There’s an oil supply ‘100 times bigger’ than US reserve: Oil exec

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Florida Manatee Deaths up Almost 50% in 2018

The Jaguar

A Florida manatee looking at the camera.
Florida manatee deaths rose significantly in 2018. Here’s Looking at You Kid – Meet a Florida Manatee by the U.S. Geological Survey. Public Domain.

Here’s a heart-breaking story by John R. Platt and Dipika Kadaba of The Revelator. It turns out that 824 Florida manatees died last year, almost 50% more than in 2017.

Those 824 mortalities (deaths) represent 13% of the Florida manatee population, and many of them were caused by people – either directly or indirectly.

The Revelator released a video that goes into more detail about why so many manatees died last year. Click below to watch it, and be sure to visit this link for the original story.

Video by The Revelator about the dramatic rise in Florida manatee mortalities in 2018.

View original post

“Half of British butterfly species on new Red List” Butterfly Conservation

May 25, 2022 ByIain H Leach

Wildlife charity Butterfly Conservation is warning that time is running out to save some of Britain’s best-loved insects, with the latest Red List assessment of butterflies published today, revealing a 26% increase in the number of species threatened with extinction.

Using data gathered by volunteers through the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme and Butterflies for the New Millennium recording scheme, scientists from Butterfly Conservation have put together the new Red List, which assesses all the butterfly species that have bred regularly in Great Britain against the rigorous criteria of extinction risk set out by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The new Red List is published today in the journal Insect Conservation and Diversity.

Of the 62 species assessed, four are extinct in Britain (Black-veined White, Large Tortoiseshell, Large Copper, and Mazarine Blue) with 24 (41% of the remaining species) classed as threatened (8 Endangered, 16 Vulnerable) and a further five (9%) as Near Threatened.

Large Copper (female/upperwing) – Tamás Nestor

Head of Science for Butterfly Conservation, Dr Richard Fox, says: “Shockingly, half of Britain’s remaining butterfly species are listed as threatened or Near Threatened on the new Red List. Even prior to this new assessment, British butterflies were among the most threatened in Europe, and now the number of threatened species in Britain has increased by five, an increase of more than one-quarter. While some species have become less threatened, and a few have even dropped off the Red List, the overall increase clearly demonstrates that the deterioration of the status of British butterflies continues apace.”

While land-use change remains the most important driver of decline, the impact of climate change on butterflies is also evident in the new Red List, with all four British butterflies with northerly distributions, adapted to cooler or damper climates, now listed as threatened (Large Heath, Scotch Argus, Northern Brown Argus) or Near Threatened (Mountain Ringlet).

Both the Large Heath and the Grayling have moved from Vulnerable to Endangered, and seven species have moved from Near Threatened to threatened, including the beautiful Swallowtail and Adonis Blue. Two new species have been added for the first time, Scotch Argus, which is listed as Vulnerable, and Dark Green Fritillary, listed as Near Threatened.

Large Blue – Sam Ellis

The focus of concentrated conservation efforts

It isn’t bad news for all butterfly species though, with some improvement in status for those that have been the focus of concentrated conservation effort, offering hope for other species.

The Large Blue, which became extinct in Great Britain in 1979 and has been the subject of an intensive, ongoing, and highly successful reintroduction programme, has moved from Critically Endangered to Near Threatened. The High Brown Fritillary, also formerly listed as Critically Endangered, has moved to Endangered; likely to be the result of intense conservation work from Butterfly Conservation alongside other organisations. The Duke of Burgundy and Pearl-bordered Fritillary, which have also benefitted from much targeted conservation effort, both moved from Endangered to Vulnerable.

Dr Richard Fox adds: “Where we are able to target conservation work, we have managed to bring species back from the brink, but with the extinction risk increasing for more species than are decreasing, more must be done to protect our butterflies from the effects of changing land management and climate change. Without action it is likely that species will be lost from Britain’s landscapes for good, but Butterfly Conservation is taking bold steps to improve key landscapes for butterflies and reduce the extinction risk of many threatened species.”

The production of the new Red List of British butterflies has been led by Butterfly Conservation with input and funding from Natural England, and the full scientific paper can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1111/icad.12582

Join Butterfly Conservation

Butterflies and moths are among the most threatened groups of wildlife in the UK. Without your support, we cannot continue our vital work to protect them. By becoming a member you will:

  • Save endangered species from extinction
  • Help restore natural habitats and create safe-havens for butterflies and moths
  • Be part of an active and friendly organisation that makes a difference at local and national levels
  • Enjoy access to our butterfly nature reserves across the UK
  • Share your voice to campaign and support wider environmental issues affecting wildlife and people
  • Get involved in the world’s largest Butterfly & Moth recording and monitoring programmes
  • Help create a world rich in butterflies for future generations to enjoy

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https://butterfly-conservation.org/news-and-blog/half-of-british-butterfly-species-on-new-red-list

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“The climbers were shocked to see who was approaching them at an altitude of 5500 m!”

Virginia has its first presumed monkeypox case: report

www.foxnews.com

Shiv Sudhakar

Virginia now has its first presumed case of monkeypox, the state’s Department of Health said today.  

“Monkeypox is a very rare disease in the United States.  The patient is currently isolating and does not pose a risk to the public,” said State Health Commissioner Dr. Colin M. Greene.  

This 1997 image provided by the CDC during an investigation into an outbreak of monkeypox, which took place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), formerly Zaire, and depicts the dorsal surfaces of the hands of a monkeypox case patient, who was displaying the appearance of the characteristic rash during its recuperative stage.

