Kroger recalls nearly 20 baked items that may be in your home

(SBG File)

local21news.com

WKRC Staff 2 minutes

(SBG File)

UNDATED (WKRC) — Kroger has issued a recall for several baked goods that may be in your house.

A variety of items under the Country Oven brand have been recalled by Kroger. Kroger issued the recall earlier this month when 19 food items were reported to have metal fragments in them.

According to Kroger, the metal fragments may have gotten into the starch during the baking process. Consumers are advised to not eat any of the items on the list and to throw them out promptly.

The following is a list of items that were recalled:

  • Cinnamon Rolls in 4-ounce and 2.5-ounce packages
  • White Cake
  • Chocolate Cake
  • White/Vanilla Cake
  • Yellow/Vanilla Cake
  • Chocolate/Vanilla Cake
  • Yellow Cake
  • Bowtie Danish
  • Cheese Pocket
  • Angel Food Cake
  • Yellow/Fudge Cake
  • Red Velvet Cake
  • Marble Cake
  • Chocolate/Fudge Cake Single Slices
  • Yellow/Caramel Cake Single Slices
  • Caramel Apple Double Layer Cake
  • Boston Cream Cake Double Layer Cake
  • Raspberry Cake
  • Party Balloon Cake

The items were reportedly sold in nearly 30 states, which include the following:

  • South Carolina
  • Georgia
  • Alabama
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Missouri
  • Ohio
  • Kentucky
  • West Virginia
  • Tennessee
  • Mississippi
  • Arkansas
  • Nebraska
  • Kansas
  • California
  • Oregon
  • Washington
  • Idaho
  • Colorado
  • Louisiana
  • Montana
  • New Mexico
  • Nevada
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming
  • Virginia
  • Utah

If you are unsure if the item you purchased has been recalled, you can check the UPC here.

There have been a few recalls by Kroger this month, including a recall on 100,000 pounds of chicken that also affected Trader Joe’s.

Further questions can be answered at 1-800-KROGERS Monday through Friday. The line is open from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. EST, and Saturday and Sunday, 8:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. EST.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/kroger-recalls-nearly-20-dessert-items-that-may-be-in-your-home-bakery-food-contamination-metal-fragments-dispose-cake-cinnamon-rolls-company-trader-joes-chicken-baked-goods-dessert-30-states-cincinnati-ohio

Xylitol: Popular Sweetener That Can Be Deadly to Your Dog

www.dogfoodadvisor.com

Xylitol is a popular artificial sweetener that can be deadly to your dog.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, the accidental consumption of xylitol by a dog can cause a sudden and life-threatening drop in blood sugar, seizures, liver failure and… death

To help warn dog owners, the FDA has created the following video:

What Products Contain Xylitol?

Food products that may contain xylitol include certain brands of peanut butter… which can sometimes be used as a tasty “stuffing” for Kongs® and other chewable dog toys.

Other products that may contain xylitol include:

  • Chewing gum
  • Peanut butter
  • Breath mints
  • Mouthwash
  • Candies
  • Toothpaste
  • Baked goods
  • Tooth whiteners
  • Chewable vitamins
  • Sugar-free desserts (like “skinny” ice cream)

Brands with a Prior History of Xylitol Content

The following brands have previously been known to contain xylitol. Some of these products may no longer contain the toxic sweetener. So, be sure to check the ingredients of each item listed.

  • Orbit®
  • Trident®
  • Icebreakers®
  • Stride®
  • Pure®
  • Mentos®
  • Spry®
  • Go Nuts1
  • Nuts ‘N More2
  • Hank’s Protein Plus3
  • P28 Foods High Protein Spread4
  • Krush Nutrition Nutty by Nature5
  • Xylimax
  • Xylishield
  • Spry Mints
  • Spry Chewing Gum
  • Xlear Nasal Spray
  • Nicorette Gum
  • Xylichew Gum
  • Ricochet

This list is not complete. Consumers are cautioned to read the labels of all products before bringing them into any environment shared with dogs.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/red-flag-ingredients/xylitol-dog/

Footnotes… Products That Contain Xylitol Go Here For A Complete List! 👇

https://www.preventivevet.com/xylitol-products-toxic-for-dogs

How to Properly Wash Fruits and Vegetables

person washing carrots in a sink

Photo by Adam Gault/Getty Images

getpocket.com

Christopher Michel

It’s always important to make sure the food that you bring into your house is safe. You probably already know how to keep meat and poultry at its best (never leave raw hamburger meat out, for instance). But when it comes to fresh produce, especially the stuff you want to eat raw (and use in your summer salad recipes), what do you do?

So many questions: How do you wash produce? Is water enough? Do you need to buy a special fruit or veggie spray from the grocery store? And what about if you’re going to peel a cucumber or a potato for a simple potato recipe? Do you need to wash those, too?

It can all be so confusing. Luckily, we’ve got the answers.

 According to the FDA (you know, the folks who ruined eating raw cookie dough for all of us), produce washes aren’t necessary. Peter Cassell, an FDA employee from the office of media affairs told the Huffington Post that “using fruit/vegetable washes or dish soaps may result in residue left on the produce and can also change the flavor.” In fact, on their site, the FDA has seven specific recommendations for getting fruit and vegetables clean:

  1. Wash your hands. Use soap and scrub those hands for 20 seconds both before and after handling fresh produce.
  2. Wash all produce. Even if you’re going to peel them, you want to rinse your veggies. That keeps dirt and bacteria from transferring onto your knife or cutting board. (This includes vegetables with rinds and skins, like avocados and melons.)
  3. Plain water will suffice. You don’t need to use soap, vinegar, produce wash or anything else. In fact, in a study by the University of Maine, water performed just as well as produce wash at removing bacteria and fungi, without leaving a residue.
  4. But you need to rub. To make sure the veggies are clean, gently rub them with your fingers. For firm fruits and veggies such as potatoes, melons, cucumbers, etc., you can use a clean vegetable brush (not the one you use for your dishes).
  5. Dry the produce. Use a clean cloth or paper towel, and get all the moisture off before storing or cooking. This will further reduce any bacteria.
  6. Remove leaves. For items like cabbage, you can remove the outermost leaves.
  7. Cut away visible damage. This may seem like common sense, but the FDA also recommends cutting away any visible damage or bruising before preparing or eating your fruit as well.

Finally, here’s an old tip from the New York Times, for cleaning very soft fruit, specifically berries, that you might not want to rub: Put them in a hot bath. Essentially, you can put blueberries, strawberries, and the like in 140°F water for about 30 seconds, and it will kill any mold or bacteria on the skins without affecting the taste or the quality of the fruit. Simply dry it off and store it when you’re done. Not only will it be clean, but it’ll last a lot longer in the fridge, as well!

Christopher Michel is the Senior Food & Garden Editor at Country Living, where he covers all things edible or growable.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-to-properly-wash-fruits-and-vegetables?utm_source=pocket-newtab-android

Bagged Salad Recalled in 10 States Due to Possible Listeria Contamination

www.self.com

Condé Nast


There’s a large recall affecting bagged salads in 10 states. Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc. voluntarily initiated the bagged salad recall affecting four brands due to the risk of listeria contamination, according to an announcement on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website. The company decided to recall the salad products on October 29, 2021, after a bag of salad tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, the pathogen that causes the potentially foodborne illness listeriosis. 

Specifically, the salad recall includes specific lots of four bagged garden salad products produced by Dole and sold under multiple brand names. The affected products include Dole Garden Salad (24 oz), Marketside Classic Salad (24 oz), Kroger Brand Garden Salad (12 oz), and Salad Classics Garden Salad (12 oz). 

The pre-washed and ready-to-eat salads contain iceberg lettuce, shredded carrot, and red cabbage. They were distributed in 10 Eastern and Southern states in U.S., including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia. 

Not all bags of these products are being recalled—only a “limited number of cases” is affected, according to the FDA notice. All of the recalled bags have a best if used by date of October 25, 2021, meaning they should no longer be available at grocery stores. However, consumers who have already purchased the salads may still have them in their fridges. 

