Petition · Asa Hutchinson: Stop the Plains All American Diamond Pipeline · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/asa-hutchinson-stop-the-plains-all-american-diamond-pipeline/sign?utm_source=action_alert_sign&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=723344&alert_id=BKRsGEACvb_zUrQoZTdzxcaD%2Bm82pqj74cAOd6d4S4SCGQmFGRRl38%3D

Petition · Tell Amazon it’s time to adopt “waste-free” packaging · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/tell-amazon-it-s-time-to-adopt-waste-free-packaging/sign?utm_source=action_alert_sign&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=722837&alert_id=kJwWDQnCua_4unhGQuWHIIG5oh050HO3P7XnxkGC7DaUp2WIhzzkGE%3D

Claim: Shell Tried to Hide Global Warming Research by Releasing a Public Documentary

Watts Up With That?

Shell Oil Shell Oil. By Catherine Hammond (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia CommonsGuest essay by Eric Worrall

Back in 1991, Shell Oil released a public documentary video which raised serious concerns about anthropogenic global warming. This hasn’t prevented The Guardian from trying to claim it is all part of the oil industry coverup.

‘Shell knew’: oil giant’s 1991 film warned of climate change danger

Public information film unseen for years shows Shell had clear grasp of global warming 26 years ago but has not acted accordingly since, say critics.

The oil giant Shell issued a stark warning of the catastrophic risks of climate change more than a quarter of century ago in a prescient 1991 film that has been rediscovered.

However, since then the company has invested heavily in highly polluting oil reserves and helped lobby against climate action, leading to accusations that Shell knew the grave…

View original post 566 more words

Stop Cutting Down Vital Wildlife Habitat

A new policy plans to eliminate massive amounts of waterside vegetation. The policy was enacted to fight bushfires, but would put endangered species at risk and reduce water quality. Take a stand for conservation and demand a repeal of this policy.

Source: Stop Cutting Down Vital Wildlife Habitat

Take action: Tell the Trump administration we won’t stand for more tar sands pipelines

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Enbridge, the company responsible for the biggest inland oil spill in the U.S. and part owner of the Dakota Access Pipeline, wants to double the capacity of tar sands coming to the US from Canada on its Alberta Clipper pipeline. Submit a public comment!

Source: Take action: Tell the Trump administration we won’t stand for more tar sands pipelines

Johnson & Johnson’s half-hearted switch from plastic to paper cotton buds isn’t good enough : TreeHugger

Johnson & Johnson’s half-hearted switch from plastic to paper cotton buds isn’t good enough
Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)
February 17, 2017

It’s only happening in half the world. The rest of us can keep using plastic sticks. (Don’t they know about ocean currents?)

This week, in response to consumer pressure, pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson changed its outdated recipe for cotton buds (also know as cotton swabs). From now on, some of them will be made with paper sticks, instead of plastic. This is an important change because there is no proper way to dispose of cotton buds. They cannot be recycled, so after use they’re either tossed in the trash or flushed down the toilet, ultimately ending up in waterways and along shorelines – forever.

According to the Marine Conservation Society, which conducts annual beach clean-ups in the UK, plastic cotton buds were the sixth most common plastic waste item found on British beaches in 2016.

Johnson & Johnson has recognized the unnecessary damage caused by its plastic sticks. Group marketing manager Niamh Finan told The Independent:

“We recognise that our products have an environmental footprint, and that’s why we’re working hard to continually improve and champion best practice in sustainability, in line with our company’s founding principles.”

Scottish environmental group Fidra, which has long campaigned against plastic cotton buds, heralds the decision as a great success. Stated in a press release published on its Cotton Bud Project website:

“The fact that cotton buds continue to be flushed down the toilet and escape through sewage works into the environment means it remains a problem. Switching cotton bud stems from plastic to 100% paper could provide a solution to this problem, combined with campaigns to raise consumer awareness about correct disposal methods. Paper stems should not be flushed but those that do reach the sewage system will become waterlogged and settle out of wastewater, never reaching our beaches.”

plastic cotton bud sticks
© The Great Nurdle Hunt/Facebook — Results of a beach cleanup day

There is something very strange, however, about Johnson & Johnson’s decision. The company is only switching from plastic to paper sticks in half the world. So stores in Europe will get paper-only sticks, but it seems that Australia, North America, and Asia will continue to stock plastic. Currently there is no mention of whether or not the change will be happening elsewhere.

