A reminder to check your cabinets for Jeff’s Peanut Butter Recall

Outbreak Investigation of Hepatitis A Virus: Strawberries (May 2022) | FDA

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Do not eat, serve, or sell imported FreshKampo or HEB brand organic strawberries purchased between 3/5/2022 – 4/15/2022. FDA’s investigation is ongoing.

The FDA, along with CDC, and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A infections in the United States linked to fresh organic strawberries. These potentially contaminated strawberries were imported from Baja California, a state in northern Mexico, and branded as FreshKampo and HEB by a common supplier; they were purchased between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022. The Public Health Agency of CanadaExternal Link Disclaimer and the Canadian Food Inspection AgencyExternal Link Disclaimer are also investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A. Imported FreshKampo brand fresh organic strawberries have been identified as the likely source of the outbreak in Canada. 

Currently, these imported fresh organic strawberries are past shelf life and are not available for purchase in stores. People who purchased these fresh organic strawberries between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022, and then froze those strawberries for later consumption, should not eat them. If you are unsure of what brand you purchased, when you purchased your strawberries, or where you purchased them from prior to freezing them, the strawberries should be thrown away.

The downstream product removal conducted by Urban Remedy and reported on June 10, 2022, is now considered a market withdrawal. It has been determined that the product was not made using implicated strawberries.

This investigation is ongoing and this advisory will be updated as more information becomes available.

Recommendation

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not sell, serve, or eat any fresh organic strawberries branded as FreshKampo or HEB if purchased between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022. People who purchased the fresh strawberries and then froze those strawberries for later consumption should not eat them. They should be thrown away. Currently, the potentially contaminated product is past its shelf life. If you are unsure of what brand you purchased, when you purchased your strawberries, or where you purchased them from prior to freezing them, the strawberries should be thrown away.

If consumers purchased fresh organic strawberries branded as FreshKampo or HEB between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022, ate those berries in the last two weeks, and have not been vaccinated against hepatitis A, they should immediately consult with their healthcare professional to determine whether post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is needed. PEP is recommended for unvaccinated people who have been exposed to hepatitis A virus in the last two weeks because vaccination can prevent a hepatitis A infection if given within 14 days of exposure. Those with evidence of previous hepatitis A vaccination or previous hepatitis A infection do not require PEP.

Contact your healthcare provider if you think you may have symptoms of a hepatitis A infection after eating these fresh organic strawberries, or if you believe that you have eaten these strawberries in the last two weeks.

Product Images

Outbreak Investigation of Hepatitis A Virus: Strawberries (May 2022) - Sample Product Images

Case Counts

Total U.S. Illnesses: 18 (including 1 probable case)
Hospitalizations: 13 (including 1 probable case)
Deaths: 0
Last illness onset: May 6, 2022
States with Cases: CA (16), MN (1), ND (1)
Product Distribution: Nationwide

Useful Links


Previous Update

June 10, 2022

The FDA, along with CDC, and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A infections in the United States linked to fresh organic strawberries. These potentially contaminated strawberries were imported from Baja California, a state in northern Mexico, and branded as FreshKampo and HEB by a common supplier; they were purchased between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022. The Public Health Agency of CanadaExternal Link Disclaimer and the Canadian Food Inspection AgencyExternal Link Disclaimer are also investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A. Imported fresh organic strawberries have been identified as the likely source of that outbreak.

As of June 7, 2022, CDC reports one additional probable case related to this outbreak. As part of this investigation, FDA has initiated an inspection. Additionally, based on records collected to date, purchase dates for potentially contaminated strawberries were between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022.

Currently, these imported fresh organic strawberries are past shelf life and are not available for purchase in stores. People who purchased these fresh organic strawberries between March 5, 2022, and April 15, 2022, and then froze those strawberries for later consumption, should not eat them. If you are unsure of what brand you purchased, when you purchased your strawberries, or where you purchased them from prior to freezing them, the strawberries should be thrown away.

Additionally, a downstream recall for Urban Remedy Organic Revitalizing Tea Tonic (Strawberry Hibiscus, LOT 1232 BEST BY 7/17/2022) has been voluntarily initiated. The company may have used strawberries linked to this outbreak in this product.

As this investigation is ongoing, additional products may be included. More information will be provided in this advisory as it becomes available.

June 1, 2022

The FDA, along with CDC, and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A infections in the United States linked to fresh organic strawberries. These potentially contaminated strawberries were imported from Baja California, a state in northern Mexico and branded as FreshKampo and HEB by a common supplier; they were purchased between March 5, 2022, and April 25, 2022. The Public Health Agency of CanadaExternal Link Disclaimer and the Canadian Food Inspection AgencyExternal Link Disclaimer are also investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A. Imported fresh organic strawberries have been identified as the likely source of that outbreak.

Currently, these fresh organic strawberries branded as FreshKampo and HEB products are past shelf life and are not available for purchase in stores. People who purchased FreshKampo and HEB fresh organic strawberries between March 5, 2022, and April 25, 2022, and then froze those strawberries for later consumption should not eat them. These products may have been sold at the following retailers, including, but not limited to:

  • HEB
  • Kroger
  • Safeway
  • Sprouts Farmers Market
  • Trader Joe’s
  • Walmart
  • Weis Markets
  • WinCo Foods

If you are unsure of what brand you purchased, when you purchased your strawberries, or where you purchased them from prior to freezing them, the strawberries should be thrown away.

Epidemiologic and traceback data show that fresh organic strawberries are a likely source of illness in this outbreak. Illness onset dates range from March 28 – April 30, 2022. Records from outbreak-associated cases in California and Minnesota show cases having purchased FreshKampo brand fresh organic strawberries prior to becoming ill. These purchases occurred between March 5, 2022, and April 25, 2022. The traceback investigation for these cases shows that the strawberries were imported from Baja California, Mexico by a common supplier. Strawberries that were identified in shipments purchased by cases were sold under both the FreshKampo and HEB brands.

As this investigation is ongoing, additional products may be included. More information will be provided in this advisory as it becomes available.

May 31, 2022

The FDA, along with CDC, and state and local partners are investigating a multistate outbreak of hepatitis Ainfections in the United States potentially linked to fresh organic strawberries branded as FreshKampo and HEB, purchased between March 5, 2022, and April 25, 2022. The Public Health Agency of CanadaExternal Link Disclaimer and the Canadian Food Inspection AgencyExternal Link Disclaimer are also investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A; imported fresh organic strawberries have been identified as the likely source of that outbreak.

Currently, the potentially contaminated FreshKampo and HEB products are past shelf life. People who purchased FreshKampo and HEB fresh organic strawberries between March 5, 2022, and April 25, 2022, and then froze those strawberries for later consumption should not eat them.

These products may have been sold at the following retailers, including, but not limited to:

  • HEB
  • Kroger
  • Safeway
  • Sprouts Farmers Market
  • Trader Joe’s
  • Walmart
  • Weis Markets
  • WinCo Foods

If you are unsure of what brand you purchased, when you purchased your strawberries, or where you purchased them from prior to freezing them, the strawberries should be thrown away.

Epidemiologic and traceback data show that fresh organic strawberries sold under brands that include FreshKampo and HEB brands and were purchased between March 5, 2022, and April 25, 2022, are a likely cause of illness in this outbreak. The traceback investigations show that outbreak-associated cases in California and Minnesota report having purchased fresh organic strawberries prior to becoming ill. Illness onset dates range from March 28 – April 30, 2022.

As this investigation is ongoing, additional products may be included. More information will be provided in this advisory as it becomes available.


Who to Contact

Consumers who have symptoms should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care.

To report a complaint or adverse event (illness or serious allergic reaction), you can

External Link Disclaimer

  • Content current as of:06/23/2022
  • Regulated Product(s)

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Contact Number 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332)

https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-hepatitis-virus-strawberries-may-2022?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

Freshpet Dog Food Recall of June 2022 | DogFoodAdvisor

Freshpet Dog Food Recall June 2022

June 18, 2022 — Freshpet Inc. is recalling a single lot of Freshpet Select dog food due to potential contamination with Salmonella bacteria.

What’s Being Recalled?

Details for the recalled product are listed below.

The Sell by date, along with the UPC code, can be found on the bottom and back of each bag.

Batch Information

  • Freshpet Select Fresh From the Kitchen Home Cooked Chicken Recipe
    Package size: 4.5 pound bag
    Sell by date: 10/29/22 L3
    Retail UPC code: 627975011673
    Lot code: 10/29/22

About Salmonella

Salmonella can affect animals eating the product and there is risk to humans, notably children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised, when handling contaminated products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fever.

Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare provider.

Salmonella and Dogs

Dogs with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some dogs will have only decreased appetite, fever, and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy dogs can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your dog has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

About the Recall

According to the company…

Our Freshpet Team had designated this single lot for destruction, but a small portion of the lot was inadvertently shipped to retailers in limited geographic markets in the last two weeks.

No other Freshpet products or lot codes are impacted by this recall.

To date, Freshpet has received no reports of illness, injury, or adverse reaction.

Where Was the Product Sold?

The single lot may have sold at limited Walmart stores in Alabama and Georgia. And at limited Target stores and other select retailers in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia.

What to Do?

If pet parents have products matching the following description and sell by date in their possession, they should stop feeding it to their dogs and dispose of it immediately.

Please call the company if you have any of the recalled product: Freshpet Select Fresh From the Kitchen Home Cooked Chicken Recipe (4.5 lb. bag) with Sell by Date 10/29/22.

The Sell by date, along with the UPC code, can be found on the bottom and back of each bag.

Pet parents who have questions or would like to report adverse reactions should call Freshpet at 800-285-0563 Monday through Friday, 9 am to 9 pm (ET) and Saturday through Sunday 9 am to 1 pm (ET).

Or visit https://freshpet.co/JUNE22.

This recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Reporting Pet Food Problems

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

Get Lifesaving Recall Alerts

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Dog Food Advisor’s emergency recall warning system.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/freshpet-june-2022/

“FDA Recalls Strawberries Linked to Hepatitis A Outbreak: What to Know”

Full Frame of Texture close up of strawberrys

Strawberries Linked to Hepatitis A Outbreak Recalled From Walmart, Trader Joe’s, and Other Stores

It has caused 12 hospitalizations so far.

May 31, 2022

By

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A infections that may be linked to organic strawberries sold at popular grocery chains like Walmart, Trader Joe’s, and Safeway. They were labeled as FreshKampo or HEB strawberries, and, while they are past shelf life, they should be thrown away if they’ve been frozen for later consumption, according to a statement from the FDA.

The affected strawberries that may be causing hepatitis A, a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus, were sold between March 5 and April 25, the statement said; the most recent illness connected to the outbreak began April 30. Restaurants and retailers should throw out FreshKampo and HEB strawberries purchased between March 5 and April 25, per the statement. There have been 15 cases in California, one in Minnesota, and one in North Dakota, and infections have also been reported in Canada. No deaths have been reported, though the outbreak has caused 12 hospitalizations.

The strawberries haven’t been definitively established as the cause of the outbreak, but the FDA’s statement said they are the “likely cause of illness.” Traceback data show that people with infections in California, Minnesota, and Canada had purchased the strawberries prior to illness. In addition to Walmart, Trader Joe’s, and Safeway, the following retailers sold the strawberries: Kroger, HEB, Sprouts Farmers Market, Aldi, Weis Markets, and WinCo Foods. If you have strawberries in your home and you don’t know what brand they are and where they were purchased, you should throw them away, the FDA statement said.

Hepatitis A is spread when a person comes in contact with an infected individual’s stool, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). This can occur when a person eats food prepared by an infected person who didn’t wash their hands after using the bathroom, for instance, or eats foods rinsed with contaminated water. Illness caused by hepatitis A usually occurs anywhere from 15 to 50 days after coming into contact with contaminated foods, according to the FDA. Anyone who has eaten either FreshKampo or HEB organic strawberries and develops symptoms of hepatitis A should contact a health care provider. Symptoms include nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, fatigue, jaundice, pale stool, and dark urine, per the FDA, which states that sometimes hepatitis A infections are asymptomatic, particularly in children. There is no treatment for hepatitis A, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); infected people are advised to rest and stay hydrated, per NLM, which adds that health care providers may suggest certain medications to relieve symptoms of a hepatitis A infection. In severe cases, infected people may require hospitalization.

Everyone is susceptible to a hepatitis A infection, though people who have received the hepatitis A vaccine or have been previously infected do have strong immunity, according to the FDA. The CDC recommends two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine (given six months apart) for all children once they turn one.

Anyone who ate the affected strawberries during the last two weeks and hasn’t received the vaccine should speak with a health care provider to determine the best course of action, per the FDA.

Related:

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Food Safety Tips

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella: Peanut Butter (May 2022) | FDA

An official website of the United States government

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA provides steps for consumers; Do not eat, serve, or sell recalled Jif peanut butter

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infections linked to certain Jif peanut butter products produced at the J.M. Smucker Company facility in Lexington, Kentucky.  

CDC’s review of epidemiological information indicates that five out of five people reported consuming peanut butter and four of the five people specifically reported consuming different varieties of Jif brand peanut butter prior to becoming ill. FDA conducted Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis on an environmental sample collected at the Lexington, KY, J.M. Smucker Company facility in 2010. The analysis shows that this 2010 environmental sample matches the strain causing illnesses in this current outbreak. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Jif brand peanut butter produced in the J.M. Smucker Company facility located in Lexington, KY, is the likely cause of illnesses in this outbreak.

J.M. Smucker Company has voluntarily recalled certain Jif brand peanut butter products that have the lot code numbers between 1274425 – 2140425, only if the first seven digits end with 425 (manufactured in Lexington, KY). Photo examples are included below.

FDA’s investigation is ongoing and more information will be provided as it becomes available.

Recommendation

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve any recalled Jif brand peanut butter.

For Consumers

Follow these steps:

  1. Check if you have Jif peanut butter in your home.
  2. Locate the lot code on the back of the jar, under the Best If Used By Date (the lot code may be next to the Best If Used By Date for cups or squeeze pouches).
  3. In the lot code, if the first four digits are between 1274 and 2140, and if the next three numbers after that are ‘425’, this product has been recalled and you should not consume this product. An example is below.

If you are unsure what to do with your recalled product, you can call or email J.M. Smucker Company for more information:

The J.M. Smucker Co. Hotline: 800-828-9980
Website: jif.com/contact-usExternal Link Disclaimer

FDA recommends that if you have used the recalled Jif brand peanut butter that have lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425 and the first seven digits end with 425, you should wash and sanitize surfaces and utensils that could have touched the peanut butter. If you or someone in your household ate this peanut butter and have symptoms of salmonellosis, please contact your healthcare provider.

For Retailers, Re-packers, and Manufacturers

In addition to the steps above, FDA recommends referring to the firm’s recall press for the UPC codes and other retailer information. Do not sell or serve recalled peanut butter or products containing recalled peanut butter.

Product Images

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - Sample Recalled Product Label
Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - Sample Label

Case Count Map Provided by CDC

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - CDC Case Count Map as of May 20, 2022

Case Counts

Total Illnesses: 14
Hospitalizations: 2
Deaths: 0
Last Illness Onset: May 1, 2022
States with Cases: AR (1), GA (2), IL (1), MA (1), MO (1), OH (1), NC (1), NY (1), SC (1), TX (2), VA (1), WA (1)
Product Distribution*: Nationwide
*Distribution has been confirmed for states listed, but product could have been distributed further, reaching additional states

Useful Links

Who to Contact

Consumers who have symptoms should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care.

To report a complaint or adverse event (illness or serious allergic reaction), you can

External Link Disclaimer

  • Content current as of:05/23/2022
  • Regulated Product(s)Topic(s)

Get Email Notifications on Outbreak Investigations

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FDA Homepage

Contact Number 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332)

https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-peanut-butter-may-2022

Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella

<img src="https://local21news.com/resources/media2/16×9/full/1015/center/80/61929329-6684-4c0a-8b93-1fddfc7af2f4-large16x9_IMG_6996.JPG" alt="Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella (WSET)

local21news.com

KELSEY CHILDRESS | WSET Staff

Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella (WSET)<p>{/p}

LYNCHBURG, Virginia (WSET) – There’s been peanut butter pandemonium after J.M. Smucker Company – the manufacturer who makes Jif – earlier this month recalled some batches for possible salmonella contamination.

Many stores have already wiped their shelves clean of Jif jars – but it may have been too late for some, like the Nichols family in Virginia. Ashley Nichols said her husband has gotten salmonella.

“I was just like: I bet you that’s why he’s sick,” Ashley said.

Ashley picked up her usual Jif peanut butter at Sam’s Club on May 4. Nearly two weeks later, her husband started getting sick.

Salmonella can cause diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps. In some cases, it can lead to life-threatening complications.

“Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. He’s cold and clammy. Like, he’s sweating, but he’s cold,” Nichols said.

At first, she just thought it was a reaction to some antibiotics he was taking. But now she thinks tainted peanut butter is behind it.

Peanut butter panic: Virginia woman says recalled Jif gave her husband salmonella (WSET)

“Saturday, I think, is when I saw the recall, and that’s when I put it all together,” Nichols said.

Nichols posted on Facebook to see if others in the area were also sick from the Jif jars. Dozens responded, saying they got sick from a recalled jar, while others said they got lucky.

Click here to learn more about the recall and see if your pantry has been affected.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/peanut-butter-panic-virginia-woman-says-recalled-jif-gave-her-husband-salmonella-lynchburg-virginia-ashley-nichols-fda-potential-contamination-symptoms-diarrhea-fever-stomach-cramps

“Important Information About Baby Formula Shortage Crisis”

Recall issued on varieties of candies, including Skittles, Starburst, Life Savers

local21news.com

WKRC Staff

FILE – This Wednesday, June 1, 2016, photo shows Skittles, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

UNDATED (WKRC) — Mars Wrigley US and Canada issued a recall of several gummy candies Friday after discovering a thin metal strand may be inside the candies or loose in the bag.

The recall includes several varieties of Skittle Gummies, Starburst Gummies and Life Saver gummies. There have been no reported injuries caused by the metal strands, but the company is urging customers not to consume the products.

The gummies were sold in the United States, Mexico and Canada.

The company did not say how many units were affected but did say that a third party manufactured the products.

Customers are encouraged to look on the back of the packet of these items and see if the first three numbers correspond with the recalled items. If they are included on the recall, customers should throw the candy away and contact the company with any questions by calling 1-800-651-2564 or by visiting www.mars.com/contact-us.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/recall-issued-on-varieties-of-candies-including-skittles-starburst-life-savers-consumers-customers-retailer-food-candy-customer-discard-throw-away-manufactured-product-metal-strands-detected

More than half a million pounds of precooked chicken recalled

www.foxbusiness.com

Paul Best

Alabama-based Wayne Farms is recalling more than half a million pounds of ready-to-eat chicken that may be undercooked, the Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced this weekend. 

The FSIS originally announced a recall of about 30,000 pounds of the precooked chicken breasts last week after a customer complained that the product appeared to be undercooked, but expanded the recall to 585,030 pounds on Saturday. 