This 1997 image provided by the CDC during an investigation into an outbreak of monkeypox, which took place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), formerly Zaire, and depicts the dorsal surfaces of the hands of a monkeypox case patient, who was displaying the appearance of the characteristic rash during its recuperative stage. (CDC via AP)

“Transmission requires close contact with someone with symptomatic monkeypox, and this virus has not shown the ability to spread rapidly in the general population. [Virginia Department of Health] is monitoring national and international trends and has notified medical providers in Virginia to watch for monkeypox cases and report them to their local health district as soon as possible.” 

The adult patient resides in the Northern region of Virginia with recent international travel to an African country where the disease is endemic, but she is not requiring hospitalization and is isolating at home.  

The health department is monitoring close contacts and no additional cases have been detected at this time as the state awaits confirmation of the test results at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

In these Centers for Disease Control and Prevention handout graphic, symptoms of one of the first known cases of the monkeypox virus are shown on a patient’s hand June 5, 2003. The CDC said the viral disease monkeypox, thought to be spread by prairie dogs, has been detected in the Americas for the first time with about 20 cases reported in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana. 

In these Centers for Disease Control and Prevention handout graphic, symptoms of one of the first known cases of the monkeypox virus are shown on a patient’s hand June 5, 2003. The CDC said the viral disease monkeypox, thought to be spread by prairie dogs, has been detected in the Americas for the first time with about 20 cases reported in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana.  (Courtesy of CDC/Getty Images)

The agency recently issued a Level 2 travel alert to practice “enhanced precautions” when traveling, noting that cases have been reported in Europe, North America and Australia

“Some cases [worldwide] were reported among men who have sex with men. Some cases were also reported in people who live in the same household as an infected person,” the agency said. 

MASSACHUSETTS CONFIRMS FIRST CASE OF MONKEYPOX IN THE UNITED STATES THIS YEAR

The Virginia case is among the nine monkeypox cases that have had samplessent to the CDC for additional confirmatory testing and genomic investigation, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky noted in a recent briefing.

placeholder
This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Monkeypox, a disease that rarely appears outside Africa, has been identified by European and American health authorities in recent days.

This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Monkeypox, a disease that rarely appears outside Africa, has been identified by European and American health authorities in recent days. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP)

She said they are working to see how each contracted the infection, but some, but not all, have traveled to regions where they are active monkeypox outbreaks. 

Virginia is now the seventh state with presumed monkeypox infections, including California, Florida, Massachusetts, New York, Utah, and Washington. 

“We need to presume that there is some community spread, but there is active contact tracing that is happening right now to understand whether and how these cases might have been in contact with each other or with others in other countries,” Walensky said. 

https://www.foxnews.com/health/virginia-first-presumed-monkeypox-case-report?intcmp=tw_fnc

83% of Americans dissatisfied with how things are going in the US, poll says

local21news.com

83% of Americans dissatisfied with how things are going in the US, poll says

FILE - President Joe Biden arrives at the White House, in Washington, from his Asian trip, Tuesday, May 24, 2022. The Congressional Budget Office released an economic outlook Wednesday saying that high inflation will persist into next year, likely causing the federal government to pay higher interest rates on its debt. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

ALEC SCHEMMEL | The National Desk

FILE – President Joe Biden arrives at the White House, in Washington, from his Asian trip, Tuesday, May 24, 2022. The Congressional Budget Office released an economic outlook Wednesday saying that high inflation will persist into next year, likely causing the federal government to pay higher interest rates on its debt. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

WASHINGTON (TND) — A whopping 83% of Americans are dissatisfied with the current path the United States is on, according to new Gallup polling.

That means the amount of those satisfied, just 16%, is 20 points lower than Americans’ satisfaction four months after President Joe Biden took office and a six-point drop since last month, Gallup’s survey data shows.

Americans’ dissatisfaction coincides with Biden’s low approval ratings.

Gallup puts Biden’s approval rating at 41%, but according to a Reuters-Ipsos poll released Tuesday Biden’s approval rating is at 36%.

Biden’s 36% approval rating from Reuters-Ipsos is his lowest to date in that particular poll.

Last month, a Quinnipiac University poll showed Biden’s approval rating at 33%, also an all-time low in that poll.

Read more: “Biden poll numbers hit rock-bottom, sees very low support among key demographics”

Besides Biden’s actions on the Russia-Ukraine crisis, the president has been under immense scrutiny for growing inflation and an out-of-control southern border.

A FiveThirtyEight-Ipsos poll found that 52% of Americans think inflation is the most important issue facing the country right now.

Americans primarily blame Biden and the war in Ukraine for the U.S.’s high inflation, which as of last month sits near a 41-year high of 8.5%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

A Morning Consult-Politico poll indicated 40% of Americans think Biden’s policies are “very responsible” for the country’s high inflation. Sixty-one percent believe Biden is at least “somewhat responsible” for inflation.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO), a research arm of the federal government, predicts the nation’s deficit will total $1 trillion in 2022 and nearly $16 trillion over subsequent decades under the current economic policy.

The nation’s debt to GDP ratio is expected to be strong in 2023. However, the CBO says the current reprieve could be short lived, projecting the nation’s debt to GDP ratio will surge to record highs by 2032.

The combination of expiring COVID relief and massive inflation, along with the economic recovery, have helped provide a fiscal reprieve. But trillion-dollar deficits are here to stay, and $2 trillion deficits will arrive by 2031. Meanwhile, debt is slated to reach a record 110 percent of GDP within a decade and could rise even further if lawmakers extend various expiring policies,” according to the CBO’s economic analysis.