It is an oddly localized response to a serious global crisis. Ocean plastic pollution is a problem of the commons – something for which we all must take responsibility, no matter where we live. In fact, responding naïvely by region doesn’t even work because places like the UK receive plastic trash from all parts of the globe. (Watch A Plastic Tide documentary to learn the tragic story of a community in Scotland where Asia’s garbage washes up daily.)

The other irritating thing is that cotton buds, whether plastic or paper, are an example of a utterly superfluous product – something we don’t even need to manufacture in the first place. Doing away with them altogether would be a better way of professing concern for the planet – not only for the oceans, but also for the cotton fields that soak up most of the world’s agrochemicals.
Ocean plastic pollution is a problem of the commons – something for which we all must take responsibility, no matter where we live.

One good thing to come out of the decision is reducing plastic production overall. Fidra’s press release cites research by British supermarket chain Waitrose, estimating this change will save 21 tons of plastic a year. But seriously, that’s “a mere drop in the ocean compared to the 4.8-12.7 million tons of total plastic waste that researchers calculate are entering our oceans every year.”

I haven’t bought cotton buds in nearly a decade; I suspect it’s similar for most people who care deeply about avoiding single-use disposables. Suffice it to say, this regional corporate decision doesn’t impress me all that much. Why can’t Johnson & Johnson, at the very least, make the transition to all-paper buds world-wide? That would be some real progress.
Related on TreeHugger.com:

“A Plastic Tide” film depicts shocking plastic pollution worldwide
Artist depicts humans entangled in plastic ocean waste
‘The Smog of the Sea’ is Jack Johnson’s new film about plastic pollution
Tags: Corporate Responsibility | Cosmetics | Cotton | Oceans | Plastics | Pollution | Waste

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Company Spilled 600,000 Gallons of Oil Into the Environment – Demand Punishment

An oil pipeline has ruptured, spilling 600,000 gallons of toxic oil into the environment. This massive spill is destroying the ecosystem, which may never fully recover. Demand that the oil company responsible for the spill be held accountable.

Source: Company Spilled 600,000 Gallons of Oil Into the Environment – Demand Punishment

Stop Manufacturing With Banned Toxic Chemical Responsible for Serious Health Problems

A toxic chemical known to cause thyroid diseases, high cholesterol and cancer is now used in manufacturing plants in China by an American company after the United States banned the dangerous chemical. Sign this petition to demand that this company end its use of this toxic chemical worldwide.

Source: Stop Manufacturing With Banned Toxic Chemical Responsible for Serious Health Problems

Congress wants MORE toxic gas in the air?

The Senate is about to vote on a measure that would block common-sense limits on the amount of dangerous methane gas leaking into the air. Tell your senators to stand against handouts to the oil & gas industry!

Source: Congress wants MORE toxic gas in the air?

Say NO to Fast-Tracking the Dakota Access Pipeline! – NRDC


https://secure.nrdconline.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=00000000.app30103a?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=4159&autologin=true&s_src=EMODAPPETACT0217&utm_source=alert&utm_medium=actr&utm_campaign=email&NONCE_TOKEN=748F5E739916AD56BB0410DCD2E87BFF

Massive Win for Marine Animals! Chicago’s Disposable Bag Tax is Now in Effect | One Green Planet

Sean McCarthy
February 1, 2017

From The Cloud Gate (most of you may know it as the giant bean) to it’s iconic Frank Loyd Wright skyline, Chicago is one of the most beautiful cities in the U.S. The only thing that could mar this city’s impressive features is a bunch of trash getting blown around the streets by its equally famous counterpart – the wind. However, Chicago has taken this problem in hand and on February 1st, a $.07 tax per disposable bag – plastic and paper – went into effect at all retail locations in the city.

To further incentivise consumers, the city is handing out 25,o00 reusable “Chi Bags” outside of several Chicago Transportation Authority stations across the city. Retailers in the city are also helping ease shoppers into this new tax. Target is handing out reusable bags to the first 200 customers at each of its 16 locations in the city and Whole Foods has guaranteed to give the first 1,000 people in each its 12 Chicago locations a reusable tote. The city hopes that this tax will dissuade shoppers from using these disposable bags – and empirical evidence shows the tax will be effective.

California and Michigan both instituted a ban on plastic bags last year and both states met with success. Across the pond, Britan banned plastic bags with a stunning effect – they saw a 50 percent reduction in the consumption of plastic bags. These bans are not just for aesthetic reasons, plastic bags are incredibly harmful to marine environments around the globe.

