Petition · U.S. Senate: Tell Congress to Dump the “DAIRY PRIDE Act” · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/u-s-senate-tell-congress-to-dump-the-dairy-pride-act/sign?utm_source=action_alert_sign&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=705674&alert_id=svSamCXsXP_Lmy4ODnkCakLUZFmLMRqnW5sM95jJs6w8VlPye7QvAA%3D

BREAKING: Trump Approves Dakota Access and Keystone Pipelines | Global Justice Ecology Project

BREAKING: Trump Approves Dakota Access and Keystone Pipelines
Posted on January 24, 2017 by Anne Petermann

With the stroke of a pen, Donald Trump moments ago signed executive orders to pave the way for completion of the massively contested Dakota Access and Keystone XL Pipelines.
In response to Trumps executive orders – a statement the Indigenous Environmental Network just put out:

“These actions by President Trump are insane and extreme, and nothing short of attacks on our ancestral homelands as Indigenous peoples.

The executive orders demonstrate that this administration is more than willing to violate federal law that is meant to protect Indigenous rights, human rights, the environment and the overall safety of communities for the benefit of the fossil fuel industry.

These attacks will not be ignored, our resistance is stronger now than ever before and we are prepared to push back at any reckless decision made by this administration.” #NoDAPL

Time to ramp up our resistance now that the Empire has been unmasked!

Category: Featured, Social Media News Tags: dakota access pipeline, Keystone, pipelines, trump
Copyright © 2017 · All Rights Reserved · Global Justice Ecology Project

Three Years Ago, Obama Signed a Law Allowing the Federal Government to Take over the Entire Media

Nwo Report

Obama-dealwithitSource: Don Wrightman

There’s an insidious law for us to ponder, courtesy of Barack Obama. An online radio host pointed out back in 2013 that the law would grant the federal government huge power to saturate Americans with domestic propaganda at the taxpayer’s expense. “This law allows the federal government to have sweeping power to push television, radio, newspaper and social-media propaganda onto the U.S. public,” warned Michael Evans, host of America’s Voice Now. He said that the law would remove protection for Americans from the ideologies of Obama’s administration. The Smith-Mundt Modernization Act of 2012 was specifically what Evans was referring to; it was inserted into the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act.

A so-called anti-propaganda law formerly prevented the U.S. government’s broadcasting arm from reaching American viewers. On July 2, 2013, the implementation of the new reform marked an end to shielding Americans from government delivered programming. The government now…

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Schwarzenegger Calls on Americans to ‘Stop Whining’ About Trump » Alex Jones’ Infowars: There’s a war on for your mind!

 Anyone who think this is fake news…..there’s a video of Schwarzenegger’s own words!

http://www.infowars.com/schwarzenegger-calls-on-americans-to-stop-whining-about-trump/

Tell Your Senators To Carefully Vet Trump’s Disastrous Pick For EPA: Scott Pruitt – NRDC


https://secure.nrdconline.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=AD8DB888F66340751E1F0ACC4FD21F2F.app330a?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=4125&autologin=true&s_src=EMOEPAPETACT1016AFC3&utm_source=alert&utm_medium=text3&utm_campaign=email

Victory for Standing Rock: DAPL Easement Not Granted

Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it would not be granting an easement under Lake Oahe for the Dakota Access pipeline to cross the Missouri River a half mile upstream of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation. The Corps further stated that it plans to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for alternative routes. These actions trigger a new round of public involvement processes to permit the final piece of the pipeline as required by the National Environmental Policy Act.

Source: Victory for Standing Rock: DAPL Easement Not Granted

Jill Stein Fails To Provide $1M Surety Bond For Pennsylvania Recount – Election Challenge Collapses…

Con artist and former Green Party candidate Jill Stein raised fleeced the alt-left moonbats for more than seven million dollars.  The financial ruse -as it was announced- was to fund an election re…

Source: Jill Stein Fails To Provide $1M Surety Bond For Pennsylvania Recount – Election Challenge Collapses…

The Future Doesn’t Suck | Grist


Now more than ever, nonprofit journalism needs your support.

