Senator Markey Works with Massachusetts Fishermen, Lobstermen, and Environmental Community to Support Right Whale Legislation

markey.senate.gov
Monday, July 9, 2018

Senator Booker legislation would establish a new grant program to fund collaborative research to reduce the impacts of human activities on North Atlantic right whales

Washington (July 9, 2018) – With fewer than 450 North Atlantic right whales remaining, 17 confirmed deaths in 2017, and no observed calves this year, the species could become functionally extinct in twenty years if immediate action isn’t taken. In light of this crisis, Senator Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) joined Senator Cory Booker (D-N.J.) in co-sponsoring his Scientific Assistance for Very Endangered (SAVE) Right Whales Act (S. 3038) after gaining the support of fishermen, lobstermen, and environmentalists in New England. The SAVE Right Whales Act establishes a new grant program to fund collaborative projects among states, research institutions, nongovernmental organizations, and members of the fishing and shipping industries to reduce the impacts of human activities on North Atlantic right whales. The bill would authorize $5 million in new funding annually from 2018-2028. In April, Senator Markey led 11 of his colleagues in requesting that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration conduct an urgent assessment of the impacts to the North Atlantic right whale from fisheries in Canada.

“The North Atlantic right whale is in crisis, and a unified effort along the entire extent of its range is needed to prevent the extinction of this treasured species,” said Senator Markey, a member of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. “Right whales are an iconic and integral part of our marine heritage in Massachusetts. We must vow not to repeat our history, when, generations ago, the right whale was hunted to near extinction. With the support of political leaders, fishermen, lobstermen, and the environmental and conservation communities, we can help the right whale recover and flourish again in our waters.”

A copy of the legislation can be found HERE.

Other Senators co-sponsoring the legislation include Senators Tom Carper (D-Del.), Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.).

“The future of the right whale greatly depends on the collective efforts of scientists, researchers, managers and fishermen alike to work for the best possible result, while allowing fishermen to fish and whales to feed in the waters off of Massachusetts safely,” said Beth Casoni, Executive Director of Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association. “The establishment of this Act is imperative and the time is now, given the Unusual Morality Events of 2017. We greatly appreciate Senator Markey’s efforts to help the Massachusetts lobster industry in looking for a solution.”

“This proposed bill is a great start toward finding solutions that protect both whales and the fishing industry. It calls for science-led conservation efforts with all stakeholders working cooperatively,” said Scott Kraus, Ph.D., Vice President and Chief Scientist of Marine Mammal Conservation at the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium. “Researchers, fishermen and government officials coming together is the only way that sustainable change will happen.”

“North Atlantic right whales are in dire need of our help,” said Dr. Priscilla Brooks, Vice President and Director of Ocean Conservation at Conservation Law Foundation. “This magnificent species is on the brink of extinction, with less than 450 whales remaining on the planet. We need to develop long-term solutions to protect right whales as soon as possible, and this bill is a meaningful step forward. We’re thankful for Senator Markey’s leadership on this critically important issue.”

“Our region’s lobstermen have bent over backwards to find ways to keep their lines from tangling up with whales,” said John Pappalardo, CEO of the Cape Cod Fishermen’s Alliance. “We are committed to a vital ocean as well as commercial fishing, and we’ll do everything we can to accomplish both goals. A bill like this, if passed, would help us get there.”

“The SAVE Right Whales Act is an enormous step forward and demonstrates the United State’ commitment to saving this critically endangered species. IFAW applauds Senator Markey’s decision to co-sponsor this bill, his steadfast leadership on this issue, and for creating the opportunity to further expand existing conservation efforts,” said Azzedine Downes, President & CEO of International Fund for Animal Welfare.

Organizations endorsing the legislation include the Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association, Conservation Law Foundation, New England Aquarium, Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society Legislative Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), and Oceana.

https://www.markey.senate.gov/news/press-releases/senator-markey-works-with-massachusetts-fishermen-lobstermen-and-environmental-community-to-support-right-whale-legislation

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NEPA Under Attack! Tell Trump ‘Hands Off Nat’l Env Law’ Before Aug. 20 |

globaljusticeecology.org
Posted on July 13, 2018 by GJEP staff Leave a Comment
Note: Thanks to a major effort by eco and other groups in the US (including GJEP), the period for commenting on the government’s attempt to gut one of the country’s strongest remaining environmental laws (the National Environmental Policy Act) has been extended to 20 August. NEPA requires production of extensive Environmental Impact Statements, including input from the public, before actions can be taken that would impact or harm the environment. This law also applies to the proposed release of genetically engineered trees in the US.

For more info or to submit comments, go to: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=CEQ-2018-0001-0001

– Anne Petermann, GJEP Carl Segerstrom/High Country News

A linchpin environmental law is now being scrutinized by the Trump administration and could be targeted for reforms. The National Environmental Policy Act, commonly referred to as NEPA, dictates the environmental planning process for federal agencies. Any changes to the NEPA process could have far-reaching impacts on the vast public lands and infrastructure of the West.

The NEPA reform push broadly traces political dividing lines, as pro-business and anti-regulation Republicans, who want to see NEPA reworked, square off with environmental groups and conservation-minded Democrats hoping to preserve the law and implementation process. Caught between the vocal factions of each party are state governments and federal land managers arguing for a middle ground of limited reform.

An August 2017 executive order, aimed at cutting environmental regulations and speeding up infrastructure projects, key goals of the Trump administration, prompted the ongoing review. The review looks at changing the implementing procedures for environmental reviews and offers some examples of what could be altered, including: limiting the time frame for environmental reviews, changing how agencies consider state and tribal input, and reducing the need to explore project alternatives.

When federal agencies consider timber sales, build bridges, renew licenses on dams, pave highways, permit nuclear facilities or make any decision that will impact the local environment, they trigger the NEPA process. Contractors working on federal projects often commission and pay for NEPA reviews. The NEPA review process has three tiers that determine how rigorous an environmental review must be. The Categorical Exclusion designation exempts actions from environmental review if they are deemed to have no “significant effect on the human environment.” The next tier is Environmental Assessment, which compels agencies to prepare a formal review of potential impacts and decide whether the action has no significant impact or requires an Environmental Impact Statement. The Environmental Impact Statement is the most thorough review process and requires multiple drafts, a public comment period and that agencies explore alternatives to proposed projects.

