No Bees, No Food Send a Message to Your Governor to Save Our Bees

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No Bees, No Food
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Subject: Save our bees

Your Letter:

Millions of bees are dying off, with alarming consequences for our environment and our food supply.

It’s urgent we protect our bees. Ask your governor to restrict bee-killing pesticides.

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End Trophy Hunting of Vulnerable Puffins – ForceChange

The puffin is rapidly moving towards extinction, in part due to trophy hunting. Tours, advertised primary to British hunters, boast that one hunter can kill up to 100 puffins at a time. Ban importation of these vulnerable birds as trophies.

Source: End Trophy Hunting of Vulnerable Puffins – ForceChange

Demand Harsher Penalties for Killing Endangered Species – ForceChange

There are more than 100 endangered species in North America, and many are at a very high risk of extinction. Current penalties for harming these creatures are not strong enough. Demand that anyone who hurts or kills an endangered species gets a far harsher penalty.

Source: Demand Harsher Penalties for Killing Endangered Species – ForceChange

Scientists scramble to learn why monarch butterflies are dying so quickly

EVANSVILLE, Ind., July 22 (UPI) — Scientists across the country are scrambling to understand why monarch butterflies are disappearing at such an alarming rate as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers listing the butterfly as endangered.

North America’s largest population of monarchs, which migrate between Mexico and the Midwest, has fallen 80 percent, from a billion in the 1990s to 200 million in 2018.

A smaller monarch population in the western United States that migrates between California and the Pacific Northwest is disappearing even faster, dropping from 1.2 million in the 1990s to just 30,000 last year — a 98 percent drop.

“That is a catastrophic decline,” said Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, which is based in Arizona. “They might not be able to bounce back.”

Faced with those numbers, the Fish and Wildlife Service is several years into a massive review of North America’s butterflies to determine if they qualify for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act.

“We have a species status assessment team that is modeling threat evaluations,” said Georgia Parham, a spokeswoman for the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Midwest office, which is leading the review.

“We’re are also soliciting evaluations from monarch experts, and we’ve also launched a monarch database that anyone can enter information into,” Parham said.

The agency plans to announce its findings in December 2020.

But many scientists say conservation efforts cannot wait that long. Groups like the Center for Biological Diversity, which petitioned the service to list the monarchs as endangered in 2014, and the Monarch Joint Venture are spearheading conservation programs based on the latest available science.

That science, they are quick to admit, is incomplete.

Scientists cannot say for certain why monarchs are dying. Several unrelated phenomena could be killing them.

“There are several hypotheses for the decline, all of which are probably contributing to some degree,” said Andrew Myers, a doctoral student at Michigan State University’s Department of Entomology who studies monarchs.

Finding precise causes are difficult, in part because monarchs are migratory insects.

They clump together on tree branches in the mountains of Mexico to hibernate during the winter — turning those forests orange. When it warms, they fly north to lay their eggs on milkweed plants growing throughout the Midwest.

They can then travel as far north as Canada in search of the nectar from flowering plants. And when the weather turns cold, they return to Mexico.

Climate change might be disrupting their long migrations, Meyers said. Urban sprawl could be choking out flowering plants. And the Mexican forests in which the insects overwinter are being logged, which undoubtedly is a threat to their survival.

“Any one of those things is enough to wipe out the monarch population,” Curry said.

But the timing of the eastern population’s decline could be the most telling, she said, because it seemed to begin around the same time as the first herbicide-resistant crops were introduced to U.S. agriculture.

These crops were genetically engineered to survive the application of certain herbicides, allowing farmers to spray those chemicals on their fields and kill off other plants without harming their crops.

One of the plants these herbicides are especially effective at killing is milkweed — the sole food monarch butterfly larvae can eat.

“What happens to milkweed in the Midwest is incredibly important to the monarch population,” said Ian Kaplan, a professor of entomology at Purdue University.

Researchers at Iowa State University and the University of Minnesota in 2013 estimated nearly 60 percent of the milkweed had disappeared from the Midwest landscape since 1999. That decline coincides with an increase in herbicide resistant crops.

Monsanto introduced the first herbicide-resistant soybean plant, called RoundUp Ready soybean, in 1996, followed by a RoundUp Ready corn in 1998. Today, about 90 percent of the corn and 94 percent of the soybeans grown in the U.S. are herbicide resistant, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

“The monarch butterfly did fine in croplands before RoundUp Ready crops,” Curry said. “That allowed more RoundUp to be sprayed, and that killed more milkweed in agricultural fields.”

Many of the monarch conservation efforts revolve around planting more native milkweed in public spaces, parks, private lands and on the edges of agricultural fields in hopes those plants replace those lost to agriculture.

But it is unclear how big of an impact that is having because scientists still don’t understand how other factors — like pesticide use — contribute to the insects’ decline.

With that in mind, entomologists like Kaplan are devising new studies every year to obtain a more detailed picture of what is happening to monarch larvae in their shrinking habitat.

Kaplan recently conducted a study at Purdue that measured the volume of pesticides present on wild milkweed growing near Midwestern agricultural fields.

“In Indiana, it’s hard to get very far from a corn field,” Kaplan said.

His study found pesticides on wild milkweed throughout Indiana, and although the amount tended to decline the farther from an agricultural field the researchers got, they still found pesticides on milkweed plants more than a mile away.

“Some of these pesticides are very hard to escape from,” Kaplan said.

Kaplan is now studying the impact the various pesticides he found on native plants have on the monarch larvae. He hopes to complete that study sometime this fall.

Elsewhere, researchers at Michigan State University are looking at monarch larvae predators, like lady beetles, ants and spiders.

“Since monarchs have lost their milkweed host plants in agricultural fields, they are now relegated to milkweed growing in grasslands in places like roadsides, fallow fields and agricultural field edges,” Meyers said.

“These areas have more diverse and abundant communities of predators, which results in naturally low survival of monarch eggs and caterpillars to adulthood. I am trying to determine which predators contribute most to monarch egg and caterpillar mortality and specific ways that these interactions take place,” he said.

“The work could eventually lead to grassland management practices that reduce predation pressure on monarchs.”

More work needs to be done, scientists say, but it is possible early conservation efforts are yielding results.

Last year, for this first time since scientists started tracking the butterfly more than 20 years ago, the eastern Monarch’s population increased.