No adverse reactions have been reported. 

chicken recall

About 580,000 pounds of these precooked chicken breasts were recalled.  (Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service / Fox News)

OVER 120K POUNDS OF BEEF RECALLED DUE TO POSSIBLE E. COLI CONTAMINATION

The affected chicken breasts were produced between Feb. 9 and April 30 of this year and have production codes of 23618, 24357, 24512, 24583 and 24957. They were shipped to distributors nationwide and are at retail locations in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, according to the FSIS. 

chicken

About 4% of all packages of chicken in the United States have salmonella, according to the CDC.  (Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service / Fox News)

About one million people get food poisoning from eating contaminated poultry in the United States every year and salmonella is the most common type of bacteria, according to the CDC. About one in 25 packages of chicken have salmonella, according to a 2018 CDC report. Still, investigators did not indicate whether any Wayne Farms chicken connected to this recall had salmonella.

Wayne Farms did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday. 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This report has been updated to clarify the nature of the recall.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/more-than-half-a-million-pounds-precooked-chicken-recalled-over-salmonella-concerns

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream recalls 2K pints due to undeclared tree nuts

www.foxbusiness.com

Stephen Sorace

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream has recalled more than 2,000 pints of ice cream after learning the product may contain undeclared tree nuts, the company announced Tuesday.

The recall effects 2,185 frozen 14-ounce pints of its non-dairy frozen dessert product “Oat Milk Brown Sugar Chunk,” which are distributed nationally in retail stores, the Brooklyn, N.Y.-based ice cream makers said in a written announcement on the FDA’s website.

“The recall was voluntarily initiated after it was discovered due to a customer complaint, who experienced a reaction, that the lot contains the undeclared tree nuts and was distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of the allergen,” the company said.

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream is voluntarily recalling 2,185 frozen 14-ounce pints of its “Oat Milk Brown Sugar Chunk” ice cream after customers reported the product may contain undeclared tree nuts. (Van Leeuwen Ice Cream)

Individuals allergic or with a severe sensitivity to tree nuts risk a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The recalled product comes in a 14-ounce white package with orange lettering and an orange lid. It is marked with lot #21V194 and a best by date of 1/13/2023, which are both displayed on the bottom of the pint. 

The recall does not apply to any other lot marking, best by date, or varieties of Van Leeuwen Ice Cream products, the company said.

An investigation into the cause of the contamination is ongoing.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/van-leeuwen-ice-cream-recalls-pints-undeclared-tree-nuts

FDA Warns Pet Treats Maker Due to Safety and Sanitary Violations

www.dogfoodadvisor.com

HomeDog Food Recalls › FDA Warns Pet Treats Maker Due to Safety and Sanitary Violations Example Pet Center Product

Important — This Is Not a Recall

April 19, 2022 — The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) posted a Warning Letter to Pet Center, Inc., of Los Angeles, California. The letter was originally issued to the pet treats maker on February 28, 2022 but not made public by the FDA until April 19, 2022.

Pet Center produces a sizeable number of dog treats, including Bully Sticks (bull pizzles), Chicken Breast Tenders and multiple flavors of SuperChews.

Editor’s Note

The FDA did not provide a list of the more than 100 pet treats made by Pet Center, Inc. A complete catalog can be found on the company’s website.

Some readers have reported technical problems when attempting to access the Pet Center website. You may need to try again later.

What Caused the FDA Warning?

The inspections were conducted on various dates in 2021 and revealed violations of the FDA’s Current Good Manufacturing Practice requirements for animal food, which caused the maker’s products to be adulterated.

Partial List of FDA Inspector Details

FDA Investigators noted evidence of significant violations of its Current Good Manufacturing Practice requirements. A limited sampling of the inspector’s observations includes the following:

Flies were present throughout the facility and were landing on raw, in-process bull pizzles and chicken.”


“…an employee used a high-pressure hose in a manner that caused blood and raw animal tissue present on the processing floor to splash onto cooked, work-in-process SuperChews that had been removed from the ovens to cool.”


Animal feces in the meat washing room, approximately five feet from an open screen door.”


“You did not take effective measures to exclude pests from the manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding areas and to protect against contamination of animal food by pests…”


“Plastic clamps used to clamp bull pizzles to dry them into a curled shape were covered in dark brown to green filth material.”


Full FDA Warning Letter

The warning letter continues by documenting additional violations.

View the full FDA Warning Letter here.

Reporting Pet Food Problems

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

Get Lifesaving Recall Alerts

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Dog Food Advisor’s emergency recall warning system.


https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/fda-warns-pet-center/

“Tucker Carlson Exposes Strange Series of Explosions At American Food Processing Plants”

Kinder Chocolates Recalled in U.S. After Salmonella Outbreak in Europe

Three Kinder Surprise eggs

April 8, 2022

By

Certain Kinder Chocolates Have Been Recalled Due to Salmonella Concerns

134 cases have been reported in Europe—here’s how that might affect the U.S.

Ferrero has voluntarily recalled some of its Kinder chocolates in the U.S. due to potential salmonella contamination, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on Thursday. Both the Kinder Happy Moments Milk Chocolate and Crispy Wafers Assortment and Kinder Mix Chocolate Treats Basket are being removed from shelves because the Belgian plant in which they were produced experienced a salmonella outbreak. 

Earlier this week, various Kinder chocolate products were recalled in several countries, including the United Kingdom, Ireland, Germany, Luxembourg, Sweden, and Denmark. As of April 5, 2022, 134 salmonella cases have been reported in Europe, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. The first case was reported in the United Kingdom in early January 2022, with Ferrero initially identifying the outbreak in mid-December 2021. “While there are no reports of illness in the United States to date, Ferrero is voluntarily recalling the products out of an abundance of caution due to reported cases of salmonella in people that consumed products in Europe that were manufactured at the same facility,” the FDA said in a statement.  

Salmonella bacteria is estimated to cause about 1.35 million infections (and 26,500 hospitalizations) in the U.S. every year, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For most of these cases, contaminated food is the underlying cause of the illness. Usually, people who have been infected with salmonella experience symptoms like diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps, headache, nausea, and loss of appetite, which might develop between six hours to six days after infection. Most people will recover from salmonella within a few days to a week and will not need any medical attention or treatment—it’s just important to keep fluid intake high because symptoms like diarrhea and fever can be dehydrating. In rare cases—especially for infants, people aged 65 and older, or those who have weakened immune systems—life-threatening complications can develop if the salmonella spreads beyond the G.I. tract. 

Related: FDA Links Raw Oysters to Norovirus Outbreak in at Least 13 States

Ferrero announced on Friday that it is suspending its operations in its Belgian plant “with immediate effect.” The Belgian plant, located in the city of Arlon, is responsible for producing around 7% of Kinder products each year. According to Ferrero, the salmonella outbreak was the result of a filter at an outlet from two raw material tanks. “We deeply regret this matter. We want to sincerely apologize to all our consumers and business partners and thank the food safety authorities for their valuable guidance,” the Italian confectionery company said in a statement. While the affected filters have been extracted, the plant will only continue production once relevant investigations have been carried out and officials deem it safe to do so.

If you’re concerned about whether you have purchased the potentially contaminated chocolates, here are the details for each one:

Kinder Happy Moments Milk Chocolate and Crispy Wafers Assortment

  • Size and packaging: 14.1 oz (400 g) square box with lid
  • Best by date: July 18, 2022 (back panel)
  • Lot codes: 48RUP334; 48RUP335; 48RUP336; 48RUP337 (back panel)
  • UPC code: 09800 52025 (right side panel)
  • Place of purchase: Costco in the Bay Area and Northern Nevada and BJ’s Wholesale Club stores

Kinder Mix Chocolate Treats Basket

  • Size and packaging: 5.3 oz (152 g) cardboard basket
  • Best by date: July 30, 2022 (bottom of package)
  • Lot codes: 03L 018AR – 306 (bottom of package)
  • UPC code: 09800 60209 (bottom of package)
  • Place of purchase: 14 Big Y Supermarket locations in Connecticut and Massachusetts

Ferrero advises that you do not eat the chocolates if they meet this description. To receive a refund, you can call the Ferrero customer service line at 1-800-688-3552 (Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. E.T.) or fill out an online form

Topicsnewsrecallssalmonellafoodborne illness

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These fruits and vegetables are packed with the most pesticides, 2022 ‘Dirty Dozen’ list reports

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Saleen Martin, USA TODAY

What are the filthiest fruits and vegetables at the grocery store? Strawberries, spinach and kale, according to a new report.  

Thursday, nonprofit advocacy organization Environmental Working Group released its annual “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen” lists using data from the Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration. View | 12 Photos

The Washington, D.C., group found that more than 90% of strawberry, apple, cherry, spinach, nectarine and grape samples tested positive for residues of two or more pesticides. Kale, collard and mustard greens, hot peppers and bell peppers had the most pesticides. A single sample of kale, collard and mustard greens had up to 21 different pesticides.

Strawberries and leafy greens have been repeat offenders at the top of the list, ranking high in the past two years. Bell and hot peppers tested higher for pesticide residue this year, moving up from No. 10 last year to No. 7 this year.

The produce with the least amount of pesticides? Avocados, sweet corn and pineapple topped the group’s “Clean Fifteen.”

Take a look at this year’s lists below.

‘Dirty Dozen’ for 2022

  1. Strawberries
  2. Spinach
  3. Kale, collard and mustard greens
  4. Nectarines
  5. Apples
  6. Grapes
  7. Bell and hot peppers
  8. Cherries
  9. Peaches
  10. Pears
  11. Celery
  12. Tomatoes

‘Clean Fifteen’ for 2022

  1. Avocados
  2. Sweet corn
  3. Pineapple
  4. Onions
  5. Papaya
  6. Sweet peas (frozen)
  7. Asparagus
  8. Honeydew melon
  9. Kiwi
  10. Cabbage
  11. Mushrooms
  12. Cantaloupe
  13. Mangoes
  14. Watermelon
  15. Sweet Potatoes

This year’s data includes results from nearly 45,000 samples of produce from 2020.

