLE

Bald Eagles weigh 6.6 to 13.9 lb and can carry about 3 to 4 lbs. Typical Wingspand (adult) is between 5.9 and 7.5 ft. females are about 25% larger than males averaging 12 lbs. against the male’s average weight of 9 lbs. Lifespan in the wild is 20 to 25 years. Scientific name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus.

Dr. David M. Bird

Imagine being out on the edge of a soggy field in early morning intently peering into some shrubbery for a closer peek at a small songbird. Suddenly you hear a very loud thump only a few feet away and you see a large branch weighing over ten pounds with its heavy end embedded into the soil. Curious as to its origin, you gaze upward to see an adult bald eagle veering away high in the sky. And your first thought might be…..”wow…..what if that log had hit me in the head?!”

Bald Eagle

A bald eagle lands in a tree above Brooks Falls, Katmai National Park

It turns out that such an event actually happened! In the early morning light on November 4, 2015, Alex Lamine was filming Mom Berry, one of the adult bald eagles nesting on the campus of Berry College, an educational institution begun in 1902 in Rome, Georgia. The college is home to several pairs of nesting bald eagles and an army of eagle voyeurs who watch the eagles’ nesting activities on a web cam. The first eagle pair showed up on the main campus in the spring of 2012, nesting in the top of a tall pine tree right near the main entrance. Two eaglets were successfully fledged in 2013, one in 2014, and two this past summer. A second nest on a more remote campus fledged three young in 2014, but was not active this year. A bald eagle carrying a 12-pound branch?! Sounds almost impossible, doesn’t it, but it not only happened but it was captured on film as well. This observation immediately raised three questions about bald eagles and eagles in general, and set off a flurry of emails among eagle experts, including yours truly. First, did the bird actually ‘carry’ an object weighing 12 pounds? Second, how much can eagles carry in the air? And third, do bald eagles actually gnaw off limbs from trees?

Amy Ries, who writes a blog for the Raptor Resource Project raptorresource.blogspot.ca/2015/11/how-much-can-bald-eagle-carry was quite impressed with the herculean feat and to learn more about it, she passed on the observation to a number of bald eagle experts. She was inclined to think that the branch was already in a falling motion from the tree and thus, does not support an assertion that bald eagles can fly for any distance carrying a 12-pound object, especially a branch heavy at one end and light at the other, in just one foot.

James Grier, a retired professor at North Dakota State University in Fargo, was the first eagle expert to respond. Growing up in the world of raptor research with Jim throughout all of my life, I am well aware of his decades of climbing to bald eagle nests in the Lake-of-the-Woods region of Ontario to band eaglets in order to learn more about their movements and fidelity to nesting sites. He said that unlike ospreys which carry fish with both feet while also orienting it with the air flow to reduce drag, bald eagles usually just grab either prey or nest materials with one or both feet and carry it dangling and swinging, and yes, sometimes dropping it. Flight conditions are also important, the best ones being high air pressure with a steady wind, and equally critical, lots of room for a good take-off and an ability to stay airborne. Even under such conditions, Jim said that it can still be a lot of work and effort for the eagles to carry large items. He added that sometimes if eagles can get a large item into the air but not all the way back to the nest, they will stop somewhere along the way such as on higher ground, a low tree branch, or an open tree, to get rid of dead weight such as the entrails, further disassemble it, and/or even eat some of it.

Bald Eagle Hunting“I remember being at blinds and hearing the heavy, labored wing-beats from eagles carrying large items into the nest. I could sometimes hear the flapping from a long distance out where it almost sounded like someone beating on the side of a boat it was so loud!” Jim explained, “One of the more interesting items I remember, it wasn’t a big item but a duck that was still alive when the eagle brought it into the nest. The eagle had a hold of the duck by the back and was carrying it in one foot. The duck was looking around and its feet were paddling the air like mad when the eagle landed on the nest with it!”

On the weight-carrying question, Chuck Sindelar, also a long-time bald eagle expert in Wisconsin, was the next to weigh in (sorry… couldn’t help myself!). He believes that an eagle can seldom fly with any more than half of its body weight.