It is impossible to know if that was because of efforts to plant more milkweed in the Midwest, or if other unrelated conditions helped the insect.

“We’re waiting to see if it is a trend, or a one-year thing,” the Fish and Wildlife Services’ Parham said.

But researchers and conservationists are pushing ahead.

“People can help right now by planting native milkweed,” Curry said. “That’s only one of the problems. It’s milkweed loss, it’s urban sprawl, it’s climate change, it’s insecticide use. It sounds really big and overwhelming, but we have to start somewhere.”

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2019/07/22/Scientists-scramble-to-learn-why-monarch-butterflies-are-dying-so-quickly/6961563481223/

Iconic desert-adapted elephant ‘Voortrekker’ killed by trophy hunter in Namibia – Africa Geographic

africageographic.com

Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant before his tusks snapped off © Ingrid Mandt

In yet another blow to big elephant genes, the iconic desert-adapted elephant bull known by millions of fans worldwide as ‘Voortrekker’ was killed by a trophy hunter after being declared a ‘problem-animal’ by Namibian authorities. The surgical removal of Africa’s big-gene animals by trophy hunters continues, and Namibia’s desert-adapted elephants now rely on a small population of mature bulls after two were killed in 2016.

In their announcement on Facebook, Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) said “the elephant bull concerned was put down after it was declared a problem. The animal alongside others have been destroying properties and infrastructure in the area of Omatjete.” On the issue of whether this bull was the legendary Voortrekker, MET responded to Facebook questions by refusing to name the hunted elephant. Several conservation charities have confirmed that the bull in question is indeed Voortrekker. ‘Voortrekker’ is Afrikaans for ‘pioneer’.

MET spokesperson Romeo Muyunda Lee advised that the price paid was N$120,000 (+/- US$ 8,500), but it is unclear at this stage whether this was the total price paid or the portion paid to communities.

A study published in Ecology and Evolution in 2016 found not only that the Namibian desert-adapted elephants were different from their savannah cousins, but that their adaptations are also not genetically transferred to the next generation, rather through the passing on of knowledge by mature individuals. Morphological differences, like the adapted elephants’ thinner bodies and wider feet, also distinguish them from typical savannah elephants.

Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant before his tusks snapped off © Ingrid Mandt

WAS THE WRONG ELEPHANT KILLED?

A Facebook post, written by Informante reporter Niël Terblanché, asks whether it was in fact Voortrekker who was causing problems for inhabitants of the Omatjete area.

Terblanché reports that an urgent letter addressed to MET official Christoph Munwela by management of conservancies neighbouring the Ohungo Conservancy in the area of Omatjete to prevent the killing of Voortrekker, suggests that a flagrant error was made when the hunting license was issued. The letter points out that Voortrekker is in fact not part of the herd that has been bothering the community of the Ohungu Conservancy in the area of Omatjete.

MET responded publically that “The communities who objected to the hunt were not affected by the elephants as the elephants were mainly causing problems in the Omatjete area.”

Prior to the hunt, the management committees of the Otjimboyo, Sorris Sorris and Tsiseb conservancies asked Munwela for a meeting to discuss ways to avoid the killing of Voortrekker, one of the oldest living bull elephants in Namibia. Their letter said: “Our people are in general accepting of the elephants’ presence and want them to remain in the area … it is our belief that the shooting of elephants does not solve the problem. In fact, this only makes it worse. We want to keep our communities safe and to do this we need to ensure that our elephants are calm and relaxed when entering villages. It is our belief that the shooting of elephants or scaring them off with gunshots, screaming or chasing them off results in aggressive animals and this cannot be tolerated.”

ELEPHANT DAMAGE

MET published photographs that they feel illustrates damage caused to property and infrastructure by Voortrekker, to justify the issue of the hunting license. Some of the images appear to show poorly neglected fences and other infrastructure, but some easily-replaced water pipes and tanks do appear to reflect damage.

Damage to infrastructure by Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant, as per MET © MET

VOORTREKKER WAS PREVIOUSLY SAVED FROM TROPHY HUNTERS

In 2008 Voortrekker fans donated US$12 000 to MET in an effort to save him from professional hunters who had their eyes on his trophy tusks. At the time, six hunting permits were issued and only Voortrekker was saved from trophy hunter guns – the remaining five elephants were killed.

According to Johannes Haasbroek of Elephant Human Relations Aid, in the period since then, “the hunting outfitters and their sick clients conspired to get this gentle giant declared a problem to justify a hunt”. He went on to say: “We remember Voortrekker as an incredibly gentle, peaceful and magnificent elephant. His presence has often calmed other inexperienced elephants around him. He was known locally as the ‘Old Man’, that was always welcome because he never caused any problems or induced fear.”

Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant after his tusks snapped off. This photo was taken 7 weeks before his death © Aschi Widmer

VOORTREKKER’S STORY

According to respected safari guide Alan McSmith, Voortrekker was a pioneer elephant for the desert-adapted elephant population in the Ugab and Huab rivers region. This giant elephant was one of the first to venture back to the region after populations were decimated during the turbulent warfare years in southern Africa. A small group of these uniquely desert-adapted elephants took refuge during the war in the remote and desolate gorges of Kaokaland in the north.

Says McSmith: “Voortrekker, one of the bulls to trek north during the conflict years, returned home in the early 2000’s, commencing a relay of south-bound expeditions, penetrating deeper and deeper into the dry and uncertain landscape before commencing with an epic traverse through to the relative bounty of the Ugab River. It was a marathon across arid plains and ancient craters that would ultimately redefine what we know of elephant endurance, intuition and behaviour. Just how he navigated, or knew where to find water, is anyone’s guess. For over two successive summer seasons he returned north to Kaokaland, returning each time to the Ugab with a small family unit in tow. An elephant patriarch. These elephants are still resident in the region and have formed the nucleus of three distinct breeding herds, making the Ugab/Huab Rivers perhaps the most viable desert elephant habitats in the world. Voortrekker continues as the Godfather, a true legend of the Ugab. His ancestral knowledge has been passed down to a new generation of desert dwellers. What a legacy! For me, all of this addresses one of the most crucial fallacies of elephant conservation, trophy hunting, and the notion of sustainable consumption: that older bulls have no value to an elephant community and can be hunted under the banner of ecological benefit.”

