Hoping someday they all have a forever home filled with happiness and love 🐾💙

 

Good Save

Video of hissing feral cat calming down and falling in love with rescuer goes viral

Published by Sahlee B. | Positive Outlooks 

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Stray cats are a common sight on many city streets, and people either stop and try to pet them, or ignore them altogether. To differentiate, stray cats are socialized to people, while feral cats are more likely the offspring of strays, are not socialized to people, and have reverted to a wild state. Catching feral cats is thus important to reduce health risks and control their population.

One animal champion endured some pain while out catching feral cats, but the cat soon calmed down and seemingly fell in love with its rescuer!

The American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) defines a feral cat as “any cat who is too poorly socialized to be handled … and who cannot be placed into a typical pet home.”

The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals estimates that there are between 60 million and 100 million feral cats in the U.S.

The Dodo | Facebook

These cats often form colonies and live in areas where shelter and food can be found, such as vacant lots and old cars. They eat from trash cans and face infection, disease, and suffer extremes in treatment and weather. Feral cats are known to decimate bird populations and pose health risks, including flea infestations.

They also go through endless cycle of breeding, since females can become pregnant as young as 16 weeks of age and produce two to three litters a year. In seven years, a single female cat and her kittens can create 420,000 more cats.

The Dodo | Facebook

Catching feral cats as part of neutering programs help bring down the population and reduce the challenges that they bring.

According to the American Association of Feline Practitioners, neutering programs entail that stray and feral cats are “humanely trapped, examined, vaccinated, and surgically sterilized by veterinarians.”

The Dodo | Facebook

They are then returned to their environment where they are hopefully cared for. Volunteers can provide food and shelter and monitor them for sickness.

But catching feral cats is certainly not easy. Hissing and biting comes with the territory, but for cats that may still be in that borderline between stray and feral, they may be able to appreciate human care.

The Dodo | Facebook

One animal advocate certainly found out the hard way. On a routine mission of catching feral cats, he chances upon a cat with its head trapped in can, most likely in an attempt to get the last morsel of food in the container. Carefully carrying the cat back to his car, he gently dislodges the can, and is immediately faced with an angry and terrified cat.

Wary about bringing the feral cat back into a rescue center, he talks to the cat and gives it a chance – go back to where it came from, or maybe have food and warmth in a safe environment. Fortunately, the cat decided that it was time to be saved!

Photo by The Dodo/YouTube

After some food and gentle loving care, the cat still lets out a few hisses every now and then, but grows more comfortable around human company.

The cat soon accepts the hand of its rescuer and shows some love! Catching feral cats may be risky, but certainly has its rewards. See the feral cat transform into a tranquil pet in the video below:

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h/t : The Dodo (This site is for everyone who loves animals and wants to spread that love and make the world a better place for them. Visit Facebook page.)

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/hissing-feral-cat-calming-down/

Hopefully he will go to a sanctuary

First Taste of Freedom

Breaking! Humane Society International Saves 70 Dogs From South Korean Dog Meat Farm & Helps Farmer Transition To Growing Vegetables Instead – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis – May 7, 2020

Photos By: Humane Society International

More than 70 dogs found languishing on a South Korean dog meat farm by  Humane Society International (HSI) have been given a second chance by the farmer’s decision to quit the dog meat industry once and for all. Mr. Nakseon Kim has been breeding dogs for nearly 40 years, but decided to leave dog farming behind when HSI offered to help him start a new life growing cabbages and other vegetables instead.

Dogs are shown locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Saturday, February 8, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

Amid growing South Korean opposition to eating dogs and new regulations and court rulings cracking down on the industry, farmers like Kim are increasingly looking for an exit strategy.

The HSI Animal Rescue Team rescues a dog at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

“I don’t think there are many people in South Korea who are willing to run dog meat farms anymore. There is no future in this dog meat industry. Once HSI helps me close my dog farm, I think I will start to grow crops instead like lettuce, cabbage, or other greens to sell to restaurants,” Kim said in a statement. “That is a business with a future.”

The HSI Animal Rescue Team rescues a dog at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

Tragically, up to two million dogs a year are bred and raised on thousands of dog meat farms across South Korea.

Dogs are shown locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Saturday, February 8, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

On his property in Hongseong, Kim breeds tosas, Jindos, poodles, beagles, huskies, golden retrievers, Pomeranians, Chihuahuas, and Boston terriers for two abusive industries; the meat trade and the puppy mill trade.

Nara Kim, Campaign Manager of HSI Korea, pets a dog at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

In rows of dilapidated cages, surrounded by animal waste, junk, and garbage, some dogs are destined for the slaughterhouse, and others the unscrupulous puppy mill trade. Despite Korea’s dog meat industry attempting to claim a difference between pet dogs and “meat dogs,” they are all just dogs whose fate ultimately depends on where greatest profits can be made.