Rather than declare victory and abandon deficit-reduction efforts, policymakers should work together to truly bring our deficit and debt under control,” the analysis continues. “It’s time to put words into action and enact a fiscal plan that pays for new initiatives, lowers health care costs, raises revenue, secures our major trust funds, cuts wasteful spending, stomps out inflation, and promotes strong economic growth.

The crisis at the southern border has also been a major point of criticism for Biden and his administration.

Gallup polling from March, before Biden announced he would be terminating the Title 42 expulsion policy, showed Americans’ concerns over illegal immigration is near a two-decade high. Forty-one percent reported worrying a great deal about the issue, with another 19% saying they are worried a fair amount.

Texas communities, like Eagle Pass, are bearing the burden of Biden’s open border policies,” Texas Governor Greg Abbott said this week. “The Lone Star State will not waiver in our efforts to secure the border. We’re deploying all resources necessary to prevent the flow of drugs, smugglers, & criminals coming into Texas.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/83-of-americans-dissatisfied-with-how-things-are-going-in-the-us-poll-says-inflation-ukraine-border-mexico-president-joe-biden

“The owner recieved noise complaints, set up a nanny cam. This is what they saw LOL”

‘We had too much to do to be scared’: the couple who fled Irpin with 19 dogs

www.theguardian.com

Daniel Boffey

The image of a windswept young woman holding tight to the leads of nine dogs under an ominously dark sky spread far and wide at the time of the Battle of Kyiv.

The apparent bravery of the woman, who was attempting an audacious evacuation across a broken bridge targeted by Russian fire, and the vulnerability of the animals, some of whom were strapped into dog wheelchairs, epitomised to many the cruelty of the war being waged by Vladimir Putin and the dignity of the Ukrainian response.

The full story of the trials of Anastasiya Tykha, 20, a veterinary student in the final year of her degree, and her husband Arthur Lee, 26, is perhaps even more striking than the photograph, which the couple discovered had gone viral when Tykha saw herself on the television news and listened to the presenter report that she was dead.

Anastasiya Tykha and her dogs attempting to travel from Irpin to Kyiv under Russian fire in March.

Anastasiya Tykha and some of her dogs attempting to travel from Irpin to Kyiv under Russian fire in March. Photograph: Handout

Speaking in Irpin, the town 13 miles north of Kyiv from where the couple had fled on 9 March, Tykha said they ended up making seven crossings of the bridge in total, each one under fire.

“We had too much to do to be worried or scared”, said Tykha, who has run an animal shelter in Irpin for four years, and who on that first journey was seeking to escape with 19 dogs, five cats, a turtle, a chameleon, two Triton lizards, an axolotl and a hamster.

It was not an easy decision to flee, but the Russians had wrestled control of the town, there was no electricity or running water and the dogs were having to drink from the shelter’s aquarium.

It was Snizhana Bugryk, 35, a friend who was involved in finding abandoned and disabled animals for Tykha and Lee’s shelter, who persuaded the couple that they had no choice but to leave.

“Snizhana said we had to go or we would be killed, that this was our last chance for us and the animals to survive,” said Tykha. “And she was right”, added Lee. “Our house was later in the heart of the heavy fighting.”

It was a two-mile walk to the bridge where Ukrainian soldiers were helping people across.

Aerial view of Irpin, destroyed by Russian bombs

An aerial view of the town of Irpin, 13 miles north of Kyiv, which has suffered heavy Russian bombardment. Photograph: Google Earth

Two of the dogs – Strong and Baileys, mongrel border collies with broken spines – were in wheelchairs, while Life, a four-year-old with amputated legs, had refused to be strapped in and was dragging herself on her stumps. “I did think at one point that we would not make it,” said Lee, “but Snizhana called and said there would be a minibus on the other side to help”.

It took three hours to get to the bridge. One dog, Pandora, a one-and-a-half-year-old mongrel Belgian shepherd, was so terrified that he bit off part of his tongue, while four of the others, including the couple’s own dog, Zeus, a beagle, became so worked up by the sounds of war they chewed through their leads and ran away.

Arriving exhausted at the Ukrainian checkpoint by the bridge, the couple and their animals drew the attention of press photographers, who crowded around them.

“That was when that photo was taken – I just wanted them to let us get through to the bridge,” said Tykha. “I was worried because there were burned out cars and lots of smashed glass and metal, and I didn’t want the animals to be cut up.”

A group of Ukrainian soldiers came to their aid, ushering the photographers away. “There were explosions and shooting but after two weeks of Russian occupation, we were used to it,” Lee said.

The couple found the minivan and it took them to a south-western district of Kyiv, where a sauna on the side of a house had been made available to them and their animals to stay in.

It was the next day that the couple discovered that their adventures were being talked about across Ukraine, and that Tykha was presumed dead.

They were determined to go back to find Zeus and the other dogs who had fled in fear.

“We were in the sauna for five days, but every one of those days Anastasiya went to the Ukrainian military checkpoint and demanded that she be allowed through to get the escaped dogs,” said Lee. Every day the commander at the checkpoint refused, and every day she came back. He was finally browbeaten into submission.

Anastasiya Tikha with one of her dogs in her garden.

Anastasiya and Arthur have returned to Irpin, where they now care for 30 dogs and 10 cats. Photograph: Ed Ram/The Guardian

After crossing the bridge, again under fire, they faced a three-mile walk to a an abandoned animal shelter, where they knew there were hungry dogs who needed help.

“It was a hard walk because we had all this heavy food,” said Lee. They returned to their own home, where they found Zeus, and picked up some neighbours’ dogs, including a German shepherd, bringing their party of animals for the return to five.

They would make two further trips, and all the dogs that fled on the first escape were accounted for.