A Facebook page has been set up to ‘actively pursue the truth behind the killing of Voortrekker, the Iconic Desert Elephant, and then decide on appropriate action’

https://africageographic.com/blog/iconic-desert-adapted-elephant-voortrekker-killed-by-trophy-hunter-in-namibia/

Breaking! Golden Eagle Chicks Found In Southern California Mountains For The 1st Time In 30 Years – World Animal News

By WAN –
June 27, 2019
Photos By National Park Service
A pair of golden eagle chicks, a fully protected species in the state of California, have been found in a nest in a remote area of Southern California.
As per the National Park Service (NPS), the last time a nest was confirmed in this remote area of Southern California was in the late 1980s.

The chicks, a 12-week-old male and female, were located several weeks ago when a consultant conducting bird surveys on private property identified the golden eagle pair and notified park biologists. NPS biologists working with biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Bloom Biological Inc., confirmed the nest location and activity and tagged them in early May.
Each chick received two bands; one colored and one numbered. The bands are part of the USGS Bird Banding Laboratory to help scientists monitor the status, trends and ecology of resident and migratory bird populations. Biologists also took blood from the chicks for genetic testing.
Loss of habitat for nesting and hunting has reduced their range in much of the state, according to Katy Delaney, an ecologist with the National Park Service.
Delaney is worried about these majestic raptors.
“Humans are the greatest threat to golden eagles,” Delaney said in a statement. “In the past, they were trapped and shot throughout their range, and today, they are vulnerable to habitat loss. Like their mammalian carnivore counterparts, they can die from eating poisoned prey, as well as from lead poisoning, electrocution on power lines and collisions with wind turbines.”
“We haven’t seen them in so many years, though they could have been around and staying away from people.” continued Delaney. “We just went through a huge fire and drought, and we are also not going to experience a decrease in urban development. We not only have mountain lions here, but we have golden eagles, as well.”
Although the chicks recently left the nest, their parents are not total empty nesters, yet. For the next several months, they will continue to rely on the more experienced birds until they learn to successfully hunt on their own, which may be around late fall.
These birds of prey typically feed on rabbits and squirrels, but also take a diverse array of prey species from small birds and snakes, up to mule deer fawns and coyote pups. Carrion is also an important component of their diet. In the case of this family, western gulls were the prey item of choice at the time of banding. There were seven gull wings found in the nest located in a large cave.
Interestingly, golden eagles are thought to form strong pair bonds and exhibit high mate and territory fidelity, meaning they will likely stay with the same partner and return to the same nest each breeding season. Some Southern California adult golden eagles remain on or close to their nest territory throughout the year while others move great distances several counties away. After gaining independence, young eagles generally disperse out of their parents breeding territory traveling between 20 to 1,200 miles away, but usually return when they are four to five years of age to establish their own area for nesting.
The golden eagle, one of the largest birds in North America, is a cousin of the bald eagle. Sightings are extremely rare and both are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Biologists believe the population may be declining in the United States, especially in California.
The golden eagle is one of 11 raptors, birds that hunt and feed on other animals. The most common raptor in the mountains is the western screech owl but red-tailed hawks are seen more often. Dark-colored red-tailed hawks are often mistaken for golden eagles by inexperienced observers.
According to the Chumash Indians, golden eagles had a deep historical connection to Boney Mountain but the last known confirmed nesting there occurred in the early 1800s.
You can help all animals by choosing compassion on your plate. #GoVeg

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-golden-eagle-chicks-found-in-the-santa-monica-mountains-for-the-1st-time-in-30-years/

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Protect the Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo and the Endangered Species Act

670864110

Natural History Wanderings

The deadline to tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service not to roll back protections for the Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo is next Wednesday, June 26. More than 16,000 Audubon supporters have already sent comments—will you join them?  It’s quick and easy to send your own comments through our Action Center.

Read more at  National Audubon Society

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Lost and starving polar bear seen scavenging in Russian city

dailymail.co.uk

By Will Stewart In Russia For Mailonline 09:07 18 Jun 2019, updated 09:44 18 Jun 2019

Lost and starving polar bear was spotted wandering in amongst traffic in Russia
Motorists in the nickel mining city of Norilsk watched as the beast dodged cars
Bear thought to have walked nearly 1,000 miles from Russian Arctic Ocean shore
Animal appeared too weak to attack humans and was seen scavenging for food

A starving polar bear has wandered into an industrial city in Russia after ‘walking almost 1,000 miles in the wrong direction’.

The lost beast headed south and inland from shore of the Arctic Ocean, far from its natural feeding habitat.

Motorists in the nickel mining city of Norilsk watched in amazement as the bear crossed busy roads.

The bear was scavenging for food and appeared too weak to attack people who were watching the wild animal – but local officials have warned of the threat to human life.

Locals said it is the first time a wild polar bear has been spotted in the city since the 1970s.

The animal is believed to have made a lonely trek of at least 950 miles crossing Arctic islands and frozen sea to reach Norilsk, according to reports.
The emaciated polar bear was seen on the streets of Norilsk dodging in and out of traffic and the animal scavenged for food
It is thought the polar bear walked nearly 1,000 miles from the Russian Arctic shore south to the mining city of Norilsk

Irina Yarinskaya, a photographer of Zapolyarnaya Pravda newspaper, snapped the bear dodging cars in the city’s traffic.

She told local media: ‘He is seriously hunger-bitten, he is hardly able to blink and keep his eyes open, almost unable to walk.

‘He was lying for a long time, having a rest, then he crossed the road and entered the industrial zone.

‘He went towards the gravel and sand factory. Then he crossed one more road and headed to a dump.’

Earlier, the same bear was spotted at Talnakh on the outskirts of Norilsk.

The animal has become a star attraction in a barren area normally populated by brown not polar bears, reported The Siberian Times.
The lost and starving wild animal appeared too weak to attack humans but was being monitored by the authorities as it still posed a threat to life
During the bear’s long walk it was pictured by residents of Norilsk and at one point was seen lying on the ground in the industrial city’s outskirts
The polar bear reportedly walked around 950 miles south from the Arctic shore to Norilsk

The bear had the ‘wrong compass settings’, and walked across the Taymyr Peninsula to reach the Soviet-era nickel city which is normally closed to foreign visitors.

Local police and emergency services are closely monitoring the bear – which poses a threat to residents.