The HSI Animal Rescue Team rescues a dog at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

“Unfortunately, it is still very common in South Korea to witness live puppies for sale in pet shop windows. But, what most Koreans will be shocked to learn is that these same puppies could easily have ended up being killed for human consumption instead. Whether they live or die, they are all born in this miserable place, their mothers intensively bred over and over until they are exhausted and eventually sold to slaughterhouses,” stated Nara Kim, HSI/Korea’s dog meat campaigner. “I am so glad that this nightmare has ended for these lovely dogs, but until the government commits to phase out this dreadful industry, the nightmare continues for millions more. As Koreans, we need to be their voice and call for an end to the dog farming and dog meat industries.”

A dog is chained to a dog house at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Saturday, February 8, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

Marking the 16th dog farm that HSI has closed since its farmer transition program began in 2015, all the dogs will eventually be flown to partner shelters in Canada and the United States to seek adoptive homes.

The HSI Animal Rescue Team rescues puppies at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

First, they are being relocated to a temporary boarding facility in South Korea while the organization waits for COVID-19 travel restrictions to relax. Once safely off the farm, the dogs will immediately receive a full veterinary check-up and settle into their temporary quarters where they can begin their rehabilitation.

Nara Kim, Campaign Manager of HSI Korea, holds a puppy at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

Dog meat consumption has been steadily declining in South Korea, and is banned or severely restricted in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, and the Philippines.

The HSI Animal Rescue Team rescues a dog at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

In 2018 both Indonesia and Vietnam’s capital city Hanoi pledged an end to the dog meat trade, and most recently in April 2020, the Chinese cities of Shenzhen and Zhuhai banned dog and cat meat consumption following a public statement by the Chinese government that dogs are considered companions and not livestock.

Nara Kim, Campaign Manager of HSI Korea, organizes the crates after the dogs were rescued at a dog meat farm in Hongseong, South Korea, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

As global pressure builds for countries across Asia to permanently close wildlife wet markets amid coronavirus risks, the array of undeniable human health risks by the dog meat trade in South Korea and across Asia is strengthening calls for action to end the trade across the continent.

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https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-humane-society-international-saves-70-dogs-from-south-korean-dog-meat-farm-helps-farmer-transition-to-growing-vegetables-instead/

Jungle Animal Rescue – USA Premiere – April 18, 2020

Hundreds of stolen pets are rescued from an illegal Chinese slaughterhouse amid coronavirus crisis

27257662-0-image-a-3_1587021415126https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8223393/amp/Hundreds-stolen-pets-rescued-illegal-Chinese-slaughterhouse-amid-coronavirus-crisis.html?ito=social-twitter_mailonline&__twitter_impression=true

  • Images show frightened dogs being driven away from the abattoir this month
  • A total of 423 dogs, most believed to be stolen pets, were saved in the operation
  • Activists have urged Beijing to ban people from eating dogs and cats nationwide 
  • The coronavirus pandemic has been linked to the eating of exotic meat in China
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Hundreds of stolen pets have been rescued from an underground abattoir in central China as animal lovers urge the country to ban citizens from eating dogs.

Pictures provided to MailOnline show frightened, wounded and helpless dogs being driven away from the illegal slaughterhouse in the province of Henan this month.ADVERTISEMENTAd

The news comes as more than 137,000 people around the world have lost their lives to the coronavirus, which has been linked to the eating of exotic meat in China.This picture provided by Humane Society International shows dogs being transported by a lorry on April 3 after being rescued from an underground abattoir in central China this month A rescuer is pictured petting one of the dogs after they were confiscated by local authorities Animal activists and volunteers are pictured helping dogs getting off a lorry after freeing them from an illegal slaughterhouse in Henan. A total of 423 dogs, including stolen pets, were saved

Activists have called on Beijing to bar wild animals, as well as dog and cat meat, from the dinner plate after the global outbreak emerged in Wuhan city in December.

A total of 423 dogs, most believed to be stolen pets, were saved in the operation on April 3, according to animal charity organisation Humane Society International (HSI).

Rescuers then transported 25 of the sickest dogs to Beijing to be looked after by an animal shelter jointly operated by HSI and its Chinese partner, Vshine.  

The rescue effort took place after police received a tip-off from animal rights activists and pet owners who had lost their dogs and were looking for them. 

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‘This is such a typical story in China, bereft pet parents searching for their lost dogs, animal activist and netizens mobilising to help, and a nightmarish dog slaughterhouse being uncovered in the process,’ a spokesperson from HSI told MailOnline.