Pesticides have been linked to multiple health issues, including brain development. Their impacts on fertility issues have the strongest data, said Alexis Temkin, an Environmental Working Group toxicologist.

“There’s still, I think, a lot of unknown impacts,” Temkin said. “If you’re reducing the exposure in the first place, then the likelihood of adverse health effects occurring is going to be much less.”

Like the customers who rely on store-bought produce, USDA researchers scrubbed and peeled the fruits and veggies before testing them. Experts say the best way to wash produce is by washing it with just cold water. Pesticide residue was still found on over 70% of the non-organic produce tested. Nearly all of the levels fell under the legal limits allowed by government regulations, Environmental Working Group said.

Teresa Thorne, executive director of the Alliance for Food and Farming, a nonprofit that represents organic and conventional farmers, says Environmental Working Group’s lists concern her.

First, she said, peer-reviewed research has shown that it’s scientifically unsupportable, especially the claim that eating organic foods versus conventionally grown foods will result in lower pesticide exposure.

“Residues on conventional-grown are already so minute if they’re present at all,” she said. “The second thing is is that this list has been shown again through peer-reviewed research to negatively impact consumers. When low-income consumers were exposed to this list and some of the messaging in the Dirty Dozen list, they stated they were less likely to purchase any produce, organic or conventional.”

She said Environmental Working Group’s goal to help families access fruits and vegetables with less pesticide exposure was achieved long ago.

According to Thorne, 99.8% of the fruits and vegetables tested by the USDA under the Pesticide Data Program are well below the Environmental Protection Agency’s safety levels. A third have no detectable residues at all.

“We have 13 million children living in food-insecure households right now. To scare people away from conventional-grown, which is the more affordable and accessible fruits and vegetables in today’s environment, really needs to be better thought through.”

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Walmart Is Recalling Over 25,500 Bags of These Chips

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By Amanda McDonald

Update: Walmart informed  Eat This, Not That! on March 11 that the product never made it to stores. “The supplier made us aware of the potential product issue on February 22. Impacted products were stopped at Distribution Centers and never shipped to stores. The supplier retrieved the product and it is our understanding they destroyed all impacted products,” a spokesperson said. 

Therefore the recall is not a danger to consumers.

More than 2,500 cases of tortilla chips sold at Walmart are being recalled because they could be contaminated with a foreign material.

Walmart Great Value Restaurant Style White Corn Tortilla Chips

The 13-ounce bags of Great Value Restaurant Style White Corn Tortilla Chips may contain metal, according to a notification sent by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The chips were sold at Walmart stores in Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

RELATED: 6 Things You’ll See at Costco This Year

This initiative has been classified as a Class II recall by the FDA. That means it’s “a situation in which use of or exposure to a violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is remote.”Courtesy of Walmart

Because Shearer’s Foods initiated the recall late February, the chips are unlikely to be on Walmart shelves—but they may still be lurking inside your pantry. The recalled items have a lot code of 112051## or 123051## and a “Best By” date of May 23, 2022.

No other information, such as if there had been any injuries or illnesses related to the recall or how it was discovered, were provided. Eat This, Not That! has reached out to Walmart for more details.

This isn’t the only food recall that you should be aware of before your next shopping trip. These Grocery Products Are Being Pulled From Shelves in 15 States.

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These Grocery Products Are Being Pulled From Shelves in 15 States

www.eatthis.com

By Amanda McDonald

With thousands of items in each grocery store, it can be hard to keep track of every single item, especially when there are safety concerns that arise for some of them. Luckily, the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regularly post details about items that are being pulled from grocery store shelves because they have been recalled.

However, these items could still be in your kitchen. Right now, there are several new recalls that have just been announced for items sold in stores across 15 states. Keep reading for the full details on these problematic foods to make sure they’re not in your own pantry. And for more grocery news, here are 6 Things You’ll See at Costco This Year.Courtesy of the FDA

Sprouts Farmers Market Chocolate Cherries

The dark chocolate-covered cherries sold at Sprouts Farmers Market locations in six states are being recalled because the packages may contain dark chocolate-covered almonds. If someone who has an allergy or sensitivity to this tree nut eats the cherries, they run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction.

“The recall was initiated after it was discovered that product containing Dark Chocolate Covered Cherries was mixed with Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds in the bag,” the recall announcement posted by the FDA on March 4 states. “Subsequent investigation indicates that some Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds were used for Dark Chocolate Covered Cherries by Production personnel.”

No illnesses or reactions related to the recalled cherries have been reported, but if you shopped at a Sprouts Farmers Marker in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, or Utah recently, check your kitchen for these snacks ASAP. They have an item number of 638-011, a UPC Code of 6 46670 46342 6, and a “Sell By Date” of 07/24/2022.

coffee crumb cake pastry

Assorted flavors of coffee cake and paczkis made by Chicago Sweet Connection Baker and sold at retailers in Illinois and Wisconsin are also bring pulled from stores because they could contain egg, milk, and wheat which were not declared on the product label.

The bakery items have a brand name of Chicago Sweet Connection Bakery and were produced between Feb. 21 and 23, 2022, with expiration dates either Feb. 26 or 28. The recall was sent out “after it was discovered that the allergen statement was not correctly printing on labels due to a computer error,” the company says in the recall notice. The allergens were not listed because the label was being cut off during printing. The issue has since been resolved.

Flavors of the Paczki—a fried dough pastry filled with sweet fillings—include apple, apricot, blueberry, chocolate custard, strawberry, pineapple, and more. Coffee cake flavors include custard, caramel, pecan, chocolate chip, and more. For a full list of all affected varieties, click here.

The Paczkis were sold in packs of 4 in a plastic clamshell container, and the coffee cakes were sold in single packs with an aluminum rectangular tray and a plastic dome lid. Anyone with any of these recalled pastries in their home is instructed that they can notify the company via phone at 773-283-4430.Courtesy of the FSIS

Beef Jerky Recall

Boyd Specialties is recalling over 1,600 pounds of ready-to-eat jerky products because they may contain Listeria, according to a recall notice from the FSIS. The problem was discovered by the organization after a routine product sample tested positive for the harmful bacteria.

The products and flavors of the recalled jerky include garlic pepper, straight whiskey, carne asada, mango habanero, Carolina reaper, cracked black pepper, and several more. You can view the full list here.  They were shipped to retail locations in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

No reports of an illness related to this issue are known, but consuming food contaminated with Listeria can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, loss of balance, and more. It is especially harmful in older adults, those with a weakened immune system, pregnant women, and newborns. Symptoms can arise as late as two months after consumption.Shutterstock

Should any of these three items be in your kitchen, throw them out or return them to the place of purchase immediately. After they are gone, clean any area the food touched using this two-step cleaning and sanitizing process, recommended by a registered dietitian.

Senior aged woman baking in home kitchen.

For more on keeping your food safe, here are The Basic Food Safety Tips Home Cooks Need to Know.

https://www.eatthis.com/news-grocery-recall-march-2022/

How Heinz uses a fake number to keep its brand timeless

www.cnn.com

New York CNN Business —  

Nathaniel Meyersohn

Heinz has been linked to the number 57 for more than a century. The company’s “57 varieties” slogan was a key part of its early strategy to attract consumers. It’s still featured on Heinz ketchup bottles today and is central to the brand’s identity.

But that famous number is completely made up.

There weren’t 57 Heinz varieties when Pittsburgh business magnate H.J. Heinz first invented the slogan in 1896. Nor when Heinz 57 sauce was introduced soon after. There aren’t 57 now. There are, in fact, hundreds of Heinz varieties.

The 57 on a Heinz bottle is more than just the right spot to smack to make the ketchup ooze out at .028 miles per hour. That number has stuck around for 126 years because it reinforces Heinz as a nostalgic and distinctly American food brand — the condiment you put on your hot dog at a baseball game or on a burger at a summer barbeque, marketing experts say.

In the early 1890s, H.J. Heinz, once described by a biographer as a “marketing genius,” sold bottled horseradish, pickles, pepper sauce, ketchup — introduced by the company in 1876 spelled “catsup” and soon changed to “ketchup” to distinguish the product — among some 60 food items. Pickles were Heinz’s biggest success at the time, and he became known as the “pickle king.”

Visiting New York City in 1896, Heinz spotted an advertisement for “21 styles” of shoes. He found it memorable and thought attaching a number to his own brand would help it stick with consumers.

There are varying theories on why he landed on 57.

Ashleigh Gibson, Heinz’s brand director, said in an email that the company’s founder felt there was something “mystical, magical, and memorable” about the number 57, which was a combination of five, his lucky number, and seven, his wife’s lucky number.

But Heinz’s personal secretary, who wrote an early biography of his boss, said that when Heinz was counting up the number of varieties the company sold in 1896, the number seven jumped out at him.

“Seven, seven —there are so many illustrations of the psychological influences of that figure and of its alluring significance to people of all ages and races,” Heinz said, according to the biography. “58 Varieties or 59 Varieties did not appeal at all to me as being equally strong.”

Within a week of seeing the shoe ad, the “57 varieties’” slogan was appearing in newspapers and on billboards, Heinz wrote in his diary. The company carved 57 on hillsides for train passengers to see and “57 Good Things For The Table” was featured on the first electric billboard in New York City in 1900. The sign stood six stories high, had 1,200 fluorescent light bulbs and included a 43-foot-long flashing Heinz pickle, according to the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation.

“I myself did not realize how highly successful a slogan it was going to be,” Heinz said.

Today, “57 varieties” is slapped high on the neck of Heinz’s octagon-shaped glass tomato ketchup bottles. In the center, “57 varieties” is printed in small gold lettering above a hanging tomato vine on the keystone-shaped label modeled after Heinz’s home state. 57 is also featured on Heinz’s baked beans, mustard, mayonnaise and cream of tomato soup.