Jon Gerrard concurs with this feeling. He studied bald eagles in Saskatchewan with Gary Bortolotti (R.I.P.) for many years and he quotes a story from their wonderful co-authored book entitled “The Bald Eagle: Haunts and Habits of a Wilderness Monarch”. A female of a pair of bald eagles nesting on the Gulf Coast of Louisiana in the 1890s caught and carried snow geese weighing from 4.5 to 6 pounds for up to a mile and a half to their nest. But here is the key point — the eagle was actually flying downhill! This means that the goose was caught high in the air and the eagle basically glided downward to its nest with its prey. And this was not a one-time occurrence — more than 35 snow goose heads were found in that particular nest at one time. Since the female weighed between 8 to 11 pounds, this suggests a weight-carrying capacity of half its body weight, but for “downhill” flights only.

With all due respect to all of the aforementioned bald eagle experts, I honestly know of no one who has accumulated as many hours of watching these magnificent birds as David Hancock, the founder of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation based in Surrey, British Columbia. He basically lives and breathes ‘bald eagles’! From his late teenage days to today, David has been an avid student of these birds and he is famous for helping to pioneer the web cameras on many of their nests much to the delight of millions of eagle enthusiasts all over the world. Surely he would have some comment on this observation.

And so he did. A number of years ago, he and some assistants were three miles offshore from the Queen Charlotte Islands. They watched a male bald eagle swoop down, catch a large red snapper, and then carry it in its talons at a speed of 25 to 30 miles per hour toward an island. After about three-quarters of a mile, the eagle dropped the fish but then immediately flew down and grabbed it again. Two hundred yards later and about a half-mile from shore, it repeated this scenario, once again relinquishing the fish to the water’s surface. Not to give up on its prize though, this stubborn bird next landed on the fish and used its wings to row it to shore! All bald eagle experts will tell you that these large birds are quite good at swimming with their wings.

Bald Eagle Catching A Fish

There’s more to this story though. Wanting to know more about the fish’s weight, David flushed the eagle off the snapper and weighed it in at one and a half pounds. He also added that the fish “tasted marvelous”!

The whole incident drove David to undertake some weight-carrying tests with some captive bald eagles. He found that for 100 yards, males could carry objects weighing two pounds, and females about three pounds. Upon hearing about this latest “branch” incident, he too felt that the bird was likely carrying it “downhill” or the branch was in a falling motion from the tree, as Amy postulated.

On a related note, I contacted Sergej Postpalsky, a raptor expert in Michigan, and I asked him what was the largest prey he had seen carried by ospreys in his 40 years of studying this species in the Great Lakes. About two pounds, he replied, and on more than once occasion. Not bad for a bird that weighs less than half of a female bald eagle!

The other aspect of the original observation focused on the ‘gnawing” behavior whereupon the eagle apparently was seen chewing on the limb to remove it from the tree. Jim Grier confessed to knowing that bald eagles do engage in that activity, but knew little else about it.

Adult Bald Eagle with two chicks in a nest in a tree on the side of a cliff.

Chuck Sindelar has seen both bald and golden eagles break sticks off standing trees by hitting them with their feet with enough force to snap them off, but did not mention any observations of them actually gnawing on them to facilitate breaking them from the tree. Jon Gerrard has often seen bald eagles at Besnard Lake, Manitoba breaking off limbs in this manner, but none as big as the one collected by the Berry College eagle. He added that they are usually dead limbs. Jon also wondered whether the eagle in question actually did some gnawing at the thick end of the branch before breaking it off because this would not fit with the fact that the eagle was clutching the thin or outer end of the limb before dropping it. He suggested that perhaps the bird gnawed the limb part way through at the thick end, and then flew to grab the thin end and then using its momentum, broke it off at the thick end. Years ago, I watched a video of ospreys in Scotland wherein the birds would dive at a tree with some speed and use their feet to snap off dead branches from trees for nesting material, but there was never any prior gnawing involved.

All in all, it was a very interesting anecdote which sparked some very healthy debate among several eagle experts. As Jim Grier points out, “With today’s technologies including the eagle nest cams, more eagles around, and a lot more people watching and taking/recording pics and videos, I think we’re going to get more anecdotes like this, insights into the eagles’ lives that we’ve never seen before, and learn a lot more than we did in the past.”

I could not agree more.
The latest from Dr. Bird

https://www.askprofessorbird.com/single-post/2017/04/20/Watching-Bird-Behavior

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10,000 Birds | Can A Hawk Carry Off Your 12-Pound Pet?

My niece came across this and posted it on her Facebook page…

The answer is: no.