Officials discovered the risk of contamination when a random sample test of a single bagged garden salad, conducted by the Department of Agriculture in Georgia, came back positive for Listeria monocytogenes. There are no reports of illness associated with the recalled products, according to the FDA. Dole describes the salad recall as “precautionary.” The company noted that it’s working closely with regulatory officials on the issue and that no other products made or sold by Dole are affected by the recall. 

https://www.self.com/story/bagged-salad-recall-listeria-contamination?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=self&utm_mailing=SLF_Dedicated_110121&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&bxid=5e3b628040f86619b00bdf58&cndid=59853872&hasha=18f60f80a201d36997742777018978e4&hashb=0fad6764495736523aa48c58a5a230fd5cdfa9a4&hashc=60e137fe5af60c13358ab7b6957cca2d78ee573c7aad4a6c5d68bf65772704b8&esrc=article-newsletter&utm_term=SLF_Daily_GenericOpens

Salmonella outbreak linked to onions, CDC advises throwing them away – CBS News

www.cbsnews.com

Tori Tori

October 21, 2021 / 7:21 AM / CBS News Why is drug-resistant bacteria in our food su… 13:24

Fresh onions have been identified as the source of a Salmonella outbreak across 37 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday. The Food and Drug Administration, CDC and other health officials concluded that fresh, whole red, white and yellow onions imported from Chihuahua, Mexico, and distributed by ProSource Inc. are behind the outbreak.   

The onions, which were sold to U.S. restaurants and grocery stores, were last imported on August 27, the distributor said. However, according to the CDC, potentially infectious onions could still be in homes and businesses due to the product’s shelf life of up to three months. 

As of Wednesday, 652 Salmonella illnesses and 129 hospitalizations from the disease have been reported in 37 states, including Texas, Virginia, California and Illinois, the CDC said. But the number of cases is likely higher than the amount reported due to the time it takes to classify a sick person as part of the outbreak and how often those with Salmonella recover without being tested or receiving medical care, according to the CDC.  

The CDC has urged businesses not to serve fresh, whole onions that were imported from Chihuahua and distributed by ProSource Inc., and has asked people not to eat them. Onions without proper stickers or packaging that indicate the brand and country where the item was grown should be thrown out, the CDC advised. Surfaces and containers that may have been touched by impacted onions should be washed with hot, soapy water or run through a dishwasher, the CDC said. 

The outbreak was reported between May 31 to September 31, the CDC said. Those affected range in age from younger than 1 to 97 years old. No deaths have been reported as of Wednesday. 

Symptoms of Salmonella — a bacterial disease — include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps usually six hours to six days after a person swallows the bacteria, according to the CDC. Symptoms typically last from four to seven days, and most people can recover without treatment. 

The illness can sometimes cause severe disease, like infection of the urine, blood, bones, joints, spinal fluid and brain. Immunocompromised people and those under the age of 5 or older than 65 are more at risk for severe illnesses. 

Each year, the bacteria causes about 1.35 million illnesses, 26,500 hospitalizations and 420 deaths in the U.S., the CDC estimates. 

Tori B. Powell

Tori B. Powell is a breaking news reporter at CBS News. Reach her at tori.powell@cbsinteractive.com

Twitter

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/salmonella-onions-imported-mexico-cdc/

Rise in ‘needle spiking’ puts women in Britain on high alert

www.washingtonpost.com

Adela Suliman

LONDON — Britain is increasingly feeling like a hostile place for women.

There have been multiple reports of “needle spiking” — which involves an injection being administered to someone without their knowledge or consent, usually in a nightclub or bar setting — as opposed to the more commonly known method of contaminating alcoholic drinks.

Zara Owen, a 19-year-old student in Nottingham, central England, said she woke up after clubbing with a “sharp, agonizing pain in my leg” and “almost zero recollection” of the night before. She walked with a limp for the remainder of the day, she wrote on social media, before finding a “pinprick” and realizing that she had been “spiked” by a needle that had pierced through her jeans.

Thankfully, she added, her friends — who had noticed her behaving strangely — helped her to return safely home.

“The fact that this form of spiking is happening is horrifying, with the memory loss it brought me,” Owen told The Washington Post. “What is supposed to be a fun night leads us to almost fear the unknown.”

The Nottinghamshire police said this week that it had received a total of 15 reports of alleged spiking with a sharp object since Oct. 2, with the majority of reports made by women, in venues across the popular university town. Two men had been arrested so far on “suspicion of conspiracy to administer poison with intent to injure, annoy or aggrieve,” the police added on Friday.

Cases have also been reported elsewhere in Britain, mostly among college students, in Glasgow, Exeter and Birmingham.

The reported needle-spiking incidents come aftertwo high-profile murders of women on the streets, which have left Britain stunned. The overall number of reported needle-spiking incidents remains far below the number of drink-spiking incidents thought to occur, and the incidents not yet been linked to other crimes such as rape or theft, but police chiefs have been asked to urgently assess how widespread the attacks are around the country, while the home secretary has also expressed concern.“We need to make sure that we earn back the trust and confidence particularly of women and girls. And that takes an approach that isn’t just the police’s problem, but all of our problem… I think misogyny should be a hate crime, and we’re lobbying the government to make sure that harassment in a public place is a criminal offense.” (Washington Post Live)

In September, a U.K. watchdog called violence against women “an epidemic” and said authorities should treat it with as much urgency as fighting terrorism. On average, a woman is killed by a man in the United Kingdom every three days, it said.

The reports of needle spiking were “deeply worrying” said Melissa Green, general secretary of the National Federation of Women’s Institutes. The cases “again remind us that our public spaces are not truly safe for women,” Green told The Post.

Police have also been criticized for their approach — including their advice to women, following the death of Everard, to shout or wave down a bus if they encounter a lone police officer they do not trust — which some said continued to place the onus on women.

“The W.I. does not agree that it is the responsibility of women to educate themselves or alter their behavior to try and keep themselves safe. … What is actually needed is action from the whole of society,” Green added.

The needle-spiking cases have also prompted a public petition urging politicians to enact tougher laws to search guests on arrival to nightclubs. As of Saturday, it had garnered more than 165,000 signatories, which will trigger the British parliament to consider the petition for a debate.

Meanwhile, from Wales to Birmingham, female students across the United Kingdom are hosting a “Girls Night In” public campaign over the next two weeks to boycott nightclubs and draw attention to the issue of needle spiking and women’s safety.

Owen told The Post that she would “like to see more change in nightclubs,” including better searches before people enter.

Meanwhile Nia Gallagher, 20, has been using her TikTok platform — where she has almost 300,000 followers, to spread awareness about spiking incidents and personal safety.

Gallagher said she had her drink spiked when she was 18, after she left her drink briefly unattended while out in a Dublin nightclub. The spiking of her drink left her severely unwell for over a week and wiped her memory, she said, although she made it safely home and was not attacked.

“I let my guard down and that’s why it happened to me,” she told The Post, adding that news of the latest attacks was “really upsetting.”

“A lot of people turned 18 over lockdown so it’s their first time going to nightclubs … so I just wanted to warn people,” she said.

It’s unclear what exact drugs are being administered in the syringes. However, Shirin Lakhani, a cosmetic doctor and former anesthetist, said needles and prescription drugs, such as pain killers and opium-based medicines, are extremely easy to get hold of online and assailants would require little knowledge of how to inject under the skin.

“Needles have gotten really fine now and you can get needles as fine as hairs, so it’s possible not to notice, especially in a club environment with the noise,” she told The Post.

Lakhani said images on social media suggested the attackers were targeting hands in particular, with bruises taking some time to manifest.

“It’s appalling that we have to look after ourselves in this way,” said the doctor and mother of two girls. “It’s another way to carry out misogynistic attacks.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/10/23/uk-women-needle-spiking/?utm_campaign=wp_main&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter

Kale Recalled in 10 States Due to Potential Listeria Contamination

www.allrecipes.com

By Michael Y. Park

The kale was sold under the Baker Farms, Kroger, and SEG brand names.

In conjunction with the Food and Drug Administration, Baker Farms has issued a 10-state recall for kale because it may be contaminated with listeria.

Fresh kale sold under the Baker Farms, Kroger, and SEG Grocers brand names between Aug. 30 and Sept. 1 should not be consumed. You can return the potentially contaminated kale where you bought it for a full refund.

The kale in question was packaged in 1-pound plastic bags with a sell-by date of Sept. 18. It shows a production code of 107020-21832 and was sold in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, New York and Virginia. The Kroger family of markets includes Ralphs, Harris Teeter, QFC, Fred Meyer, Dillons and others. SEG, or Southeastern Grocers, includes chains like Winn-Dixie, Harvey and Fresco y Más. It’s unclear if the potentially listeria-ridden kale was also sold under subsidiary brand names or only under parent-company brand names.

curly kale on a blue background with a red recall stick

Credit: Image by Marie LaFauci/Getty Images

Listeria is potentially fatal in children, the elderly, and people with existing health problems. It can cause miscarriages and stillbirths in pregnant women. Even healthy people who consume foodborne listeria monocytogenes may suffer high fevers, headaches, nausea, stiffness, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.