Grist Newsletter
The future doesn’t suck
By Chip Giller on Nov 19, 2016 11:00 am

Sooo … that happened. Donald Trump won the U.S. election and now threatens the progress we’ve all worked so hard to achieve. Does this mean our planet is gonna burn and our future is gonna suck? Many of us are in pain and fear for the future right now. Optimism might as well go on the endangered species list. Great time to kick off a newsletter focused on hope and progress for building a better world, right?

Actually, yes. Because change doesn’t begin — or end — in Washington, D.C. And it doesn’t rest solely on the actions of one person, or even one government. Innovators, artists, activists, cleantech pioneers, community organizers, city and state leaders, and many others across the globe aren’t giving up on the effort to build a better future for all humanity. That’s why Grist is here — to shine our beacon in the smog. To show progress and solutions and bring together the best and brightest to facilitate progress. Shift happens … let’s share it together.

Hence, this newsletter. Feedback welcome. Please bamboozle friends to subscribe via email, too.

–Chip, Grist founder
5 people you should know

One of the great things about my job: I get to hang out with cool people.

Check out what these five are up to:

Alvaro Sanchez wows me with his work on environmental equity at The Greenlining Institute. He looks at public transit, for example, and sees a boon for communities and the climate — equitable transit can solve poverty and pollution at the same time. Sweet.
Rebecca Burgess founded Fibershed (a play on “watershed,” get it?) after vowing to spend a year wearing clothing sourced within 150 miles of her home — the whole kit and caboodle, from fabrics to dyes to labor. She now envisions a system of regional textile communities that uses water renewably, builds up local soils, and creates “climate-beneficial” clothes … that look way comfier than mine.
Michael Ford is digging into the social and cultural impact of architecture and urban planning on city-dwellers, and is designing the Universal Hip-Hop Museum in the Bronx.
David Pomerantz, executive director of the Energy and Policy Institute, is the chief anti-BS officer who helped take down Florida’s fake solar amendment. His main hobby? Haunting dreams of fossil fuel execs everywhere.
Hard not to fanboy over artist and architect Maya Lin, who is working on a project to highlight biodiversity loss and climate change and what can be done about them. It’s called What is Missing? — take a look, and cue the jaw-drop.

P.S. Recently, Team Grist held a dinner in the Big Apple with a bunch of Grist 50 types, including NYC Councilmember Donovan Richards, sustainable fashionista Maxine Bédat, and attorney and community organizer Elizabeth Yeampierre. We like people who are getting shit done. Want to grab dinner soon?
Stuff I’m reading

Election Day wasn’t a complete disaster. Floridians cared enough about renewables to vote down a Koch bros-backed initiative masquerading as pro-solar. Seriously, the fight for climate and environmental justice is more important than ever — and a lot of it will shift to the regional and local levels in the United States. Last week, an important oil-producing county in California actually banned fracking — a huge environmental justice win for residents. Soda taxes won big in cities, too. Election Day also saw Seattle and L.A. voters boost public transit like crazy, and Nevada took a big step toward ending a state-wide monopoly on electricity. Yep, cities and states can be home to environmental solutions even in Trump’s America, but only if they dig deeper than canvas totes, and keep high-density development top of mind. (Good job on that, Santa Monica. Tesla, that means you, too!) And in some especially surprising news: Children can sue the feds over climate change. Follow the yutes.
On my nightstand

Need perspective on the election and the work moving forward? These books are a start. Got questions for the authors? Shoot ’em to me and I’ll do my mightiest to get answers.

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, by J. D. Vance, is an examination of the struggles of poor, white Americans — some of the same struggles that helped bring us a Trump presidency.

Rules for Revolutionaries: How Big Organizing Can Change Everything, by Bernie Sanders campaign organizers Becky Bond and Zack Exley. Important right now.

Coming of Age at the End of Nature, a collection of essays by twentysomethings working to get us out of this planetary pickle.