No hawk can carry off a 12-pound pet. No hawk can carry off a 3-pound pet. The largest hawk in North America (the Ferruginous Hawk) weighs at most four pounds, so leaving the ground carrying three – let alone twelve – would be aerodynamically (not to mention logically) impossible. Red-tailed Hawks weigh about two pounds.

That did not stop a New Jersey animal shelter from publishing this rabble-rousing flyer on Facebook, all written in alarming red capital letters:

PARK RANGERS AND VET OFFICES ARE PUTTING OUT WARNINGS. THIS YEAR THE HAWKS REALLY SEEM TO BE OUT IN FORCE OFF THE EAST COAST.

THE PETS THAT ARE IN REAL DANGER ARE THE ONES WHO ARE 12 POUNDS AND UNDER. THESE ARE THE PETS THAT HAWKS CAN SWOOP DOWN AND GRAB.

DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS OUTSIDE WITHOUT SUPERVISION.

One could joke about the squadrons of hawks out patrolling the beaches, or the park rangers suddenly worried about the safety of household pets, but before it was taken down the post had over 108,000 views, 4,200 Likes, and 1,000 comments. And since these things never really disappear, it’s still out there.

The frustrating responses went like this: “OMG!” “Yikes!” “I had no idea!” “How awful!” The frightening responses went like this: “Just shoot ‘em.” “That’s why we need more trapping.” “I’m going to string wire all across my backyard!”

Wildlife lovers and rehabilitators, as always, tried to intervene. “I have been caring for raptors for almost 29 years and not even a Bald Eagle can carry off 12 pounds,” wrote Eileen Wicker, the Executive Director of Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky. “Please disregard this for the rubbish it is!”

If you see a flyer such as this and you’re unfamiliar with wildlife, you can 1) believe the hundreds of people who write things like “I know for a fact a Barn Owl can carry off a 3-pound Chihuahua!” (Barn Owls weigh about a pound); 2) access fact-filled sites like the Peregrine Fund or the Cornell Lab of Ornithology; or 3) call any raptor rehabilitation center, and whoever answers the phone will tell you that the information on Facebook is bunk.

There’s one more option, if you’d like to combine learning and entertainment: 4) watch this Monty Python clip, which does a fabulous job of explaining exactly what we’re talking about using a coconut, European Swallows, and King Arthur:

Once you watch it, every time someone posts about a murderous hawk carrying off twelve pounds, you’ll be able to set them straight.

One might say the heart of the person who wrote the flyer was in the right place. But they were abysmally ignorant, not only of the facts but of the damage that can be done by posting something so stupid. Predators have a hard enough time surviving without having to deal with the fallout from something they’re incapable of even doing.

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This is not to say they might not take a swipe at a very tiny dog. If you have a one, be careful and use common sense. If you have a cat, keep it inside.

“All birds of prey are protected by state and federal law,” says Eileen Wicker. “If you harm one or threaten one in any manner, you are subject to a fine and prison term. Appreciate their beauty, and their value to our earth.”

All photos courtesy of Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky.

http://www.10000birds.com/can-a-hawk-carry-off-your-12-pound-pet.htm

Why Is This Northern Cardinal Yellow? | Audubon

Why Is This Northern Cardinal Yellow?

Yes, that is a cardinal. We asked experts how this redbird might have gotten its golden feathers.

By Purbita Saha
February 22, 2018

The bombshell yellow Northern Cardinal from Alabama (left) compared to a regular old Northern Cardinal (right). Photos: Jeremy Black Photography; Diane Wurzer/Audubon Photography Awards

“If you see one cardinal, you’ve seen them all,” said no one ever. As common as they are, Northern Cardinals rank among the most-loved birds in the eastern United States (unless you’re a Chicago Cubs fan). The National Audubon Society should know: Our Facebook followers can’t seem to get enough of them.

So, it’s no surprise when a cardinal turns heads—except in Charlie Stephenson’s case, where that double take may have resulted in some whiplash. Back in January, she found an impossibly bright male in her backyard in Alabaster, Alabama. But instead of the typical ruby-red color scheme, this Northern Cardinal looked like it had been dipped in a bucket of turmeric.

After hosting the oddball for weeks, Stephenson invited fellow Alabaman Jeremy Black over to photograph it. The resulting images hit the internet last weekend, and boy, were people psyched . . . and confused.

Thankfully, Stephenson had already consulted Geoffrey Hill, an ornithologist and coloration expert at Auburn University. He told her that the bird probably had a genetic mutation that renders the pigments it draws from foods yellow rather than red. The condition he cited, xanthochroism, has been seen in other cardinals, along with eastern House Finches and maybe Evening Grosbeaks.