So far, there have been no reported cases of illness linked to the contaminated kale.

Consumers with questions can contact Richard G. Baker at richard@bakerfamilyproduce.com or call (229) 769-3113 from Monday to Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern time.

https://www.allrecipes.com/syndication/kale-recall-listeria/?did=677871-20210921&utm_campaign=hot-dish_newsletter&utm_source=allrecipes.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=092121&cid=677871&mid=67525488835

PFAS ‘Forever Chemicals’ found in Tuna, Fish Sticks, Protein Powder and Baby Food, says FDA

Chemical Free Life

Last month we reported on the FDA study results showing that of the nearly 100 food types the FDA tested, the vast majority of raw food in the U.S. is free of PFAS chemical contamination.  On August 26, 2021 however, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it had found PFAS “forever chemicals” in some processed foods, including several baby foodsThe results showed that 164 of the 167 foods tested had no detectable levels of the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) measured–which is surprising since we know that a number of commercially processed food manufacturers still use packaging that contains PFAS which can migrate or leach into the food.

Among the processed foods testing positive for PFAS contamination* fish sticks, tuna, and protein powder had three specific PFAS chemicals: perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) ranging from 33 parts per trillion…

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FDA Issues Important Warning to Maker of 12 Dog Food Brands

midwestern pet food chickasha operations facility

Image:  KWTV Channel 9 Oklahoma City

www.dogfoodadvisor.com

August 17, 2021 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a formal warning to Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc., maker of 12 pet food brands and sub-brands, after inspections of manufacturing plants revealed serious violations.

The FDA claims conditions at the firm’s facilities likely contributed to the illness or death of hundreds of dogs and cats.

What Caused the FDA’s Action?

According to the FDA…

“Analysis of these subsequent samples found that additional SPORTMiX branded products, spanning multiple products and lot codes, contained aflatoxin at levels as high as 558 ppb. FDA considers that aflatoxin levels in dog and cat food above 20 ppb will support a charge of adulteration… because of the reasonable possibility that a regular diet of such food will be fatal or injurious to the health of the pet. Therefore, these pet food products manufactured in your OK facility are adulterated in that they bear or contain a poisonous or deleterious substance which renders them injurious to health.”

Editor — Aflatoxin levels were nearly 28 times the safe upper limit of 20 parts per billion (ppb) established by the FDA.

More Safety Violations

The FDA’s official warning to Midwestern Pet Foods contained multiple instances of critical safety violations… too many to detail in this short article.

So, for greater detail…

Be sure to read the official FDA Warning letter issued to Midwestern Pet Foods.

Midwestern Pet Foods Brands

The following is a list of brands and sub-brands known to be manufactured by Midwestern Pet Foods.

And any one of them (at any time) can be suddenly affected by changes to these FDA findings:

  • CanineX
  • Earthborn Holistic
  • Meridian
  • Nunn Better
  • Pro Pac
  • Pro Pac Ultimates
  • Splash
  • Sportmix
  • Sportmix Wholesomes
  • Sportstrail
  • Unrefined
  • Venture

Midwestern Pet Foods Recall History

The following list includes all dog food recalls since 2016 related to Midwestern Pet Foods.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls since 2009 here.

What to Do?

As of this date…

No additional recalls related to this FDA warning have been reported.

However…

Please keep in mind just how unpredictable a dangerous and deadly dog food recall can be.

So…

Before purchasing ANY dog food, be sure to check The Dog Food Advisor’s Best Dog Foods pages.

That’s because anytime we determine a particular manufacturer has become a high risk, repeat offender

Their products are immediately removed from our Best Dog Foods page.

Our Very Best Advice

Since there’s no such thing as a perfect dog food

And because built-in flaws tend to be magnified when the same food is fed endlessly… day after day for a lifetime.

You may wish to consider diet rotation when feeding your pet.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/midwestern-pet-foods-warning/

Hostess Is Recalling Hamburger and Hot Dog Buns Due to Possible Contamination

The products may be contaminated with Listeria and Salmonella. By Sarra Sedghi August 19, 2021

https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.476.0_en.html#goog_1263040908Remaining Time -0:39

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has shared a recall on certain hamburger and hot dog buns created by Hostess Brands, LLC due to the potential presence of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. The impacted products were manufactured by Best Harvest Bakeries, a Hostess co-manufacturer. At the moment, Hostess has received no reports of illness related to the issue from consumers.

The affected products, Hostess Soft White Hamburger Buns and Hostess Soft White Hot Dog Buns, have respective UPCs of 888109110987 and 888109110970. The affected hamburger buns have best-by dates ranging from August 13, 2021 to October 4, 2021 and the affected hot dog buns have best-by dates ranging from August 13, 2021 to September 30, 2021. For more information including batch numbers, check the FDA’s announcement.

Credit: Hostess

Both Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in children, frail and elderly people, and immunocompromised people. Salmonella infection symptoms include fever and gastric issues such as vomiting, abdominal pain, and vomiting. In rare cases, Salmonella can enter the bloodstream and cause a more severe illness.

Listeria infection symptoms include high fever, severe headaches, stiffness and gastric issues such as vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, and the organism can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant people. If you are experiencing severe symptoms of either illness, contact a medical professional.

No other Hostess products are affected by this recall, the FDA says. If you’ve purchased the affected products, dispose of them or return to the place of purchase for a refund.

Related: FDA Recalls Nearly 60,000 Pounds of Frozen Raw Chicken Products Sold at Aldi, Other Stores

McCormick Is Voluntarily Recalling Seasonings in 32 States Due to Possible Salmonella Risk Video Nearly 300,000 Pounds of Raw Beef Recalled Due to E. Coli Article An E. Coli Outbreak Has Been Potentially Linked to Cake Mix in Multiple States — Here’s What You Need to Know Article Carrot Recall: California Company Announces Possible Salmonella Contamination in Baby and Shredded Carrots Video Packaged Muffins Sold at Walmart, 7-Eleven, and Other Stores May Be Contaminated With Listeria, FDA Says  Video Over 8 Million Pounds of Chicken Recalled Due to Possible Listeria Contamination Video Dole Recalls Blueberries for Possible Parasite Contamination Video Avanti Frozen Foods Recalls Several Shrimp Products Linked to Salmonella Outbreak Video The FDA Is Recalling Nearly 3,500 Pounds of Romaine Lettuce in 19 States Over Potential E. Coli Contamination Video Hot Pockets Recall: Nearly 763,000 Pounds of Pepperoni Sandwiches Could Be Contaminated With Glass and Plastic Video FDA Announces Recalls of Spices Over Fears of Salmonella Contamination Video Sunbeam Products Recalls Nearly One Million Crock-Pot Multi-Cookers Video Peaches Sold at Aldi, Target Recalled for Possible Salmonella Contamination Video If You Stocked Up on Canned Goods, Check Your Pantry for This Recalled Chicken Noodle Soup Article The USDA Is Recalling More Than 38,000 Pounds of Beef Article Recalls FDA Expands List of Recalled Hand Sanitizers Containing Toxic Methanol Article Lemons, Limes, Oranges, Potatoes Recalled in Several States Over Listeria Concerns Video More Than 40,000 Pounds of Ground Beef Sold at Walmart, Other Stores Recalled for Possible E. Coli Video Fresh Express Southwest Chopped Salad Kits Recalled in 11 States

https://www.allrecipes.com/article/hostess-hamburger-hot-dog-bun-recall/?did=666636-20210822&utm_campaign=hot-dish_newsletter&utm_source=allrecipes.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=082221&cid=666636&mid=65182110220

Six Dog Food Brands Recalled Due to Dangerous Mold Toxin

Animal feed corn with mold

Corn mold producing dangerous aflatoxin

www.dogfoodadvisor.com

July 29, 2021 — Sunshine Mills is recalling six dog food brands due to dangerous levels of aflatoxin.

Aflatoxin is a potentially deadly toxin produced by Aspergillus mold (typically found on corn)… and which can be harmful to pets if consumed in significant amounts.

What’s Recalled?

Sunshine Mills Dog Food Recall Batch Info July 2021

To date, no illnesses have been reported in association with the related products. No other Sunshine Mills pet foods are affected by this announcement.

Sold Nationwide

The affected products were distributed in retail stores nationally.

Retailers who received the recalled lots have been contacted and asked to pull these lots from their inventory and shelves.

There are no other Triumph®, Evolve®, Wild Harvest®, Nurture Farms®, Pure Being®, or Elm products or other lot codes of these products affected by this recall.