But they are awaiting a decision from Moscow on whether to sedate the beast and return it to the Arctic shoreline – or move it to a zoo in Krasnoyarsk, the regional capital, come 950 miles further to the south.

Initially the local emergency services refused to believe there was a polar bear in the Talnakh district of the Arctic city which is some 350 miles inland.

Anatoly Nikolaychyuk, head of Taymyr department of state hunting control, said: ‘This is a unique and rare case.
The polar bear was seen wandering around industrial area of Norilsk and walking in busy roads looking for food
Norilsk is an industrial city in Krasnoyarsk Krai region above the Arctic Circle, east of the Yenisei River. It is what’s known as a ‘closed city’ as foreigners cannot visit and during the Soviet-era did not appear on maps, road signs or connect to public transport
Residents took videos and pictures of the emaciated polar bear as it made its long journey from its natural habitat over the Taymyr Peninsula

‘There are two options now – either to relocate him to the shore, or, perhaps, some zoo will take him.’

Local campaigners are demanding the bear is returned to its natural habitat.

Oleg Krashevsky – who specialises in tours to the remote Putorana Plateau – posted: ‘I don’t understand how the bear could have walked such distance, across Taymyr and not come across anyone.

‘He must have encountered many hunters. The same thing happened in 1970’s when a polar bear showed up at an explosives warehouse around the same place as this time.’

Polar bears are an endangered species in Russia’s Red Book.

The bear’s mammoth journey is believed to have started on islands deep in the Arctic either in Krasnoyarsk or Yakutia regions.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7153051/amp/Lost-starving-polar-bear-seen-scavenging-Russian-city-nearly-1-000-miles-natural-habitat.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ico=taboola_feed&__twitter_impression=true

Sign Petition: These Countries Want to Reopen the Ivory Trade and Put Elephants at Risk

thepetitionsite.com
by: Care2 Team
recipient: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES)more

In the ten years leading up to 2016, Africa lost more than 100,000 elephants to poachers. Some conservationists warn that at that rate, African elephants could go extinct in less than a decade. Yet with that clarion warning, some governments want to roll back the clock and reopen the international ivory market, putting the rest of the remaining herd in danger.

The governments of Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Namibia, as well as Angola, are working together to propose a plan that would turn back the prohibition on the international ivory trade that has been in place for two decades.

Sign to make sure that the ivory ban is never lifted.

Currently, the ivory trade is governed through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES) the treaty charged with protecting endangered animals. The presidents of these five countries believe that locals have the right to profit off ivory as a resource. It’s as if ivory could be exploited like oil or minerals and didn’t come from a living animal with a fragile population.

The Southern African governments plan to make their proposal at the next CITES meeting. The most recent event was canceled in Sri Lanka due to the Easter bombings in that country, but a new meeting will surely be scheduled soon and if these five governments get their way, the doors to the ivory market would be opened once more.

We cannot let this happen. Please sign the petition and tell CITES not to cave. Tell them the ivory ban must stand.more

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/212/445/021/

Florida Manatee Deaths up Almost 50% in 2018

The Jaguar

A Florida manatee looking at the camera.
Florida manatee deaths rose significantly in 2018. Here’s Looking at You Kid – Meet a Florida Manatee by the U.S. Geological Survey. Public Domain.

Here’s a heart-breaking story by John R. Platt and Dipika Kadaba of The Revelator. It turns out that 824 Florida manatees died last year, almost 50% more than in 2017.

Those 824 mortalities (deaths) represent 13% of the Florida manatee population, and many of them were caused by people – either directly or indirectly.

The Revelator released a video that goes into more detail about why so many manatees died last year. Click below to watch it, and be sure to visit this link for the original story.

Video by The Revelator about the dramatic rise in Florida manatee mortalities in 2018.

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Take Action to Help Save the Sunflower Sea Star

takeaction.oceanconservancy.org

Take Action to Help Save the Sunflower Sea Star

A new study has documented that the sunflower star has been virtually eliminated along a 3,000 mile stretch of coast. A “zombie apocalypse” has been underway beneath the waves since 2013, with “sea star wasting disease” (SSWD) literally dissolving more than 20 species of sea stars into puddles of rotting flesh on the seafloor.

The publication documents how this most important of species, the sunflower star, has rapidly declined because of the combined effects of a devastating disease and climate-driven ocean heat waves. As we continue to burn fossil fuels, massive amounts of heat are being absorbed by the ocean, which is driving extreme temperature events that appear to increase the lethality of SSWD. This one-two punch is not only destroying the sunflower star—but also destroying the kelp forests that provide the foundational structure for an entire ecosystem of ocean species.

Saving what we love—including the sunflower star—will take all of us who do have a voice using it.

Congress must act on climate change. The science is clear, solutions are available here and now, and the ocean must be at the heart of climate action.

Congress must debate and move aggressive climate legislation that will ensure communities and ecosystems are spared the most devastating potential impacts from climate change, and are able to successfully adapt to those they can’t avoid.

That work must start now.

But in addition, Congress can and must take action immediately using the tools we already have. This spring Congress will take up appropriations legislation for the next fiscal year. Those bills must prioritize critical funding for the climate research, coastal resilience, and adaptation programs that are already working to tackle our climate challenges.

Take action today.

https://takeaction.oceanconservancy.org/page/38258/action/1?ea.tracking.id=19LPBCBAXX&utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=20190210ClimateAdvocacy&utm_content=20190210-ClimateAA-Prospects-Email1-19LPBCBAXX&ea.url.id=1856064&forwarded=true

Sign Petition: Instead of Relocating Them, These Cougar Kittens Are Now Dead

thepetitionsite.com
by: Care2 Team
recipient: Colorado Parks and Wildlife

18,848 SUPPORTERS – 19,000 GOAL

A mother and her three kittens. Those are just some of the casualties of urban sprawl in Colorado.

Since the beginning of the year, Glenwood Springs residents had noticed they weren’t alone in their neck of the woods. Over the past several weeks they had seen a family of mountain lions lurking about, and after one neighborhood dog was killed people began to worry.

That’s when they decided to call (CPW). Perhaps residents thought CPW officials would be able to scare the cougars back to the mountains or relocate them to a more remote area where they wouldn’t pose a threat. Unfortunately, officials had another solution in mind. They trapped the mother and her one-year-old kittens and killed them.