Every year, we consume 100 billion plastic bags and while we may only use them for a few minute, they stick around in the environment for much, much longer than that. After being thrown out, most plastic bags make their way into our oceans where they choke, entrap, and strangle marine life. Plastic bags combine with the rest of the 8.8 million tons of plastic waste we toss in our oceans annually to create a huge problem for our oceans’ ecosystems. Currently, over 800 species are threatened by plastic pollution and over 50 percent of sea turtles have plastic in their stomachs.

This is why plastic bag bans like the one in Chicago are so important. But even if you’re not in Chicago you can help to keep plastic out of our oceans and save marine life! Bring a disposable tote with you when you every time you go shopping and you will effectively keep 330 plastic bags from entering the ocean. For more tips on how to keep plastic out of your life and our planet’s waterways, join One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic campaign.
Let’s #CrushPlastic! Click the graphic below for more information.

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Petition · President Donald Trump: leave Standing Rock alone. · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/president-donald-trump-leave-standing-rock-alone?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=6&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAAhEmgAAAAAAWIgNtD6mFW1lM2I1MDI0Yg%3D%3D

Stop Dams From Leaking Oil Into Columbia River

Dam operators must switch to eco-friendly oils in order to stop harmful substances from leaking into waterways thanks to a new ruling. Despite this ruling, they will be allowed to drag their feet while searching for alternatives. Demand that a timeline is set to remove pollutants from our rivers.

Source: Stop Dams From Leaking Oil Into Columbia River

World Bank Put On Notice: Do Not Jeopardizes Farmers’ Right to Seeds, Food Security | Global Justice Ecology Project


World Bank Put On Notice: Do Not Jeopardizes Farmers’ Right to Seeds, Food Security

Ahead of World Bank’s release of the 2017 “Enabling the Business of Agriculture” (EBA) report this month, 157 organizations and academics from around the world denounce the Bank’s scheme to hijack farmers’ right to seeds, attack on food sovereignty and the environment.

Global Justice Ecology Project believes it’s critical that environmental protection groups respond to the World Bank when it tries to regulate the autonomy and biodiversity of local farmers from around the globe.

The World Bank’s corruption is endless. As a bully of developing nations and a friend to multi-national corporations it should be dismantled so peoples everywhere can regulate themselves.
From the Civil Societies letter calling on the World Bank to end the Enabling the Business of Agriculture (EBA):

While the EBA reforms will not benefit the majority of farmers, they will increase the profits of a handful of private companies. Only six multinationals currently control over two-thirds of the industrial seed market, and pending agroindustry mergers stand to further consolidate this oligopoly.4 The concentration of the global seed market has a significant impact on seed prices5 as well as seed diversity. Replacing farmers’ seeds with a few uniform industrial varieties contributes to the rapid erosion of global agro-biodiversity, which is crucial to address the climate crisis.

In the letter, the group demands the immediate end of the project, originally requested by the G8 to support its industry-co-opted New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition.

“The EBA dictates so-called ‘good practices’ to regulate agriculture and scores countries on how well they implement its prescriptions,” said Frederic Mousseau, Policy Director at the Oakland Institute. “But the EBA has become the latest tool, to push pro-corporate agricultural policies, notably in the seed sector—where it promotes industrial seeds, that benefit a handful of agrochemical companies,” he continued.

Only six multinationals currently control over two-thirds of the industrial seed sales, and pending agro-industry mergers stand to further consolidate this oligopoly. Further market expansion for these corporations depends on the shrinking of farmer-managed seed systems, which currently provide 80 to 90 percent of the seed supply in developing countries through on-farm seed saving and farmer-to-farmer seed exchange.

A new report, Down On the Seed, the World Bank Enables Corporate Takeover of Seeds, exposes that while the World Bank claims to promote “smart and balanced policies,” its EBA index blatantly ignores farmer-managed seed systems. Instead, it reinforces the stranglehold of agrochemical companies and Western nations by pushing for intellectual property rights in agriculture, so that private breeders profiteer from the use of their seeds by farmers.

The EBA also awards the best scores to countries that ease private companies—not the farmers—access to public gene banks. In addition, the Bank recommends that governments reduce the time and cost necessary to register industrial seeds, with the private sector as the predominant force on the national committees that oversee the introduction of new varieties.

“The EBA reforms aim to foster the privatization of seed systems, regardless of the consequences for farmers and the planet,” said Alice Martin-Prevel, author of the report, Down on the Seed. “The reduction of farmers as passive consumers of industrial seeds undermines their contribution to agro-biodiversity, which is crucial to mitigate pests, disease, and the effects of climate change. It also disempowers farmers, while failing to protect them in increasingly concentrated markets.”