Message from the Company

“While no adverse health effects related to these products have been reported, Sunshine Mills, Inc. has chosen to issue a voluntary recall of the above-referenced products as a precautionary measure in furtherance of its commitment to the safety and quality of its products.”

What to Do?

Pets that have consumed any of the above recalled products and exhibit symptoms of illness including sluggishness or lethargy combined with a reluctance to eat, vomiting, yellowish tint to the eyes or gums, or diarrhea should be seen by a veterinarian.

Consumers who have purchased the recalled dog food should discontinue use of the product… and may return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers may contact Sunshine Mills, Inc. customer service at 800-705-2111 from 7 am to 4 pm Central Time, Monday through Friday.

Or by email at [email protected] for additional information.

This is a voluntary recall being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/sunshine-mills-july-2021/

Simply Nourish Dog Food Recall | Dog Food Advisor

Simply Nourish Cooked Frozen Dog Food Recall

Simply Nourish Recalls 8 Products

August 13, 2021 — Wet Noses Natural Dog Treat Company of Monroe, Washington, is recalling approximately 51,000 packages of Simply Nourish frozen dog food due to it elevated levels of Vitamin D.

What’s Being Recalled?

Recalled products are marketed in 2-pound and 4.5-pound packages across specific “Best By” dates.

A full list of affected products is included below:

Simply Nourish Dog Food Recall Batch Info

Affected Simply Nourish frozen food products were distributed at select PetSmart stores nationwide.

No illnesses have been reported to date. No other products have been affected.

About Vitamin D Toxicity in Dogs

Dogs ingesting elevated levels of Vitamin D may exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss.

Vitamin D when consumed at very high levels or over a long period of time can lead to serious health issues in dogs… including kidney failure and death.

Consumers who have dogs that have consumed any of the products listed above and are exhibiting these symptoms, should contact their veterinarian.

What Caused the Recall?

The recall was initiated after a routine nutrition test confirmed elevated Vitamin D levels on certain Simply Nourish frozen food products.

Subsequent investigation indicates the problem arose as a result of the vitamin mix dosage being significantly reduced by the vitamin mix manufacturer, and this change was not detected or properly communicated.

As a result, the dosage was not reduced.

Company Message

We care deeply about our customers and their pets, and have put corrective actions into place to ensure this issue does not reoccur.

This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

What to Do?

Consumers should immediately stop feeding the above products to their dogs.

Consumers who have purchased Simply Nourish Frozen Food are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 800-938-6673 Monday to Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm PST.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/simply-nourish/

Tyson Foods Inc. Recalls Ready-To-Eat Chicken Products Due to Possible Listeria Contamination

www.fsis.usda.gov

WASHINGTON, July 3, 2021 – Tyson Foods Inc., a Dexter, Mo. establishment, is recalling approximately 8,492,832 pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen, fully cooked chicken products were produced between December 26, 2020 and April 13, 2021. The products that are subject to recall are listed here. View the labels here.       

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-7089” on the product bag or inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped nationwide to retailers and institutions, including hospitals, nursing facilities, restaurants, schools and Department of Defense locations.                             

On June 9, 2021, FSIS was notified of two persons ill with listeriosis. Working in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state public health partners, FSIS determined there is evidence linking the Listeria monocytogenes illnesses to precooked chicken produced at Tyson Foods Inc. The epidemiologic investigation identified three listeriosis illnesses, including one death, between April 6, 2021 and June 5, 2021. During routine sample collection, FSIS collected two precooked chicken samples from two establishments that are closely related genetically to Listeria monocytogenes from ill people. One of the samples was collected at Tyson Foods Inc. FSIS is continuing to work with federal and state public health partners to determine if there are additional illnesses linked to these products.

Additional information on the investigation may be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumer and institutional freezers. Consumers should not eat these products. Institutions should not serve these products. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify theircustomers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Members of the media who have questions regarding the recall can contact Derek Burleson, Communications Manager, Tyson Foods, at (479) 290-6466 or  derek.burleson@tyson.com. Consumers who have questions can contact Tyson Foods customer relations, at (855) 382-3101.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to MPHotline@usda.gov. For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/.

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls-alerts/tyson-foods-inc.-recalls-ready-eat-chicken-products-due-possible-listeria

Ice Cream Recall 2021: Weis Markets Recalls Over 11,000 Ice Cream Containers

Be sure to check the freezer if you might have Weis ice cream.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has shared a recall from Weis Markets, recalling more than 11,000 containers of ice cream. The frozen treats may be contaminated with “extraneous material, specifically metal filling equipment parts,” which is not a traditional ice cream topping.

The company has recalled 10,869 containers of Weis Quality Cookies and Cream Ice Cream in 48-ounce containers, as well as 502 bulk units of Klein’s Vanilla Dairy Ice Cream in three-gallon containers. The ice cream may be contaminated with foreign matter which is, obviously, a choking hazard. 

MORE: A Dog & Cat Food Recall Has Expanded After More Than 70 Dogs Die

The recall notice says there has been one report of someone finding an “intact piece of metal equipment” in their ice cream. There is concern that more containers may have been contaminated as well. 

The ice cream was sold at 197 Weis Markets stores in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, New York, Delaware, and West Virginia. The vanilla bulk ice cream packages are not available for retail sale, so you probably don’t have that sitting in your fridge. For the average shopper, there’s just the single product that you want to look out for. The Cookies and Cream ice cream has a sell-by date of October 28, 2021, which can be found near the bottom of the container. 

MORE: Blueberry Yogurts Are Being Recalled Over Potential Mold Contamination

Two other types of ice cream were packaged on the same date, but the announcement says all units were stored in a warehouse and never distributed. Be sure to return that package for a refund if you’ve got it in the freezer. You can also call Weis Markets’ customer service line with questions.

https://www-thrillist-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.thrillist.com/amphtml/news/nation/ice-cream-recall-2021-weis-markets?amp_js_v=a6&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQFKAGwASA=#ampshare=https://www.thrillist.com/news/nation/ice-cream-recall-2021-weis-markets

Deadly Dog and Cat Food Recall Expands: More Brands, Over 1000 Lots

www.dogfoodadvisor.com

HomeDog Food Recalls › Deadly Dog and Cat Food Recall Expands: More Brands, Over 1000 Lots

Image Credit – Food Safety News

Important: Illustrations not complete. Additional images will be added if or when they become available.

January 11, 2021 — The FDA is alerting consumers that Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc. is expanding its recent recall to include over 1000 lots of Sportmix and 2 other brands of dog and cat food because they contain potentially fatal levels of aflatoxin.

As of this date, FDA is aware of more than 70 deaths and 80 illnesses in pets that have eaten the affected products.

This is an ongoing investigation. This count is approximate and may not reflect the total number of pets affected.

What’s Recalled?

On December 30, 2020, Midwestern Pet Foods announced a recall of nine total lots of Sportmix pet food products.

  • Sportmix Energy Plus, 50 lb. bag
    Exp 03/02/22/05/L2
    Exp 03/02/22/05/L3
    Exp 03/03/22/05/L2
  • Sportmix Energy Plus, 44 lb. bag
    Exp 03/02/22/05/L3
  • Sportmix Premium High Energy, 50 lb. bag
    Exp 03/03/22/05/L3
  • Sportmix Premium High Energy, 44 lb. bag
    Exp 03/03/22/05/L3
  • Sportmix Original Cat, 31 lb. bag
    Exp 03/03/22/05/L3
  • Sportmix Original Cat, 15 lb. bag
    Exp 03/03/22/05/L2
    Exp 03/03/22/05/L3

On January 11, 2021, the company expanded its recall to include all pet food products containing corn that were made in the firm’s Oklahoma plant and that expire on or before July 9, 2022.

More than 1000 lot codes are affected, so they are not listed individually.

Lots of the following pet food products have been recalled if the date/lot code includes an expiration date on or before “07/09/22” and includes “05” in the date/lot code, which identifies products made in the Oklahoma plant:

  • Pro Pac Adult Mini Chunk, 40 lb. bag
  • Pro Pac Performance Puppy, 40 lb. bag
  • Splash Fat Cat 32%, 50 lb. bag
  • Nunn Better Maintenance, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Original Cat, 15 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Original Cat, 31 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Maintenance, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Maintenance, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix High Protein, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Energy Plus, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Energy Plus, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Stamina, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Stamina, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Bite Size, 40 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Bite Size, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix High Energy, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix High Energy, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Premium Puppy, 16.5 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Premium Puppy, 33 lb. bag

Lot code information may be found on the back of bag and will appear in a three-line code, with the top line in format “EXP 03/03/22/05/L#/B###/HH:MM”

Sportmix Aflatoxin Recall Package Information

About Aflatoxin

Aflatoxin is a toxin produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus and at high levels it can cause illness and death in pets.