‘It’s too early to say if any of the rescued dogs will turn out to be the missing pets being searched for, but the majority of the dogs saved will have once been someone’s companion,’ she added.  Activists have called on Beijing to bar wild animals, as well as dog and cat meat, from the dinner plate after the coronavirus outbreak emerged in the city of Wuhan in December Activists and legal experts have in the past proposed animal protection law to ban the eating of dogs and cats completely. But so far, no national legislation has been released to ban pet meat In February, China banned all trade and consumption of wild animals in response to the coronavirusShenzhen and Zhuhai have also banned their residents from eating dogs and cats The Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs have listed dogs as ‘companion animals’

Several groups took part in the operation, including Vshine’s partner groups in Henan and Zhengzhou Animal Protection Association.

Assisted by volunteers, the charities worked together to apply pressure on local authorities, urging them to confiscate the dogs.

Staff from Vshine led the negotiations with law enforcement officers and participated in the confiscation.       Animal charity workers are seen carrying some of the rescued dogs off a lorry on April 15 Volunteers give water to some of the rescued dogs, which have been put into separate cages Those dogs were saved from a slaughterhouse in Henan, central China, this month after police received a tip-off from animal rights activists and pet owners who had lost their dogs

In February, China banned all trade and consumption of wild animals in response to the coronavirus.

Two cities, Shenzhen and Zhuhai, have taken further steps and banned their residents from eating dogs and cats.

Last week, the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs excluded dogs from farm animals in a proposal, which could see canine meat being barred from the dinner plate across the country.

The authority said it recognises dogs as ‘companion animals’ and ‘not suitable’ to be treated as livestock.

Experts have called the Ministry’s proposal ‘a significant step in the right direction’.  Volunteers are pictured taking the dog to an animal shelter. Activists have demanded China prohibit the eating of dogs for years, but no law has been passed so far on a national level One volunteer is pictured providing dogs with water in an animal shelter after the rescue While no evidence suggests that dogs can spread coronavirus, the global crisis has prompted the international community to press on their demands for China to halt its dog meat trade Some of the dogs are pictured at an animal shelter after being saved from the dinner plate

Animal rights advocators have demanded the Chinese government prohibit the eating of dogs for years, but no law has been passed so far on a national level.ADVERTISEMENT

The annual Yulin Dog Meat Festival is one of the most controversial food festivals in China.

It sees thousands of dogs cruelly killed, skinned and cooked with blow-torches before being eaten by locals on the summer solstice every year.

While no evidence suggests that dogs can spread coronavirus, the escalating global emergency has prompted the international community to press on their demands for China to halt its dog meat trade.

The exact source of the coronavirus remains unclear. 

But an investigation carried out by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in January showed that the virus was passed onto humans by wild animals sold as food at the market, state media Xinhua reported. 

The market traded various live animals, including foxes, crocodiles, wolf puppies, giant salamanders, snakes, rats, peacocks, porcupines, koalas and game meats, according to the South China Morning Post. 

Wuhan officials ordered the market to shut on January 1 in the wake of the outbreak.

Robert Altermoser has dedicated his life to helping these dogs

Animal Activist gave two dogs a second chance

Going Home 🐨

Man Keeps Promise By Re-Adopting The Dog He Was Forced To Surrender 4 Months Ago

by Jennifer Nelson

Lewis Jiminez adopted Titus as an 8-month-old puppy from the Austin Animal Center in 2013, never imagining that fate would force him to return the pup in November of 2017 over a dispute with a landlord.

On February 25, Jiminez finally found new housing that allowed Pit Bulls and he was able to adopt Titus again. Thankfully, he hadn’t been adopted by anybody else while Jiminez searched for affordable housing that would allow Titus to come home again. Shelter staff, who had watched Jiminez repeatedly visit Titus during his stay, were delighted to see the two finally reunited for good.

In a post on Facebook, Austin Animal Center says,

“These pictures right here make our hearts so happy.

Titus has been with us for 4 months. His family was forced to surrender him due to problems with their apartment complex, but they’ve been moving mountains to bring him home ever since.

Titus has been stressed out at the shelter and generally having a tough time. His family would come visit him, but we can’t imagine the heartbreak for them or him every time they had to leave without him. They had raised him from puppyhood; they were the only family he’s ever known.

Yesterday was the day we’ve all been waiting for. With new housing in place, Titus’ dad came to take him home. And as you can see from the photos, happiness is an understatement for this moment. 😍❤️”

One of Jiminez’s neighbors resented sharing an apartment building with a Pit Bull and repeatedly complained to management. Jiminez had even resorted to walking Titus at 4 am when nobody was around. But the situation came to a head in November when Jiminez’s 10-year-old grandson took Titus for a walk and met the problematic neighbor, where Titus “nipped the neighbor’s finger” according to TODAY. While Jiminez didn’t witness the incident, he believes Titus was trying to protect his grandson.

Worried about being evicted, Jiminez did the last thing he ever imagined – he returned Titus to the Austin Animal Center. During Jiminez’s repeated visits to Titus in the shelter, he kept promising Titus that he would come back for him one day — he only hoped he would be in time. Luckily, Austin Animal Center has a 97.9 percent live release rate, so there was little chance of Titus being euthanized; the only concern was that he would be adopted before Jiminez could change his living situation.