Heading the push for NEPA reform is Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, who has had the law in his sights for the last decade. During a committee meeting on NEPA, Bishop, the chair of the House Committee on Natural Resources, complained the law has been warped by lawsuits and court interpretations and become “a weapon for litigants to force delays and denials on all sorts of activities.” Bishop, who has been a vocal proponent of loosening federal regulations on oil and gas companies and the transfer of federal lands to state control, said, “Environmental reviews should inform government of the actions they need to take, not paralyze it.”

Conservation groups are digging in order to preserve NEPA and asking for an extended public commenting period on the current review. The “Protect NEPA Campaign,” which is a coalition of environmental, labor and civil rights group, such as the Sierra Club and Natural Resources Defense Council has called the Trump administration’s review an unprecedented attack on the law. More than 350 environmental organizations signed a letter to the Council on Environmental Quality, asking for an extension of the public comment period from 30 to 90 days. Raul Garcia, the senior legislative counsel for the environmental law group Earthjustice, said the month-long commenting process “is the latest in a long line of this administration’s efforts to silence public opinion and hinder democracy.”

The Western Governors’ Association recently called for changes to the NEPA process that would give more influence to state governments. In a policy resolution, the association, which represents Western state executives, asked that federal agencies adopt more consistent NEPA planning processes and better engage with state and local governments. The group of Western lawmakers also asked that state environmental impact studies carry more weight in federal decision-making.

Land management professionals say parts of the NEPA process could be reformed, but caution against sweeping changes to the law. Mike Ferguson, a retired Bureau Land Management land planner, first worked on NEPA implementation with the BLM in the 1970’s and has seen the implementation of the law become more convoluted over time. He says tightening the time frame for NEPA actions, clarifying the role of public comments, and investing in training and agency personnel could improve the process.

Getting back to the basic language and intent of the law should be the goal of any NEPA reforms, says Ferguson. “A tug-of-war obliterates what NEPA was designed for in the first place, and I don’t care whether that’s from the left or the right,” he says. “Opening it up on either side will lead to a downward spiral that will dilute its effectiveness in the long-run.”

The commenting period for NEPA reform is slated to be open through Aug. 20, and a comment form can be accessed via the Council on Environmental Quality’s website. To date, the majority of the comments so far have either urged the council to keep NEPA intact or asked for an extended commenting period.

https://globaljusticeecology.org/nepa-under-attack-tell-trump-hands-off-natl-env-law-before-aug-20/#comments

Category: Climate Justice, Featured, Social Media News Tags: High Country News, National Environmental Policy Act, NEPA

Petition: Expulsion For Maxine Waters – Remove Her From Congress

petitions.whitehouse.gov
Expulsion For Maxine Waters – Remove Her From Congress
2-3 minutes
We the people ask the federal government to Call on Congress to act on an issue:
Created by A.M. on June 25, 2018
Sign This Petition

Needs 17,679 signatures by July 25, 2018 to get a response from the White House

82,321 signed – 100,000 goal

It’s time for Maxine Waters to go.

Waters has crossed a dangerous line, calling for attacks and violence against all Trump officials.

What Waters said, when she called on Americans to “push back” against Trump officials, and make it impossible for them to shop, eat out, or go to gas stations, is one of the most irresponsible statements anyone could have said, let alone a so-called Democrat leader.

It is especially dangerous to call for public attacks at a time in our country when liberals are so wildly unhinged and violent, have no control over their emotions and are brainwashed by fake news and hoodwinked by lying, sleazy politicians like Maxine Waters.

Under the circumstances, censure is not enough for Maxine Waters.

Waters should face expulsion for what she’s done.
https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/expulsion-maxine-waters-remove-her-congress

Hurricane season starts today, and Trump still hasn’t learned from his deadliest blunder — Hurricane Maria

grist.org
By Justine Calma on Jun 1, 2018

It wasn’t until five days after Hurricane Maria made landfall that President Trump tweeted about the devastation. FEMA administrator Brock Long arrived in Puerto Rico that same day — he was among the first Trump officials to get to the battered U.S. territory.

This week, a Harvard study revealed that the September 2017 storm is likely the deadliest disaster in modern U.S. history — with more casualties than Hurricane Katrina and the 9/11 attacks combined. The analysis places Puerto Rico’s death toll at somewhere between 4,645 and 5,740 people, 90 times more dead than the government’s widely disputed official death toll.

The president has yet to offer any public condolences on the death count in the new study. He has, however, tweeted vigorously in the wake of Roseanne Barr being fired to Disney CEO Bob Iger demanding an apology for “HORRIBLE” statements made about him on ABC.

“What if 5,000 people in any US state died because of a natural disaster? It would be 24/7 news. Well, that happened in #PuertoRico as a result of #HurricaneMaría, and we are now talking about a mediocre sitcom being cancelled,” tweeted journalist Julio Ricardo Varela.

Writing in an opinion piece for NBC news, Varela continued: “Puerto Ricans are not suddenly shocked by the Harvard study … because the proof was already there months ago. But almost nobody else wanted to look for it.”

Trump’s only visit to the island after the storm — when he said that Maria wasn’t a “real” tragedy like Hurricane Katrina — Varela writes, “served to highlight the late response and federal neglect to Puerto Rico’s catastrophe.”

The president’s inattention, critics argue, contributed to a disaster response that was slow, meager, and ripe with allegations of misconduct and corruption. And rather than drive compassion for fellow Americans, his priorities have helped shift attention elsewhere. Cable news dedicated more than 16 times more airtime to the Roseanne controversy than it did to the Puerto Rico death toll.