In its 2016 EBA report, the World Bank upheld Tanzania as a model country for enacting intellectual property laws in agriculture, and becoming the first least-developed nation bound by the 1991 UPOV Convention. UPOV is a pro-industry treaty that dramatically restricts farmers’ rights to save, exchange, and sell seeds. Under Tanzania’s seed laws, farmers now risk fines and imprisonment for practicing ancestral seed saving and trading, and are being forced to rely on industrial varieties.

“The Bank, behind closed doors, convinces governments to implement reforms based on the EBA scores, thereby bypassing farmers and citizens’ engagement,” said Mousseau. “The signatories to the petition are demanding an end of the EBA as a step to enable the full participation of farmers and rural communities in agricultural policymaking. This participation is essential for development to be inclusive and to tackle the challenge of food insecurity and rural poverty around the world.”

               

Copyright © 2017 · All Rights Reserved · Global Justice Ecology Project

10 Banks Financing Dakota Access Pipeline Decline Meeting with Tribal Leaders | Global Justice Ecology Project

10 Banks Financing Dakota Access Pipeline Decline Meeting with Tribal Leaders
Posted on January 17, 2017 by GJEP staff
One month after the pipeline was effectively put “on hold” by the Army Corps of Engineers, major commercial banks are still banking on the project — and losing thousands of customers a week as a result.

Via IENEarth.org:
Standing Rock, ND – For the last six weeks, a global coalition has been pressuring banks providing project loans to the Dakota Access Pipeline to renegotiate or cancel their loans. In December, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other Indigenous leaders requested that each of these banks meet with tribal representatives to hear their concerns.

The deadline for banks to respond to the Tribe’s meeting request was January 10, and as of this statement:

Four banks have declined: BayernLB, BNP Paribas, Mizuho Bank, and Suntrust
Six banks have not responded at all: Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, BBVA Compass, ICBC, Intesa Sanpaolo, Natixis, and Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation
Seven banks have met or agreed to meet with the Tribe and its allies: Citi, Crédit Agricole, DNB, ING, Société Générale, TD, and Wells Fargo

In response, organizers are escalating their pressure on banks that refuse to engage. The Indigenous coalition at Standing Rock has a running billboard in Times Square asking millions of people to #DefundDAPL. Organizers continue a drumbeat of protests and bank occupations, along with brand-damaging campaigns that have already led to the closure of thousands of accounts worth a self-reported $46,314,727.18.

Protests have increased in fervor and frequency over the last few weeks, including multiple occupations of Wells Fargo, US Bank and Citibank branches, as well as a daring banner drop during a nationally televised Vikings/Bears NFL game at US Bank Stadium in protest of their bankrolling of DAPL project sponsors Sunoco Logistics and Energy Transfer Partners.

Backed by hundreds of thousands of online signatures and commitments to #DefundDAPL, organizers from more than 25 grassroots groups vowed the campaign will continue and intensify in the coming weeks, building up to a planned “global week of action” unless all 17 of the banks act. The ask for the banks is to discontinue loan disbursements in consultation with Native leaders until outstanding issues are resolved, and Free, Prior and Informed Consent from Indigenous peoples is upheld.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II said: “We are pleased that some of the banks behind DAPL are willing to engage Standing Rock Sioux leadership, but maintain that all 17 should not be helping a company who deliberately ignores our concerns. We call on the remaining banks to agree to a meeting with the Tribe. We know that they have heard Energy Transfer Partners’ side of the story, and they need to hear our perspective as well.”

Ladonna Bravebull Allard, Sacred Stone Camp said: “I want the banks to know that the power of their investment comes from the people, and the people are saying we have the right to water, and we will stand for the water. Stop investing in destruction of the earth.”

Tara Houska, National Campaigns Director, Honor the Earth said: “This movement has shown again and again that the power and strength of the people is incredible. Banks need our dollars to make their investments. We can and must hold these financial backers accountable for supporting destruction of our shared planet and futures. Move past dated fuels and justly transition to a green economy.”

Eryn Wise, International Indigenous Youth Council said: “What began as a protection of the earth has now become a reclamation of power. We are demanding that our interests as a prospering people be put before banks and their investments. We hold in our hands the ability to encourage divestment to the point of fruition and we will not back down.”

