Meet Narwhal: The ‘Unicorn’ Puppy With A Tail On His Face

thedodo.com
Meet Narwhal: The ‘Unicorn’ Puppy With A Tail On His Face
To help other special needs dogs like Narwhal, you can make a donation to Mac’s Mission.
5-6 minutes

All dogs are perfect — but a 10-week-old golden retriever named Narwhal is extra special.

The puppy has an adorable “unicorn” tail growing out of his forehead.
Narwhal the magical unicorn puppy with an extra tail
Mac’s Mission

Last week, Narwhal was found outside in the freezing cold along with another dog. Narwhal’s foster mom, Rochelle Steffen, founder of Mac’s Mission in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, stepped up to help the “different” puppy as soon as she heard about him.

“We were tagged in a social media request for help because he was special and had been dumped,” Steffen told The Dodo. “All my friends and fellow rescuers know I love the hard cases.”

Mac’s Mission

The moment Steffen met Narwhal, it was love at first sight: “I melted,” Steffen said. “I literally smiled so big because he lights up the entire room with how happy he is. His butt tail never stops wagging — too bad his face tail doesn’t wag!”

Narwhal’s extra tail is a rare birth defect, a third of the size of his regular tail. X-rays show the tail to be made of skin and fur, and otherwise not connected to anything. “It just kind of hangs down like a lock of hair like Superman,” Steffen said.

Besides a case of worms that can be treated with medication, Narwhal is completely healthy. And his special tail is staying — for the time being. “At this point, there is no medical reason to remove it and it does not bother him,” Steffen said. “He has no idea he’s different.”

The carefree pup is currently living it up at Steffen’s house and loves to be held and give kisses.

“He loves humans and he loves to romp around with the other dogs,” Steffen said. “He is very partial to the adult dog that we rescued him with and another Chihuahua mix dog named Ash. They play in a big giant pile!”

In a few months, Narwhal will start his search for a forever home. But for now, Steffen is watching him grow and making sure his extra tail does not get in the way of him living life to the fullest.

And the magical unicorn puppy couldn’t be happier.

https://www.thedodo.com/amphtml/close-to-home/unicorn-puppy-narwhal-extra-tail-on-face?__twitter_impression=true

Dejan needs our help to build a winter shelter and to find forever homes for 600 dogs he has rescued

Freedom 🐻

‘Miracle’ Dog Rescued After Weeks Trapped Under A Pile of Rubble from Hurricane

ladyfreethinker.org
Photo Credit: Big Dog Ranch Rescue

In a heartening story of survival against the odds, a dog who was trapped for over three weeks in debris left by the destructive force of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas has been found alive by an animal rescue organization.

Named Miracle by his rescuers, the emaciated, weak and frightened dog was discovered wedged under an air conditioning unit and building debris in Marsh Harbour on the Abaco Islands by members of Big Dog Ranch Rescue.

The organization was alerted to Miracle’s desperate situation on Friday, October 4 and immediately employed drones and recovery teams to locate and save him. After detecting a small area of heat among the rubble, the team managed to uncover the dog and rush him back to their HQ, where Miracle received lifesaving treatment and food.

On its Facebook page the rescue organization gave an update on Miracle’s condition: “We are taking care of our Miracle baby at Big Dog Ranch Rescue. He has a long road to recovery, but for now, he is comfortable, and he is eating and gaining a bit of strength! He is anemic, heartworm-positive, very weak, and he cannot walk on his own… The poor baby fought for his life over there — surviving on rain water from the storm for weeks!”

Big Dog Ranch Rescue has so far saved 138 dogs from the Bahamas in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian, some of whom had become separated from their carers as they evacuated the area. Happily, many of these canine survivors have been reunited with their worried owners.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/miracle-dog-rescued-after-weeks-trapped-under-a-pile-of-rubble-from-hurricane/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Saving the dogs of BARK ARK shelter in Prnjavor, Bosnia

IN MEMORY OF VUČKO

Animal Webaction launched a campaign to collect food for the in Prnjavor. There are over 700 dogs in this shelter and food and medical care are only provided by outside donors, even though this is a ‘public shelter’. The Government only covers a one-time fee that barely covers vaccinations. They have an amazing advocate, Bojan Veselica, and he along with supporters have managed to do a lot for the dogs and to try to make the shelter safe, but without food, the situation is impossible. The dogs come from a hard life as strays on the streets of Prnjavor, Samac, Celinac, Modrica and other cities in Northern Bosnia. Others are surrendered by their heartless owners after a life on a chain because they are too old or got sick. All of them have one thing in common: they need to eat to survive.