Because of the silence, Refinery 29 journalist Andrea González-Ramírez has started a viral thread on Twitter in an effort to remember and name the dead:

“This should be a day of collective mourning in Puerto Rico. Thousands dead because of administrations that could not get the job done,” San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz tweeted on Tuesday. “These deaths & the negligence that contributed to them cannot be forgotten. This was, & continues to be, a violation of our human rights.”

And with Hurricane Season 2018 beginning today, there’s still uncertainty about how prepared this administration is for another storm. Puerto Rico’s power authority announced yesterday that it may take another two months to get power back completely on the island, and officials say it’s likely that the electrical grid will crash again with the next hurricane.

On top of that, FEMA is going through a “reorganization,” Bloomberg reported last week, and several key leadership roles are still vacant or temporarily filled.

“What the impacts from the 2017 disasters show is that there is also still work to do in order to build a culture of preparedness across the country at all levels of government, including improved resilience among our critical infrastructure,” FEMA wrote to Grist in an email.

https://grist.org/news/hurricane-season-starts-today-and-trump-still-hasnt-learned-from-his-deadliest-blunder-hurricane-maria/

Satirical ad reveals how to live luxuriously like Scott Pruitt

 

grist.org
Satirical ad reveals how to live luxuriously like Scott Pruitt
By Kate Yoder on May 18, 2018
1-2 minutes

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt got ridiculed in front of the nation at a hearing this week, when Senate Democrats took him to task over his excessive spending and alleged ethical missteps.

But that wasn’t enough for the Sierra Club. The environmental group launched a satirical video making fun of Pruitt’s lush life on Friday. The premise of the parody advertisement? That you, too, could live in such a luxurious fashion — as long as you’re cool with doing a little dirty business.

“Looking to plan a luxury vacation to far off places like Australia, Morocco, or Italy? Try Do-it-Pruitt, your one-stop shop for outrageous pay-to-play deals at the Environmental Protection Agency,” the narrator says. “We have a lobbyist ready to make your plane, dinner, and hotel reservations for you — all you have to do is meet with their corporate polluter clients.”

The ad is part of the growing #BootPruitt campaign, the first coordinated effort to kick Pruitt out of office.

https://grist.org/politics/satirical-ad-reveals-how-to-live-luxuriously-like-scott-pruitt/

Petition: Hundreds of Kittens Have Been Killed for Experiments Funded With Taxpayer Money

Hundreds of Kittens Have Been Killed for Experiments Funded With Taxpayer Money

by: Care2 Team
target: USDA

24,881 SUPPORTERS – 25,000 GOAL

One hundred dead kittens a year.

That’s the price we are paying for a taxpayer-funded experiment that feeds kittens infected meats and then monitors their response. The kittens barely get a chance at life, as the experiment uses cats that are less than three months old.

According to a recent exposé, the majority of the kittens are perfectly healthy, even after being forced to eat spoiled meat. After they are no longer “useful,” lab workers kill them and burn their bodies.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has tried to defend themselves by saying the number of kittens reportedly killed in the tests has been overestimated. But, even if one kitten dies, it is too many. There is something very wrong when the U.S. government is trying to infect poor helpless animals, and then, if by some miracle they survive, they are killed anyway.

The lab conducting the cruel tests is located in Maryland, a state, which just last month, passed the “Beagle Freedom Bill.” The law that requires all labs to work with willing animal rescue organizations to find homes for pets once they are no longer needed. The bill also protects cats.

However, the Beagle Freedom Bill may take time to go into effect and these hundreds of kittens need our help today. That’s why Care2 is calling on the USDA lab in Beltsville, Maryland to immediately stop euthanizing their kittens and instead rehome them.

Please help us find these kittens a new home. Sign the petition and demand the USDA stop killing these kittens.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/300/652/801/

Tell the Trump Administration: No Drilling in Carrizo

environmental-action.webaction.org
Tell the Trump Administration: No Drilling in Carrizo
1 minute

US Bureau of Land Management California State Director Jerome Perez,

We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to reverse your approval of a new oil platform and pipeline in Carrizo National Monument. This special place, its wildlife, and its natural beauty should be protected, not sacrificed for the sake of more destructive oil and gas drilling.

We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to reverse your approval of a new oil platform and pipeline in Carrizo National Monument. This special place, its wildlife, and its natural beauty should be protected, not sacrificed for the sake of more destructive oil and gas drilling.

https://environmental-action.webaction.org/p/dia/action4/common/public/?action_KEY=26038&uid=1220798&utm_source=salsa&utm_medium=email&tag=email_blast:46299&utm_campaign=EAC4-FCNS:SPECPLCCNS-0418&utm_content=EM9:00C:0HH-AAP

Federal Court Orders Trump Administration To Release Public Records On Wildlife Imports Within 14 Days! – World Animal News

BREAKING NEWS
By WAN –
April 4, 2018

A federal court in Arizona has ordered the Trump administration to release public records about how much wildlife is being imported into the United States, including live animals for the pet trade and dead animals destined for clothing and biomedical research.
The court found that the data, which includes the species’ names, quantity imported, and importing and exporting companies’ names, must be disclosed under the Freedom of Information Act.
As per the government’s website, “The basic function of the Freedom of Information Act is to ensure informed citizens, vital to the functioning of a democratic society.”
The ruling stems from a 2016 FOIA request filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, followed by litigation after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refused to provide all the data.
“The United States is a huge hub for the wildlife trade, including trade in imperiled animals and plants,” Tanya Sanerib, a senior attorney with the Center’s international program said in a statement. “The public has every right to know what wildlife is coming across our borders. Given the enormous threats from wildlife trafficking, we’re glad to know these records will see the light of day.”
The United States imports millions of wildlife and plant parts each year from around the globe. Imported products include birds, fish, and turtles destined for the pet trade; python-skin boots and fur coats for the fashion industry; corals, orchids, and shells used for home décor; lions and other animals killed as hunting “trophies”; and primates destined for medical research.
For decades the Fish and Wildlife Service has tracked wildlife import and export data and freely provided that data to conservation groups and the public. Beginning in 2016, however, the agency refused to release data from certain companies. Without the data, the public cannot track or evaluate whether U.S. trade is endangering wildlife at home or abroad and thus seek protections for those animals domestically or internationally.
The new court order directs the Service to release the disputed wildlife data within 14 days.
One step forward of many needed!