Lee said their final trip back to Irpin, on 29 March, was the scariest. “The council had said that the Russians had gone the previous day and that it was safe – but it wasn’t,” Lee said. “The bombs were landing just 2 metres from us. We hid between the minivan and a fence, but it was close.”

Now they are back in Irpin in a new, rented house. Because so many former residents have left, their collection of sheltered animals has grown to 30 dogs and 10 cats. They are, the couple say, just happy to be living the life they love.

You’ve read 9 articles in the last year

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has abruptly transformed the world. Millions of people have already fled. A new Iron Curtain is grinding into place. An economic war deepens, as the military conflict escalates, civilian casualties rise and evidence of horrific war crimes mounts.

It’s our job at the Guardian to decipher a rapidly changing landscape, particularly when it involves a mounting refugee crisis and the risk of unthinkable escalation. Our correspondents are on the ground in Ukraine and throughout the globe delivering round-the-clock reporting and analysis during this perilous situation.

We know there is no substitute for being there – and we’ll stay on the ground, as we did during the 1917 Russian Revolution, the Ukrainian famine of the 1930s, the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the first Russo-Ukrainian conflict in 2014. We have an illustrious, 200-year history of reporting throughout Europe in times of upheaval, peace and everything in between. We won’t let up now.

Tens of millions have placed their trust in the Guardian’s fearless journalism since we started publishing 200 years ago, turning to us in moments of crisis, uncertainty, solidarity and hope. We’d like to invite you to join more than 1.5 million supporters from 180 countries who now power us financially – keeping us open to all, and fiercely independent.

Unlike many others, the Guardian has no shareholders and no billionaire owner. Just the determination and passion to deliver high-impact global reporting, always free from commercial or political influence. Reporting like this is vital to establish the facts: who is lying and who is telling the truth.

And we provide all this for free, for everyone to read. We do this because we believe in information equality. Greater numbers of people can keep track of the global events shaping our world, understand their impact on people and communities, and become inspired to take meaningful action. Millions can benefit from open access to quality, truthful news, regardless of their ability to pay for it.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/23/we-had-too-much-to-do-to-be-scared-the-couple-who-fled-irpin-with-19-dogs?CMP=fb_gu&utm_medium=Social&utm_

The fish in our oceans are filled with drugs, new study says

The fish in our oceans are filled with drugs, new study says

local21news.com

The National Desk | WPEC

WEST PALM BEACH, Fl. (WPEC) — A new study out of South Florida has found the fish in our waters are on drugs.

The fish in our oceans are filled with drugs, new study says

Dozens of pharmaceuticals have been discovered in fish’s blood and tissue.

From valium, blood pressure medicine, to antidepressants all sorts of drugs found in the fish in this study.

The numbers are so alarming scientists say our fisheries could disappear.

“We found pharmaceuticals everywhere and there was no place where basically a fish could be unexposed to pharmaceuticals and that was a surprise,” says Nick Castillo who just completed a three year study with fellow scientists at Florida International University and the Bonefish and Tarpon Trust.

The research team tested the blood of 93 bonefish in South Florida and they found pharmaceutical drugs in every single one.

The average number of drugs reported in just one bonefish was seven and some had up to 16 different prescriptions in their systems.

In Florida bonefish are supposed to be caught and released.

(WPEC)

We don’t eat bonefish but what they eat, other fish are eating too and some of the drugs are altering their behavior.

“So it could be making a fish more bold they’ll take risks they can get eaten more frequently. It can affect their reproduction,” says Castillo.

Dr. Jennifer Rehage, the lead researcher for the study says people are often deceived by the color of the water a fish lives in.

The perception is if the habitat looks nice, the fish are healthy but that’s not always the case.

“Areas that we perceive as pristine and beautiful and the water is clear and turquoise and there’s fish swimming they are contaminated,” says Dr. Rehage.

The pharmaceuticals are being ingested by the fish through human waste.

When we take a prescription, the leftover medicine our body doesn’t process comes out when we go to the bathroom.

From our toilets to waste water treatment plants, Florida has 4,000 of them.

Dr. Rehage says those facilities are outdated and aren’t meant to deal with pharmaceuticals.

“So we don’t have the right equipment and the right legislation, the rules, the treatment and its escalating and it’s exploding right in front of our faces,” she says.

At Florida Atlantic University’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce, Dr. James Sullivan says a crisis is just around the corner.

“Plastics pollution, nutrient pollution, harmful algal blooms, ecoli, pharmaceuticals getting into the water, you know how much more can nature take before it becomes a critical turning point that were going to lose very valuable ecosystems in our state,” he says.

The scientists are just starting to research how eating these fish will affect humans.

More studies are expected soon.

https://local21news.com/news/videos/the-fish-in-our-oceans-are-filled-with-drugs-new-study-says-antidepressants-pollution-wastewater-fisheries-water-oceans-valium-blood-pressure-medication

“Formula to Texas: Relief on the way for babies who have special allergy to certain infant foods”

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella: Peanut Butter (May 2022) | FDA

An official website of the United States government

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA provides steps for consumers; Do not eat, serve, or sell recalled Jif peanut butter

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infections linked to certain Jif peanut butter products produced at the J.M. Smucker Company facility in Lexington, Kentucky.  

CDC’s review of epidemiological information indicates that five out of five people reported consuming peanut butter and four of the five people specifically reported consuming different varieties of Jif brand peanut butter prior to becoming ill. FDA conducted Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis on an environmental sample collected at the Lexington, KY, J.M. Smucker Company facility in 2010. The analysis shows that this 2010 environmental sample matches the strain causing illnesses in this current outbreak. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Jif brand peanut butter produced in the J.M. Smucker Company facility located in Lexington, KY, is the likely cause of illnesses in this outbreak.