Dallas Goldtooth, Keep it in the Ground Organizer, Indigenous Environmental Network said: “As a movement to stop this dirty Bakken oil pipeline, we are demonstrating the inherent power of organized communities and mobilized citizens. We are showing Big Oil and government leaders that we know the power of our capital, and as such we collectively choose to invest in life and water, not death and oil. As first peoples of the land and in defense of our Indigenous rights, we will continue to rise, resist, self-determine and divest until the Dakota Access pipeline is nothing but the defeated aspirations of a Energy Transfer Partners’ dream.”

Judith LeBlanc, Director, Native Organizers Alliance said: “The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has a spiritual obligation to protect the Missouri River for all. The best way for the banks to meet their obligation to protect their investor’s interest is to meet with the Tribal leadership. Mother Earth and all of our ancestors deserve the opportunity for an exchange on our shared moral obligations to protect Mother Earth for generations to come.”

Sara Nelson, Executive Director, Romero Institute and the Lakota People’s Law Project said: “We are moving our financial accounts from Wells Fargo to a local bank that does not invest in companies who violate Indigenous rights and environmental impact requirements, and will not endanger clean water for millions of people. We want our money used to support positive solutions for our children’s future, not to float big companies who send oil overseas, make the American people pay for inevitable spills, and generate profits for banks and billion dollar global companies.”

Leila Salazar López, Executive Director, Amazon Watch said: “From Standing Rock to the Amazon, Indigenous peoples are defending their territories and providing a model for a fossil free world. It’s time banks listen to Indigenous peoples and their allies in our call to Keep It In The Ground.”

Lindsey Allen, Executive Director, Rainforest Action Network said: “Investing in a project of Energy Transfer Partners, a company that has abused Indigenous and human rights, was a big mistake. These banks now have a chance to fix it by meeting with the Standing Rock Sioux, and upholding Free, Prior and Informed Consent from Indigenous peoples.”

Dr. Gabriela Lemus, President of Progressive Congress Action Fund said: “No bank should support poisoning communities’ land and water- yet too many banks still have investments in Energy Transfer Partners and the Dakota Access Pipeline. We call on these banks to divest completely. Families’ lives are at risk, and that should always take priority over profits. All banks have a responsibility not only to their shareholders and customers, but to the communities that are impacted by their investments. Don’t keep funding this dangerous project.”

Todd Larsen, Executive Co-Director of Green America said: “Banks need to end investments that harm the rights and lives of Indigenous peoples. We call on all banks to divest entirely from the Dakota Access Pipeline. Until these banks do so, all Americans should divest their money from any bank providing financing to this ruinous pipeline.”

Erich Pica, President, Friends of the Earth U.S. said: “The voices of Indigenous peoples have been ignored for too long – by the US government, corporations and big banks. By not acknowledging Indigenous peoples, or outright refusing to meet with them, these ten banks are perpetuating a pattern of colonialism and failing to respect Indigenous peoples’ rights to Free, Prior and Informed Consent.”

Johan Frijns, Director of BankTrack said: “The Dakota Access Pipeline project is supposed to be in compliance with the Equator Principles, and therefore guarantee Indigenous peoples’ rights to be properly consulted. The refusal of leading EP banks to meet with the Sioux Tribe not only makes a complete mockery of that commitment, but also poses a severe risk to the very credibility of the Equator Principles.”

Vanessa Green, Director of DivestInvest Individual said: “DAPL is simply the wrong kind of investment, and people don’t want their money behind it. With government mandates to scale up clean energy investments, a market increasingly supportive of a low carbon future, and unprecedented consumer and investor interest in moving money into climate and community solutions, the question now is which banks will lose the most in this historic energy transition.”
Mary Sweeters, Arctic Campaigner with Greenpeace USA, said: “People across the world have pledged their solidarity with the Indigenous communities who reject this dirty pipeline and the threat it poses to the water and climate. The banks must choose whether they want to continue to invest their money in yesterday or listen to the millions of people who stand with Standing Rock.”

Lena Moffitt, Sierra Club Beyond Dirty Fuels Director, said, “People power can, does, and will continue to prevail over corporate polluters. The people will not stop until the banks financing these operations invest in our clean air and water — not fossil fuels.”