The toxin can be present even if there is no visible mold.

Pets are highly susceptible to aflatoxin poisoning because, unlike people, who eat a varied diet, pets generally eat the same food continuously over extended periods of time.

If a pet’s food contains aflatoxin, the toxin could accumulate in the pet’s system as they continue to eat the same food.

Pets with aflatoxin poisoning may experience symptoms such as sluggishness, loss of appetite, vomiting, jaundice (yellowish tint to the eyes, gums or skin due to liver damage), and/or diarrhea.

In some cases, this toxicity can cause long-term liver issues and/or death.

Some pets suffer liver damage without showing any symptoms.

Pet owners whose pets have been eating the recalled products should contact their veterinarians, especially if they are showing signs of illness.

There is no evidence to suggest that pet owners who handle products containing aflatoxin are at risk of aflatoxin poisoning.

However, pet owners should always wash their hands after handling pet food.

What to Do?

Affected products may still be on store shelves, online, or in pet owners’ homes.

Pet owners should stop feeding their pets the recalled products listed above and consult their veterinarian, especially if the pet is showing signs of illness.

The pet owner should remove the food and make sure no other animals have access to the recalled product.

Contact Midwestern Pet Foods Consumer Affairs at 800-474-4163, ext. 455 from 7 am to 4 pm CT, Monday through Friday, or by email at info@midwesternpetfoods.com for additional information.

Further information regarding this recall can be found in the related FDA Bulletin.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

Get Lifesaving Recall Alerts by Email

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https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/recall-expands/

Albright’s Raw Dog Food Recall

Pin

Albrights Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe Recall

November 13, 2020 — Albright’s Raw Dog Food of Fort Wayne, Indiana, is voluntarily recalling 67 cases of Chicken Recipe for Dogs because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.

What’s Being Recalled?

The product is labeled Albright’s Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe for Dogs and is packaged in 2-pound chubs/rolls (see image above).

Each chub/roll is printed with:

  • Lot number C000185
  • Best By 19 May 2021

Product was sold frozen, and was distributed from the company to distributors from 7/8/20 to 8/27/20.

One animal illness has been reported. No human illnesses have been reported to date.

Where Was It Sold?

Albright’s Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe for Dogs was distributed in CA, FL, IL, IN, NH, NJ, NV, NY, PA, and TN.

The affected product was also distributed through retail stores, mail order, and direct delivery.

What Caused the Recall?

The problem bacteria was revealed after testing conducted by the FDA.

The problem was confined to this batch and the company has ceased the distribution of the batch as FDA and the company continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

About Salmonella in Humans

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

About Salmonella in Pets

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

What to Do?

Due to the frozen condition of the product, it is possible that retailers and end users may still have the product in their freezers.

Consumers who have purchased Albright’s Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe for Dogs are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 260-422-9440 Monday through Friday, 8 AM to 4 PM ET.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/albrights-raw/

15K Pounds Of Canned Soup Recalled

Faribault Foods Inc., a Faribault, Minn. establishment, is recalling approximately 15,134 pounds of canned PROGRESSO  soup product due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The product contains milk and soy, known allergens, as well as beef and pork, which are not declared on the product label.

The cans labeled as chicken noodle soup actually contain a meatball and pasta product. The canned soup items were produced on May 26, 2020. The following products are subject to recall:

14-oz. cans of “PROGRESSO ORGANIC CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP” with a best by date of “BestByMAY262022” printed on the bottom of the can and a best by date of “09JUN2022” printed on the product case.
The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST18826A” printed on the bottom of the can under the best by date. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered when the firm’s distributor notified FSIS of consumer complaints that the soup contained meatballs and pasta instead of chicken and noodles.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ pantries. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

https://breaking911.com/15k-pounds-of-canned-soup-recalled/

Love Shellfish? New Study Suggests Oysters Might Contain Bacteria, Plastics and Baby Formula : MEDICINE & HEALTH : Science Times

 

 

Scientists from the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with the University of Queensland and Environmental Defense Fund, Cornell University, yield an alarming discovery after conducting the first landmark study using high technology to examine the contaminants of oysters.

Love Shellfish? New Study Suggests Oysters Might Contain Bacteria, Plastics and Baby Formula

Their study reveals that oysters are contaminated with human bacterial pathogens and micro debris like plastics, kerosene, talc, paint, and baby formula.

The study was conducted in the eastern part of the Andaman Sea, with the help of local researchers in Myanmar in the rural Tanintharyi region. The researchers found that coastal urbanization and lack of sewage treatment contaminates seafood and, in turn, poses health risks for humans.

love-shellfish-new-study-suggests-oysters-might-contain-bacteria-plastics-and-baby-formula(2)

(PHOTO:Pixabay)

The findings of their research were published in Science of the Total Environment.

Read: Marine Plastic Pollution Harms Bacteria That Help Us Breathe

What’s Inside the Shellfish?

The study covered nine coral reefs off the Mergui Archipelago of Myanmar situated roughly 40 miles from the city of Myeik that has over 250,000 residents.

The researchers used the next-generation DNA sequencing technology to reveal 5,459 potential human pathogens of 87 species of bacteria. More than 50% of these bacteria are harmful to human health.

Additionally, they used infrared spectroscopy to examine human-derived micro debris found in oysters and found 78 different contaminants.

Study senior author Joleah Lamb, an assistant professor of ecology & evolutionary biology at UCI, said that 48% of the contaminants they found in oysters were microplastics. However, many other particles were also present and not just plastics.

They were surprised to find constituents of fuel, paint, cosmetics, and three different brands of powdered milk that comprise 14% of the micro debris.

The pathogens and microparticles reflect the pervasive presence of sewage and other human-derived micro debris, which implies that coastal urbanization has led to the contamination of vital marine species globally.

Read Also: Happy As A Clam: Boracay Beach Front Covered in Clams Has Caught the Attention of Netizens in Social Media

Implications for Human Health

The study’s implications for human health are very important. Oysters in the study area and anywhere that is part of the local diet consume the shellfish raw and whole. The contaminants found suggest that even areas such as rural Myanmar, far from the urban cities, have significant pollution from agricultural and human waste.

Today, more than 50% of seafood exports come from developing countries, which raises concerns about food safety and security worldwide.

But aside from pathogens present in shellfish, experts are very much concerned about the predominance of microplastics and its other types that are present in seafood that could adversely affect the environment and human health.

Microplastics such as persistent organic pollutants, or POPs carry toxins that enter the seafood and eventually transferred to people through food. That means, microplastics in the marine environment could be an emerging health risk to the people worldwide.

The authors are also concerned that over 50% of the micro debris detected in the Myanmar oyster tissues are polymer materials that are harmful to human health. These are kerosene, saponin, and talc.

Furthermore, the presence of milk supplement reveals that there is a direct fecal-oral link between sewage and human waste that is making its way back to the food chain. Therefore, it elevates further the risk of contamination or, worse, disease transmission.

https://www.sciencetimes.com/amp/articles/26690/20200730/love-shellfish-new-study-suggests-oysters-contain-bacteria-plastics-baby.htm?__twitter_impression=true

CDC: Cases of Salmonella from onions reported in Tennessee and Virginia

Bianca Marais 22 hours ago

(WJHL) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning people not to eat, serve, or sell onions from Thomson International, Inc., or food made with them after 396 illnesses were reported in 34 states. This includes red, white, yellow, and sweet onions.

Those states include Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina and Kentucky. https://d-170205462774592454.ampproject.net/2007172306003/frame.html

One case of salmonella was reported in Kentucky, Three cases were reported in North Carolina, five in Tennessee, and four in Virginia. A full list of cases in affected states can be found by clicking HERE. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0

According to a report by the CDC, 59 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

For a full list of symptoms for the Salmonella infection, click HERE.

At home, the CDC recommends that you check your refrigerator and kitchen for any of these onions or fresh foods made with them:

  • Check the package or look for a sticker on an onion to see if it is from Thomson International, Inc. If it is, don’t eat it. Throw it away.
  • If you can’t tell where your onions are from, don’t eat them. Throw them away.
  • If you made any foods with onions and you don’t know where they are from, do not eat them. Throw them away, even if no one got sick.
  • Wash and sanitize any surfaces that may have come in contact with onions or their packaging, such as countertops, refrigerator drawers, knives, and cutting boards.