But that’s just one theory behind the bird’s wardrobe malfunction. As Geoff LeBaron, Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count director, points out, the cardinal’s crest and wing feathers look frayed in photos. While wear and tear is a natural part of a bird’s life, it can be exacerbated by a poor diet or environmental stressors. These health issues could also lead to changes in how carotenoids—plant-based pigments that turn feathers red, orange, and yellow—are expressed.

Although this alternative theory is plausible, ultimately, LeBaron agrees that genetics could be the sole factor. But the only way to solve the case is to wait for the cardinal to swap its feathers. “Time will tell with this bird,” LeBaron says. If it sticks around Alabaster and is still yellow next winter, a mutation is the likeliest culprit. But if it comes out red after another molt, it means the bird somehow recalibrated its pigments.

As birds have shown over and over, there are always new plumage puzzles to investigate. Remember the half-female, half-male cardinal that made the news a few years ago? That turned out to be a an obscure type of hermaphroditism—a phenomenon that affects many types of animals.

For Stephenson’s yellow cardinal (not to be confused with a Yellow Cardinal), we’ll have to see if its look is permanent. Regardless, at least it wore its golden feathers boldly. “If I fly or if I fall, at least I can say I gave it all.” That one’s from RuPaul.

http://www.audubon.org/news/why-northern-cardinal-yellow?=&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20180305_engagement&utm_content=medium

Stop Slaughtering 3,000 Birds Every Day in Iran Wetland

Every day 300,000 birds, including endangered and threatened species, are slaughtered illegally for food and trophies. If nothing is done, these birds will go extinct and the whole ecosystem will suffer. Sign the petition to urge Iran’s Department of the Environment to help stop these killings.

Source: Stop Slaughtering 3,000 Birds Every Day in Iran Wetland

These Birds Build Big Nests It Doesn’t End Well National Geographic

The world’s oldest known wild bird is about to become a Mum at 67, baffling scientists (Midway atoll, USA)

The ocean update

January 8th, 2018. One Laysan albatross is brazenly defying the norms for her species. Wisdom, the world’s oldest known wild bird, has returned to home port and laid an egg – at the magnificent age of 67 years old.

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“Snowball the Cockatoo Can Dance Better Than You” National Geographic

Petition: Wealthy People Are Kicking Birds Out of Trees to Protect Their Cars

Wealthy residents of  an exclusive neighborhood in Bristol have attached anti-bird spikes to trees in an effort to protect their expensive cars from bird droppings. According to reports the spikes have  made the trees completely uninhabitable to  birds. Please sign this petition urging the Bristol city council to take these spikes down immediately.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/593/246/473/

Some birds use discarded cigarettes to fumigate their nests


https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21729739-they-help-keep-parasites-bay-some-birds-use-discarded-cigarettes-fumigate?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed/somebirdsusediscardedcigarettestofumigatetheirnests

Audubon California – Starr Ranch | live webcams: barn owl, red-shouldered hawk, black-chinned hummingbird

Warning…. can be very addictive 🐦

http://starrranch.org/blog/

Protect Birds from Deadly Collisions with Glass Stadium

Dozens have birds have been killed by collisions with the clear glass panes of the U.S. Bank Stadium. Adding a less reflective coating to the glass could potentially spare thousands more birds from meeting the same fate in coming years. Demand that the owners of the stadium make it more bird-friendly to prevent a possible ecological disaster.

Source: Protect Birds from Deadly Collisions with Glass Stadium

Protect Northwest Forests for Spotted Owl – American Bird Conservancy


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Petition – Eagle Rule – American Bird Conservancy


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Petition – Time to End Bird Deaths in Pipes – American Bird Conservancy


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=175

Help Protect Seabirds! – American Bird Conservancy


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=227

American Bird Conservancy’s “Together for Birds” Petition – American Bird Conservancy


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=115A5FE499745A80BE0A2A61FDC5F149.app203a?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290

Petition: Urgently stop all hunting in Freshwater Lagoon, Ca, to protect the threatened pochard!


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/271/617/387/?z00m=28752125&redirectID=2294329110

Sweet Cat Shares Food With Bird (Video)

A true sign of friendship is when your friend is totally okay with sharing their food with you! That’s exactly what this sweet cat does when his bird friend comes over  to take a few bites of food.