In late February, Jiminez and his girlfriend found an affordable house to rent that needed fixing up – something Jiminez does for a living. Austin Animal Center spokesperson Jennifer Olohan told TODAY:

“Titus got lots of love here at the shelter from staff and volunteers. He went on regular walks, played with toys, and got lots of treats. News of Titus’ reunion spread through the shelter pretty quickly and there were tears from everyone.”

Jiminez is immensely grateful to have Titus back. He told TODAY:

“Animals are our family. He’s home. He’s home, and he’s happy.”

We’re so glad their story had a happy ending!

https://iheartdogs.com/man-keeps-promise-by-re-adopting-the-dog-he-was-forced-to-surrender-4-months-ago/?utm_campaign=IHD-Email-Newsletter-022320&utm_medium=0000&utm_source=IHD-Email-Newsletter-022320&_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJuYWNrcGV0c0BnbWFpbC5jb20iLCAia2xfY29tcGFueV9pZCI6ICJNazJDaUsifQ%3D%3D

Joaquin Phoenix Liberates Mother Cow And Her Baby Calf From Slaughterhouse

amp.dailycaller.com
Daily Caller : Katie Jerkovich

Joaquin Phoenix visited a slaughterhouse in Los Angeles and helped liberate a mother cow and her baby calf following his rambling Oscars speech that touched on the dairy industry and humans’ treatment of cows.

The 45-year-old actor recently took a trip to Manning Beef in Pico Rivera, California, and had a sit-down chat with the President and CEO of the company, Anthony Di Maria, according to TMZ in a piece published Thursday. (Related: Joaquin Phoenix Wins The Academy Award For Best Actor For ‘Joker’)

Though the two men didn’t completely see eye to eye on everything, the discussion between the two led to a form of mutual understanding, and Phoenix along with the LA Animal Save group were able to free a mother cow and her newborn calf, a daughter. (RELATED: Jane Fonda Tells Woman To ‘See The Parallels’ Between Trump And Hitler)

“I never thought I’d find friendship in a slaughterhouse, but meeting Anthony and opening my heart to his, I realize we might have more in common than we do differences,” the actor shared of the meeting. “Without his act of kindness, Liberty and her baby calf, Indigo, would have met a terrible demise.”

In the video shared from the visit, we see the “Gladiator” star carrying the baby cow away from the holding area and placing into a trailer with her mom. The cow family will now live out the rest of their days at a Farm Sanctuary location in northern L.A. County. The pair are the fifth set of mother and baby cows liberated by the group, accroding to TMZ.

It all comes after the “Joker” star’s speech at the Academy Awards in which he talked about a variety of subjects, including social justice, human solidarity and cancel culture.

The speech then turned toward a discussion about plundering “natural resources” before talking about bovine insemination.

“We feel entitled to artificially inseminate a cow and when she gives birth, we steal her baby, even though her cries of anguish are unmistakable,” Joaquin went on. “And then we take her milk that’s intended for her calf and we put it in our coffee and our cereal. And I think we fear the idea of personal change because we think that we have to sacrifice something to give something up.”

https://amp.dailycaller.com/2020/02/20/joaquin-phoenix-liberates-mother-cow-baby-calf-slaughterhouse?__twitter_impression=true

A pigeon that can’t fly befriended a puppy that can’t walk. Yes, it’s as cute as it sounds

fox43.com
Author: CNN Wire

Meet Herman and Lundy, recent cuddle buddies and rescue animals.

The two are an unlikely pair: Herman, a pigeon, suffered neurological damage more than a year ago. He can’t fly. Little Lundy, a newborn chihuahua puppy, can’t use his back legs.

But stick them together, and the two will snuggle up as though they were members of the same litter — or nest.

The two met through the Mia Foundation, a rescue organization in Rochester, New York, that rehabilitates animals with birth defects and physical deformities. Sue Rogers, the nonprofit’s founder, sends most of her rescues to foster homes around the US but keeps a few of them for school programs about bullying.

Their interspecies friendship has inspired scores of supporters to donate to the foundation. And the animals, Rogers said, make each other better.

Two rough beginnings

Herman was found over a year ago in a car dealership parking lot, where he sat on the pavement, unmoving, for three whole days. Eventually his rescuers realized the poor pigeon couldn’t fly.

Neighboring wildlife rescues said he couldn’t be rehabilitated and would need to be euthanized, so Rogers took care of him herself.

He now rests in a baby crib for some of the day, but she takes him outside daily to stimulate him.

Little Lundy, an infant chihuahua, is a new arrival. His breeders in South Carolina sent him to Rogers because he had trouble using his hind legs, a condition known as swimmers syndrome.