The slogan is used as a branding device to convey a “sense of timelessness and authenticity” to consumers, Kelly Haws, a marketing professor who studies consumer choices about food at Vanderbilt University, said in an email.

Gibson said the slogan has become “a brand asset,” similar to the company’s logo, keystone and glass bottle design, reminding consumers of Heinz’ history.

Heinz and its association with 57 have also served as minor footnotes in US history.

When Joe DiMaggio’s record hit streak ended at 56 games in 1941, the Yankees star reportedly told a teammate that he missed out on $10,000 promised to him by Heinz if he matched its label.

According to “Demagogue,” a 2020 biography of Sen. Joe McCarthy, McCarthy once told a reporter “probably in jest” that when he alleged he had a list of 57 names of communists working in the State Department, he came up with the number from a bottle of Heinz ketchup. It’s even is a plot point in the 1962 film “The Manchurian Candidate.”

Then there’s the Heinz 57 sauce for steak, chicken and pork, which was memorialized by Jimmy Buffet’s “Cheeseburger in Paradise”: “I like mine with lettuce and tomato, Heinz 57 and French fried potatoes.”

Noel Geoffrey, who led the Heinz ketchup division from 2008 to 2011, said 57 was “like a good luck charm” at the company. The telephone number for the main switchboard at its previous headquarters — the Heinz 57 Center— was, of course, 57. In 2001, the company paid the Pittsburgh Steelers $57 million over 20 years for naming rights to the stadium.

“It was everywhere,” Geoffrey said, “and part of the DNA of the company.”

It may seem commonplace today, but the idea of “57 varieties” was a significant innovation in food marketing at the time. In the late 19th century, packaged and processed foods were a new concept to the public.

“The big shift was to try to create a consumer population for pre-packaged food,” said Rita McGrath, a professor at Columbia Business School who has studied the rise of major food brands. “Before then, food wasn’t marketed.”

H.J. Heinz also had to convince consumers that his products were safe during an era before food was regulated. One way he tried to convey quality was to sell his goods in glass jars, so customers could see what was inside.

His choice of the word “variety” was another attempt to signal that Heinz was experienced in a range of products, suggesting to customers they could trust the brand.

“Variety has always been a thing Americans love,” said Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific. “They want choice. Even if it’s flavors of the same thing.”

By the beginning of the 20th century, Heinz was America’s largest ketchup manufacturer. The brand accounted for roughly 70% of the ketchup market last year, according to Euromonitor data. Hunt’s, its closet competitor, had 8%.

The famous number has stuck around through more than a century of different advertising campaigns and changes to Heinz packaging.

It also survived different corporate owners. In 2013, Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway (BRKA) and Brazilian private equity firm 3G Capital bought H.J. Heinz. Two years later, Kraft Foods and H.J. Heinz merged, and the company was renamed Kraft Heinz (KHC).

“There’s a comfort in the familiar,” McGrath said. “Once you got something like that that sticks, people are reluctant to change because of the brand association.”

In 2009, Heinz changed the design of its ketchup label for the first time in more than 60 years, replacing the Gherkin pickle that was under the words “tomato ketchup” with a tomato on the vine. Noel Geoffrey, who oversaw the redesign, said there was never any consideration of removing 57 from the label.

But Emily Ruby, a curator at the Sen. John Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh and author of “57 Servings from the Heinz Table,” said she was surprised by the change because Heinz “stuck so long to these symbols of the past.”

When Kraft and Heinz merged in 2015, there was fear in Pittsburgh about losing the link between Heinz and the city. Kraft Heinz has co-headquarters in Pittsburgh and Chicago.

“There’s a sense the company is no longer tied to the history and the region,” she said. If Kraft Heinz were to drop the 57, “I think people would be really upset because they like the connection.”

Whenever Ruby gives local talks on H.J. Heinz or the history of the company, she is always asked about the origins of the number. People even offer up their own theories about its meaning.

“There’s still a lot of curiosity out there about it,” Ruby said.

https://www.cnn.com/2022/02/19/business/heinz-ketchup-57-varieties-history/index.html?utm_source=pocket-newtab-android

400-Plus Family Dollar Stores Close In Six States After Rodent Infestation Discovered; Recall Instituted

www.dailywire.com

Amanda Prestigiacomo

More than 400 Family Dollar locations in six states temporarily closed Sunday after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration discovered a large rodent infestation at one of the discount retailer’s distribution centers.

Following a consumer complaint, the FDA searched the West Memphis, Arkansas distribution facility in January.

“Family Dollar ceased distribution of products within days of the FDA inspection team’s arrival on-site and the inspection concluded on Feb. 11,” a press release from the FDA said. “Conditions observed during the inspection included live rodents, dead rodents in various states of decay, rodent feces and urine, evidence of gnawing, nesting and rodent odors throughout the facility, dead birds and bird droppings, and products stored in conditions that did not protect against contamination.”

“More than 1,100 dead rodents were recovered from the facility following a fumigation at the facility in January 2022,” the FDA said. “Additionally, a review of the company’s internal records also indicated the collection of more than 2,300 rodents between Mar. 29 and Sep. 17, 2021, demonstrating a history of infestation.”

Family Dollar locations in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee have been affected.

MassLive reported Monday that the retailer implemented a voluntary recall at the 406 affected stores, including all drug products; “medical devices; cosmetics; dietary supplements; and human and animal (pet) food products.”

“The recall does not apply to products shipped directly to the stores by the distributor or manufacturer, such as all frozen and refrigerated items,” the report said, added that Family Dollar, to date, “said it is not aware of any consumer complaints or reports of illness related to this recall.”

“Consumers are advised not to use and to contact the company regarding impacted products,” the FDA said. “The agency is also advising that all drugs, medical devices, cosmetics and dietary supplements, regardless of packaging, be discarded. Food in non-permeable packaging (such as undamaged glass or all-metal cans) may be suitable for use if thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. Consumers should wash their hands immediately after handling any products from the affected Family Dollar stores.”

“Consumers who recently purchased affected products should contact a health care professional immediately if they have health concerns after using or handling impacted products,” the press release added. “Rodent contamination may cause Salmonella and infectious diseases, which may pose the greatest risk to infants, children, pregnant women, the elderly and immunocompromised people.”

View the full FDA press release, below (emphasis by the FDA):

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting the public that several categories of FDA-regulated products purchased from Jan. 1, 2021, through the present from Family Dollar stores in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee may be unsafe for consumers to use. The impacted products originated from the company’s distribution facility in West Memphis, Arkansas, where an FDA inspection found insanitary conditions, including a rodent infestation, that could cause many of the products to become contaminated. The FDA is working with the company to initiate a voluntary recall of the affected products.

“Families rely on stores like Family Dollar for products such as food and medicine. They deserve products that are safe,” said Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs Judith McMeekin, Pharm.D. “No one should be subjected to products stored in the kind of unacceptable conditions that we found in this Family Dollar distribution facility. These conditions appear to be violations of federal law that could put families’ health at risk. We will continue to work to protect consumers.”

This alert covers FDA-regulated products purchased from Family Dollar stores in those six states from Jan. 1, 2021, through the present. Some examples of these products include human foods (including dietary supplements (vitamin, herbal and mineral supplements)), cosmetics (skincare products, baby oils, lipsticks, shampoos, baby wipes), animal foods (kibble, pet treats, wild bird seed), medical devices (feminine hygiene products, surgical masks, contact lens cleaning solutions, bandages, nasal care products) and over-the-counter (OTC) medications (pain medications, eye drops, dental products, antacids, other medications for both adults and children).

Consumers are advised not to use and to contact the company regarding impacted products. The agency is also advising that all drugs, medical devices, cosmetics and dietary supplements, regardless of packaging, be discarded. Food in non-permeable packaging (such as undamaged glass or all-metal cans) may be suitable for use if thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. Consumers should wash their hands immediately after handling any products from the affected Family Dollar stores.

Consumers who recently purchased affected products should contact a health care professional immediately if they have health concerns after using or handling impacted products. Rodent contamination may cause Salmonella and infectious diseases, which may pose the greatest risk to infants, children, pregnant women, the elderly and immunocompromised people.

Following a consumer complaint, the FDA began an investigation of the Family Dollar distribution facility in West Memphis, Arkansas, in January 2022. Family Dollar ceased distribution of products within days of the FDA inspection team’s arrival on-site and the inspection concluded on Feb. 11. Conditions observed during the inspection included live rodents, dead rodents in various states of decay, rodent feces and urine, evidence of gnawing, nesting and rodent odors throughout the facility, dead birds and bird droppings, and products stored in conditions that did not protect against contamination. More than 1,100 dead rodents were recovered from the facility following a fumigation at the facility in January 2022. Additionally, a review of the company’s internal records also indicated the collection of more than 2,300 rodents between Mar. 29 and Sep. 17, 2021, demonstrating a history of infestation.

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This Snack Sold at Costco and other Grocery Stores Is Being Recalled For Potentially Containing Lead — Eat This Not That

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By Amanda McDonald

Being a member at Costco comes with certain perks, such as free samples and discounts on travel and tires. It also means there’s an inventory stashed away of what you buy. By keeping track of purchases, the warehouse is able to alert customers in the event of a safety recall.

And that’s exactly what happened when a snack item was recently recalled, according to an alert Costco sent to individuals who purchased the item at warehouses in Alaska, California, Oregon, and Washington. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also posted a notice revealing that certain dried plum products from SnakYard may be contaminated with lead.

The snacks were distributed or sold in California, Nevada, and Utah. In turn, they were sent to retail stores and supermarkets, including Costco. The impacted bags of saladitos (salted dried plums) were sold at select warehouses between April 2021 and January 2022 as item #1516905. The alert sent to members warns, “If you still have any of this product, please stop using the item and return it to your local Costco for a full refund.”