Parks and Wildlife defended their action by saying it was their “only option.” But that simply isn’t the case. Colorado is a vast, mountainous state with wide swaths of unpopulated lands where these mountain lions could have been released to live a long and wild life. Instead, officials decided to take the lives of five pumas — a mother, her three cubs, and another adult.

The land these animals were roaming is theirs not ours and they should not be punished simply for being the predators that nature intended them to be.

Obviously, we must take the safety of Glenwood Springs residents into account but euthanization should have never been an option when they could have easily been relocated. Especially since their location could have been monitored with collars.

It’s too late for the five mountain lions that were killed by CPW but hopefully, it won’t be for the next family of pumas that encroach into a Colorado town. Please sign the petition and demand that Colorado Parks and Wildlife stop using lethal methods to deal with animal nuisances and ask them to use relocation instead.

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/698/524/585/

Sign Petition: These Surprise Seal Pups Must Be Protected!

by: Kelsey B.
recipient: Point Reyes National Seashore rangers

70,527 SUPPORTERS – 75,000 GOAL

During the recent government shutdown, Drake’s Beach in Northern California remained closed to visitors. But what was bad news for beachgoers and nature lovers turned out to be great news for a group of elephant seals!

60 elephant seals decided to take advantage of the empty beach and make the spot their birthing place. During those 35 days of the shutdown, about 35 seal pups were born! The problem is that now that the shutdown is over, officials want to open that beach back up.

Sign the petition if you want the beach to stay closed for good so we can give the seals their natural habitat back!

The spate of births was really quick, magical and adorable, but also very fragile. Normally the seals would have given birth elsewhere but experts are speculating that recent storms have forced them to find new places to do it. It’s critical that we don’t scare, harm or overwhelm the animals. Most of the pups are still nursing with their moms so it’s really important they are given time and space to get their pups ready to venture back into the ocean.

And what better way to give them the space they need than to shut down the beach to humans permanently!

We had a good run, but these seals have reclaimed what is rightfully theirs. Please sign the petition to close the beach for good!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/152/394/001/these-baby-seal-must-be-protected-keep-beach-closed/

Petition: Legal Loopholes Are Giving Poachers Permission to Hunt Protected Birds

by: Margherita B
recipient: Malta

Thousands of birds fly over Malta during the migratory season.

And thousands are killed, both legally and illegally. Illegal killings amount to more than 200,000 birds per year — and these are only the documented ones.

Legally, birds that are protected worldwide (including storks) can be shot and caught in nets in Malta, by taking advantage of loopholes that allow hunters to collect birds for “traditional” and “cultural” practices. The black stork is an extremely rare bird and people have been shooting them, using these loopholes.

Although not as screen-worthy as the slaughtering of dolphins in other countries, what happens in Malta is no different. There is no need to hunt these protected species — they are protected for a reason!

These loopholes must be filled and Malta has to abide by the rest of the EU’s laws. Currently, Malta is considered a true sinkhole for migratory birds — this has to change. Malta, stop this slaughter now!
https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/790/699/070/

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Sign Petition: This Imperiled Bumble Bee Can’t Wait Any Longer for Help

thepetitionsite.com

The rusty patched bumble bee, which can be identified by a rust-colored patch on its abdomen, was once a commonly seen pollinator from the midwest to the east coast.

Unfortunately, scientists believe that they have disappeared from 87 percent of their historic range since just the 1990s and that their population has declined by more than 90 percent.

While conservation organizations have been working for years to help them, it wasn’t until 2016 that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) agreed that protection was warranted, and it wasn’t until 2017 that they were actually protected.

The listing marked the first time in history a bumble bee species has been federally protected, and the first time any bee has received federal protection in the continental U.S.

Still, this little bumble bee has continued to wait for the help it desperately needs. Under the Endangered Species Act, the FWS is legally required to designate critical habitat for protected species within one year of their listing, but has still managed to miss that date for this bumble bee – even with a one-year extension.

The agency is now facing a third lawsuit filed by the Natural Resources Defense Council on behalf of this bumble bee, which seeks to compel it to take action to protect their home from further destruction.

You can show your support for protecting the rusty patched bumble bee by signing and sharing this petition urging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to take immediate action to designate critical habitat for them.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/198/488/489/

Sign Petition: Stop Bird Hunting on the Lake Earl Wildlife Refuge

thepetitionsite.com

To be delivered to Jeffrey Stoddard, Program Manager, Charlton H. Bonham, Director, Governor Gavin Newsom, The California State House, The California State Senate.

We the undersigned request that California Department of Fish and Wildlife end hunting on the Lake Earl Wildlife Refuge. Hunting defeats the purpose of a tax payer supported wildlife refuge.

As grounds for this petition we request the state of California to take notice of the following:

1) Prior to 1971, Lakeview Drive, formerly known as Lake Earl Road, did not dead end at the lake, resulting in a walk of more than 1,000 feet. The exercise of the county’s easement to the lake has significantly increased hunters, fisherman, and crime.

2) Little if anything that is killed along the lake is ever taken home and a number of pictures proving this are in the possession of the originator of this petition.

3) Residents along Lakeview Drive have had to contend with an ongoing traffic problem from hunters and fisherman who use the lake, as well as those who visit the lake after dark to do their drug deal.

4) The whole concept of hunting on a taxpayer supported Wildlife Refuge defeats the purpose of having the wildlife refuge and the California Dept of Fish and Widlife has a conflict of interest because they receive money from hunting licenses which support staffing and officers to visit the lake.

  1. Some of the dead animals in the piles surrounding the lake include endangered species which is not surprising since a hunter can’t tell the difference as to what he is killing when the bird is almost completely out of visual range.
  2. With respect to over fishing, because of salt water contamination caused by incompetent breaching, the only fish that is capable of living in this lagoon (formerly a lake) is sturgeon who’s numbers have dwindled so much due to overfishing that the fish’s presence in the lake is almost extinct. Fisherman will commonly kill every sturgeon they can get their hands on, gut the fish for the eggs, and the leave the rotting fish carcasses on the side of the road at the entrance to Lake Earl.

  3. A number of hobby farmers around the lake have reported hunters killing their geese in front of their homes.

For these reasons we the undersigned request that hunting and fishing be permanently banned on Lake Earl.