Category: Bioenergy, Featured, Indigenous People, Social Media News Tags: #StandWithStandingRock, Citibank, Dakota Access, Standing Rock, US Bank, Wells Fargo
Copyright © 2017 · All Rights Reserved · Global Justice Ecology Project

This 7-Year-Old Started His Very Own Recycling Company to Help Keep Trash Out of the Oceans | One Green Planet


Kat Smith
December 20, 2016

Attention, people of earth: we have a serious plastic problem. In just 30 years, global plastic production has jumped over 320 percent, which equates to about 300 million tons of plastic pieces coming into circulation every year. If imagining what 300 million tons of plastic looks like isn’t enough to boggle your mind, here’s another scary fact: over 85 percent of that plastic is never recycled. It makes its way from the factories to the stores to our homes, and then, way more often than not, it ends up in landfills instead of the recycling bin. To make matters worse, it doesn’t stay in landfills. Studies have shown that 80 percent of marine trash is land-based and 90 percent of that trash is plastic. Once plastic ends up in the ocean, the world’s marine animals are stuck with it. It can take thousands of years for plastic to break down, and when it does, it only breaks into small pieces known as microplastics.

These facts are some heavy realities to process but in spite of that, we can all do something to help. In fact, one little boy took his passion for recycling and turned it into a business that benefits the planet.
In 2012, after visiting the local recycling center in Orange County, California, Ryan decided that recycling would be his future. He was three-years-old at the time.

According to the Ryan’s Recycling website, “The day after going to the recycling center, Ryan notified his mom and dad that he wanted to give empty plastic bags to all the neighbors and maybe they would save their recyclables for him.” Soon he had a bonafide consumer-base made up of neighbors and community members.

He collects and sorts plastic, glass, and tin items then takes them over to the recycling center. Ryan is using the money he’s made from customers to save for his future college education (you really have to get a head start these days).

Ryan has also become a Youth Ambassador for the Pacific Marine Mammal Center (PMMC) in Laguna Beach. Currently, over 700 marine species are threatened with extinction, so this rescue organization can use all the help they can get. All proceeds from Ryan’s Recycling t-shirts go to help PMMC’s volunteer efforts.

It’s amazing that at such a young age, Ryan is committed to sticking to a regular recycling schedule. He spends a portion of each week sorting recyclables that have been donated by friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers of neighbors and he and his family make weekly trips to the center. So far, he has recycled over 200,000 bottles and cans and donated $1,624 to charity. This kid sure knows how to #CrushPlastic! To learn more about Ryan’s Recycling, visit the official website.

While efforts are being made to remove debris from the oceans, improve recycling systems, and innovate barriers to prevent plastic from getting into waterways, we can all take action in our daily lives to stop plastic waste at the source.

If we all make an effort to identify where we use plastic and actively look for alternatives, we can drastically cut down on the amount of plastic pollution that finds its way into the oceans.
Let’s #CrushPlastic! Click the graphic below for more information.

Student Artwork Inspires Us to Clean Up Our Plastic Act for the Future of Marine Life | One Green Planet


When we start to look for it, we quickly find there is a literal sea of distressing environmental news flooding our phones and computers every day. Seeing this deluge of negativity, it’s easy to start to lose faith. But the winners of the Bow Seat’s 2016 Ocean Awareness Contest reminds us that we have the power and the creativity to change the course of our oceans’ fate. Bow Seat is an organization dedicated to, “inspire[ing] the next generation of ocean caretakers through education and engagement with the arts, science, and advocacy.” As a part of this mission, Bow Seat hosts The Ocean Awareness Contest. Every year, they ask middle schoolers and high schoolers across the world to submit a piece of artwork addressing ocean pollution and the challenges we face going forward. They say a picture is worth 1000 words, and these images speak volumes. Here are a few of some of the compelling pieces centered around ocean plastics from the 2016 winners.
This piece is titled, “Message in a Bottle” by Jessica Yang. It shows how the 40 billion plastic bottles we put in landfills every year make their way into our oceans and affect marine life.


Hannah Sarakinsky worries about the same thing in here painting, “Is This the Ocean You Want?” Only 15 percent of the plastic we use is recycled – most of it makes its way into our oceans.


“What the Duck” by Jessica Xia, echoes the sentiment of the 700 species that are endangered due to plastic waste.


“Your Choice. Their Future.” by Anais Beninger, illustrates how the 100 billion plastic bags that are put into the ocean, every year, trap and entangle its inhabitants


Complementing this theme, “Pacific Currents” by Marion Hopkinson points out that 12 million tons of plastic containers are discarded every year.

“Plastic Chokes Me” by Erica Lim, speaks for itself.

“Be Aware of Trash Shark,” cautions Nicole Zhu. But it seems instead of avoiding this threat, we are feeding it. Scientists estimate will be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050.