Dried Plums recall Costco

Courtesy of Alli & Rose

Also included in the recall are 1.5-ounce bags of saladitos and saladitos con chile y limon (dried plums with chili and lemon) under the Tolteca brand label, which were not sold at Costco. They have a UPC code of either 704927600694 or 704927600700, according to the FDA.

No illnesses related to lead have been reported. Symptoms of lead poisoning include abdominal pain, behavior or mood changes, irritability, lethargy, vomiting, weakness, seizures, and more. Per the Mayo Clinic:

“Lead poisoning occurs when lead builds up in the body, often over months or years. Even small amounts of lead can cause serious health problems. Children younger than 6 years are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can severely affect mental and physical development. At very high levels, lead poisoning can be fatal.”

If this snack is in your kitchen, you can return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. This isn’t the only recall you need to know about, however—These Frozen Grocery Items Are Being Pulled From Shelves in 12 States.

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US warned Mexico of avocado ban if cartels threatened inspectors again

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YAMI VIRGIN | KABB Staff

A worker selects avocados at a packing plant in Uruapan, Mexico, Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Armando Solis)

SAN ANTONIO (KABB) — The current avocado crisis between Mexico and the United States didn’t come without a warning. Investigative reporter Yami Virgin explains how the cartels have a stronghold in the only Mexican state where avocados are allowed to be imported from – Michoacan.

The current avocado crisis between Mexico and the U.S. didn’t come without a warning.{ }(Video: KABB)

The violence in Mexico has not only controlled drug trafficking but now it’s trying to control a $2.4 billion industry — the avocado industry.

The United States’ Drug Enforcement Administration said the splintering of the cartels after the arrest and extradition of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the former leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, didn’t have much of an effect on drug trafficking in San Antonio, Texas.

“How has this affected us here in San Antonio? Have we seen a change because of his conviction? The short answer is no,” says Dante Sorianello, the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA in the San Antonio district, in a 2017 interview regarding the Sinaloa Cartel.

But in Mexico, it created more than a dozen new organized crime organizations wanting to get their hands on the green gold – the avocado. Avocados are only allowed to be imported from the State of Michoacan where close to 100 inspectors check the avocados when they are harvested before touching U.S. soil. The recent threat called into a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector forced the import of avocados from Mexico to the U.S. to stop.

But this sort of threat from the cartels is not the first to be reported.

In 2019, a USDA team of inspectors was “directly threatened in Ziracuaretiro in Michoacan, when members of a criminal organization robbed the vehicle they traveled in at gunpoint.”

The U.S. agency then wrote a letter warning if there was another threat to their inspectors in Michoacan, they would suspend the avocado program. A warning that growers in Michoacan published for the cartels to see that any further threats could kill the state’s money-making industry.

The ban that is in effect now has left distributors like Eric Villagomez waiting for updates on negotiations in Mexico.

“The USDA is negotiating to keep their inspectors safe so that this export can continue once again,” says Eric Villagomez, owner of Las Huertas Producers.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/mexico-was-warned-about-an-avocado-ban-if-cartels-threatened-us-inspectors-again

These 5 Walmart, Kroger, ALDI and Other Grocery Store Foods Are Being Pulled From Shelves — Eat This Not That

www.eatthis.com

By Amanda McDonald 7 – 9 minutes

There’s been a 125% increase in the number of foods being pulled from shelves recently. But have you ever stopped to wonder why there have been so many grocery recalls in the news?

“The answer: new laws and new technology,” Eat This, Not That! Medical Expert Board member Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, writes. “In 2011, the FDA enacted the Food Safety Modernization Act that provided them with more power in preventing food safety issues.”

How To Save Money On Groceries

Unfortunately, there are new recalls to add to the ever-growing list, which includes items sold at top grocery stores like ALDI, H-E-B, Kroger, Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Whole Foods. To help keep your family safe, check to see if the following items are in your kitchen ASAP.

Related: 3 Reasons Your Grocery Store’s Shelves May Look Empty Right Now Shutterstock

Grocery salad

Dole has been plagued by harmful bacteria in its bagged salads three times in only three months. Recalls were issued in October and December, and now there is a new one to be aware of. More than 70 varieties of bagged salads are being recalled due to possible health risk from Listeria, according to an announcement posted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The recalled items were distributed to retailers in more than 35 states, as well as several provinces in Canada. In addition to Dole-branded products, they included private label packaged salads sold at grocery stores like ALDI, H-E-B, Kroger, and Walmart, which gave this statement to Eat This, Not That! about the recall:

“Walmart is committed to providing our customers with safe, high-quality products at our everyday low prices. As soon as we were notified by Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc. of the recall, we alerted our stores and distribution centers to remove the affected product from their shelves and inventory, and we implemented a register block to prevent additional sales. Customers who have purchased one of the items identified in the recall may return it to their nearest Walmart for a full refund.”

Fortunately, no illnesses have been reported to date. The impacted items have “Best if Used By” dates between Dec. 22, 2021, and Jan 9, 2022. To view a full list of the affected products on the FDA’s website, click here.Courtesy of Trader Joe’s

Trader Joe's Soycutash

This blend of sweet corn, shelled edamame, and red bell peppers is one of the beloved frozen food products sold at Trader Joe’s. However, the low-cost grocery chain is pulling almost 46,000 16-ounce bags from shelves because they may be contaminated with Listeria. 

The FDA classifies the situation as a “Class II” recall, or “a situation in which use of or exposure to a violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is remote.”

Similar to other foodborne germs, Listeria contamination causes symptoms like diarrhea and fever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infections in pregnant women may lead to miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, or more complications.

The bags were distributed to stores in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. No information about potential illnesses related to this recall was provided.

Related: To get all of the latest recall and grocery store news delivered right to your email inbox every day, sign up for our newsletter!Courtesy of FSIS

Walmart Beef Sticks

Almost 15,000 pounds of beef sticks sold at stores nationwide are being recalled because of faulty labeling and undeclared allergens. The Iowa Smokehouse Original Smoked Beef Sticks may contain milk, a known allergen, according to an alert posted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Anyone who is allergic to milk or has a sensitivity to it may have an adverse reaction to this product.

“The problem was discovered after the firm received consumer complaints of cheese in the product and reported the event to FSIS,” the alert says. “There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.”

Walmart tells Eat This, Not That! that the beef sticks are not sold at all Walmart stores but at some of the company’s third-party marketplaces. “We blocked and removed the item from our website on January 8 and directed the sellers to take appropriate action to address the recall,” a spokesperson says.

It’s possible that some of these items may still be lurking in consumers’ pantries or refrigerators. If you have one in your kitchen, double-check the packaging. Affected products have sell-by dates of 11/15/2022 or 11/17/2022 and establishment numbers of 1633B.Courtesy of Whole Foods

Whole Foods Vanilla Sky Bites

Dream Pops is asking retailers to pull 26,111 cases of its products after it was discovered that the bite-sized desserts may contain undeclared milk, according to an alert posted by the FDA.

The Berry Dreams, Birthday Cake, Cookie Dough, and Vanilla Sky bites are available at Whole Foods, Wegmans, ShopRite, Schnucks, H-E-B, Harris Teeter, and more grocery stores, but the notice doesn’t specify which places the recalled pops were sold at. All of the affected packages have best-by dates ranging from 6/28/22 to 10/21/22. 

The FDA classifies this as a “Class I” recall, or “a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the use of or exposure to a violative product will cause serious adverse health consequences or death.”

No information about possible illnesses related to this recall was provided. Shutterstock

Angel Formula, which was sold at Moor Herbs’ Detroit store and on its website, is being recalled after the FDA determined that it didn’t meet certain labeling and nutrition requirements for infant formula. The product is labeled as “a powdered mylk alternative for the health conscious mother.” Here’s what the organization said about the issue:

“When the product was tested, the iron, sodium, and potassium content were well over the maximum allowed, which could potentially lead to iron overload and/or electrolyte imbalances. In addition, the product did not have vitamin D, and a vitamin D deficiency can potentially lead to rickets, a softening and weakening of bones.”

The company began shipping this product in 2019, and “all units in distribution are included in this recall.” Parents and caregivers who purchased the affected formula should stop using it and either throw it away or return it for a refund. Anyone concerned about the health or safety of their child should contact a health care provider for more information.

For more on what’s happening at your neighborhood supermarket, check out:

https://www.eatthis.com/news-grocery-recalls-walmart-kroger-aldi-january-2022/

A Dole Salad Listeria Outbreak Linked to Prepackaged Salad Has Killed 2 People

www.self.com

Serena Coady 3 – 4 minutes

The CDC is in the midst of an active investigation into two separate listeria outbreaks connected to packaged salads from Dole and Fresh Express. So far there have been 2 recorded deaths, 13 hospitalizations, and 17 illnesses across 13 U.S. states, according to the CDC. These salads have been available for purchase under a number of brand names, including Ahold, Dole, HEB, Kroger, Lidl, Little Salad Bar, Marketside, Naturally Better, Nature’s Promise, President’s Choice, and Simply Nature. The specific salads and ingredients range from mixed greens to garden salads and Caesar salad kits. This is not the first time Dole has been connected to a listeria outbreak. Last October, Dole recalled a number of bagged salads due to the risk of listeria contamination.

If you are concerned about whether you might have purchased one of these products (available in either bags or clamshells) it might help to note that the listed use by date can be anywhere between 11/30/21 and 1/09/22 and the product code will begin with B, N, W, or Y.

If you have purchased one of these specified products, discard them or return them to the store of purchase for a refund. As listeria can easily spread, if the product was opened, thoroughly sanitize any surface or ingredient that came into contact with it. The CDC has put together a helpful five-step guide to properly deep cleaning your refrigerator; you will just need to ensure you have sealed bags, warm soapy water, clean towels, and if you like, bleach. It can be a lengthy process, but it is worth it to ensure the safety of your household.