When you eat out or shop for food, the CDC recommends that you check with restaurants and grocery stores to make sure they are not serving or selling onions from Thomson International Inc., or fresh foods prepared with them:

  • If they don’t know where their onions are from, don’t buy the product.
  • People sickened in this outbreak reported eating raw onions in freshly prepared foods, including salads, sandwiches, wraps, salsas, and dips.

For more information about the outbreak, click HERE. Categories: Consumer, News, Regional https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0 Loading … https://d-170205462774592454.ampproject.net/2007172306003/frame.html

WJHL | Tri-Cities News & Weather

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Parasite Outbreak in Bagged Salads Sickens More Than 200 in Eight States

ecowatch.com

Olivia Rosane

Two of the salads impacted by a series of recalls linked to a Cyclospora outbreak. FDA

A Cyclospora outbreak linked to bagged lettuce has sickened 206 people in eight Midwestern states and sent 23 to the hospital, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Friday. No one has died.


The outbreak has led to several recalls of salads made at a Fresh Express production facility in Streamwood, Illinois that were sold at major retailers Walmart, Hy-Vee, Aldi and Jewel-Osco, USA TODAY reported.

“[O]bviously there was some breakdown in the quality chain,” Rutgers University food microbiologist Donald W. Schaffner told The New York Times. He said the size and spread of the outbreak suggested “some rather significant sanitary breakdown in the production of this food.”

FOOD RECALL: Fresh Express recalled products with iceberg lettuce, carrots, and red cabbage due to Cyclospora. Prod… https://t.co/mi3qsBhvXz — CDC (@CDC)1593380259.0

The parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis causes an infection called cyclosporiasis when humans eat or drink contaminated food or water, according to the CDC. The main symptom is watery diarrhea, but it can also cause stomach cramping, appetite loss and fatigue. It can last from a few days to longer than a month and is typically treated with antibiotics.

The first major foodborne cyclosporiasis outbreak was in the mid-1990s, Schaffner told The New York Times, and no one knows exactly what caused it. The current outbreak marks the third year in a row that there has been an outbreak of the illness during the warmer months.

“It’s likely due to the quality of the water used to irrigate the produce, and it probably has something to do with human fecal contamination of that water, but of course there’s a whole lot of unknowns,” Schaffner said. “Very often with these fresh produce outbreaks, we never learn the definitive cause.”

Illnesses from the current outbreak have been reported in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and Wisconsin between May 11 and June 17, the CDC said. So far, the CDC and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigation has uncovered a Fresh Express bagged salad mix containing iceberg lettuce, carrots and red cabbage as the likely culprit.

The outbreak has already prompted a number of recalls.

1. Brand: Marketside brand Classic Iceberg Salad

Store: Walmart

States: Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin

Bag Size: 12 to 24 ounces

Use By: 05/19/2020 through 07/04/2020

2. Brand: Little Salad Bar brand Garden Salad

Store: ALDI

States: Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin

Bag Size: 12 ounces

Use By: 05/01/2020 through 06/29/2020

3. Brand: Hy-Vee brand Garden Salad

Store: Hy-Vee

States: Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wisconsin

Bag Size: 12 ounces

Use By: All dates

4. Brand: Jewel-Osco Signature Farms brand Garden Salad

Store: Jewel-Osco

States: Illinois, Indiana and Iowa

Bag Size: 12 ounces

Use By: 05/16/2020 through 07/04/2020

Jewel-Osco Voluntarily Recalls Bagged Signature Farms Garden Salad Due to Possible Cyclospora Contamination… https://t.co/nqaUR2DeXr — U.S. FDA Recalls (@U.S. FDA Recalls)1593184537.0

Then, on Saturday, Fresh Express issued a voluntary recall of all the salads made at its Streamwood facility that contain iceberg lettuce, red cabbage or carrots. The recall only impacts salads with a “Z” at the beginning of the Product Code in the upper-right-hand corner of the front of the package. The recalled salads have a Product Code of Z178 or lower.

“Our immediate thoughts and concern are for those consumers who have become ill due to the outbreak,” Fresh Express said in a statement Saturday reported by USA Today. “Out of an abundance of caution, we have issued a voluntary recall of both branded and private label salad products that were produced at the Streamwood facility and contain those ingredients.”

The Fresh Express recall came after the FDA began an investigation of the Streamwood plant and raised concerns that some products not already recalled might be impacted, according to the FDA.

“Consumers should not eat, and restaurants and retailers should not sell or serve any Fresh Express products currently on the market that were made in the Streamwood, Illinois, production facility and contain either iceberg lettuce, red cabbage, or carrots,” the agency recommended.

https://www.ecowatch.com/bagged-salad-recall-parasites-2646289730.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=0f262331cb-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-0f262331cb-86074753

Salad Recalled In Several States

breaking911.com

Fresh Express is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity of Fresh Express 11.5-ounce Southwest Chopped Kit with production codes G163B10A and G163B10B, UPC code 071279306025 and use-by date of June 29 due to the presence of undeclared wheat, soy, cashews, and coconut. In some individuals the consumption of undisclosed allergens could cause allergic reactions that in some cases could be life-threatening.

The recall was necessitated when Fresh Express learned that, during a single production run, incorrect condiment packets were placed into Southwest Chopped Kit bags and, as a result, the allergens wheat, soy, cashews, and coconut are not properly declared.

Only the Southwest Chopped Kit displaying the identified product codes, UPC code and use-by date are subject to the recall. All other Fresh Express Southwest Chopped Kits are properly labeled, and no other Fresh Express products are included in the recall. No illnesses are reported to date.

The recalled product was distributed between June 12 and June 18 in the states of Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. Fresh Express representatives are coordinating with retail stores, instructing them to remove the recalled product from store shelves and inventories.

Fresh Express takes all matters of food safety very seriously, including the issue of allergens. Company procedures and programs stringently follow all mandated regulations and focus on preventive measures designed to minimize potential risks. Express is coordinating with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is conducting a full investigation into this isolated incident.

Consumers in possession of the recalled product should discard it. A refund is available where purchased or by contacting the Fresh Express Consumer Response Center toll-free at (800) 242-5472 Monday through Friday during the hours of 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time.

Information regarding Fresh Express products sold at Publix affected by this recall:

Product Name: Fresh Express Southwest Chopped Kit
GTIN: 071279306025
Lot/Exp. Date: Lot G163B10A/use by June 29, Lot G163B10B/use by June 29

https://breaking911.com/salad-recalled-in-several-states/

Nearly 43,000 pounds of ground beef recalled for possible E. coli contamination

The beef products were sold in stores across the country.

Something went wrong. Author: Megan Yoder (TEGNA) Published: 12:05 PM EDT June 14, 2020 Updated: 1:26 PM EDT June 14, 2020

A meat producer is recalling 42,922 pounds of ground beef products because they may be contaminated with E. coli. 

The products were produced on June 1 and were shipped to retail locations nationwide, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. 

  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing “MARKETSIDE BUTCHER ORGANIC GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF” and a use or freeze by date of 07/01/20 and lot code P-53298-82.
  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing four ¼ lb. pieces of “MARKETSIDE BUTCHER ORGANIC GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES” and a use or freeze by date of June 27, 2020 and lot code P-53934-28.
  • 3-lb. vacuum packages containing three 1 lb. pieces of “MARKETSIDE BUTCHER ORGANIC GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF 93% LEAN / 7% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 07/01/20 and lot code P53929-70.
  • 1-lb. tray packages containing four ¼ lb. pieces of “THOMAS FARMS GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES 85% LEAN / 15% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 06/25/20 and lot code P53944-10.
  • 4-lb. tray packages containing 10 ¼ lb. pieces of “THOMAS FARMS GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES 80% LEAN / 20% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 06/25/20 and lot code P53937-45.
  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing four ¼ lb. pieces of “THOMAS FARMS GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES 85% LEAN / 15% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 06/27/20 and lot code P53935-25.
  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing “VALUE PACK FRESH GROUND BEEF 76% LEAN / 24% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 07/01/20 and lot code P53930-18.

The following products are affected by the recall: 

There have been no confirmed cases of E. coli connected to this recall, FSIS said. 

Credit: FSIS

You can see photos of the labels here. 

Consumers can contact the Lakeside Processing Center Call Center at (856) 832-3881 with questions.

© 2020 WPMT-TV. All Rights Reserved.

https://www.fox43.com/article/news/nation-world/ground-beef-recall-e-coli-lakeside-refrigerated-services/507-b6a720d8-6da3-418a-8086-0202ccb272dc

Unending Quarantine: We Are Not the Only Ones

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freefromharm.org

Ashley Capps 10-12 minutes


In addition to the logistical and financial crises so many continue to endure as a result of COVID-19, extended social distancing has plunged much of the world into a full-blown existential crisis as well. Shelter-in-place mandates, shuttered businesses and community spaces, and the loss of important social and familial rituals has found us confronting an unprecedented moment of alienation. We are profoundly disoriented by the sense of being estranged from our own lives.