J.M. Smucker Company has voluntarily recalled certain Jif brand peanut butter products that have the lot code numbers between 1274425 – 2140425, only if the first seven digits end with 425 (manufactured in Lexington, KY). Photo examples are included below.

FDA’s investigation is ongoing and more information will be provided as it becomes available.

Recommendation

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve any recalled Jif brand peanut butter.

For Consumers

Follow these steps:

  1. Check if you have Jif peanut butter in your home.
  2. Locate the lot code on the back of the jar, under the Best If Used By Date (the lot code may be next to the Best If Used By Date for cups or squeeze pouches).
  3. In the lot code, if the first four digits are between 1274 and 2140, and if the next three numbers after that are ‘425’, this product has been recalled and you should not consume this product. An example is below.

If you are unsure what to do with your recalled product, you can call or email J.M. Smucker Company for more information:

The J.M. Smucker Co. Hotline: 800-828-9980
Website: jif.com/contact-usExternal Link Disclaimer

FDA recommends that if you have used the recalled Jif brand peanut butter that have lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425 and the first seven digits end with 425, you should wash and sanitize surfaces and utensils that could have touched the peanut butter. If you or someone in your household ate this peanut butter and have symptoms of salmonellosis, please contact your healthcare provider.

For Retailers, Re-packers, and Manufacturers

In addition to the steps above, FDA recommends referring to the firm’s recall press for the UPC codes and other retailer information. Do not sell or serve recalled peanut butter or products containing recalled peanut butter.

Product Images

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - Sample Recalled Product Label
Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - Sample Label

Case Count Map Provided by CDC

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - CDC Case Count Map as of May 20, 2022

Case Counts

Total Illnesses: 14
Hospitalizations: 2
Deaths: 0
Last Illness Onset: May 1, 2022
States with Cases: AR (1), GA (2), IL (1), MA (1), MO (1), OH (1), NC (1), NY (1), SC (1), TX (2), VA (1), WA (1)
Product Distribution*: Nationwide
*Distribution has been confirmed for states listed, but product could have been distributed further, reaching additional states

Useful Links

Who to Contact

Consumers who have symptoms should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care.

To report a complaint or adverse event (illness or serious allergic reaction), you can

External Link Disclaimer

  • Content current as of:05/23/2022
  • Regulated Product(s)Topic(s)

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Contact Number 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332)

https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-peanut-butter-may-2022

Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella

<img src="https://local21news.com/resources/media2/16×9/full/1015/center/80/61929329-6684-4c0a-8b93-1fddfc7af2f4-large16x9_IMG_6996.JPG" alt="Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella (WSET)

local21news.com

KELSEY CHILDRESS | WSET Staff

Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella (WSET)<p>{/p}

LYNCHBURG, Virginia (WSET) – There’s been peanut butter pandemonium after J.M. Smucker Company – the manufacturer who makes Jif – earlier this month recalled some batches for possible salmonella contamination.

Many stores have already wiped their shelves clean of Jif jars – but it may have been too late for some, like the Nichols family in Virginia. Ashley Nichols said her husband has gotten salmonella.

“I was just like: I bet you that’s why he’s sick,” Ashley said.

Ashley picked up her usual Jif peanut butter at Sam’s Club on May 4. Nearly two weeks later, her husband started getting sick.

Salmonella can cause diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps. In some cases, it can lead to life-threatening complications.

“Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. He’s cold and clammy. Like, he’s sweating, but he’s cold,” Nichols said.

At first, she just thought it was a reaction to some antibiotics he was taking. But now she thinks tainted peanut butter is behind it.

Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella (WSET)

“Saturday, I think, is when I saw the recall, and that’s when I put it all together,” Nichols said.

Nichols posted on Facebook to see if others in the area were also sick from the Jif jars. Dozens responded, saying they got sick from a recalled jar, while others said they got lucky.

Click here to learn more about the recall and see if your pantry has been affected.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/peanut-butter-panic-virginia-woman-says-recalled-jif-gave-her-husband-salmonella-lynchburg-virginia-ashley-nichols-fda-potential-contamination-symptoms-diarrhea-fever-stomach-cramps

Watermelon and Coconut Sorbet – Richard Church UK

watermelon and coconut sorbet

richardchurchuk.com

by richardchurchuk

Originally created as a pallet cleanser between courses, sorbets have become a refreshing dessert all of their own.  This watermelon and coconut sorbet has a delicious background creaminess of coconut with the cool taste of watermelon. It is incredibly easy to make, all you need is a saucepan, a blender and a container to freeze it in.

The process of freezing is made a little easier if you have an ice cream churner, which keeps the sorbet moving as it freezes, keeping ice crystals at bay. However, I made this sorbet without one. All you have to do is whisk it up every hour or two as it is freezing to prevent any large ice crystals from forming. It freezes quite solid overnight, so you will need to bring it out of the freezer a good 20 minutes before serving.

This is a perfect light summer dessert that you can enjoy even if you’ve had a big meal.


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What you will need to make this watermelon and coconut sorbet

Lemon Juice:

The lemon juice will give this sorbet a very subtle and extremely refreshing tang.

Caster sugar:

Golden caster sugar adds a deeper depth of flavour than the regular kind.

Creamed Coconut:

Creamed coconut is available in most supermarkets, usually with the Chinese sauces and coconut milk. It comes in a solid block that you can chop up to crumble and is great for a variety of sweet and savoury dishes.