Sarah Jaffe’s new book Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt explores movement-building in America. I asked her what lessons she drew from the book that can be applied to the climate cause right now. Her response: While doubling down on our specific issues is important, we’re going to have to do better at showing up for others’ struggles to build unlikely alliances. Labor and the climate movement have to learn to talk to each other. Climate activists need to see protecting immigrants from deportation as part of their fight, because we’re going to have a lot more climate migrants in the years to come.

Action that inspires

The fight to block the Dakota Access Pipeline continues. Activists on Tuesday held protests around the country and beyond. Keep up with Dakota Access news on Grist and on Twitter.

Have any loose change lying around that you’re itching to put to good use? Big national charities like Planned Parenthood are raking in donations since Trump’s win, and that’s great. But if you want your contribution to reach the community-based groups that need it most right now, I asked around for suggestions.Here are some organizations to consider.

What are your favorite causes that merit special help right now? Zap me with suggestions to highlight in a future newsletter. You can also, of course, donate to Grist.
Opportunities

Food+Tech Connect has a new job board for you foodies.
Zooming in on foodie freelancers: Civil Eats needs a managing editor.
The New School is hiring a visiting professor in the climate field.
Hey, Grist is hiring, too.

Do you know of a sweet job waiting to be filled? Do tell!
How to spend your Sunday

Listen to stuff by soul singer/climate activist extraordinaire Antonique Smith, especially her take on Marvin Gaye’s “Mercy Me.” What gives her hope after this election? People power, if we use it: Whether it’s in our personal lives or coming together to fight for our futures, our freedom and equality, our right to clean air and clean water, we, the people, actually have the power.

And read this letter from E.B. White. It helps.

A Beacon in the Smog®

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Obama could still permanently protect the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. Here’s how. | Grist


Obama could still permanently protect the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. Here’s how.
By Ben Adler on Nov 18, 2016
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Environmentalists are cheering the Obama administration’s new five-year plan for offshore drilling, with some major reservations.

The plan, released on Friday, puts most of most of the Arctic Ocean off-limits to oil and gas drilling for the next five years — but climate hawks wanted it to go further, protecting all of the Arctic. And now, with a very different president about to assume office, green groups are calling on President Obama to make those protections permanent.

The Department of Interior’s plan blocks the sale of new leases for offshore drilling in sensitive areas of the Arctic, including the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas off Alaska, and in waters along the Atlantic coast. But it allows for some limited leasing in the Cook Inlet off Alaska.

Although the plan is supposed to govern offshore leasing until 2022, it could be unraveled by President-elect Donald Trump, who promised a dramatic expansion of oil and gas drilling during his campaign. Under a Trump administration, the Interior Department could revise its five-year plan and open these areas to extraction within a few years.

That gives added urgency to hopes that President Obama will protect the Atlantic and Arctic coasts from drilling for good through an executive action. Experts argue that the risks of offshore drilling are too high and that to prevent catastrophic climate change some significant reserves of oil and gas will have to stay in the ground.

Environmental advocates say they plan on stepping up pressure on the White House to act in the weeks ahead.

“With Trump threatening to return to the days of ‘drill, baby, drill,’ President Obama should be doing everything in his power to secure our public lands and waters, climate, and communities from the significant and irreversible dangers of fossil fuel development,” says Marissa Knodel, climate change campaigner at Friends of the Earth, via email.

Putting off-shore areas off-limits to drilling is not the same as naming a national monument, but it’s similar in that it uses a presidential power outside the normal rule-making process. To repeal permanent protection, Congress would need to change the underlying law, the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, or pass stand-alone legislation.

“The president has clear executive authority to provide the Arctic and Atlantic coasts the permanent protection that they richly deserve, that the public would support, and that the climate science says is necessary,” says Franz Matzner, director of the Beyond Oil Initiative at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “That’s something a host of voices across the country are still calling for.”

Obama has already demonstrated that he can be moved to keep fossil fuels in the ground. Stopping leasing in Chukchi and Beaufort was a response to strong grassroots lobbying earlier this year. Obama also stopped the Keystone XL oil pipeline in response to activists’ campaigns.