At just 6 ounces, he was small enough to fit in a shirt pocket. Rogers said she suspects Lundy’s difficulty walking is due to damage to his teeny spinal cord.

When Lundy met Herman

The two were bound to meet eventually. Rogers set them together while attending to Lundy and saw the way the two snuggled up almost immediately — Herman didn’t peck, and Lundy didn’t nibble.

Rogers snapped some pictures of their cuddles. The “oohs” and “ahhs” followed soon after.

People from every corner of the world flooded Rogers’ inbox with donations, messages of support and, naturally, pleas to adopt Lundy or the other cute pups in her care.

“I was blown away,” she said.

And the donations keep coming — the foundation raised $6,000 in two days, she said. That’s enough to cover the high-end cost of a veterinary surgery that many of her rescue animals require.

Lundy needs to get stronger to be adoptable

Herman will likely stay in Rogers’ care for the rest of his life. She’s hopeful Lundy stays strong and survives.

“With animals born with defects, there’s a chance we could lose them,” she said. “So we don’t want to make anyone really excited. But now I think we’ve gotten a thousand emails asking, ‘Please, don’t ever separate those two!'”

One of Lundy’s rescuers fell in love with him while traveling with him to Rochester, so he may already have a new home lined up. The question, then, is if Herman will ask to tag along too.

https://www.fox43.com/article/news/dog-pigeon-friends-animals/521-14a5e73f-4f1e-4c83-8d1d-dd569d29d4e5

A Mother’s Love is Strong 💙

 

Enjoy your weekend 🤗

180 Sheep Destined for Slaughter Given Second Chance After Cargo Ship Capsizes

ladyfreethinker.org
Image Credit: FOUR PAWS/Instagram

Nearly 200 sheep have a new lease on life after surviving a disaster at sea, and now get to live out their lives in peace at farm animal sanctuaries.

Last November, the Queen Hind cargo ship capsized near the Romanian coast while carrying around 14,000 sheep. All of the ship’s crew members survived, but thousands of sheep lost their lives due to drowning, injuries, and exhaustion.

The ship sinking merely expedited the grim fate of thousands of its passengers as they headed toward Saudi Arabian slaughterhouses. Fortunately, 180 of these gentle creatures withstood the tragic event long enough to be rescued.

The rescuers, also members of animal welfare groups, lobbied for the sheeps’ liberation from the meat trade. Granting their request, Four Paws and their Romanian partner ARCA are working to find sanctuaries to provide homes for the surviving animals.

“We are happy that the Romanian authorities placed the sheep in our care and will continue cooperating with them closely,” said Four Paws Head of the Disaster Relief Unit Jackson Zee. “Shortly after their arrival, our team on-site began to examine them and determine their future care. So far, they are mostly in good condition. Now, they can rest and recover from all the suffering they’ve had to endure recently.”

The sheep are safe at a farm near Bucharest, receiving veterinary treatment. They will remain at the farm until permanent living situations are secured, which shouldn’t be difficult considering numerous individuals and rescues have already come forward to offer new homes for the rescued animals.

For the 180 sheep that overcame the odds, the story ends happily ever after, but for the thousands who died, this tragedy is a powerful reminder that animals are not safe during long-distance transport.

“Our association is shocked by the disaster,” said president of Acebop Mary Pana. “If we cannot protect livestock during long-distance transports, we should outright ban them.”

The easiest way to avoid contributing to such cruelty is to leave animals off your plate and choose plant-based foods instead.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/180-sheep-destined-for-slaughter-given-second-chance-after-cargo-ship-capsizes/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

An Australian zookeeper took home animals in order to keep them safe from bushfires

mypositiveoutlooks.com
An Australian zookeeper took home animals in order to keep them safe from bushfires
4-5 minutes

Ongoing since September 2019, wildfires across Australia have ravaged more than 7.3 million hectares, obliterating entire towns and burning through habitats of the country’s wildlife. Those in the path of the wildfires do their best to save their properties, but one zookeeper went the extra mile – he took home most of the animals in his care to ensure their survival.

Mogo Wildlife Park is a popular tourist destination along the South Coast of New South Wales. It hosts about 200 endangered and exotic animals, including Sumatran tigers, southern white rhinos, zebras, and giraffes, as well as the largest collection of primates in Australia.

Lying directly in the path of wildfires, an evacuation order was sent out, but staff decided to stay behind to keep their wards from harm. All the animals were saved following the zoo’s established fire defense protocols.

Mogo Wildlife Park Director Chad Staples described the situation as “apocalyptic” and that it “felt like Armageddon.” The zoo was encircled by fire and smoke. “The scariest thing was how fast those winds were,” Staples said. “It got so dark it felt like it was midnight which was such a scary feeling.”