BACKGROUND

Hunting on the Lake Earl Wildlife Preserve, particularly off of Lakeview Drive destroys the natural serenity and peace of this community. Visitors around the lake wake up to the sound of gunfire which is hardly inviting to people who come here to vacation and enjoy the redwoods and natural beauty.

Additionally since the county exercised its easement on Lakeview Drive, formerly Lake Earl Road, the number of hunters, fisherman, and people using the Lake Access area has increased exponentially to where there is nothing less than a big crowd. The resulting humanity has left trash in the streets, increased crime, and a steady parade of traffic all night long that is disturbing the residents on this street.

Other factors are that most of the dead animals the hunters kill are left on the street and rarely taken home, and I have pictures to prove it. This includes dead dear, big piles of dead birds. Yet the California Department of Fish and Wildlife is defiant and will not change their position.

And still another factor is that a number of endangered species have shown up in the dead piles of animals and it isn’t possible for the hunter to determine what species a bird is when it is more than 100 feet higher than where he is standing.

And most importantly it is completely ludicrous for the California tax payers to pay for a Wildlife Preserve when the state is making money from hunting licenses on this property. It defeats the whole purpose. As the record stands, the state would be better off giving the property back to the Tolowa Indian Tribe who’s land was taken away from them by force during a big massacre.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/613/953/649/

Breaking! Tiger Poachers Arrested In Thailand; Authorities Warn More Criminal Gangs Are Threatening Critically Endangered Tigers In The Wild – World Animal News

By WAN –
January 24, 2019

An image found on a confiscated mobile phone documents a suspected poacher standing over a dead tiger in a forest in Thailand. Photo from Freeland Foundation.
Following a three-month investigation, Thai officials are warning that organized crime gangs that are dispatched across borders are targeting the endangered wild tigers in Thailand and Malaysia.
According to Freeland Foundation, a frontline counter-trafficking organization working for a world that is free of wildlife trafficking and human slavery, Thai authorities have arrested one of many gangs.
The investigation was initiated after the successful arrest of two Vietnamese males by Thai Police in October 2018 following a tip-off from a Thai driver-for-hire.
The observant driver, who was taking the men from the western town of Tak to Pitsanalok, thought the baggage was suspicious, so he called the police who subsequently stopped the vehicle, inspected the bag, and discovered a fresh tiger skeleton inside.
The police arrested the owners of the bag, took the suspects and tiger remains to the Nakorn Sawan Police station, and inspected the suspects’ belongings, including their phones.

Police then contacted Freeland for analytical assistance.
Freeland’s forensics experts were dispatched to the scene and provided on-the-job training. Using Cellebrite digital forensics technology, police found evidence that the poaching coordinators, originating from Vietnam, had crossed Laos into Thailand to sponsor targeted hunting inside the forests of Thailand and Malaysia, and possibly Myanmar. The poachers documented their trips on their phones, including tiger kills.
Freeland believes the poachers were working on assignment from a Vietnamese criminal syndicate.
“We do not think this was the poacher’s or poaching coordinators’ first time in Thailand, or working together, and we have reason to believe they were planning to strike again,” Petcharat Sangchai, Director of Freeland-Thailand said in a statement.
Following the discovery of the gang and poached tiger, Thai rangers were put on high alert.
“This gang has been removed as a threat, but we should be aware that whoever employed them may dispatch more hunters to kill our country’s tigers,” said Sanchai. “Police, rangers, and the public must remain vigilant.”
Tragically, there are only an estimated 2,500 tigers remaining in the wild.
Freeland Foundation is requesting that people with any information on the “poachers’ ID, whereabouts, or about other poaching coordinators” to contact them; noting on their Facebook page that “solid tips” like the one that resulted in the arrest of two poaching coordinators who are in jail now, may be rewarded.”
Freeland Thailand is located at 92/1 Soi Phahonyothin 5, Phahonyothin Road, Phaya Thai, Bangkok 10400 THAILAND. The phone number is +(66) 2-278 2033 and fax number is +(66) 2-278 2037. Tips may also be sent to info@freeland.org

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-tiger-poachers-arrested-in-thailand-authorities-warn-more-criminal-gangs-are-threatening-endangered-species/

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Breaking! American Trophy Hunter Kills Endangered Markhor Goat In Pakistan – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
January 18, 2019

Yet another American trophy hunter proudly standing over an animal that he killed with a boastful smile, clouded eyes, and the misguided conscious of a heartless sub-human who kills innocent animals, including endangered species, for so-called “sport.”
It’s a haunting image, yet tragically familiar.
This week, according to the National Parks of Pakistan Facebook page, one such American hunter, identified by the Pamir Times as Christopher, paid $92,000 for one of four permits allotted by the government of Pakistan to kill a Markhor Goat, the country’s national animal.
Strange, especially since with an estimated population of only 6,000 of these rare goats living in the mountains of Pakistan and Afghanistan, they are supposed to be protected by local and international laws under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.
Christopher reportedly hunted, shot and killed the poor animal in the Chitral Region of Pakistan, then displayed his bloodied so-called “trophy” next to him and his team in photos.
As per the post, “Although hunting the markhor is illegal in Pakistan, the government has introduced a scheme which makes the hunt legal. The scheme is known as trophy hunting.”
A hunting trophy license was issued to Christopher after a “proper auction by Peshawar’s wildlife department.” The highest bidder earns the opportunity to hunt one markhor. Without the appalling human conflict, the endangered animals, also known as screw-horn goats, are estimated to live between 10 to 12 years in the wild.
There are reports that permits were also granted to another American trophy hunter who recently killed his fourth markhor, as well as a tourist from New Zealand.
These hunting expeditions are reportedly monitored by village representatives, as well as government officials to ensure that laws are not broken.
What? Ensure that laws are not broken? Remember the part about the “scheme” called trophy hunting!

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-american-trophy-hunter-kills-enangered-markhor-goat-in-pakistan/

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,
endangered, hunting,Pakistan,Trophy hunting

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Petition: Japan Is About to Start Slaughtering Even More Whales

by: Judy Molland
recipient: Japanese Government

39,173 SUPPORTERS – 40,000 GOAL

Japan announced December 26 that it was pulling out of the International Whaling Commission (IWC).

“We have decided to withdraw from the International Whaling Commission in order to resume commercial whaling in July next year,” Japanese Cabinet Chief Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters.

Commercial whaling has been illegal since 1986, but Japan has flouted the ban several times. Now the country is declaring that it is leaving the IWC in order to pursue the slaughter of whales.