Source: Sweet Cat Shares Food With Bird

All Those Nice Houses We’re Building Are Affecting Songbird Reproduction | Care2 Causes


By: Susan Bird
Here’s something to think about whenever you pass by a new housing development. Researchers now say that as we continue to add to burgeoning suburban sprawl, we’re cheating songbirds out of the prime years of their reproductive lives.
University of Washington (UW) researchers released a study in December 2016 that paints a sad picture for certain types of songbirds. It seems that as we keep building houses and other infrastructure, we often disrupt their lives in ways they have a tough time recovering from.

The research team spent a decade following the movements and breeding habits of six types of birds who live in areas east of Seattle. Between 2000 and 2010, some of these sites transitioned from forested areas to new suburban developments. What happened to the hundreds of birds tracked in this study is a cautionary tale for us all.

Songbirds tend to fall into two types:
Avoiders – These birds mate monogamously, avoid places where humans are, and need groundcover and brush like felled trees, shrubs, ferns and root balls in order to breed. The Pacific wren and Swaison’s thrush are two examples of “avoider” songbirds in the Pacific Northwest.
Adapters/Exploiters – These birds do well around humans, aren’t always monogamous, and often live in backyards or birdhouses. They seem not to be bothered at all by the loss of forested areas or increased human activity. Bewick’s wren, the song sparrow, the dark-eyed junco and the spotted towhee are examples of “avoiders” or “exploiters”living in the Seattle area.

As you might expect, the “adapters” and “exploiters” studied by the team did pretty well when formerly forested areas underwent development. These birds are flexible and adaptable. They’re prepared to live, mate and begin a family nearly anywhere.
Photo credit: Thinkstock

Photo credit: Thinkstock
The “avoiders” didn’t fare as well. The loss of underbrush and trees proved devastating enough that they left the newly developed area entirely. For them, leaving means relocating to areas about the size of one and a half football fields away.

For a monogamous bird, having to flee home often ends up splitting mated pairs permanently. That meant the birds had to spend time finding a new home and then finding a new mate.

The life span of a bird isn’t particularly long. Unfortunately, UW’s researchers found that “avoider” birds lost up to half of their breeding years when forced to relocate. That’s not good. For rarer species, it’s especially problematic.

“The hidden cost of suburban development for these birds is that we force them to do things that natural selection wouldn’t have them do otherwise,” the study’s lead author, UW professor John Marzluff, said in a UW news release.

Most of us don’t even consider an impact of this type when we buy a parcel of property and build houses or a shopping center on it. We don’t think about the animals and birds who make a home in the trees and underbrush on that property. Maybe we assume they’ll head for the hills and find a new place to live.

                             

Photo credit: Thinkstock

Most probably do, but we’re often blissfully unaware of the long-term damage we might be doing to creatures like “avoider” birds. Without question, there are fewer of them around because our desire for more and more development affects their lives in profound ways.

“To conserve some of these rarer species in an increasingly urban planet is going to require more knowledge of how birds disperse,” Marzluff said in the UW news release. “I expect that as we look more closely, we will find birds that are compromised because of us.”

Losing your lifelong mate and half your breeding years is no small matter. As we continue to sanction urban sprawl, we risk compromising more and more bird species. 

Copyright © 2017 Care2.com, inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved

Petition:Owls Are Forcefully Constrained And Immobilized At “Interactive” Cafe In Japan – World Animal News

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http://worldanimalnews.com/owls-forcefully-constrained-immobilized-interactive-cafe-japan/

Don’t Legalize the Killing of Buzzards

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

A licence to hunt buzzards, a previously endangered species, has been issued to an anonymous landowner. This will increase the amount of illegal killings and may endanger the species once more. Demand an end to the licencing program.

Source: Don’t Legalize the Killing of Buzzards

Petition · Stop the Cormorant Slaughter on Oregon’s East Sand Island! · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/stop-the-cormorant-slaughter-on-oregon-s-east-sand-island?source_location=discover_feed

Petition update · Help us bring justice to 200 killed geese · Change.org

Petition update
Help us bring justice to 200 killed geese
Global Conservation Group

Jun 30, 2016 — This week, we asked you to take action with us to urge a Wisconsin city not to kill 200 geese.

This morning, hundreds of babies saw their mothers brutally killed right in front of their eyes. Their lifelong mates saw their partners brutally killed right in front of their eyes. All because some in the city deemed them a “nuisance.”