Help us continue to bring you the latest breaking animal news from around the world and consider making a Donation Here! http://www.peace4animals.net/donate

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“One Person CAN Make A Difference”

TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,animal welfare organizations,
Freedom of Information Act,Trump Administration,US Fish And Wildlife

http://worldanimalnews.com/federal-court-orders-trump-administration-to-release-public-records-on-wildlife-imports-within-14-days/

© Copyright 2016 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Botswana’s President Ian Khama Blasts Trump For “Encouraging Elephant Trophy Hunting” – World Animal News

http://worldanimalnews.com/botswanas-president-ian-khama-blasts-trump-encouraging-elephant-trophy-hunting/

BREAKING
By Lauren Lewis –
March 19, 2018

The decision by Trump to reverse a ban on the imports of animal “trophies” into the United States continues to cause a rippling effect across the globe.
Most recently, on Friday, Botswana’s President Ian Khama, who is stepping down from his office in two weeks, called out Trump while speaking at the anti-poaching Giant’s Club Summit in Kasane, a town in the northeastern corner of the South African country near the borders of Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
Khama stated, as per africanews.com, that he wanted “to take this moment to condemn in the strongest possible terms” the March 1st decision made by the Trump administration to immediately begin considering issuing “trophy” importation permits on a “case by case” basis.
“I think that this administration is undermining our efforts and also encouraging poaching in the process because they are well aware of our laws that prohibit hunting in Botswana,” said Khama.
The controversial decision by the U.S. Department of the Interior allows when approved, for tusks and skins of elephants killed in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe to be legally imported into the United States.
Botswana is reportedly one of 32 African countries at the conference calling on the European Union to end its ivory trade.
According to the Daily Nation, Kenya, Uganda, and Gabon were also among the countries urging European countries to follow the likes of China and Hong Kong and ban the trade.

Help us continue to bring you the latest breaking animal news from around the world and consider making a Donation Here! http://www.peace4animals.net/donate

Please Go Plant-Based!

“One Person CAN Make A Difference”

TAGS:Animal,Animal News,Animal Protection,Elephants,Ivory Trade,South Africa,Trophy hunting

© Copyright 2016 – WorldAnimalNews.com

The USDA Is Still Hiding Animal Welfare Records from the Public – Why This Is an Issue and What’s Being Done – One Green PlanetOne Green Planet

The USDA Is Still Hiding Animal Welfare Records from the Public – Why This Is an Issue and What’s Being D
Arianna Pittman
March 5, 2018

For nearly a decade, the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) housed an online search tool where the public could access inspection reports and legal documentation concerning entities licensed under the Animal Welfare Act. Then, suddenly, in February 2017, the search tool was disabled and the records were no longer accessible to the public, with the USDA claiming privacy concerns as the reason for the documents being removed.

It was a shock to organizations and advocates, who relied on the reports to show people the horrors of puppy mills and expose the mistreatment of animals in roadside zoos and other attractions. They also brought to light the number of animals used in research facilities and the conditions in which many were forced to live. The reports showed facility names and locations, the type(s) of animals kept and how many, and recorded any violations of federal law including failure to provide adequate veterinary care and proper food and shelter. They were not only an educational tool, but they also served as evidence in lawsuits and legislative efforts aimed at helping and protecting animals.

The USDA has reinstated some of the documentation since the “blackout” that took place just over a year ago, but much of the information organizations rely on has been removed, making the reports virtually useless in their animal protection efforts.
A Continued Lack Of Transparency Is Harming Animals

The USDA Is Still Hiding Animal Welfare Records from the Public — Why This Is an Issuesdnelson11/Wikimedia

In August 2017 a new public search tool was launched and many of the inspection reports were reinstated, but with one major change – the vast majority of information was redacted, meaning you could no longer see animal counts, facility names and locations, and in some cases, the details of what violations were found during an inspection. Many of the search and reporting features have also been disabled in the new search tool, making it more difficult to find information on specific breeders and zoos.

Documents can be requested from the agency through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), but organizations have reported that those documents were redacted as well, as were any photographs depicting animal welfare violations. Not only that, but long waiting periods to receive the documents can hinder an organization’s ability to protect animals covered under the Animal Welfare Act.

Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) stated that “obtaining animal welfare records through traditional FOIA requests significantly burdens countless animal protection organizations and other agencies. Records which were previously immediately accessible at no cost now require each individual organization to manage voluminous FOIA requests that take several months or even years to process, not to mention the possibility of large fees.”

For people and organizations working to protect animals by tracking problematic facilities and holding them accountable under the law, this can have a direct impact on their life-saving work and advocacy. The USDA said they plan to make animal inventories and other information available again in the future, but in the meantime, advocates continue to wait, forced to work with the little information that is available to help protect animals from harm.
Why the Records Are Important

The USDA Is Still Hiding Animal Welfare Records from the Public — Why This Is an IssuePetra Martin/Wikimedia

Countless animal welfare organizations used the inspection reports and other records posted by the USDA to monitor animal welfare violations and track the sizes and conditions of puppy mills, zoos, roadside attractions, aquariums, and research labs.

The ASPCA used information from the reports, as well as photographs acquired through the FOIA, to create an online database of problematic breeders and their connections to various pet stores. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) used inspection report data to publish their annual “Horrible Hundred” list, which calls out puppy mills who have repeatedly violated the Animal Welfare Act, yet are allowed to remain licensed by the USDA.

The USDA reports helped advocates expose the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus’ multiple violations of the Animal Welfare Act throughout its history, revealing the sad truth behind circuses and animals being used for entertainment. An abusive animal handler who rented animals out for film and television was also exposed because of information made available through USDA inspection reports.

Companion Animal Protection Society (CAPS) conducts undercover investigations that have exposed the cruel practices of puppy mills and how pet stores often deceive customers by hiding the truth about where the puppies really come from.