A Beacon in the Smog®
© 1999-2016 Grist Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Grist is powered by WordPress.com VIP.

Climate hawks unite! Meet the newest members of Congress who will fight climate change. | Grist


L-r, clockwise: Chris Van Hollen, Kamala Harris, Nanette D. Barragán, Salud Carbajal, Brad Schneider Edward Kimmel | Wikipedia | Barraganforcongress | Salud Carbajal | Amelia Bates | Wikipedia
Let the climate hawks soar
Climate hawks unite! Meet the newest members of Congress who will fight climate change.
By Ben Adler on Nov 16, 2016

Last week was an awful one for anyone who cares about the environment.

The new Congress and president-elect have a broad, aggressive, anti-environment agenda. Donald Trump has promised to scrap the Paris agreement, repeal all climate regulations, and approve every oil pipeline he can find. Congressional Republicans have spent years practicing for this moment by passing bills that eviscerate the government’s power to regulate pollution. And it’s sure to get worse as Trump fills his cabinet with fossil fuel magnates and climate science deniers.

But amid all the depressing news, there were a handful of election results that offer a glimmer of hope. At least five candidates with strong climate credentials won offices in Congress, and they have an impressive range of personal and political backgrounds. Here’s a quick overview of the newest congressional climate hawks.

Chris Van Hollen: Van Hollen is a progressive from the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., who just won election to the Senate. He served for the last 13 years in the House of Representatives, where he co-chaired the Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change and the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus. When he served in Maryland’s legislature, he helped pass a comprehensive package of tax incentives to support clean energy.

Last year, Van Hollen introduced the “Healthy Climate and Family Security Act.” The bill would cap and gradually reduce carbon pollution, set up an auction for carbon pollution permits, and hand over proceeds to Americans in the form of an annual dividend. The League of Conservation Voters gives him a near-perfect 98 percent lifetime voting score.

Ever the optimist, Van Hollen told Grist that he thinks there are some issues around energy policy in which he hopes to work with Republicans, especially in light of president-elect Donald Trump’s pitch for new infrastructure investment.

“I do think there are possible opportunities,” Van Hollen says. “One is in the focus on modernizing our infrastructure, which we should look at in an expansive way to include everything from broadband to clean energy.”

Van Hollen also thinks a “green bank,” which would lend capital to businesses, non-profits, and local governments for energy efficiency and clean energy projects, could be incorporated into a Trump administration’s infrastructure bill.

Of course, Republicans have largely resisted such proposals. (Van Hollen introduced a bill to create a green bank in 2014 that went nowhere.) But Van Hollen thinks that could change if Democrats stress the high cost of inaction.

“We need to continue to emphasize the costs of doing nothing and the opportunities for economic growth,” Van Hollen says. “We need to highlight that the United States better not fall behind our competitors.”

Kamala Harris: Sen. Barbara Boxer, the longtime climate leader from California, is retiring. Her replacement is Harris, the Golden State’s attorney general and a charismatic African-American woman. Harris excited the state’s climate activists earlier this year when she launched an investigation into whether ExxonMobil lied about climate science. Her environmental platform included calling for carbon pricing and a raft of proposals to address California’s water shortage.

“She fully understands that the drought is going to have a profound effect on California’s future and that the drought is caused in part by climate change,” says R.L. Miller, the California-based founder of Climate Hawks Vote, a political action committee that supported Harris and other pro-climate candidates.

Miller says she was underwhelmed by the details of Harris’s campaign climate policy and disappointed that the investigation of ExxonMobil hasn’t produced any results. Still, she is inclined to trust Harris’s instincts. “She has a thin record,” Miller says, “but it’s very promising.”

Nanette Barragán: Barragán ran a pro-climate congressional campaign in California’s 44th district. Barragán, a Latina lawyer and former member of the Hermosa Beach City Council, helped lead a successful campaign to stop new oil drilling in the city. She also helped pass a ban on plastic bags and backed the city’s goal of getting carbon neutral by 2020.