Listeria can be mild in individuals who are healthy, with symptoms similar to food poisoning, such as fever, stomach pain, and diarrhea, according to the CDC. Sometimes, symptoms can develop up to four weeks after consuming the contaminated food. However, it is important to note that symptoms can be far more severe when it comes to vulnerable individuals, including pregnant people, newborns, adults over the age of 65, and immunocompromised individuals. These groups can be more likely to face a more advanced and invasive kind of listeriosis, which can be a life-threatening form of the infection that moves on from the digestive system to other parts of the body, including the joints or bloodstream. This can lead to further illness, severe complications, and even be fatal, as we have seen with these two recent deaths.

https://www.self.com/story/listeria-outbreak-salads?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=self&utm_mailing=SLF_Daily_020522&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&bxid=5e3b628040f86619b00bdf58&cndid=59853872&hasha=18f60f80a201d36997742777018978e4&hashb=0fad6764495736523aa48c58a5a230fd5cdfa9a4&hashc=60e137fe5af60c13358ab7b6957cca2d78ee573c7aad4a6c5d68bf65772704b8&esrc=article-newsletter&utm_content=A&utm_term=SLF_Daily

Check your fridge: Wish-Bone recalls some salad dressings

Conagra Brands says it is voluntarily recalling some bottles of Wish-Bone Thousand Island and Chunky Blue Cheese. (FDA)

Conagra Brands says it is voluntarily recalling some bottles of Wish-Bone Thousand Island and Chunky Blue Cheese. (FDA)

A popular brand of salad dressing is being recalled because they may have something in them that’s not on the label.

Conagra Brands says it is voluntarily recalling some bottles of Wish-Bone Thousand Island and Chunky Blue Cheese.

Both contain egg which is not stated on the product label.

The Food and Drug Administration says people who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to egg run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

There have been no reports of illness or injury due to the consumption of these products to date.

Conagra is working to remove the dressings from store shelves. This recall does not impact any other Wish-Bone or Conagra Brands products.

If you’ve bought the product, you should throw it away.

People with any questions or concerns can contact Conagra Brands Consumer Care at 1-800-881-3989.

CLICK HERE for more information.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/check-your-fridge-wish-bone-recalls-some-salad-dressings

Frozen Spinach Recalled in 9 States Due to Potential Listeria Risk

a bag of steamable frozen spinach on a two-tone yellow background with a red recall button

If you bought frozen spinach at Lidl, you’ll want to check the label. By Leah Goggins January 20, 2022 Advertisement FB

Credit: Allrecipes Image

Frozen Food Development announced a recall of two lots of store-brand frozen chopped spinach sold in Lidl stores. The spinach was distributed in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The company instigated the recall after a bag of the spinach tested positive for listeria. 

The recalled spinach is in 12-ounce bags marked “Steamable by Lidl” with lot numbers #R17742 or #R17963 and an expiration date of September 10, 2023 on the back of the bag. You can see photos of the spinach packaging in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s recall announcement. There are no known illnesses reported in connection with the recall.

Related: Dole Is Recalling Bagged Salad in More Than 30 States Due to Listeria Risk

Listeria monocytogenes is a species of bacteria that can survive—and even grow—under refrigeration and other preservation measures. Consuming listeria can cause listeriosis. Symptoms of listeriosis include fever, nausea and vomiting in mild cases, or headache, confusion and loss of balance in severe cases. According to the FDA, listeriosis can be fatal “among the elderly, people with weakened immune systems or chronic diseases.” If you think you are experiencing symptoms of listeriosis, contact your healthcare provider immediately. 

Those with the recalled spinach in their possession are encouraged to return their purchase to Lidl for a full refund. If you have questions, contact LIDL Customer Care at 1-844-747-5435 Monday through Saturday, 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard time.

Related: Here’s What a Food Recall Is and Why One Happens

This story originally appeared on EatingWell.com.

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https://www.allrecipes.com/syndication/lidl-frozen-spinach-recall-listeria-january-2022/?did=728938-20220123&utm_campaign=hot-dish_newsletter&utm_source=allrecipes.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=012322&cid=728938&mid=77796910277&lctg=163934651

7 New Recalls at Costco, Trader Joe’s, and More Supermarkets to Know About

Costco Food

These items may be lurking in your kitchen, so check your pantry ASAP.

Shutterstock

By Amanda McDonald December 20, 2021 FACT CHECKED BY Joseph Neese

Because there are thousands of products on display at grocery stores and dozens more lining your kitchen pantry, it can be hard to keep track of every item on your shopping list. When groceries are the subject of a recall, supermarkets and other retailers act quickly to remove them from shelves. However, it’s still crucial for shoppers to be in the know in case any affected products are already inside their homes.

Luckily, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other government groups post the latest food recalls that grocery shoppers should know about. To help you easily identify the products involved in these recalls, the information shared with consumers includes items like “Best By” dates and UPC codes.

Here are seven new recalls that include products sold at Costco, Trader Joe’s, and other top supermarkets. To keep your family safe, take a moment to pause and check your pantry today. 

Related: Grocery Recalls Are Hitting an All-Time High—Here’s Why 1

Nature’s Own Honey Wheat Bread at Costco

Nature's Own

Courtesy of Costco

Costco sells this bread in packages of two loaves, but certain bundles are being recalled due to the potential presence of undeclared milk. “Flowers Foods and the FDA have issued a recall on a specific code of their Nature’s Own Honey Wheat Bread,” a notice sent to Costco members who purchased the item says. “If you have a milk allergy, do not eat any remaining bread . . . please return it to Costco for a full refund.”

The affected products were sold in warehouses in Arizona and Colorado. The bags have a “Best If Used By” date of 12-26-2021 and a UPC code of 0-72250-00539-5. No related illnesses or incidents related to the recalled items have been reported, according to the FDA. 2

Alaura Two-Tone Jar Candles Sold at Costco

Costco candle recall

Courtesy of the CPSC

Almost 140,000 of the Alaura Two-Tone Jar Candles sold at Costco stores are being recalled because they pose “laceration and fire hazards.” Specifically, they could “shatter, crack, or break apart while burning,” according to a recall notice posted by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

The recall was initiated after 138 reports of the candles shattering, cracking, or breaking apart were submitted—three of which resulted in lacerations. The impacted candles were sold at Costco warehouses nationwide between August and September 2021 for around $17.

Related: To get all of the latest grocery store news delivered right to your email inbox every day, sign up for our newsletter! 3

Herbal Essences, Pantene, and More Dry Shampoos

Shutterstock

More than 30 types of dry shampoo spray are being recalled by Proctor & Gamble after the presence of benzene was detected in some products. The recall includes items under the brand names Aussie, Hair Food, Herbal Essences, Old Spice, Pantene, and Waterless. Here’s exactly what the notice posted by the FDA says about the risks associated with using products that contain benzene:https://a1e698b4fcb08b4be32fa6086116cba9.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html Benzene is classified as a human carcinogen. Exposure to benzene can occur by inhalation, orally, and through the skin and it can result in cancers including leukemia and blood cancer of the bone marrow and blood disorders which can be life-threatening. Based on exposure modeling and the cancer risk assessments published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (IRIS database), daily exposure to benzene in the recalled products at the levels detected in our testing would not be expected to cause adverse health consequences.

Proctor & Gamble said it reviewed its entire portfolio of aerosol products “following recent reports that indicated traces of benzene in some aerosol spray products.”

“While benzene is not an ingredient in any of our products, our review showed that benzene came from the propellant that sprays the product out of the can. We detected unexpected levels of benzene in aerosol dry shampoo sprays and aerosol dry conditioner sprays,” a Proctor & Gamble spokesperson told Eat This, Not That!. “The majority of our portfolio—mousses, hairsprays, liquid shampoos, liquid conditioners, styling products and treatments—including other Pantene, Aussie, Herbal Essences, Hair Food, and Waterless products are not included in the scope of this recall and may continue to be used as intended.”

The company says it hasn’t received any reports of “adverse events” related to this recall. The dry shampoo spray products were sold nationwide at retailers and online. 4

Morton Salt

salt

Shutterstock

Almost 17,000 26-ounce canisters of Morton Salt are being recalled because of mislabeling. Instead of iodized salt, the packages contain salt that isn’t fortified with iodine. The items in question have a “Best By” date of 9/8/2026 and were distributed to retailers in Colorado and California.

The FDA classifies this event as a Class III recall, meaning “use of, or exposure to, a violative product is not likely to cause adverse health consequences.”

Related: Follow These Two Steps to Sanitize Your Kitchen, Expert Says 5

Minute Maid Beverages

Courtesy of Target

Minute Maid Fruit Punch

Eat This, Not That! reported on Dec. 15 that more than 7,000 cases of “America’s Favorite Juice” were being recalled due to the possibility they may contain pieces of metal.

The original recall notice cited 59-ounce jugs of Minute Maid Berry Punch, Fruit Punch, and Strawberry Lemonade products. An update later listed a similar risk posed by containers of Minute Maid Watermelon juice sold in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.https://a1e698b4fcb08b4be32fa6086116cba9.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

“The firm was notified via a consumer complaint that the product contained a long piece of metal,” the notice said. 6

Kool-Aid Products

Costco Kool-Aid

Courtesy of Costco

Another large beverage recall was also updated to include additional items. The ongoing Kool-Aid recall is classified as a Class II event by the FDA due to the potential presence of glass and metal in the affected products. That means this is a “situation in which use of, or exposure to, a violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is remote.”

Impacted items were removed from Costco warehouses back in mid-November, with other stores like Walmart and select Sam’s Clubs following suit as the recall was expanded.

The Kraft Heinz Foods Company says to throw any of the items involved in this recall out immediately if they’re in your pantry. 7

Trader Ming’s Chicken & Vegetable Wonton Soup

Shutterstock

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recently issued public health alerts for two grocery items, one of which includes a product carried at Trader Joe’s.