Organizations focused on animal law used the reports to fight for legislative change to better protect animals and file cruelty complaints with both state and local agencies when laws had been violated. Without the vital information contained in these reports, each organization’s work to protect animals becomes even harder than it was before.
Organizations Taking Legal Action

In addition to public outcry over the USDA’s sudden loss of transparency, several organizations decided to take action by filing lawsuits and demanding that the database be brought back online and all of the animal welfare documents restored.

ALDF, an organization focused on using the law to protect animals, understands the importance of these records and how their removal impacts animal welfare organizations throughout the U.S. In 2017, they filed a lawsuit against the USDA along with Stop Animal Exploitation NOW!, Companion Animal Protection Society and Animal Folks, claiming that removal of the documents “violates both the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).” The lawsuit was eventually dismissed by a district judge, but ALDF is now appealing that dismissal, according to a press release recently posted on the organization’s website.

That same year, PETA, Beagle Freedom Project, Born Free USA and Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals were also part of a lawsuit requesting that animal welfare documents be reinstated and made available to the public. To date, the lawsuit is still pending.

These lawsuits will likely continue for some time, so it’s important for advocates to continue demanding that these records be fully reinstated, without redaction, so they can continue their work to protect those who have no voice.

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/usda-still-hiding-animal-welfare-records/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=f4c4f9cf18-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-f4c4f9cf18-106049477

Amazon.com, tax dodgers

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video from the USA says about itself:

You Won’t Believe How Much Taxes Amazon Paid Last Year

3 March 2018

Guess how much Amazon paid in taxes? Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian, the hosts of The Young Turks, have the answer. Get money out of politics: here.

Jeff Bezos is the richest person in the world, with a personal net worth of $108 billion. In 2017, Bezos’ company, the internet retail giant Amazon, reportedly took in $5.6 billion in U.S. profits.

So, how much did Amazon pay in income tax on that bounty? Hang on, we’re getting some news…what? What’s this? Amazon effectively paid zero dollars in federal income taxes in 2017? Oh.

Amazon is projecting a $789 million windfall from the Republicans’ tax bill, according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, which may have factored into its reason…

View original post 149 more words

Take Action | American Wild Horse Campaign

Updated Feb.28,2018

Congress has less than a month until March 23rd to come up with a 2018 budget deal. That’s what the current Continuing Resolution keeping the government running expires.

Congress will decide between house legislation that allows the BLM to destroy healthy wild horses and burros, and the senate version, which continues to prohibit killing and slaughter.

https://act.americanwildhorsecampaign.org/p/dia/action4/common/public/?action_KEY=25931

Director not found; error 404

Wild Horse Education

Editorial, Laura Leigh

For those of us that have spent a lot of time in the world of “internet language” the number 404 means one thing, an error.

The HTTP 404404 Not Found and 404 (pronounced “four oh four”) error message is a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) standard response code, in computer network communications, to indicate that the client was able to communicate with a given server, but the server could not find what was requested.

There are multiple ways to fix the error like refreshing the page, checking to make sure the url is formatted correctly or checking for malware.

In the instance of the Department of Interior failure to produce a director for National Parks Service (NPS) or the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) it is all about the “malware.”

America’s public land represents our public resources. Those public resources are part of what has…

View original post 1,067 more words

DARPA launches programme to use marine life for detecting naval threats (USA)

The ocean update

The PAL programme aims to use the wide array of senses possessed by marine wildlife to detect naval activity. Credit : DARPA.

February 6th, 2018 (Robert Scammell). DARPA (Ed Sibylline : Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) has launched a programme that aims to use the sensory capabilities of marine organisms to detect naval activity.

View original post 420 more words

2 national monuments in Utah are about to lose most of their land | Grist


http://grist.org/news/2-national-monuments-in-utah-are-about-to-lose-most-of-their-land/#close

Life-saving Weather Forecast Cost $3 a Person Annually Trump Wants to Slash Them

Trump wants to cripple storm forecasting just when it’s getting good — and we need it most.

By Eric Holthaus on Oct 23, 2017

As Hurricane Harvey roared toward the Texas coast in late August, weather models showed something that forecasters had never seen before: predictions of four feet of rainfall in the Houston area over five days — a year’s worth of rain in less than a week.

“I’ve been doing this stuff for almost 50 years,” says Bill Read, a former director of the National Hurricane Center who lives in Houston. “The rainfall amounts … I didn’t believe ‘em. 50-inch-plus rains — I’ve never seen a model forecast like that anywhere close to accurate.

“Lo and behold, we had it.”

That unbelievable-but-accurate rain forecast is just one example of the great leap forward in storm forecasting made possible by major improvements in instruments, satellite data, and computer models. These advancements are happening exactly when we need them to — as a warmer, wetter atmosphere produces more supercharged storms, intense droughts, massive wildfires, and widespread flooding, threatening lives and property.

And yet the Trump administration’s climate denial and proposed cuts threaten these advances, spreading turmoil in the very agencies that can predict disasters better than ever. The president’s budget proposal would slash the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s budget by 16 percent, including 6 percent from the National Weather Service.

Besides hampering climate research, the cuts would jeopardize satellite programs and other forecasting tools — as well as threaten the jobs of forecasters themselves. And they may undermine bipartisan legislation Trump himself signed earlier this year that mandates key steps to improve the nation’s ability to predict disasters before they happen.

Billy Raney and Donna Raney climb over the wreckage of what’s left of their apartment after Hurricane Harvey destroyed it on August 26, 2017 in Rockport, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

It’s hard to overstate how backward that seems after the hurricane season we’ve just witnessed, as well as the deadly wildfires in California, the climate-charged droughts and deluges and, well, you name it. Just when we need forecasting to be better than ever — and need our forecasters to be able to go even further, using those predictions in ways that protect people’s lives and livelihoods — the Trump administration wants to cut back?

Here’s how far we’ve come in forecasting: Three-day hurricane forecasts are now nearly as accurate as one-day forecasts were when Katrina struck 12 years ago. Even routine, “will it rain this weekend?” forecasts are better today than you probably realize. A 2015 paper in the journal Nature called the advancements a “quiet revolution,” both because they’ve gone relatively unnoticed by the general public, and because it’s been cheap. The National Weather Service, an agency of the U.S. government, costs taxpayers about $3 per person each year.