A precise plan for the safety of the animals was already in place, and as the fires moved in the zookeepers went into action. The first step was to remove all flammable materials from the area. The zoo staff had already collected thousands of liters of water, which were then placed in smaller tanks and loaded on vehicles so that staff can drive around and put out spot fires.

Mogo Wildlife Park

Then they turned their attention to the animals. Giraffes and zebras who had large enclosures where left there since there was room enough for the animals to move away from spot fires. Lions, tigers, orangutans, and other larger animals were placed in night enclosures to keep them calm and safe. The smaller ones, however, needed extra shelter.

So the chief zookeeper took some of them home! Most of the animals were kept on site, but Staples’ house provided temporary lodging for monkeys, pandas, and even a tiger. Staples said that these were mainly the animals that were highly stressed, not by the fires, but by the flurry of activity as zookeepers and vehicles moved quickly around the small zoo to battle the flames.

Mogo Wildlife Park

Mogo Wildlife Park staff Sara Ang said that “some of the smaller monkeys had to be moved to the house, the red panda is in the house and there’s a tiger in the back area of the house.”

Staples added, “Due to the amazing staff here and a well-executed plan, no one is hurt, not a single animal. Any species of animal that was small enough, or was in an area we couldn’t protect, we caught up. Right now in my house there’s animals of all descriptions in all the different rooms, that are there safe and protected… not a single animal lost.” Another staff member is keeping a tiger in their backyard.

Mogo Wildlife Park

Almost 30 people, including firefighters, have died due to the rampaging bush fires. Thousands have lost homes and properties and face an uncertain future. More than a billion animals, including thousands of koalas, are also believed to have perished in this devastating, and ongoing, fire season.

Staples said that the team battled spot fires at the 65-acre park for several hours. He expressed his gratitude to all the passionate staff and volunteers who worked tirelessly to protect the animals because they “love them like their own family.”

Mogo Wildlife Park

Temporarily closed, the zoo, however, confirmed that every animal was “safe and in wonderful care.” The heroic efforts of the zookeepers of Mogo Wildlife Park is a bright spot in this long battle against wildfires and continuing measures to save precious wildlife.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/an-australian-zookeeper-took-home-animals-in-order-to-keep-them-safe-from-bushfires/

Heroic dog leads 900 sheep to safety during Australian wildfires

 

mypositiveoutlooks.com
Heroic dog leads 900 sheep to safety during Australian wildfires
3-4 minutes

A heroic dog who saved hundreds of sheep amid the wildfires in Australia is capturing global attention because of her bravery.

Over a billion animals have died in Australia due to the bushfires that have been ravaging the country since September. Disasters of this magnitude require that the victims receive all the help that they can get, and that is exactly what the community in Australia and other parts of the world are doing.

Instagram

Even some animals are turning out to be the saviors of their fellow animals. One of them is Patsy, a 6-year-old border collie and kelpie mix from Corryong, Victoria. According to her owner, Stephen Hill, the heroic dog has been instrumental in saving the lives of 900 sheep on his farm.

The fire began to close in on the small Victorian town during the early hours of New Year’s Eve. Despite the heat and danger, Patsy sprang into action to make sure that the farm and livestock were protected in the face of the oncoming fire. Working alongside her dad – who used a tractor with a water tank to keep the flames that were creeping close to the property at bay – Patsy herded the large flock away from where the blaze was headed into the safest paddock in the area.

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Stephen’s sister, Cath Hill, shared the story of Patsy’s courageous act in an interview with Bored Panda.

“For Patsy, funnily enough the fires don’t really make much of a difference!!! She’s a border collie/kelpie cross, so she’s a working dog through and through. These dogs have been bred for generations to develop their ability to work with sheep and cattle on farms, and they are very intelligent and resilient animals. They love to work, it’s just what they are bred to do, and they can be very focused and singleminded on the job! So when my brother needed Patsy to help bring the sheep into safety, that’s exactly what she did. She just got on with her job and did it, regardless of the conditions. Cool, calm, and collected.”

Instagram

Because of Stephen and Patsy’s teamwork, the pair were able to save all but a handful of sheep. Except for a few sheds, all the buildings in the property were spared from the fire. His owner admitted that he wouldn’t have done all of it without his loyal companion.

“I’d have been stuffed without Patsy,” Stephen told SBS News. “She’s earned front-seat privileges for the rest of her life.”

Instagram

Cath hopes that by getting Patsy’s story out, more people will be encouraged to help however they can. In these disastrous times, it seems like there is not much to celebrate. But through this heroic dog’s story, she hopes that the community will realize that there is still much to be grateful for and most importantly, that there is still hope.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/courageous-border-collie-leads-900-sheep-to-safety-during-australian-bushfires/

Petition: Tell Gov. Wolf to Help Save Dillan the Bear!