This is a barbaric and destructive practice. If you agree, please sign my petition urging Japan to return to the IWC and not resume whaling for profit.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/826/671/977/

 

Sign Petition: In 15 Years This Parrot Could Be Extinct, But Australia Wants to Bulldoze Its Home Anyway

thepetitionsite.com
by: Care2 Team
recipient: Minister of the Environment is The Hon. Melissa Price

43,266 SUPPORTERS – 45,000 GOAL

The Australian native swift parrot is a sight to behold. With a brilliant green, blue, red and yellow plumage, anyone who gets a chance to see it should count themselves lucky. Lucky, not only because it’s such a stunning ave, but also because it’s disappearing.

The bird, which breeds only in Tasmania and then flies across to the mainland to forage for nectar is now critically endangered federally. One might think that the government, after recognizing its endangered status would do all they can to protect their habitat. But they’d be wrong. In fact, the parrot’s most vital habitat, their nesting grounds in Tasmania, could be on the chopping block.

That’s because, despite their protected status, the environmental minister could rule to allow a local council to bulldoze around 40 hectares of the birds nesting area — all in order to build a dam for fish farming and a golf course.

If this happens, not only will the parrots lose out, but it will prove that Australia doesn’t take conservation seriously.

According to a 2015 study, the swift parrot, on its current decline, is doomed for extinction within 15 years. That’s why the federal government’s threatened species commissioner made it a special priority with a goal of improving its trajectory by 2020. And yet, constant threats to its survival keep popping up.

Australia is among the top 10 countries with the highest amount of endangered species. They should be taking action rather than destroying habitat.

Please sign the petition and ask Australia’s Minister of the Environment is The Hon. Melissa Price to say no to the proposed dam and fish farm that could push the swift parrot over the edge.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/523/271/460/

 

National Geographic: Snaring is now the Dominant Threat to Africa’s Lions

The Jaguar

Lions like this female are increasingly falling prey to an indiscriminate killer: snares. Lion Eyes by Jeremy Vandel. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

I recently read another great story from National Geographic. In it, author Rachel Nuwer and photographer Steve Winter detail the rise of the new dominant threat to African lions: snaring.

I am not going to summarize the story in much detail here, because it would be far better if you read the original. However, as a brief synopsis, people have eaten wild game (bushmeat) in Africa for millennia. Snares are a cheap and effective way to catch game, since they can be constructed from easily-accessible materials and work while the hunter is away.

Unfortunately, snares are also indiscriminate and brutal. They catch any animal that is unlucky enough to walk into them, regardless of which species is being targeted, and often cause horrible injuries and painful deaths. In…

View original post 211 more words

Sign Petition: Sea Lions Are Being Found Shot Dead and Decapitated

by: Care2 Team
recipient: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries)more

64,962 SUPPORTERS – 65,000 GOAL

Someone is brutally murdering sea lions in the state of Washington, and they must be found now.

Six sea lions were recently found along the Washington coast, each dead from a gunshot wound. Another sea lion was found decapitated. In total, 13 sea lions have been found dead since September, the remaining having died from acute trauma, most likely from forceful interactions with humans.

Please sign this petition demanding that NOAA Fisheries do everything they can to find whoever is responsible for these horrific deaths and file appropriate charges now.

Marine animals, like these sea lions, are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop fishermen from savagely killing these adorable creatures in order to get rid of competition for fish — which authorities believe is the case here. Similar attacks occur each year during the winter months, but sadly, most of the killers are never held accountable.

NOAA Fisheries is investigating these deaths, but we must keep pressure on them to find the killers and file charges now — before they kill again.

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/674/563/189/?z00m=31115454&redirectID=2785125044

 

Legal Battle Continues; a herd in danger

Wild Horse Education

LLeigh_OutsideMag - 1 (13) Winter Velvet; His herd is in serious danger

(Informal short update on the legal fight against mine approval). Reading list at the bottom of the page.

This summer many of you remember the way we found out about the Canadian Fiore Gold project? It was a bit of a shock after BLM announced an “emergency” that would afford absolutely no transparency of the removal of wild horses in a subset population of Pancake.

We had to engage legally to simply be able to observe wild horses held at temporary, that BLM placed on reservation land (always makes me suspicious and can often indicate some other project where a bit of “cash in pocket” can create a more conducive climate for agreements). Then BLM cancelled the operation and was supposed to notify if it resumed. BLM did not notify. BLM did not create a tour of the Broken Arrow (Indian Lakes)…

View original post 1,175 more words

Sign Petition: The Koala Is Heading Towards Extinction

thepetitionsite.com
by: Care2 Team
recipient: Premier Gladys Berejiklian

Count to sixty. In that one minute period, 19 animals perished in the Southern Australian state of New South Wales (NSW). They are dying because of tree clearing that has become rampant in the state under the government of Gladys Berejiklian, who has written off the environment as a concern for her administration.

19 animals a minute equals a whopping 10 million animal deaths a year in NSW. According to conservative figures, the government estimates that nearly 2000 square miles of forest have been felled between 1998 and 2015, toppling a forest and woodland area that equals twice the size of Luxembourg. In that time 10.7 million birds, 67.1 million reptiles and 9.1 million mammals have disappeared.

One of those mammals is the koala. It might seem unbelievable, but one of Australia’s most iconic animals is now under threat of disappearing.

In fact, if things don’t change, researchers say that the animals could go extinct within our lifetime. This previously unthinkable headline is mainly because states like NSW have been far too lenient when it comes to clear-cutting in the koala’s last remaining ranges. Their survival depends on having enough habitat where they are able to thrive. But without a sound policy that protects vegetation and wildlife, the famous marsupial and many other animals are likely to disappear in short order.

Is this how the Berejiklian government wants to be known? As the administration that let the last remaining koalas in NSW go extinct? We certainly hope not, but we must make sure.

Speak up and tell Premier Berejiklian’s government that they have a duty to protect New South Wales’ koala populations.