Still, knowing what the weather is going to do tomorrow and understanding how best to warn the public about potential risks are two different things. The first is all about physics; the other is about psychology, human behavior, social interaction, the built environment, and much more. You can guess which is easier.

Forecasts for Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall totals might have been stunningly accurate, but the floodwaters still surprised thousands of people. Days after Harvey’s rains ended, first responders in towns throughout southeast Texas were still rescuing families stranded by rising waters that flowed downstream toward the Gulf.

In the interest of saving lives, forecasters have started moving from simply predicting the weather to attempting to predict the consequences. Call it impact forecasting, an attempt to say what will happen after the rain hits the ground. Scientists hope to answer questions like: Where will water accumulate? Where will floodwaters head? How will it affect people?

The next step is using those “impact forecasts” to get people to safety. Researchers are working to build customized, real-time personal prediction tools that could tell people if their house is likely to flood, or how long they might go without power. There’s also a drive to create easier to understand warning systems, making better use of the latest communication tools and social media.

Besides getting people out of harm’s way, better warning systems could help by letting nonprofits seek donations in advance of a devastating storm, for instance, so they could provide relief more quickly. And they could help public officials do a better job of prepping for the worst.

Residents affected by Hurricane Maria wait in line for fuel donated by the Fuel Relief Fund in the municipality of Orocovis, outside San Juan, Puerto Rico. REUTERS / Shannon Stapleton

The need for this new branch of forecasting was highlighted during the height of Harvey’s rains, when the National Weather Service issued a bulletin that put the deluge in stark terms: “This event is unprecedented & all impacts are unknown & beyond anything experienced.”

“This was a good step forward,” says Kim Klockow, a meteorologist and behavioral scientist at the University of Oklahoma who supports the effort to develop impact forecasting. “It admitted something very important,” Klockow says — namely, that the system we have for warning people isn’t good enough.

In fact, experts say the best early-warning systems are ones that start years before the wind picks up and raindrops begin to fall, alerting people who live in vulnerable areas who might be prone to more threats in a climate-charged world.

Following Harvey, Klockow was named to a team of external scientists who will study the National Weather Service’s performance and look for ways to improve. They could start with better flood warnings, she says. “It’s like peering into a black box,” she says. “We give people almost nothing.”

In part, that’s a consequence of insufficient flood-zone maps. Even though rainstorms are getting more intense as the climate warms, FEMA sticks to historical flood data to determine which neighborhoods are required to purchase flood insurance — a policy that’s already leading to skyrocketing losses from floods. A recent study showed that 75 percent of the flood losses in Houston between 1999 and 2009 fell outside designated 100-year flood zones.

If residents don’t know their home is at risk of flooding, they’re less likely to consider that it might, even when a major storm is forecast. So it’s no surprise that, after floods, people report being caught by surprise.

How to keep them from getting surprised? Talk plainly.

There’s evidence that giving people unambiguous information can help move them to action. Recent research has shown that people often need to see the storm with their own eyes before they take cover. They need to see neighbors boarding up their houses before they do the same.

Read, the former National Hurricane Center director, says the same thing applies to him, despite his years of forecasting experience. “Most people, including myself if I’m really honest about it, are in denial that the bad thing will happen to you.”

Before Hurricane Katrina hit the New Orleans area in 2005, the National Weather Service issued a blunt statement that promised “certain death” should anyone be trapped outside unprotected. A post-storm analysis credited that warning with spurring an evacuation rate of more than 90 percent. Read says that’s why the Weather Service is shifting its focus toward making impending storms feel as real as possible to those in its path.

Forecasters need to “personalize the threat,” he says.

Klockow says that she’d like to see flood warnings take a personal approach, too. During a storm, an overlay in Google Street View could show you how high the water is rising in your neighborhood and re-route you away from flooded roads to get you home safely.

The tools to make that happen already exist. Several companies and local governments have already developed mapping tools that to warn of impending floods. North Carolina’s Flood Inundation Mapping and Alert Network relies on 500 measurement stations across the state that transmit their readings back to a central database. When conditions are ripe for flooding, the system’s software estimates possible consequences and alerts emergency managers.

This budding technology, integrated with databases of rescue supplies, could help FEMA figure out where to put aid and supplies before they’re needed.

Other organizations are working on an initiative called “forecast-based financing.” The idea is to allocate money for clearing out storm drains, as well as distributing first aid and water filtration systems, in the days ahead of a storm. Already tested in Uganda, Peru, Bangladesh and other countries, this innovation is now in the process of being scaled up worldwide. It could help organizations like the American Red Cross craft appeals for donations in advance, instead of relying on scenes of devastation after disaster strikes.


Ramon Sostre stands in front of his damaged house after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town’s bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico. REUTERS / Shannon Stapleton

All of these efforts and ideas show a lot of promise. Yet even as forecasters have come to understand the importance of developing better advance-warning techniques, their ability to undertake those efforts is being undercut by a White House hostile to funding science.

Earlier this year, along with recommending that Congress gut funding for NOAA, President Trump proposed an 11 percent cut from the National Science Foundation’s budget, slashing funds from the institution behind much of the country’s basic scientific research. If Congress agrees, it would be the first budget cut in the foundation’s 67-year history.

At the National Weather Service, the Washington Post recently reported that the agency couldn’t fill 216 vacant positions as a result of a Trump-imposed hiring freeze. As a result, meteorologists were working double shifts when hurricane after hurricane hit last month and covering for each other from afar.

A forecast center in Maryland, for example, provided days of backup to the National Hurricane Center as hurricanes spun toward shore. National Weather Service meteorologists at the San Juan, Puerto Rico, office complained of “extreme fatigue.” Colleagues in Texas stepped in to give them breaks.