 

support.peta.org
Tell Gov. Wolf to Help Save Dillan the Bear!
2 minutes

At the Union County Sportsmen’s Club in Millmont, Pennsylvania, a morbidly obese bear named Dillan is suffering from painful and life-threatening dental disease inside a small, concrete-floored cage. We need your help to urge Gov. Tom Wolf to help save him now.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture continues to find that Dillan has been denied adequate veterinary care, including for his severe dental issues, most recently writing that his condition has deteriorated and he’s likely in “a significant amount of pain.”

Please join PETA and Alec Baldwin in asking Wolf to use his power to secure Dillan’s transfer to an accredited sanctuary immediately and to ensure that authorities hold the club accountable.

Speak Up for Dillan!

https://support.peta.org/page/16197/action/1

Dog found in Bahamas rubble 3 weeks after hurricane adopted by Florida family

 

The dog, found by rescuers after he was nearly crushed by debris, was recently adopted by a Florida family.

Miracle, the puppy that was rescued in the Bahamas after surviving more than three weeks under debris from Hurricane Dorian, has a new family just in time for the holidays.dog-ranch-45-ht-er-191118_hpembed_4x3_1600171471372.jpg

The Beaty family — Clark, Briana and their three daughters Jayne, 8; Kate, 5; and Clare, 3 — of Palm Beach, Florida, were formerly announced Wednesday as Miracle’s new owners during a news conference at the Big Dog Ranch Rescue in Loxahatchee Groves.

Clare Beaty, 3, Kate Beaty, 5, Jayne Beaty, 8, take a photo with Miracle. The dog was found in rubble in Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian. The Beatys of Florida adopted him.

“Miracle has now gained 16 pounds — almost half his body weight [when] he came in — and weighs almost 35 pounds,” said Lauree Simmons, Big Dog Ranch Rescue’s founder and president. “He’s healthy and ready to go home.”

VIDEO: Dog nearly crushed under collapsed building found alive

In October, workers from Big Dog Ranch Rescue found Miracle in Abaco, one of the hardest-hit areas in the Bahamas, after the Category 5 hurricane devastated the islands in September. The foundation used a drone with a high-resolution, heat-seeking camera to help them spot dogs that were either hidden under rubble or only coming out at night.

 

Clare Beaty, Jayne Beaty, Big Dog Ranch Rescue founder/president Lauree Simmons; mother Briana Beaty; and Kate Beaty take a photo with Miracle.

Miracle was trapped underneath an air conditioning unit that had fallen on him for more than three weeks after the hurricane struck. When rescuers located him, he was emaciated, his muscles had atrophied and he was suffering from other diseases after surviving only on rainwater.

Simmons was the first to start calling the dog Miracle as he recuperated in Florida. More than 10,000 families reached out to the organization, offering to adopt him.

Yarleen Rodriguez, Big Dog Ranch Rescue veterinary clinic manager, treats Miracle.

On Monday, Briana Beaty told ABC News that her family of five was looking forward to having the “best holiday ever” with Miracle.

“We’re so grateful to Big Dog Ranch for saving him and all the love they put into him,” she told ABC News on Monday.

ABC News’ Laura Laughead contributed to the reporting in this story.

Dog Found in Bermuda Rubble Weeks After Hurricane Dorian

Update on The Rescue of Wildlife in Australia

Meet Narwhal: The ‘Unicorn’ Puppy With A Tail On His Face

thedodo.com
Meet Narwhal: The ‘Unicorn’ Puppy With A Tail On His Face
To help other special needs dogs like Narwhal, you can make a donation to Mac’s Mission.
5-6 minutes

All dogs are perfect — but a 10-week-old golden retriever named Narwhal is extra special.

The puppy has an adorable “unicorn” tail growing out of his forehead.
Narwhal the magical unicorn puppy with an extra tail
Mac’s Mission

Last week, Narwhal was found outside in the freezing cold along with another dog. Narwhal’s foster mom, Rochelle Steffen, founder of Mac’s Mission in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, stepped up to help the “different” puppy as soon as she heard about him.

“We were tagged in a social media request for help because he was special and had been dumped,” Steffen told The Dodo. “All my friends and fellow rescuers know I love the hard cases.”

Mac’s Mission

The moment Steffen met Narwhal, it was love at first sight: “I melted,” Steffen said. “I literally smiled so big because he lights up the entire room with how happy he is. His butt tail never stops wagging — too bad his face tail doesn’t wag!”

Narwhal’s extra tail is a rare birth defect, a third of the size of his regular tail. X-rays show the tail to be made of skin and fur, and otherwise not connected to anything. “It just kind of hangs down like a lock of hair like Superman,” Steffen said.

Besides a case of worms that can be treated with medication, Narwhal is completely healthy. And his special tail is staying — for the time being. “At this point, there is no medical reason to remove it and it does not bother him,” Steffen said. “He has no idea he’s different.”

The carefree pup is currently living it up at Steffen’s house and loves to be held and give kisses.