Watermelon:

There isn’t much that is more satisfying than bringing home a huge chunk of watermelon on a hot day. Watermelons are usually available from June to September, where you can get them in a variety of stores, including supermarkets. I get mine from a grocer close to me in North London. You want to take out the seeds before you blend it for this recipe.

watermelon and coconut sorbet

Watermelon and Coconut Sorbet

Prep Time 10 mins

Cook Time 5 mins

Freezing Time 12 hrs

Gluten Free

  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 200 g golden caster sugar
  • 200 g creamed coconut crumbled
  • Flesh of half a medium watermelon about 1kg, deseeded and cut into chunks
  • Put the lemon juice and sugar into a saucepan and melt until you have a syrup. Add the coconut and melt over a gentle heat. The sauce will thicken quickly so you need to stir constantly. Once it is melted, turn off the heat and set aside.
  • Put the watermelon in a blender and add the coconut syrup. Blend until completely smooth, then pour into a container for freezing. While freezing, whisk the sorbet up every hour or two, to prevent crystals from forming. It could take up to 12 hours to freeze properly. Thaw for about 30 minutes before serving.

Keyword coconut, dessert, gluten free, sorbet, vegan, watermelon

watermelon and coconut sorbet

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vegan spaghetti with spinach and tofu balls
vegan new potatoes with vegan chorizo sausage
vegan blueberry pancakes
Vegan sausage and kale curry
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Spaghetti with Spinach and Tofu Balls

Fresh, leafy spinach, courgettes, vegan cream cheese, pine nuts and firm tofu are some of the ingredients that make up these delicious spinach and tofu balls. Served with spaghetti, they are an incredibly satisfying and hearty vegan meal that gives you a good dose of nutrition at the same time. Although they do take a

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New Potatoes with Vegan Chorizo Sausages

Continuing with my obsession with vegan sausages, this New Potatoes with Vegan Chorizo Sausages is another way of throwing together a simple meal using a couple of pre-made ingredients. In this instance: sausages and pesto. The chorizo style of vegan sausage works best for this recipe, which, along with the pesto, gives the whole dish

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Vegan Blueberry and Lemon Pancakes

The weekend is most definitely a time for a putting a little more effort into your breakfast, for taking a few moments away from the weekday rush of getting the kids ready for school and yourself ready for work. It’s a time to not have to guzzle down cereal, or chew on burnt toast that

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Dry Curry of Cabbage and Roast Tomatoes

A dry vegetable curry is a new concept for me, having always had curries that are full of sauce. The possibilities for a dry curry are as varied as those for a sauce one, the only real difference is that you omit the liquid. This omission can also make the cooking time shorter, which is

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Vegan Sausage and Kale Curry

This vegan sausage and kale curry is ready to eat in just under an hour. It uses very simple ingredients, with just a few spices that you can pick up from your local supermarket and have on hand for future dishes. You can use frozen or fresh vegan sausages, and if you’re not a fan

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Vegan Bolognese (Batch Recipe)

I’ve come up with a couple of vegan Bolognese recipes over the years, that usually have a few extra ingredients in them, such as butternut squash or sweet potato. This Bolognese recipe I wanted to keep as traditional as I could, without any embellishment. I also wanted to make a very rich tomato sauce, which

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We must stop producing and using plastics

www.washingtonpost.com

Letters to the Editor

After reading the May 5 news article “In U.S., plastics recycling rate slumps below 6 percent,” about the U.S. recycling rate dropping from 8.7 percent to under 6 percent, all I could think was, “Why are we even still talking about plastic recycling?”

Recycling has failed for more than half a century, an unarguable fact when you see recycling rates. Under 6 percent is dismal, but so was 8.7 percent. Decades were wasted because of the plastics industries’ multimillion-dollar public relations efforts. It wanted consumers to believe they were responsible for the plastic pollution problem and could prevent it if they used their recycling bins more effectively.

Now, here we are, with the equivalent of two garbage trucks full of plastic entering our oceans every minute — 33 billion pounds a year — and an estimation from the plastics industry that plastic production will more than triple by 2050.

Federal lawmakers must stop following industry’s playbook and take real action. The Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act, introduced in March, would phase out unnecessary single-use plastic products and prevent new and expanded plastic production facilities across the country. It’s up to U.S. leaders to reverse course and reduce the production and use of single-use plastic before it’s too late.

Christy Leavitt, Washington

The writer is plastics campaign director of Oceana.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/05/10/we-must-stop-producing-using-plastics/

Sunday funnies

bluebird of bitterness

An oldie but goodie.

❧ ❧ ❧ ❧ ❧

After Fr. Gregory’s beloved old tabby died, he adopted a kitten from the animal shelter and named her Frances. While chasing a squirrel one day, Frances ran up a tree, and then refused to come back down.

The tree wasn’t sturdy enough for a grown man to climb, and Fr. Greg didn’t have a ladder. After thinking it over, he had an idea. He took a piece of clothesline and tied one end to the tree and the other end to his car, thinking he would drive just far enough to bend the tree down to where he could reach Frances from the ground.

But just about the time the tree was bent far enough, the clothesline snapped, the tree sprang back, and Frances sailed up into the air and out of sight.

Fr. Greg searched everywhere for his kitten, without success. Finally he…

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Petition · Negligence killed our fur baby while in the care of a Rover​.​com approved pet sitter · Change.org

www.change.org

We dropped our dogs off for a long weekend boarding stay on Thursday, 5/5/22. We messaged the pet sitter thru the Rover app on Monday, 5/9/22 to let him know that we would be arriving at 11am to pick up our boys. No response. We arrived at 10:58am. No response upon arrival. He then came around the corner with one of our dogs on a leash, but not our lil’ guy Zukie/Mr. Magoo.