We are very disappointed in Oconto Falls city officials for moving forward with the unnecessary brutal killing of 200 geese this morning. They knew we wanted to meet with them at 1:00pm to discuss the matter in person, however they decided it was best to kill the animals before our staffers made the three hour drive to their city. In addition, city officials received thousands of phone calls and emails this week politely urging them to explore more humane methods. Rather than listening to them, they actually hung up on our phone calls. Our organization even offered to cover all expenses for any humane options if the killing was called off.

In an effort to make it clear that these actions will not be tolerated, Global Conservation Group just approved the most aggressive campaign in our history against the City of Oconto Falls. We will boycott the city, place advertisement campaigns all around the country, and file hundreds of FOIA (open records requests) to look through all the city’s emails, phone logs, council meeting transcripts and more to determine if they had a financial incentive to kill all these innocent animals. After all that, we will file lawsuits, issue national press releases, and file criminal complaints against those who allowed the killing to move forward despite steep opposition from the community and the world.

Help fund our campaign and investigation. Please consider making a contribution to ensure this brutal slaughter never happens to another group of animals again. Please chip in here: https://www.gofundme.com/savewigeese

Sincerely,

Jordan W. Turner
President
Global Conservation Group

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URGENT: Wis. City Plans to Kill 200 Geese Tomorrow!
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Petition update · Urgent: Help us save 200 geese before a Wis. city kills them! · Change.org

Vietnam Officials: Change animal handling policies
by Global Conservation Group · 44,781 supporters
Petition update
Urgent: Help us save 200 geese before a Wis. city kills them!
Global Conservation Group

Jun 27, 2016 — The City of Oconto Falls, Wisconsin plans to brutally slaughter 200 “nuisance” geese this Thursday. Non-lethal remedies are more effective, less costly, and better for everyone involved. However, the city simply refuses to consider or explore other methods.

Canadian Geese mate for life, which makes killing them all the more cruel. Please stand with Global Conservation Group to peacefully protest the city’s deplorable plans. All materials will be supplied.

Please also politely contact the following city officials urging them to cancel the slaughter in favor of more effective, non-lethal solutions:

admin@ci.ocontofalls.wi.us
smannsparkrec@gmail.com
dclerk@ci.ocontofalls.wi.us
Mayor: (Office) 920-846-4505 (Home) 920-846-3530

Alderpersons:

920-846-3675
920-373-8685
920-373-5811
920-846-2800
920-373-2685
920-373-2171
Protest to Cancel Oconto Falls Plans to Brutally Kill 200 Geese
Protest to Cancel Oconto Falls Plans to Brutally Kill 200 Geese
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petition: President Obama: Please order USDA and the Department of Energy to remove heaters from El Yunque Rai

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http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/322/438/683/

petition: Save Spain’s Disappearing Birds

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                                             http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/401/509/309/

Save Millions of Birds From Slow Deaths in Glue Traps

 

 

Millions of migratory birds are being subjected to slow, painful deaths when they get caught in trees covered in sticky substances, known as glue traps. Urge officials to act urgently to end this cruel hunting practice.

Source: Save Millions of Birds From Slow Deaths in Glue Traps

Protect the Migratory Bird Treaty Act – American Bird Conservancy

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https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=7150553760198EC88CA8A7178C807BE1.app262a?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=205

List the Tricolored Blackbird under the California Endangered Species Act – Audubon California

image

https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=64FDB2C4A7262B9ADD95A95E99712921.app330a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=2237

Radiation and Cataracts in Birds at Chernobyl

Mining Awareness +

Rouge gorge familier - crop (WB correction)
European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) by Pierre Selim via wikimedia
Very sad. Bird eyes with cataracts:
Bird Cataracts Chernobyl in Mousseau and Moeller, 2013
(k) robin (Erithacus rubecula), significant haze on cornea
Photographs of selected eyes from Chernobyl birds
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From: Mousseau TA, Møller AP (2013) “Elevated Frequency of Cataracts in Birds from Chernobyl” http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0066939

Lucky for us some few are still doing serious academic research. If animals can’t see well, with some exceptions, they can’t find food and die, or can more easily be killed by predators. The frequency and severity of cataracts increases with background radiation. In the abstract below “reduced fitness” means they are unfit for survival! Overall, increasing radiation was related to fewer birds, suggesting “effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age…”. Cataracts in humans at Chernobyl and elsewhere are also discussed:

Mousseau TA, Møller AP (2013) “

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