In an interview with Grist during the campaign, Barragán emphasized her commitment to environmental justice for her largely low-income, overwhelmingly non-white district in the Los Angeles area. Her opponent in the general election — California has nonpartisan primaries — was state senator Isadore Hall, one of California’s top recipients of fossil-fuel donations. Hall moved left on environment and energy policy in the campaign and was the state party establishment’s favorite. But Barragán appears to have pulled off a narrow upset win. (Ballots are still being counted, but she is ahead by several thousand votes.)

Salud Carbajal: Another Latino climate leader from California, Carbajal is a supervisor in Santa Barbara County. Climate Hawks Vote backed Carbajal because he stood up against fracking, fighting for a ballot measure to ban it in 2014, even as it went down to defeat.

“He showed the political courage we expect,” says Miller of Climate Hawks Vote. “He stood by it even when he knew it was going down in flames.”

Miller recounts a story from late October to illustrate Carbajal’s commitment. Santa Barbara’s County Council was closely divided on a proposal to approve 96 new oil wells in the area. Kamala Harris, whose election to the Senate looked certain, was campaigning for down-ballot Democrats in tight races. She went to Santa Barbara County, because Carbajal was in a very close race. But he missed the event with Harris to attend the county council vote over the wells. In the end, Carbajal cast the decisive vote rejecting them.

“He was willing to forgo being there with one of California’s most popular politicians,” Miller says. “He did the right thing: took the vote instead of standing up on the stage. That’s the kind of dedicated public servant that we’re looking for.”

Brad Schneider: While congressional climate hawks tend to cluster on the coasts, you can find some in the Midwest. One is Illinois congressman Brad Schneider, who lost his House seat in 2014 but just reclaimed it last week. During his previous two-year term, Schneider racked up an impressive LCV score of 90 percent.

Schneider had the backing of a number of green groups in this election. He earned the endorsement of Vote Climate USA PAC, a pro-climate political action committee, after he declared his support for a nationwide carbon tax or a similar scheme to put prices on emissions.

The Sierra Club praised him for fighting for the Great Lakes Restoration Fund and for defending “environmental safeguards against Republican efforts to dismantle them.”

That last part refers to congressional Republicans constant assault on regulations of carbon and conventional pollutants, an attack sure to resume next year.

Any action to combat climate change under a Trump administration will require boundless stamina, local organizing, and dedicated climate leaders who push the boundaries of what is politically possible. And, despite all the negative news, there will be a fresh crop of such leaders coming to Washington.

A Beacon in the Smog®
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Hillary Clinton Cancels West Coast Travel Following Health Scare At 9/11 Memorial

 

Hillary Clinton cancels plans to travel to West Coast on Monday and Tuesday following health episode at 9/11 memorial.

Source: Hillary Clinton Cancels West Coast Travel Following Health Scare At 9/11 Memorial

Who are the Green Party candidates? | WPMT FOX43


Despite record levels of dissatisfaction with the Republican and Democratic candidates, nearly 70% of Americans know nothing about the Green Party presidential hopeful Jill Stein, according to a recent Gallup poll.

Stein has consistently polled as the fourth-most popular option in the presidential race after Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump and Libertarian Gary Johnson. In the most recent CNN/ORC poll, Stein received 5% support nationwide, 4 points behind Johnson, her nearest competitor.

Stein and her running mate Ajamu Baraka hope to change that Wednesday at the CNN Green Party town hall.

Jill Stein

Occupation: Physician

Age: 66

Past experience: She ran for president in 2012 with the Green Party and ran for Massachusetts governor in 2002 against former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Stein also ran for state representative in 2004 and Massachusetts’ secretary of state in 2006 as the Green-Rainbow candidate.

Memorable quotes:

“If Donald Trump wins, Hillary Clinton deserves the blame because she knocked out Bernie Sanders through backstabbing & sabotage. #DNCleaks,” Stein tweeted.

“My campaign is the only one that’s not corrupted by lobbyists’ money, corporate money or super PACs, so I have the unique ability to stand for what the people need, not the banks,” she told CNN Tuesday. “I’m here to really empower people to let them know we can actually have those solutions that we need in order to move forward.”