The threat of budget cuts is already crimping federally funded disaster research. A few days after Harvey struck Texas, the Colorado-based National Center for Atmospheric Research — one of the country’s top meteorological research institutions — cut entire sections of its staff focused on the human dimensions of disasters, including impact forecasting.

In an all-staff meeting on Aug. 30, the center’s director explained that the anticipation of tighter budgets forced the decision.

Antonio Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, which oversees the center, called the cuts “strategic reinvestments” in a statement to Grist. He said the money saved would be reallocated to “the priority areas of computer models, observing tools, and supercomputing.”

But researchers at the center, called NCAR, say the layoffs will hurt efforts to make forecasts more human-focused and effective.

“Our whole group was cut,” says Emily Laidlaw, an environmental scientist at NCAR, whose work focuses on understanding what puts people at risk from climate change and climate-related disasters. “I would absolutely say that these cuts make people less safe.”

Read, the former hurricane center chief, says increases in supercomputing power shouldn’t come at the expense of developing forecasts that work better for people.

“You can’t drop one for the other,” he says.

The cuts to the National Center for Atmospheric Research will result in the loss of 18 jobs. That may not sound like a lot, but consider that these were some of the only scientists in the United States working to prepare our country’s system for predicting disasters in an era of rapid change.

In that context, the recent revolution in meteorology and pitfalls in preparedness become a powerful metaphor: We know that if we stick to our current course, the future will be bleak. Acting on the forecast of a warmer planet in a way that helps us to usher in a safer and more prosperous future is completely possible, and the stakes keep getting higher.

One-third of the U.S. economy, some $3 trillion per year, is subject to fluctuations in the weather, and millions of people endure weather disasters every year — a number that keeps going up as climate change boosts the frequency and intensity of storms.

Despite excellent weather forecasts, hundreds of people have lost their lives, and billions of dollars in economic value have been lost during this year’s record-breaking hurricane season. In some especially hard-hit places, like Barbuda, Dominica, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, recovery will take years, or longer.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Get people out of a hurricane’s path, put aid workers and supplies in the right place, and a raging storm might not lead to a catastrophe.

We are living in a golden age for meteorology, but we haven’t yet mastered what really matters: knowing in advance exactly how specific extreme weather events are likely to affect our lives. Getting that right could usher in a new era of disaster prevention, rather than the current model of Disaster Response.
A Beacon in the Smog®

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Petition: No Private Travel for Cabinet Members!


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Walling Off Wildlife – Defenders of Wildlife Blog

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Defenders of Wildlife Blog
19 September 2017
Walling Off Wildlife
Posted by: Bryan Bird

The Trump administration pushes forward with plan to wall off wildlife.

While the president continues his bombastic border wall talk and the administration and Congress argue over funding for this monstrosity, construction equipment is already moving in, land is being cleared and people and wildlife are being displaced in the borderlands of California and Texas.
By Hook or by Crook

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has already waived a host of environmental and other laws in order to expand the border wall along a 15-mile stretch of the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego, California. Defenders, along with a coalition of national conservation groups, sued to stop this unlawful overreach of the authority provided by Congress in the Real ID Act of 2005.

Similarly, in Texas the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have started clearing land, taking soil samples and conducting tests in areas where they plan to build new border wall – often without even notifying the landowners or the public of their actions. This was the case when the managers of the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas, discovered industrial mowers stripping vegetation from their land and imperiling more than 200 species of butterflies.

Now, CBP is trying to conceal efforts to build a 60-mile extension through the area that includes two national wildlife refuges and important habitat for the endangered ocelot and jaguarundi.

In a letter recently sent to a select group of stakeholders earlier this month, CBP requested comments on the proposed construction of 60 miles of border wall that would cut through parts of the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, the National Butterfly Center and the Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park. The letter appears to be a dubious ploy to claim that the agency is fulfilling its obligation to “seek public comment,” while not actually making the public aware of their plans. Perhaps even they realize what a terrible idea it is to construct a barrier through these sensitive habitats and critical wildlife corridors that support countless species of wildlife, including more than 500 species of birds, 300 butterfly species and 1,200 plant species.

A Tale of Two Refuges

Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge

Few places in the Western Hemisphere exhibit such a diversity of flora and fauna as the lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas, home to the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge. While small in size, the Santa Ana Refuge contains an abundance of neotropical songbirds, raptors, mammals and reptiles, including the nine-banded armadillo, Texas tortoise, Mexican free-tailed bat. It is also home to more than 400 bird species, more than 300 species of butterflies –half of all butterfly species found in North America – and more than 450 varieties of plants.

The refuge also provides habitat for at least eight species protected under the Endangered Species Act, including the highly-imperiled ocelot and jaguarundi. With fewer than 50 left in the United States, the refuge is essential to ocelot recovery.

Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Comprising several units along the Rio Grande, the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge helps protect a crucial link between coastal and river wildlife corridors. The various refuge units are located at the nexus of four climate zones – tropical, temperate, coastal and desert – and at the confluence of the Mississippi and Central flyways, making the region one of the most diverse conservation areas in North America. The Lower Rio Grande Valley is home to more than 700 vertebrate species, 300 species of butterfly and at least 18 threatened or endangered species, including the highly-endangered ocelot and jaguarundi.

The Lower Rio Grande Valley refuge complex conserves Mid-Delta Thorn Forest, a rare forest type that provides habitat for an array of small mammals and birds and serves as a key hunting ground for the ocelot. As the thorn forest has continued to diminish over the years, ocelots have been forced to cross open fields and been exposed to more dangers from vehicular traffic and predators. Further degradation of this crucial habitat from wall construction could prove devastating to the dwindling U.S. population of ocelots.
A Decisive Blow to Wildlife

The construction of an impenetrable wall through these refuges would fragment riparian habitats, block migration corridors for rare migratory birds and imperiled species, degrade and destroy habitat, and disrupt nesting, breeding and foraging by countless birds and other wildlife. Levee walls, which are proposed for at least 28 miles along this route, can trap wildlife and drown animals during severe flooding events.