Humans are also affected by the toxins we put into our water as Taein Gu reminds us in her piece, “Inheritance: A Mistake We Must Fix.”

“The Blue Endless Loop” by Theresa Ho warns us that this cycle of pollution and death needs to stop.

There are around 270 million tons of plastic floating on the ocean’s surface alone. A fact that is made apparent in “Two Sides to A Wave” by Jane Anderson-Schmitt.

We have a responsibility to future generations to maintain our most precious resource. These children clearly see the danger plastic poses to our oceans and marine life – we owe it to both these young ones and animals to stop our reckless behavior and prevent plastic pollution. Join One Green planets #CrushPlastic movement to learn about easy ways that you can help to save our planet’s oceans and the animals that live in them.
Let’s #CrushPlastic! Click the graphic below for more information.

10 Indigenous and Environmental Struggles—And How You Can Help in 2017 | Global Justice Ecology Project

10 Indigenous and Environmental Struggles—And How You Can Help in 2017
By The Indigenous #NoDAPL Coalition
The Black Snake is not yet dead. Far from it. The corporations behind the Dakota Access pipeline made it clear that they “fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe.”

The winter camps will stand their ground as long as DAPL construction equipment remains on Oceti Sakowin treaty land. We can all continue to support them by emailing or calling the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers comment line at 202-761-8700 to ask when it will open the Environmental Impact Statement process to public comment. We can also keep pressure on the banks to divest with our international campaign to #DefundDAPL.

But while international attention has been on the Standing Rock Sioux and the #NoDAPL struggle, the Obama and Trudeau administrations have approved several other pipeline projects slated to run across indigenous territories from Canada to the U.S. and Mexico. The struggle to protect sacred lands from climate change, toxic pollution, and the fossil fuel industry continues to rage around the world.

In the year ahead, it is our hope that the energy and love we have received in our struggle against the Dakota Access pipeline can also be extended to other indigenous communities in their local battles. Here are ten struggles you could consider donating to, volunteering time for, or supporting in other ways:

  1. Trans-Pecos pipeline and Comanche Trail pipeline – Texas

In May 2016, the Obama administration approved two pipeline projects by Energy Transfer Partners, the same company behind DAPL. The Trans-Pecos and Comanche Trail pipelines would carry fracked gas from Texas into Mexico, where it will supply the Mexican energy grid. The Two Rivers camp is a resistance camp being erected in the face of the Trans-Pecos pipeline. Support their legal defense fund and camp fundraiser. Or support the efforts of No Trans Pecos Pipeline, the Big Bend Conservation Alliance, and the Frontera Water Protection Alliance as they organize against these pipelines.

  1. Copper One Rivière Doré Mine – Quebec, Canada

The Algonquins of Barriere Lake have set-up a land protection camp at a proposed mining site in the heart of their territory, where core sample drilling for copper is scheduled to begin at any time. They have been camped for weeks to protect the headwaters of the Ottawa River, which could have catastrophic downstream effects if mined. The staked area is abundant with lakes, wetlands, and waterways and is also a crucial hunting and fishing area for Barriere Lake families. See their urgent call to action here and donate to the campaign or get involved here.

  1. Sabal Trail pipeline – Florida

The Sabal Trail pipeline, a 515-mile natural gas pipeline project, is being constructed from Alabama to Georgia to Florida. It threatens one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world. The Sacred Water Camp and Water Is Life Camp are ongoing camps in need of supplies, experienced organizers, and other people. A mass civil disobedience event is being held in Florida. Get in touch here or donate to support the camps. Also support the organizing efforts of the SPIRET Foundation and Bobby C. Billie, one of the clan leaders and spiritual leader of the Council of the Original Miccosukee Simanolee Nation Aboriginal Peoples, in their efforts to hold regulatory agencies accountable for support of the pipeline. Contact organizers Shannon Larsen or email Beth Huss. Keep up to date with events with all groups statewide at the Water Protector Alliance calendar.

  1. Line 3 pipeline – Hardisty, Alberta to Superior, Wisconsin

The massive Line 3 pipeline project approved by Canada’s federal government is designed to transport tar sands oil from the mines of Hardisty, Alberta, to Superior, Wisconsin, through the heart of Anishinaabe territory and some of the most beautiful lakes and rice beds in the world. The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs is challenging the Trudeau government’s approval of Line 3. Follow and support Honor the Earth’s work, learn about ongoing resistance to Line 3, and follow community members’ opposition to the pipeline here.