While this feeling of separation is emotionally harrowing, I believe it can also provide an opportunity to consider the abjectly alienated existences we routinely inflict on so many of our fellow beings; the nonhuman animals we breed or capture for the purposes of exploitation. For us, this estrangement from the lives we belong to is temporary. For the animals languishing on farms, in zoos, vivisection laboratories, aquariums, circuses, pet stores, breeding mills, kill shelters, and anywhere else humans have imprisoned our fellow creatures, alienation is the very essence of their existence, and a permanent condition.

A “beef” cow at a “livestock” show. Photo by Unparalleled Suffering Photography.

And while the plights of all of these creatures is urgent and worthy of closer examination, in the interest of time I will limit this reflection to animals who are farmed; not only because they comprise the bulk of my research and advocacy, but because our consumption of animals, and our obsession with meat, is now unavoidably implicated in the current pandemic on multiple levels.

Our Fatal Flesh Obsession

While it is widely believed that COVID-19 jumped to humans via the animal flesh trade, this has led to a disproportionately critical focus on wildlife and “wet” markets. In reality, the “livestock” sector is the single largest source of human zoonotic disease pandemics globally. A 2012 global study mapping human diseases that come from animals found that “While zoonoses can be transmitted to people by either wild or domesticated animals, most human infections are acquired from the world’s 24 billion livestock, including pigs, poultry, cattle, goats, sheep and camels.”

Indeed, the World Health Organization states that “the greatest risk for zoonotic disease transmission occurs at the human-animal interface through direct or indirect human exposure to animals, their products (e.g. meat, milk, eggs…) and/or their environments,” while the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations notes that “Seventy percent of the new diseases that have emerged in humans over recent decades are of animal origin and, in part, directly related to the human quest for more animal-sourced food.”

Just a decade ago, swine flu, an H1N1 influenza virus, jumped from farmed pigs to humans and infected nearly 61 million people in the U.S. alone, where it resulted in 12,469 deaths, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, as many as 284,500 people were killed by the swine flu pandemic.

The infamous 1918 influenza pandemic known as the Spanish Flu was also caused by an H1N1 virus. Attributed to having developed from either a swine flu or avian flu virus on a pig or poultry farm (pre-dating so-called factory farms, it should be noted), the pandemic killed an estimated 50 million people globally.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

The Bigger Sickness

While these pandemics are tragic, they are not inevitable. In the grand scheme of things, they are symptoms of a much deeper sickness, one of our own making, with which we have infected not only ourselves, but whose toxic consequences can now be seen across the globe: in the burning of the Amazon rainforest to make room for ever more cattle ranching; in Australia where the ceaseless bulldozing of koala habitat, and the deliberate mass killing of kangaroos, both on behalf of the beef industry, kill far more of each species every year than the recent wildfires that drew a collective gasp of horror; in the unprecedented rates of wildlife species extinction resulting from habitat loss, whose number one driver is animal agriculture; in the climate crisis to which meat and dairy production contribute more greenhouse gas emissions than all global transport combined, leading to more and increasingly devastating droughts, floods, fires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events, while inching global temperatures inexorably toward the point of no return.

A koala mother and joey on a bulldozed log pile in Queensland. Photograph: WWF

Killing animals is killing us.

And the sickness is not in the scale of our killing; this is not an argument about the evils of industrial animal farming and a need to simply shift to more so-called humane, bucolic forms of exploitation and slaughter. The sickness is the mentality that designates sentient beings as something to be farmed at all. These animals, from whom we have stolen so many dignities; the dignities of self-determination, of bodily and reproductive autonomy, of family, of wildness, and of inherent existential worth, live suspended in a Frankensteinian netherworld of separation, entirely outside the natural order their ancient instincts once belonged to.

A mother goat at a “livestock” show. Unparalleled Suffering Photography

As author Joanna Lucas has written:

“Isolated from the natural world to which they belonged for millennia, farmed animals are forced to live their short lives in severely degraded physical and psychological environments that are far different from the ecosystems and cultures from which they historically derive. Severed from the intricate social structures that governed and guided their free-living communities, and confined, without the possibility of escape, to a human world where they have no place in the present, no link to the past, and no possibility of a future, domesticated animals have no power whatsoever over the most important aspects of their lives.

Humans decide where they will live; if they will ever know their mother; if, and how long, they will nurse their babies; when, and if, they will be permitted to see or be with their families and friends; when, where, or if they will be allowed to socialize with members of their own species; when, how, and if, they are going to reproduce; what, when, and how much they will eat; how much space they will have, if any; if, and how far, they will be allowed to roam; what mutilations they will be subjected to; what, if any, veterinary care they will receive; and when, where, and how they are going to die.”

Photo by Toronto Cow Save.

What can it mean that in a society obsessed with personal identity and freedom, we have erased the very concepts of identity, liberty, autonomy, and consent from entire populations of sentient individuals without so much as blinking at the moral implications of the indignity and debasement we needlessly inflict on them in the name of profit and palate pleasure?

To degrade any individual, much less entire species, to the lifelong status of property, captive, and commodity, is the grossest devaluing of life, and the ultimate alienation.

A dead hen on the egg conveyor. Jo-Anne McArthur/WeAnimals Media

Quoting author Linda Clark:

“When we use other individuals, they have not a thing to call their own; not their bodies, not their children, not even their very lives. Nothing. Reduced to commodities and resources, every moment of their existence is governed by human economics of the service that can be taken from them, the cash value of such substances as milk, eggs and body fibres that can be stripped from their living bodies, and ultimately the value per kilo of their pitiful corpses hacked and sawed to pieces. Our use of them is thorough and utterly pitiless.

These are the innocent victims of our deluded species. They do not ‘live’ as we know and value the word. They endure an existence. They are powerless, brought into the world by violation on an industrial scale for the sole purpose of gratifying human indulgence.

It doesn’t have to be this way. We can thrive without causing this devastating harm.”

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And here’s author Will Tuttle:

“Harboring the idea of owning another living being is in itself an act of violence, and our outer violence toward nonhuman animals, which is so devastating to us all, springs from this idea… [W]e are never owners of others. We can be their guardians, companions, friends, protectors, admirers, and appreciators, and this blesses us far more than we might think. The move from “owner” to “guardian” frees both the “owners” and the “owned,” and establishes the foundation for peace, freedom, and justice. We are all harmed by the culturally mandated ownership mentality that reduces beings to mere commodities, whether for food, clothing, entertainment, or the myriad of other uses. It is long past time for us to awaken from the cultural trance of owning our fellow beings…”

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It is no coincidence that our systematic destruction of animal lives, which is in large part facilitated by our refusal of their subjectivity, is also destroying the earth. As I write this, U.S. slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have been identified as the largest hotspot for coronavirus infection in the country, but are being forced to stay open by executive order of Donald Trump in order to supply the flesh fetish. Meanwhile, headlines continue to report “mass meat shortage” fears alongside images of people in full medical masks browsing empty meat refrigerators.

Our culture is in a state of addiction. It is pathological. And it is wrecking our planet, which ought to be incidental to the immorality of needlessly breeding billions of sentient individuals into captivity, reproductive subjugation, and slaughter. Bodies are not commodities. Body parts are not barcodes. Beings are not property.

Until we divest from this poisonous sense of entitlement, this stupor of violence, exploitation, and consumption, our species is doomed.

May it be otherwise. 

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ENOUGH…THIS NEEDS TO STOP!!!

13 Of The Best Grocery Delivery Services

If you’re practicing social distancing and at a high risk of contracting the coronavirus, or just don’t feel comfortable going to the market right now, there are a handful of awesome delivery services that will deliver a meal kits and groceries right to your door.

Please read tips and related information in the comments at the end of the article.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/hannahloewentheil/best-grocery-delivery-services?origin=tastynl&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Tasty%20Bumble%20Sponsored%203%2F30&utm_term=Tasty%20confirmed

The Coronavirus Could Force Mass Slaughterhouse Closures | LIVEKINDLY

 

https://www.livekindly.co/coronavirus-could-force-mass-slaughterhouse-closures/

Enoki Mushrooms Recalled Over Deadly Listeria Outbreak in 17 States

ecowatch.com

Olivia Rosane

A listeria outbreak linked to enoki mushrooms has killed four people in 17 states and sent 30 to the hospital. Amarita / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The new coronavirus isn’t the only public health threat facing the U.S. right now.