In the news: Earlier this month, Stein dismissed anxieties that Russia could have been behind the Democratic National Committee hacking that has raised concerns of a foreign state or actor meddling in the US presidential election.

“This is routine,” said Stein, who added that there was “no question” WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is a hero. “This is what state departments do to one another.”

Surprising fact: Stein is a recording artist who has put out folk-rock recordings with the band Somebody’s Sister. She plays the conga, guitar and the djembe drum.

Top issues: Green jobs, campaign finance reform and increasing taxes on the wealthy.

Ajamu Baraka

Occupation: Associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a left-leaning DC-based think tank

Age: 62

Past experience: Founding executive director of the US Human Rights Network, a network of more than 300 human rights organizations; served on several boards of human rights organizations, including Amnesty International.

Memorable quotes:

“We’ve got to address in a real way the ongoing assault on black lives in the United States of America,” Baraka told CNN Tuesday. “It appears that police in the US seem to understand that they are able to operate with almost virtual impunity because they are not being prosecuted and they are not being convicted.”

“It is absolutely outrageous that we have a Democratic process in which we only have two choices and those choices are very, very narrow,” he also told CNN.

“The fact that Barack Obama will be standing in the shadow of Dr. (Martin Luther) King (Jr.), his presence conveying the impression that he somehow represents the values and self-sacrificing lives of Dr. King … should be taken as an insult by everyone who has struggled and continues to struggle for human rights, peace and social justice,” he wrote prior to the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

Surprising facts: Baraka has military experience, unlike the candidates on the major party tickets. He served in Vietnam in the US Army.

In 1998, Baraka was one of 300 human rights workers honored by then-United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan.

Top issues: Criminal justice reform, ending racial discrimination and helping the working poor.
Filed in: News, Politics
Topics: Donald Trump, Green Party, Hillary Clinton, Jill Stein

Petition · It should be illegal for politicians to take donations from lobbyists. · Change.org

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https://www.change.org/p/it-should-be-illegal-for-politicians-to-take-donations-from-lobbyists/sign?utm_source=action_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=587666&alert_id=xxhaETkAbN_xrhNGM8YDsR3h61zXEiVQ9g6LfEGcgpAyW0OXdOvc6zVXpJLCU%2BwCs9MvqvzqbWd

See how much you would pay in taxes under each presidential candidate | WPMT FOX43

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See how much you would pay in taxes under each presidential candidate
Posted 10:39 AM, March 30, 2016, by Tribune Media Wire

So how much would you have to pay in taxes under each presidential candidate?

With debates already at a fevered pitch, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump and Ted Cruz are all trying to convince voters to side with them – but it’s hard to size up a candidate from podium time alone. One of the crucial ways the next president will affect every citizen by the changes he or she has planned for the country’s tax policy.

Vox teamed up with the Tax Policy Center to create a handy tax calculator that uses each candidates’ proposal to give you a sharper idea of what April 15, 2017 might look like for your checking account.

If you want see how much you’d have to pay under Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump or Ted Cruz, you can enter in a hypothetical amount into the calculator.

For example, let’s say you are single, have one child and make $50,000. This is what your taxes would like under the four candidates:
                              

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If you’re married, make $140,000 and have two or more children:

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What about the millionaires? Here’s a married couple with no children who makes $1,000,000:

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See how much you might be on the hook for under the different candidates by using this calculator.
Related stories

Front-runners Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton score key Western victories
Harrisburg man indicted for using his tax preparation service to file false tax returns
How Donald Trump could cause a recession

Filed in: News, Politics

Topics: BERNIE SANDERS, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, taxes, ted cruz

Pennsylvania Residents: Tell Governor-elect Wolf to Protect Parks from Fracking Impacts! – National Parks Conservation Association

fracking_throPennsylvania Residents: Tell Governor-elect Wolf to Protect Parks

from Fracking Impacts! – National Parks Conservation Association.