The pet sitter then claimed that our fur baby had gotten out 30 minutes earlier. He claims his father-in-law did not shut the gate. Our sweet boy had clearly been left outside unattended for him to access the gate. 

The pet sitter searched for about an hour with us. Then stopped. 

My husband and I continued searching into the night. Putting up flyers with a Reward. Going door to door. Posting all over social media. No luck. We resumed the search first thing the following morning. 

We then received the call that all pet parents dread, someone had seen him dead on the side of the road. I drove to the scene and collapsed by his side . His vest/ harness ripped, his tags removed. I held his little lifeless body and wept. I wrapped him in a blanket and drove to the nearest vet where we were told that severe head trauma caused his death. We said our final goodbye. 

He died alone.

Terrified. 

The pet sitter did not contact Rover.com to advise of his disappearance.

The pet sitter did not notify us when our fur baby went missing.

The pet sitter did not respond to my husband when he messaged him asking for the video footage from the cameras on the house.

The pet sitter showed no remorse.

Now, Rover.com…who claims that “pet safety is our priority” , “backed by the security of a nationwide company” , and “premium insurance helps create a fun, carefree stay”… had the audacity to call and inform us that they would be willing to “reimburse us for the boarding stay” and would cover the cost of our sweet boy’s cremation/remains, and provided “condolences “ while then strategically stating that the pet sitter is an independent contractor.

Help us get #JusticeForZukie …

1) Demand that Rover.com release the number of wrongful pet deaths that occur due to pet sitter negligence.
2)Demand that Rover.com PERMANENTLY remove the pet sitter whose neglect and incompetence killed our fur baby.
3) Demand that Rover.com be held accountable for negligent and intentional misrepresentation of services. 


Help us work to prevent another tragedy. 

Please sign and share. 

https://www.change.org/p/negligence-killed-our-fur-baby-while-in-the-care-of-a-rover-com-approved-pet-sitter?original_footer_petition_id=32020405&algorithm=promoted&source_location=petition_footer&grid_position=6&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAOFU%2FAEAAAAAYol3DwEVN%2FM4NTI5OTgzZg%3D%3D

Petition · U​.​S. Congress – Ban trophy hunting imports and end elephant slaughter. · Change.org


http://www.change.org
Sign the Petition

U.S. Congress – Ban trophy hunting imports and end elephant slaughter. Support the CECIL and Protect Acts

The Botswana government announced it will restart elephant hunts this year. A quota has been issued of 272 killings starting in April and will go through September during their dry season when the bush is thinner and elephants are easier to locate.

Foreign hunters will be allowed to kill 202 of the elephants and 70 will be reserved for local people. Most of the hunters that go to southern Africa are from the U.S. The average cost for a foreign trophy hunter the right to shoot an elephant is anywhere between $21,000-$60,000 or more.

Now is the time to pressure the U.S. government to take action to prevent the pending elephant slaughter.

Sign this petition asking our members of Congress to support two bills that are moving against trophy hunting elephants from Botswana and ask for lawmakers to defund trophy hunting import permits sold here in America:

CECIL Act H.R. 2245; Conserving Ecosystems by Ceasing the Importation of Large Animal Trophies
This will restrict the import and export of trophies of any species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
Protect Act, H.R. 4804; Prohibiting Threatened and Endangered Creature Trophies
Prohibit trophy hunting of ESA species in the US and import of any trophy of a species listed under the ESA.
Lastly there is an Appropriations Bill For Fiscal Year 2021

The appropriation bill is a spending bill that authorizes the expenditure of government funds. We would like to see language for the Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2021 to defund U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s trophy import permits of elephants from Botswana.

To help make a bigger impact, you can call your House of Representative asking him/her to support the Cecil and Protect Acts as well as the Appropriations Bills for Fiscal Year 2021. To find your House of Representative, go to http://www.house.gov

How did we get here?

One hundred years ago, the global elephant population was approximately 3-5 million. After decades of poaching and hunting, the current elephant population is estimated at 415,000. Elephants are critically endangered and protections for them in certain regions, like Botswana, has recently diminished.

In 2014, the government of Botswana put a trophy hunting ban in place. Due to this ban, elephants from bordering countries such as Namibia and Angola came to Botswana seeking refuge. Today, one third of the African elephant population reside in Botswana.

In 2019, the government made another decision to lift the hunting ban on elephants. Last year, there were 358 elephant hunting permits allotted and a further 386 elephants were poached. Such a large- scale loss of bull elephants in what was once their greatest refuge is unsustainable.

Elephant hunting only hurts us in the big scheme of life. In fact, since the elephant is a keystone species that actually supports ecosystems, their sheer existence helps to maintain biodiversity that supports the health of our planet. We actually benefit from the elephants’ presence without even realizing it.

Elephants contribute more to the ecosystem per capita than we do. Elephants are known as the Gardeners of the Forest. Elephants spread the seeds from the plants they have eaten which helps to disperse the plant life to other areas. This new plant life gives off oxygen for us to breathe. Elephants dig water holes in dry river beds that other animals use as a water source as well as creating trails that serve as fire breakers.

To take this one step further on how detrimental commercial elephant hunting and poaching is, we are currently in the world’s sixth mass extinction. The first 5 mass extinctions were all-natural phenomena. This current extinction is almost exclusively due to humans. Dozens of species are going extinct every day and it is predicted by 2050, 30-50% of all species will be extinct. Losing species at this rate will break down ecosystems that we rely on for the health of the planet. This is another reason why it is critical we help conserve and protect the elephants and all wildlife.