Containers of Trader Ming’s Chicken & Vegetable Wonton Soup sold in Arizona, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Southern California, Southern Nevada, Utah, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. may contain undeclared shrimp and pork. No reports of adverse reactions have been confirmed at this time.

Unfortunately, these aren’t the only recalls to know about right now. Before you go, read about These 4 Recalled Grocery Items That May Also Be Lurking in Your Kitchen.

For more on what’s happening at your neighborhood supermarket, check out:

Amanda McDonald Amanda is a staff writer for Eat This, Not That!. Read more Filed UnderCostco // food safety // Groceries // Grocery Shopping // Grocery Stores // News // Trader Joes Sponsored Stories

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https://www.eatthis.com/news-food-recalls-costco-trader-joes-december-2021/

Kroger recalls nearly 20 baked items that may be in your home

(SBG File)

local21news.com

WKRC Staff 2 minutes

(SBG File)

UNDATED (WKRC) — Kroger has issued a recall for several baked goods that may be in your house.

A variety of items under the Country Oven brand have been recalled by Kroger. Kroger issued the recall earlier this month when 19 food items were reported to have metal fragments in them.

According to Kroger, the metal fragments may have gotten into the starch during the baking process. Consumers are advised to not eat any of the items on the list and to throw them out promptly.

The following is a list of items that were recalled:

  • Cinnamon Rolls in 4-ounce and 2.5-ounce packages
  • White Cake
  • Chocolate Cake
  • White/Vanilla Cake
  • Yellow/Vanilla Cake
  • Chocolate/Vanilla Cake
  • Yellow Cake
  • Bowtie Danish
  • Cheese Pocket
  • Angel Food Cake
  • Yellow/Fudge Cake
  • Red Velvet Cake
  • Marble Cake
  • Chocolate/Fudge Cake Single Slices
  • Yellow/Caramel Cake Single Slices
  • Caramel Apple Double Layer Cake
  • Boston Cream Cake Double Layer Cake
  • Raspberry Cake
  • Party Balloon Cake

The items were reportedly sold in nearly 30 states, which include the following:

  • South Carolina
  • Georgia
  • Alabama
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Missouri
  • Ohio
  • Kentucky
  • West Virginia
  • Tennessee
  • Mississippi
  • Arkansas
  • Nebraska
  • Kansas
  • California
  • Oregon
  • Washington
  • Idaho
  • Colorado
  • Louisiana
  • Montana
  • New Mexico
  • Nevada
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming
  • Virginia
  • Utah

If you are unsure if the item you purchased has been recalled, you can check the UPC here.

There have been a few recalls by Kroger this month, including a recall on 100,000 pounds of chicken that also affected Trader Joe’s.

Further questions can be answered at 1-800-KROGERS Monday through Friday. The line is open from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. EST, and Saturday and Sunday, 8:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. EST.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/kroger-recalls-nearly-20-dessert-items-that-may-be-in-your-home-bakery-food-contamination-metal-fragments-dispose-cake-cinnamon-rolls-company-trader-joes-chicken-baked-goods-dessert-30-states-cincinnati-ohio

Xylitol: Popular Sweetener That Can Be Deadly to Your Dog

www.dogfoodadvisor.com

Xylitol is a popular artificial sweetener that can be deadly to your dog.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, the accidental consumption of xylitol by a dog can cause a sudden and life-threatening drop in blood sugar, seizures, liver failure and… death

To help warn dog owners, the FDA has created the following video:

What Products Contain Xylitol?

Food products that may contain xylitol include certain brands of peanut butter… which can sometimes be used as a tasty “stuffing” for Kongs® and other chewable dog toys.

Other products that may contain xylitol include:

  • Chewing gum
  • Peanut butter
  • Breath mints
  • Mouthwash
  • Candies
  • Toothpaste
  • Baked goods
  • Tooth whiteners
  • Chewable vitamins
  • Sugar-free desserts (like “skinny” ice cream)

Brands with a Prior History of Xylitol Content

The following brands have previously been known to contain xylitol. Some of these products may no longer contain the toxic sweetener. So, be sure to check the ingredients of each item listed.

  • Orbit®
  • Trident®
  • Icebreakers®
  • Stride®
  • Pure®
  • Mentos®
  • Spry®
  • Go Nuts1
  • Nuts ‘N More2
  • Hank’s Protein Plus3
  • P28 Foods High Protein Spread4
  • Krush Nutrition Nutty by Nature5
  • Xylimax
  • Xylishield
  • Spry Mints
  • Spry Chewing Gum
  • Xlear Nasal Spray
  • Nicorette Gum
  • Xylichew Gum
  • Ricochet

This list is not complete. Consumers are cautioned to read the labels of all products before bringing them into any environment shared with dogs.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/red-flag-ingredients/xylitol-dog/

Footnotes… Products That Contain Xylitol Go Here For A Complete List! 👇

https://www.preventivevet.com/xylitol-products-toxic-for-dogs

How to Properly Wash Fruits and Vegetables

person washing carrots in a sink

Photo by Adam Gault/Getty Images

getpocket.com

Christopher Michel

It’s always important to make sure the food that you bring into your house is safe. You probably already know how to keep meat and poultry at its best (never leave raw hamburger meat out, for instance). But when it comes to fresh produce, especially the stuff you want to eat raw (and use in your summer salad recipes), what do you do?

So many questions: How do you wash produce? Is water enough? Do you need to buy a special fruit or veggie spray from the grocery store? And what about if you’re going to peel a cucumber or a potato for a simple potato recipe? Do you need to wash those, too?

It can all be so confusing. Luckily, we’ve got the answers.

 According to the FDA (you know, the folks who ruined eating raw cookie dough for all of us), produce washes aren’t necessary. Peter Cassell, an FDA employee from the office of media affairs told the Huffington Post that “using fruit/vegetable washes or dish soaps may result in residue left on the produce and can also change the flavor.” In fact, on their site, the FDA has seven specific recommendations for getting fruit and vegetables clean:

  1. Wash your hands. Use soap and scrub those hands for 20 seconds both before and after handling fresh produce.
  2. Wash all produce. Even if you’re going to peel them, you want to rinse your veggies. That keeps dirt and bacteria from transferring onto your knife or cutting board. (This includes vegetables with rinds and skins, like avocados and melons.)
  3. Plain water will suffice. You don’t need to use soap, vinegar, produce wash or anything else. In fact, in a study by the University of Maine, water performed just as well as produce wash at removing bacteria and fungi, without leaving a residue.
  4. But you need to rub. To make sure the veggies are clean, gently rub them with your fingers. For firm fruits and veggies such as potatoes, melons, cucumbers, etc., you can use a clean vegetable brush (not the one you use for your dishes).
  5. Dry the produce. Use a clean cloth or paper towel, and get all the moisture off before storing or cooking. This will further reduce any bacteria.
  6. Remove leaves. For items like cabbage, you can remove the outermost leaves.
  7. Cut away visible damage. This may seem like common sense, but the FDA also recommends cutting away any visible damage or bruising before preparing or eating your fruit as well.

Finally, here’s an old tip from the New York Times, for cleaning very soft fruit, specifically berries, that you might not want to rub: Put them in a hot bath. Essentially, you can put blueberries, strawberries, and the like in 140°F water for about 30 seconds, and it will kill any mold or bacteria on the skins without affecting the taste or the quality of the fruit. Simply dry it off and store it when you’re done. Not only will it be clean, but it’ll last a lot longer in the fridge, as well!

Christopher Michel is the Senior Food & Garden Editor at Country Living, where he covers all things edible or growable.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-to-properly-wash-fruits-and-vegetables?utm_source=pocket-newtab-android

Bagged Salad Recalled in 10 States Due to Possible Listeria Contamination

www.self.com

Condé Nast


There’s a large recall affecting bagged salads in 10 states. Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc. voluntarily initiated the bagged salad recall affecting four brands due to the risk of listeria contamination, according to an announcement on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website. The company decided to recall the salad products on October 29, 2021, after a bag of salad tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, the pathogen that causes the potentially foodborne illness listeriosis. 

Specifically, the salad recall includes specific lots of four bagged garden salad products produced by Dole and sold under multiple brand names. The affected products include Dole Garden Salad (24 oz), Marketside Classic Salad (24 oz), Kroger Brand Garden Salad (12 oz), and Salad Classics Garden Salad (12 oz). 

The pre-washed and ready-to-eat salads contain iceberg lettuce, shredded carrot, and red cabbage. They were distributed in 10 Eastern and Southern states in U.S., including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia. 

Not all bags of these products are being recalled—only a “limited number of cases” is affected, according to the FDA notice. All of the recalled bags have a best if used by date of October 25, 2021, meaning they should no longer be available at grocery stores. However, consumers who have already purchased the salads may still have them in their fridges. 

Officials discovered the risk of contamination when a random sample test of a single bagged garden salad, conducted by the Department of Agriculture in Georgia, came back positive for Listeria monocytogenes. There are no reports of illness associated with the recalled products, according to the FDA. Dole describes the salad recall as “precautionary.” The company noted that it’s working closely with regulatory officials on the issue and that no other products made or sold by Dole are affected by the recall. 

https://www.self.com/story/bagged-salad-recall-listeria-contamination?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=self&utm_mailing=SLF_Dedicated_110121&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&bxid=5e3b628040f86619b00bdf58&cndid=59853872&hasha=18f60f80a201d36997742777018978e4&hashb=0fad6764495736523aa48c58a5a230fd5cdfa9a4&hashc=60e137fe5af60c13358ab7b6957cca2d78ee573c7aad4a6c5d68bf65772704b8&esrc=article-newsletter&utm_term=SLF_Daily_GenericOpens