Both refuges serve as important migration corridors for animals like the ocelot and jaguarundi, who travel back and forth from Mexico to the U.S. These rare cats would be cut off from crucial habitat affecting their dispersal and their potential to establish new resident populations in the U.S. The noise from increased vehicle traffic and lighting along the border wall could also greatly impair these animals’ ability to hunt and alter the behavior of their prey.
No Longer the “Land of the Free” for Wildlife

A border wall offends our core American values – freedom, equality, justice and the preservation of our natural heritage. For wildlife in the borderlands, a wall would set back decades of conservation success in the region.

We are the guardians of these imperiled animals and at Defenders we are fighting to make sure they have a voice and can continue to recover and prosper in our country. The illicit and secretive actions by the current administration would have disastrous consequences for wildlife.
Act now!

Tell the administration you won’t stand for any attack on our refuges or our wildlife. Stand up for imperiled wildlife in jeopardy because of the border wall.
Stand up for wildlife now!

Tell CPB and the administration that you oppose any border wall construction that would destroy vital wildlife habitat on our national wildlife refuges and public lands.

Defenders is committed to protecting human communities, wildlife and habitat threatened by a border wall. We have joined a diverse coalition of conservation, human rights, civil rights, religious and other groups to mount substantial opposition. Please join us in this important fight.

Bryan Bird, Southwest Program Director
Bryan oversees Defenders work in the Southwest, where he has spent 23 years working on wildlife conservation. His efforts are focused on maintaining and enhancing vital wildlife habitat, and on protecting imperiled species, such as Mexican gray wolves, jaguars, desert tortoises and California condors, in the face of a changing climate, drought, and increasing development.
Categories: border wall, Habitat Conservation, habitat conservation, jaguarundi, Lower Rio Grande, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, migration corridor, ocelot, Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Take Action, Trump administration, Wildlife

http://www.defendersblog.org/2017/09/walling-off-wildlife/

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Petition: Demand Members of Congress Allow Videotaping at Public Meetings


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Native America, Environmental Groups File Lawsuit to Overturn Trump’s Keystone XL Permit

First Suit Filed for an Injunction Against Trump’s Keystone XL Pipeline Permit by Indigenous Environmental Network, North Coast Rivers Alliance
WASHINGTON – The Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN) and North Coast Rivers Alliance (NCRA) have filed suit in Federal District Court in Great Falls, Montana, challenging the Presidential Permit issued by President Trump allowing construction and operation of the Keystone XL Pipeline.
IEN’s and NCRA’s Complaint challenging the State Department’s approval of a Presidential Permit for the KXL Pipeline is available here: http://www.ienearth.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Complaint_for_Declaratory_and_Injunctive_Relief.pdf

Stephan Volker, attorney for IEN and NCRA, filed the suit on Monday, March 27th. The suit alleges that the State Department’s Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (“FSEIS”) fails to (1) provide a detailed and independent Project purpose and need, (2) analyze all reasonable alternatives to the Project, (3) study the Project’s transboundary effects, (4) disclose and fully analyze many of the Project’s adverse environmental impacts, (5) formulate adequate mitigation measures, and (6) respond adequately to comments. In addition, the FSEIS was irredeemably tainted because it was prepared by Environmental Resource Management (“ERM”), a company with a substantial conflict of interest. The suit also alleges that Trump’s permit violates the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.
“President Trump is breaking established environmental laws and treaties in his efforts to force through the Keystone XL Pipeline, that would bring carbon-intensive, toxic, and corrosive crude oil from the Canadian tar sands, but we are filing suit to fight back,” said Tom Goldtooth, Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network. “Indigenous peoples’ lands and waters are not here to be America’s environmental sacrifice zone. For too long, the US Government has pushed around Indigenous peoples and undervalued our inherent rights, sovereignty, culture, and our responsibilities as guardians of Mother Earth and all life while fueling catastrophic extreme weather and climate change with an addiction to fossil fuels. The time has come to keep fossil fuels in the ground and shut down risky extreme energy projects like the tar sands that are poisoning our families, wildlife, water sources and destroying our climate.”
“Oil, water and fish do not mix. KXL poses an unacceptable risk to the Missouri River and its fisheries, including the nearly extinct Arctic grayling,” said Frank Egger, President of the North Coast Rivers Alliance (NCRA). “No oil pipeline is safe. One major oil spill, and the Missouri River and adjacent aquifers would be polluted for generations.”
“Because President Trump has turned his back on the Native American community and protection of our clean water, endangered fisheries, and indeed, survival of the Planet itself, we have asked the Federal Courts to order him to comply with our nation’s environmental laws,” said Volker. “We are confident that the courts will apply and enforce the law fairly and faithfully, and protect our irreplaceable natural heritage from the risky and unneeded KXL Pipeline. Alternatives including renewable energy and conservation must be given full and fair consideration to protect future generations from the ravages of global warming.”
Additional documents pertaining to the litigation can be obtained from the Volker law offices.
Copyright © 2017 · All Rights Reserved · Global Justice Ecology Project

USDA: Stop Hiding Animal Welfare Records and Covering For Abusers – The Animal Rescue Site


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Former Koch Agents, Fossil Fuel Industry Hired Guns Now Staffing Trump’s Federal Agencies | Common Dreams


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Petition · Beagle Freedom Project: Reverse the USDA’s Blackout of Information Related to Animals in Labs! · Change.org


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U.S. Government Must Stop Hiding Animal Abuse

 

The USDA website has taken down the portal to their records of animal cruelty, claiming a need to protect personal information that has long been redacted from those records. This is bad news for animals all over the world suffering from abuse and unethical treatment. Sign this petition to demand the USDA restore the portal to these records.

Source: U.S. Government Must Stop Hiding Animal Abuse

Wyden, Senators Demand Trump Administration Restores Transparency for USDA Records on Animal Cruelty, Puppy Mills | Press Releases | U.S. Senator Ron Wyden


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Animal Rights Groups Sue Over Unprecedented USDA Website Blackout | Common Dreams | Breaking News & Views for the Progressive Community


http://www.commondreams.org/news/2017/02/13/animal-rights-groups-sue-over-unprecedented-usda-website-blackout