  1. Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline – Strathcona County, Alberta, to Burnaby, British Columbia

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also recently approved the expansion of Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, which would transport tar sands oil from northern Alberta to the British Columbia coast. The Sacred Trust is an initiative of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and a mandate to stop this project. You can donate here through RAVEN (Respecting Aboriginal Values and Environmental Needs) or Join their mailing list to follow this campaign and receive updates.

  1. Pilgrim pipeline – New York and New Jersey

The Ramapough Lunaape Nation, a community in the Ramapo Mountains currently face the threat of the Pilgrim pipeline, which would transport Bakken crude oil from Albany, New York, to Linden, New Jersey. Meanwhile, Spectra Energy continues to expand its pipeline network so that more fracked natural gas can be transported and ultimately exported out of the country. Read about the history of the Ramapough Lunaape here, follow the developments at Split Rock Prayer Camp, and follow ongoing efforts to resist continued Spectra expansion with the FANG Collective and Resist Spectra.

  1. Petronas/Pacific Northwest Terminal – Prince Rupert, British Columbia

The Petronas/Pacific Northwest Terminal is a proposed liquefied natural gas plant on traditional Lax Kw’alaams territory Lax U’u’la (Lelu Island) at the mouth of the Skeena river near Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Plans call for a 48-inch diameter submarine pipeline to be dredged into estuary sediment to supply fracked gas from Treaty 8 territory. Ten Indigenous nations and 60,000 people in the Skeena watershed rely on fish there for food, commercial fishing, and cultural identity. The Lelu Island Camp has been set up on Lax Kw’alaams traditional territory to stop this terminal from being built without consent.

  1. Bayou Bridge pipeline – Louisiana

In 2017, Bold Louisiana, a nonprofit organization that mobilizes alliances to protect land and water in Louisiana, will focus on stopping the proposed Bayou Bridge pipeline in a state that is experiencing climate devastation and coastline loss at an average rate of one football field of land every hour. This pipeline, a sister and end point to the Dakota Access pipeline, would run from Lake Charles to St. James, Louisiana. Support their efforts, follow their progress, or go to Baton Rouge to disrupt the Bayou Bridge public hearing on January 12.

  1. Diamond pipeline – Arkansas

Arkansas Rising is a collective of guardians working through direct action to stop the Diamond pipeline, a 20-inch diameter pipeline that would run 440 miles from Cushing, Oklahoma, to Memphis, Tennessee. The pipeline would cross more than 500 waterways, including five major watersheds. Construction has already begun. Donate to their efforts here.

  1. Atlantic Sunrise pipeline and Sunoco Mariner East pipeline – Pennsylvania

The Atlantic Sunrise pipeline is a proposed high-presure 42-inch diameter pipeline to carry fracked gas from Marcellus Shale to U.S. markets to the south. Members of Lancaster Against Pipelines and supporters have built a blockade, nicknamed “The Stand,” on a farm in Conestoga in Lancaster County in the path of a proposed route. They are refusing to grant right of way to the project and have said they will occupy it if construction begins. Visit the Clean Air Council for more information, find the schedule for public input here, and keep an eye out for an upcoming mobilization at Pennsylvania Against Atlantic Sunrise. The Sunoco Mariner East pipeline is a proposed natural gas liquid pipeline that would cross four states. The construction permits for the pipeline could be granted any day. Stay updated at Juniata Watershed People Before Pipelines. Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics are parent corporations of the Dakota Access pipeline and will be merging in the first quarter of 2017.

And we’ll suggest three more:

Support the long-running campaigns of Protect Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii, the Unis’tot’en Camp in British Columbia, and Saving Oak Flat! at the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona.

Comment – Extended information on the Sabal Trail pipeline:

The Sabal Trail pipeline, a 515-mile natural gas pipeline project, is being constructed from Alabama to Georgia to Florida. It threatens one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world. Run by local folks impacted by the pipeline, The Sacred Water Camp and Water Is Life Camp are ongoing camps and in need of supplies, experienced organizers, and other people. A mass civil disobedience event is being held in Florida January 14 & 15th. Get in touch here or donate to support the camps. Contact organizers Shannon Larsen or email Beth Huss. Keep up to date with events with all groups statewide at the Water Protector Alliance calendar.
Category: Bioenergy, Featured, Indigenous People, Social Media News Tags: bayou bridge, diamond pipeline, indigenous, Standing Rock, Yes Magazine

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