Sign and ask them to demand tree-clearing restrictions today.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/268/366/574/the-koala-is-heading-towards-extinction-and-new-south-wales-is-doing-nothing-to-save-it./

 

Trump Administration Withholding Life-Saving Protection For 78 Species That Are At Risk Of Extinction – World Animal News

By WAN –
October 22, 2018

Photo from Defenders of Wildlife
For the second year in a row, the Trump administration has fallen short in protecting species under the Endangered Species Act, ultimately putting dozens of native animals at heightened risk of extinction.
According to a new analysis by the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service failed to make protection decisions for 57 species or designate critical habitat for another 21 promised under a seven-year workplan developed by the agency in 2016.The agency is under the leadership of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.
“Zinke and other Trump officials are preventing the Fish and Wildlife Service from doing critical work to protect species from extinction,” said Noah Greenwald, the Center’s endangered species director in a statement. “The wolverine, lesser prairie chicken, and Hermes copper butterfly are all species Trump and Zinke left high and dry.”
The workplan was created to address a backlog of more than 500 imperiled species awaiting protection decisions. In fiscal year 2018, the workplan called for 82 separate decisions about listing species or designating critical habitat. Another 13 decisions were never completed in fiscal year 2017, for a total of 95 decisions.
Instead, the agency only managed to make 18 decisions in 2018, resulting in listing of only four species and proposed protection for only eight species. Another six species were denied protection, including one, the beaverpond marstonia, which had gone extinct while waiting for protection.
“The Trump administration’s anti-regulatory agenda is turning it into the extinction presidency,” said Greenwald. “The vast majority of the American public wants to see endangered species protected, but administration officials are flushing these imperiled plants and animals down the toilet for their patrons in the oil industry and other polluters.”
Delays in protecting species have real consequences. At least 46 species have become extinct while waiting for protection since the Endangered Species Act was passed in 1973. During the Obama administration, a total of 357 species were protected for a rate of 37 per year. Likewise, under the Clinton administration, a total of 523 species were protected, for a rate of 62 species per year.
So far, the Trump administration, which has protected just 14 species — all but one proposed under the previous administration — is shaping up to be even worse than the Bush administration, when only 62 species were protected.

https://worldanimalnews.com/trump-administration-withholding-life-saving-protection-for-78-species-that-are-at-risk-of-extinction/

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,conservation,endangered,
Endangered Species Act,Trump Administration

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com
© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Watch “Rescued Scottish Wildcat Kittens Among Last of Their Kind | National Geographic”

Protect Belize’s Endangered Jaguars

Endangered Jaguars are facing extinction as deforestation runs rampant in Belize’s jungles. Sign the petition to demand that the government of Belize work to end deforestation and protect the nation’s endangered jaguars.

Source: Protect Belize’s Endangered Jaguars

PETITION| Save the monarch butterfly!

https://go.saveanimalsfacingextinction.org/page/s/Save-Monarch-Butterfly?source=MS_EM_FR_2018.10.03_B2_Save-Monarch-Butterflies_X__F1_S1_C1__all

Last Chance: Fight This Vicious Attack on Wildlife Petition

Bald eagle

Sept. 24 is the last day to let the Trump administration know that you firmly oppose its disastrous plan to gut protections for threatened wildlife at the bidding of industry.

Bald eagles, blue whales and alligators wouldn’t exist today without the Endangered Species Act. It’s our nation’s most successful environmental law and has prevented the extinction of 99 percent of the animals and plants in its care. But now the law itself is in danger.

If we’re going to stop President Trump and Secretary Zinke from destroying the Act’s key provisions, we all need to speak up with one voice.

Using the form on this page, tell Zinke and Trump to immediately withdraw their vicious proposal.

The Trump administration’s proposed changes would dismantle protections for polar bears, jaguars and hundreds of other endangered species, as well as the places they live.

It would also mean that hundreds of at-risk species waiting to be granted protection under the Act — like the monarch butterfly — would face delays or be denied help. We can’t let it happen.

Act now to help save the law that has saved bald eagles and scores of other iconic wildlife from disappearing. Let’s make sure this fierce and vital law remains so well into the future.

https://act.biologicaldiversity.org/onlineactions/TkeADTm-40qUeAp1iTfj1A2?sourceid=1004296&utm_source=action&utm_medium=email&emci=4bc40129-6bb8-e811-bce7-000d3a12b7e6&emdi=d9c7b3a2-e0bf-e811-af11-28187847c89e&ceid=111331&smartlinkdata=JmZuPU5hbmN5JmxuPUtlaXRlciZlbT1uYWNrcGV0cyU0MGdtYWlsLmNvbSZhZGQxPTIyNStIZWF0aGVyK0RyKyZjaT1IYXJyaXNidXJnJnN0PVBBJnBjPTE3MTEyJnA9TXJzLg%3d%3d

Center for Biological Diversity | Saving Life on Earth

Photo of bald eagle by Jerry McFarland/Flickr.

Petition: This Town Could Kick 400 Endangered Turtle Eggs Off Their Private Beach

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Belleair Shore town commissioners

22,265 SUPPORTERS – 25,000 GOAL

Florida is the most important nesting area for the various species of sea turtles that inhabit the United States. From loggerheads to greens and leatherback these turtles rely on the Florida beaches to survive.

Since they are all threatened or endangered you would think that most people would do all they can to help protect them. But that isn’t the case in one small Florida town who at this very moment is trying to kick turtle nests off their private beach.

In an attempt to give the this season’s sea turtle hatch a fighting chance the Clearwater Marine Aquarium relocated some 400 eggs from non-ideal beaches to a better beach within Belleair Shore.

In Florida, beaches that are rebuilt with government funds after hurricanes or other disasters are, by law, public lands. So when the affluent town of Belleair Shore was offered help, they said “no thanks!” in favor of keeping their beach private. But as David Yates, the CEO of the Clearwater Marine Aquarium suggests, the fact that Belleaire’s beach hasn’t been rebuilt is what makes it so perfect for turtle nests.

Now the locals say the cordoned off areas on their beach which are protecting the eggs from being disturbed is an eyesore and want them gone. What’s worse, is even though the eggs are due to hatch within the next sixty days, at their next meeting, the town commissioners are considering passing an ordinance that might give the eggs the boot.

One would hope that the people of Belleaire would reconsider and vote to protect these endangered creatures rather than toss them from their private beach. But we can’t be sure. Their next meeting is slated for August 21 so it’s up to us to let them know we are watching and we want them to protect the sea turtles of Florida.

Please help by signing the petition and tell the Belleair Shore town commissioners to share their private beach and do their part to help save the sea turtle.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/816/174/525/