Elephants also help the local economies through eco-tourism. According to an article by All Africa research indicates eco-tourism is a $2 billion-dollar industry and reintroducing hunting contributes to only 1.9% of tourism.

Please sign and share this petition to help end trophy hunting and protect elephants and other incredible wildlife.


With heartfelt gratitude,

Nicole @WildForChange


Photo by James Hammond on Unsplash

https://www.change.org/p/u-s-house-of-representatives-u-s-congress-ban-trophy-hunting-imports-and-end-elephant-slaughter?recruiter=38083566&recruited_by_id=f8a0bdb0-3a74-0130-b144-3c764e048845&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=petition_dashboard

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Finally!!

What to Plant in Your Garden to Help Save the Bees

www.onegreenplanet.org

By Libby Baker

It ain’t easy being a bee these days.

With the introduction of genetically modified crops, stronger, more powerful, and prevalent pesticides, and a rapidly changing climate, bee colonies are quickly disappearing. According to the urban beekeeping organization, Honeylove, after WWII, there were 5 million honeybee colonies; today, there are approximately half that many.  

Bees are one of our most valuable pollinators, responsible for pollinating 80 percent of the world’s plants! That means 1 out of every four bites of food we eat is due to the hard work of bees. Without them, our food supply would be dramatically decreased, and life as we know it severely altered.

Additionally, the demand for honey has resulted in many commercial honey brands streamlining production by feeding bees a diet of corn syrup rather than wildflowers, which results in sick bees.

What can we do to help the bees? Plant a bee-friendly garden! Here are some pollen-plenty plants to make a bee’s job a little easier and maybe even save them too!

Native flowering plants

The most beneficial and easiest plants for your garden are always natives. Native plants can be found naturally in your particular region, so they are specially adapted to the local growing conditions, wildlife, and climate. Flowering natives with open blooms are the best for bees, and you can check with your local nursery to find the ideal plants for your region or websites such as The Native Plant Database, Plant Native, America’s Beauty, or Enature.

Heirloom plants

Old fashioned varieties of plants are tried and true. The hybridization of many flowers has created resilient and showy blooms, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that these plants are healthy for a garden ecosystem. Single blossom plants are easier for bees to access and tend to provide more nectar and pollen than their hybrid, double blossomed versions. Look for organic, heirloom flowers that your grandparents or great-grandparents might have planted in cottage gardens (when attracting enough pollinators might be the difference between a sustainable harvest and starving), like petunias, poppies, daisies, peonies, hollyhocks, delphiniums, geraniums, and old fashioned roses. Bees have an excellent color perception, so don’t be afraid to mix up your blooming color palate! They especially love blues, purples, whites, and yellows. Also, a variety of flower shapes in the garden will ensure that all of the 4,000 different species of bees in North America, with their different sizes and tongue lengths, have access to nectar.

Herbs

You can’t go wrong with herbs! Not only do bees adore them, but they are edible, help control invasive insect populations, smell nice, and look wonderful. Many herbs are self-seeding (especially if you get lots of bees in there mixing up that pollen), so make sure you plant them where you intend to keep them! Also, other herbs, such as mint and thyme, will spread like crazy, so grow them in containers, in well-edged gardens, or in large flower pots sunk under the soil level. Borage, catnip, dill, lemon balm, mint, lavender, sage, rosemary, basil, marjoram, and thyme are all popular with pollinators! Let a few of the herb plants bolt (go to flower) and plant among the vegetables in your garden to increase harvests.

Vegetables

Before becoming the produce we eat, many vegetables in the garden must flower first, attracting pollinators and ensuring a good harvest. Bees love the flowers from cucumbers, onions and chives, pumpkins, and other squash, as well as all types of melons. Broccoli, radish, and cauliflower blossoms are also a hit!

Fruit

Nearly every fruit tree will attract bees when flowering, but some types, like Royal Gala Apple and Cherry trees, produce an abundance of bee-friendly blooms. Peach and nectarine trees, as well as fragrant citrus, are also great options. Every fruit tree has different pollination requirements; some simply need pollen to be spread within their blossoms. Others need to be cross-pollinated (pollinated from other trees of the same or, as in the case of apples, different types of fruit species)! When it comes to fruit trees, the work of the bees is especially important. Shrubs like blackberry, blueberry, elderberry, and raspberry are also particularly attractive to pollinators.

There’s no doubt about it: modern-day bees have their work cut out for them, but we can help save them (and ourselves) by planting a bee-friendly garden!

“No living creature, not even man, has achieved, in the centre of his sphere, what the bee has achieved in her own: and were some one from another world to descend and ask of the earth the most perfect creation of the logic of life, we should needs have to offer the humble comb of honey.” – Maurice Maeterlinck, The Life Of The Bee, 1924

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https://www.onegreenplanet.org/lifestyle/what-to-plant-in-your-garden-to-help-save-the-bees/

World Bee Day!

FIREPAW, Inc.

World Bee Day is celebrated every year on May 20th.  The annual event takes place every year to raise awareness for the essential role bees and other pollinators play in our and the planet’s survival.  (World Bee Day first came about in 2017 after the United Nations adopted the celebration from the Slovenian Beekeepers Association.) Today, bees face threats from our industrialized way of life such as climate change, pesticides and lost habitats. Pollinators like bees are behind nearly all our crops worldwide, and so much of the food we eat such as fruit, vegetables and seeds, including crops eaten by livestock too. Without these intelligent creatures we would struggle to produce enough food to feed everyone, which is why it is so important we do all we can to protect them!

bees with gentle wings sipping water

What can you do to protect bees?

♥ Use only non-toxic weed-killer in your garden

♥ Mow your…

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