A listeria outbreak linked to enoki mushrooms has killed four people in 17 states and sent 30 to the hospital, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced Tuesday.

“Until we learn more about the source and distribution of the enoki mushrooms, CDC advises that people at higher risk for Listeria infections – pregnant women, adults ages 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems, such as people with cancer or on dialysis – avoid eating any enoki mushrooms labeled as ‘Product of Korea,'” the agency advised.

The CDC warning came a day after California-based Sun Hong Foods recalled all cases of its enoki mushrooms labeled “Product of Korea” after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) alerted the company that samples of its product had tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes in Michigan.

“Enoki mushrooms are white, with long stems and small caps,” the FDA explained. “They’re usually sold in clusters.”

The mushrooms are popular in East Asian cooking and are also called enokitake, golden needle, futu or lily mushrooms, according to USA Today.

The affected mushrooms were packaged in a white cardboard box, and then in clear plastic bags with green labels, according to the FDA. They have a Universal Product Code of 7 426852 625810 and were distributed in Washington, California, Florida, Illinois, Oregon and Texas. They are carried by J&L Supermarket, Jusgo Supermarket, ZTao Market, New Sang Supermarket and Galleria Market.

The outbreak so far has sickened a total of 36 people in Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Tennessee and Virginia, according to the CDC. Cases began to emerge between Nov. 23, 2016 and Dec. 13, 2019. The four deaths occurred in California, Hawaii and New Jersey.

People infected with listeriosis usually begin to have symptoms one to four weeks after eating contaminated food, though infections can begin as late as 70 days after exposure.

Pregnant people usually come down with flu-like symptoms such as fever and muscle ache, but it can have dangerous consequences for their children. Six of the people to fall ill in the current outbreak were pregnant, and two of these cases resulted in the loss of the infant.

In non-pregnant people, symptoms include flu-like symptoms as well as headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions. While otherwise healthy people will likely only experience symptoms for a short amount of time, the disease can have deadly consequences for children, elderly people or those with weakened immune systems, according to the FDA.

https://www.ecowatch.com/enoki-mushrooms-listeria-2645456832.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=f6f26032d7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-f6f26032d7-86074753

Purina recalls 4 different food brands sold in 32 states

grocery-recall602401348.jpg

msn.com
Shawn M. Carter 8 hrs ago

Pet company Purina Animal Nutrition has issued a massive recall across several of its food brands.

The recalled products — Purina Rabbit Feed, Purina Turkey Feed, Country Acres Rabbit Feed and DuMOR Chick Starter/Grower Feed — received several customer complaints, according to a press release, that the food was causing their pets and animals to fall ill.

The company said it found elevated calcium levels in the food, which could cause severe health issues in rabbits and young chicken and turkeys, and in some cases, death.

In a statement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said “elevated calcium carbonate levels can cause health issues and mortality in rabbits. Continued feeding of these products may result in death as a result of feed refusal. Elevated calcium carbonate levels in young chickens and turkeys can lead to leg abnormalities and kidney calcification.”

Symptoms of “excess calcium carbonate in rabbits may include pinkish urine and lethargy due to decreased feed intake,” the agency said. “Chicken and turkeys up to 6 weeks of age may show leg abnormalities associated with excessive dietary calcium carbonate.”

The products in question were produced from Dec. 16, 2019, to Feb. 3, 2020, and sold in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Nebraska, South Dakota, Florida, Virginia, North Dakota, North Carolina, South Carolina, Colorado, California, West Virginia, Texas, Hawaii and Arizona.

A list of the formula, item and lot numbers can be found on the FDA’s website.

Impacted customers should discard the food or return it to a local feed store for a refund.

Related Video: More Pet Owners Are Buying Healthy, Organic Pet Food (Provided by Buzz60)

Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health-news/purina-recalls-4-different-food-brands-sold-in-32-states/ar-BB10DXhW?li=BBnb7Kz

The CDC Says Not To Eat Romaine Lettuce From A California Region After 40 Reported Cases Of E. Coli

delish.com

Kristin Salaky

US-HEALTH-FOOD

ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDSGetty Images

The CDC issued a food safety alert on Friday advising people not to consume romaine lettuce from the Salinas, CA, region following 40 reported cases of E. coli.

In the alert, the CDC advised that people not eat and businesses not sell any romaine products that have been labeled as created in (or partly in) Salinas. This includes all types of whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and packages of precut lettuce and salad mixes which contain romaine. If your romaine does not include a region or you aren’t sure if it’s romaine, the CDC advises throwing it away.

The CDC also reported 40 confirmed cases of E. coli from 16 states associated with the recall, 28 of which have been hospitalizations. There have been no deaths. You can find a map of reported cases here.

The alert listed the recent salad recall from Missa Bay, LLC which saw thousands of pounds of pre-packaged salad recalled over E. coli fears.

“We are concerned about the potential for contaminated lettuce on store shelves and in people’s refrigerators,” Director of the CDC’s Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases Dr. Robert Tauxe told USA Today in a statement: “Heading into the Thanksgiving holiday, it is critically important to avoid buying or eating romaine lettuce from the Salinas growing area so you can protect yourself and your family.”

If you have any of the romaine lettuce in question in your home, you should dispose of it and wash any surfaces it may have touched.

Romaine lettuce has been linked to several outbreaks in recent years and this most recent health alert said that this outbreak was caused by the same strain of E. coli that caused outbreaks linked to lettuce in 2017 and 2018.

News Editor Kristin Salaky is the news editor at Delish.com covering viral foods, product launches, and food trends.

https://www.delish.com/food-news/a29895348/romaine-lettuce-outbreak-november-2019/?source=nl&utm_source=nl_del&utm_medium=email&date=112319&src=nl&utm_campaign=18679623&utm_term=AAA%20–%20High%20Minus%20Dormant%20and%2090%20Day%20Non%20Openers

Smoked Salmon Sold in 23 States Recalled Over Botulism Fears

Olivia Rosane

Salmon lovers in more than 20 states had better check their refrigerators.

“Consumers are warned not to use the product even if it does not look or smell spoiled,” the recall notice said.

The Maine-based company is recalling the salmon because it could become contaminated with Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that causes botulism. Botulism occurs because the bacteria make spores that help them survive, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explained.

“The spores usually do not cause people to become sick, even when they’re eaten. But under certain conditions, these spores can grow and make one of the most lethal toxins known,” the CDC said.

Those conditions include low oxygen, low acid, low sugar, a certain temperature range, a certain amount of water and low salt. It seems like a combination of the last three is what caused the potential problem with the salmon, as the recall notice explained:

The recall was initiated because the product’s water phase salt (WPS) tested below 3.5%. This was discovered upon re-review of laboratory certificates, which were found to have incorrectly reported WPS levels. Labeling instructions state to keep refrigerated at or below 38ºF and that the product may be frozen. Because the WPS is under 3.5% the product must remain frozen until ready to consume. Product stored in the refrigerator after thawing has the potential to be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum.

Water phase salt (WPS) measures the amount of salt relative to moisture in the fish, according to the BC Centre for Disease Control. Salt helps to keep moisture out of the fish, which reduces bacteria growth.

“The combination of refrigeration temperatures and prescribed salt levels offer a high degree of assurance that bacterial growth will be retarded,” the centre explained.

Mill Stream Corp. said it froze the salmon before distribution, but retailers may have thawed it before selling it.

“Consumers who purchased the product frozen are advised to keep it frozen until ready to use and thaw under refrigeration immediately before use,” the recall notice advised. “If a consumer has refrigerated product subject to the recall, they should dispose of it immediately even if it does not look or smell spoiled.”

The recalled salmon was sold between March 6 and Sept. 17, 2019 in whole salmon side, two pound, one pound, eight ounce and four ounce vacuum-sealed packages. The packages had the following lot numbers on the back: 7049, 7050, 7051, 7052, 7054, 7056, 7058, 7060, 7062 and 7066.

It was sold and distributed wholesale, online and to retail stores in Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, Rhode Island, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, Utah, Iowa, Tennessee, Minnesota, Colorado, Florida, Arizona, Wisconsin, Washington, Georgia, Illinois, Virginia, Michigan and Texas, Newsweek reported.

The symptoms of botulism include weakness, dizziness, double vision and difficulty speaking or swallowing, the FDA said. According to the CDC, botulism can ultimately cause difficulty breathing, paralysis and even death. No one has been sickened by the salmon to date, but anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical attention.

Around 200 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with botulism every year, Newsweek reported. Most have to be hospitalized, but, if they receive proper medical attention, fewer than five in 100 patients die from the disease.