“He loves humans and he loves to romp around with the other dogs,” Steffen said. “He is very partial to the adult dog that we rescued him with and another Chihuahua mix dog named Ash. They play in a big giant pile!”

In a few months, Narwhal will start his search for a forever home. But for now, Steffen is watching him grow and making sure his extra tail does not get in the way of him living life to the fullest.

And the magical unicorn puppy couldn’t be happier.

https://www.thedodo.com/amphtml/close-to-home/unicorn-puppy-narwhal-extra-tail-on-face?__twitter_impression=true

Dejan needs our help to build a winter shelter and to find forever homes for 600 dogs he has rescued

Freedom 🐻

‘Miracle’ Dog Rescued After Weeks Trapped Under A Pile of Rubble from Hurricane

ladyfreethinker.org
Photo Credit: Big Dog Ranch Rescue

In a heartening story of survival against the odds, a dog who was trapped for over three weeks in debris left by the destructive force of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas has been found alive by an animal rescue organization.

Named Miracle by his rescuers, the emaciated, weak and frightened dog was discovered wedged under an air conditioning unit and building debris in Marsh Harbour on the Abaco Islands by members of Big Dog Ranch Rescue.

The organization was alerted to Miracle’s desperate situation on Friday, October 4 and immediately employed drones and recovery teams to locate and save him. After detecting a small area of heat among the rubble, the team managed to uncover the dog and rush him back to their HQ, where Miracle received lifesaving treatment and food.

On its Facebook page the rescue organization gave an update on Miracle’s condition: “We are taking care of our Miracle baby at Big Dog Ranch Rescue. He has a long road to recovery, but for now, he is comfortable, and he is eating and gaining a bit of strength! He is anemic, heartworm-positive, very weak, and he cannot walk on his own… The poor baby fought for his life over there — surviving on rain water from the storm for weeks!”

Big Dog Ranch Rescue has so far saved 138 dogs from the Bahamas in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian, some of whom had become separated from their carers as they evacuated the area. Happily, many of these canine survivors have been reunited with their worried owners.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/miracle-dog-rescued-after-weeks-trapped-under-a-pile-of-rubble-from-hurricane/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Saving the dogs of BARK ARK shelter in Prnjavor, Bosnia

IN MEMORY OF VUČKO

Animal Webaction launched a campaign to collect food for the in Prnjavor. There are over 700 dogs in this shelter and food and medical care are only provided by outside donors, even though this is a ‘public shelter’. The Government only covers a one-time fee that barely covers vaccinations. They have an amazing advocate, Bojan Veselica, and he along with supporters have managed to do a lot for the dogs and to try to make the shelter safe, but without food, the situation is impossible. The dogs come from a hard life as strays on the streets of Prnjavor, Samac, Celinac, Modrica and other cities in Northern Bosnia. Others are surrendered by their heartless owners after a life on a chain because they are too old or got sick. All of them have one thing in common: they need to eat to survive.

More than 150 dogs find warm and loving…

View original post 317 more words

Amazing

Denmark buys last circus elephants so they can retire – CBBC Newsround

09 September 2019

Image copyright Getty Images Denmark-has-bought-four-elephants
Image caption The elephants are called Ramboline, Lara, Djunga and Jenny

The government in Denmark has bought four elephants from Danish circuses in order to give them a proper retirement.

The elephants, who are called Ramboline, Lara, Djunga and Jenny, are the last four circus elephants in the country.

The government is paying 11 million Danish krone – about £1.3 million – for the animals.

The Danish government is planning to introduce a total ban on wild animals in circuses later this year.

They also said they are not yet sure where the elephants will live but anyone who have a suitable space should make themselves known.
More elephants stories

Capturing baby African elephants for zoos and circuses is banned

Wild animals to be ‘banned from travelling circuses’

Nine reasons why we love elephants

Crisis in Africa: Elephants and ivory
Image copyright Getty Images The-Gartner’s-training-elephants-family-performs-during-the gala-of-the-43th-Monte-Carlo-International-Circus-Festival-in-Monaco
Image caption Elephants like these at the Monte Carlo International Circus Festival have been used as performers for hundreds of years, but it is becoming much less common as many more countries opt to ban the use of wild animals in circuses.

In May 2019, the UK government announced a new law to ban travelling circuses from using wild animals, with MP Michael Gove saying “Travelling circuses are no place for wild animals in the 21st Century.”

It was decided at a big wildlife conference in August that baby African elephants will no longer be taken from the wild in order to be sold to zoos and circuses.

Earlier this year, a circus in Germany became the first in the world to use holograms instead of real animals in its acts

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/amp/49607433?__twitter_impression=true
More on this story
Wild animals to be ‘banned from travelling circuses’

02 may 2019
Should wild animals perform in circus shows?

28 october 2015

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