More than 150 dogs find warm and loving…

View original post 317 more words

Amazing

Denmark buys last circus elephants so they can retire – CBBC Newsround

09 September 2019

Image copyright Getty Images Denmark-has-bought-four-elephants
Image caption The elephants are called Ramboline, Lara, Djunga and Jenny

The government in Denmark has bought four elephants from Danish circuses in order to give them a proper retirement.

The elephants, who are called Ramboline, Lara, Djunga and Jenny, are the last four circus elephants in the country.

The government is paying 11 million Danish krone – about £1.3 million – for the animals.

The Danish government is planning to introduce a total ban on wild animals in circuses later this year.

They also said they are not yet sure where the elephants will live but anyone who have a suitable space should make themselves known.
More elephants stories

Capturing baby African elephants for zoos and circuses is banned

Wild animals to be ‘banned from travelling circuses’

Nine reasons why we love elephants

Crisis in Africa: Elephants and ivory
Image copyright Getty Images The-Gartner’s-training-elephants-family-performs-during-the gala-of-the-43th-Monte-Carlo-International-Circus-Festival-in-Monaco
Image caption Elephants like these at the Monte Carlo International Circus Festival have been used as performers for hundreds of years, but it is becoming much less common as many more countries opt to ban the use of wild animals in circuses.

In May 2019, the UK government announced a new law to ban travelling circuses from using wild animals, with MP Michael Gove saying “Travelling circuses are no place for wild animals in the 21st Century.”

It was decided at a big wildlife conference in August that baby African elephants will no longer be taken from the wild in order to be sold to zoos and circuses.

Earlier this year, a circus in Germany became the first in the world to use holograms instead of real animals in its acts

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/amp/49607433?__twitter_impression=true
More on this story
Wild animals to be ‘banned from travelling circuses’

02 may 2019
Should wild animals perform in circus shows?

28 october 2015

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

These animals were rescued today from abacos

When this elephant got trapped in a canal, it seemed impossible to save him – until these strangers got creative 🐘

Momo’s time is running out

Celebrating Raju’s 5th Rescue Anniversary with Wildlife SOS!

‘Bring Your Dog To Work Day’ aims to raise money for charity on June 21

mypositiveoutlooks.com
Farah R. | Positive Outlooks

If you’ve always wanted to bring your dog to work, it’s your chance to do on Bring Your Dog To Work Day this Friday, June 21! Aside from a whole lot of fun for dogs and their parents, this event is dedicated to raising money to help several animal charities.

Also known as Take Your Dog To Work Day, the annual holiday allows pet-owners to bring their dog with them to the office – that is, if their company allows it. So don’t get too excited, okay? Make sure that bringing your pooch to work is legal and boss-approved!

This year marks the 21st year that the holiday is celebrated in the US and the 4th year in the UK. The event occurs annually on the first Friday after US Father’s Day and aims to support dog lovers and their pets through fundraising.

In the US, the holiday was commenced by Pet Sitters International in 1999. PSI is a database for professional pet sitters and dog walkers where people can search for available pet sitters. Their objective for starting BYDTWD was for people without dogs to see the bond that their co-workers have with theirs, so as to encourage them to adopt one of their own.

The charity initiative supports the well-being of dogs without homes and the welfare of dogs around the world.

In the UK, several animal charities benefit from the funds raised such as All Dogs Matter, an organization that rescues and finds homes for more than 400 dogs in London every year. Another is Animal Asia, an international charity that aims to stop the practice of bear bile farming, as well as the improvement of the welfare of dogs in China and Vietnam.

In the US, participants are called to donate animal charities of their choice.

Aside from helping animals, bringing your dog with you to work is scientifically proved to be good for you too. According to studies, the presence of pets in the workplace can help reduce a person’s stress level.

Employees who take their pooch with them to work reported increased levels of job satisfaction and had a more positive perception of their employer.

“Not only are there proven benefits to having pets at work, like lowered blood pressure, lessened anxiety and increased physical activity, but it also helps attract and retain employees, especially among millennial workers,” said Chanda Leary-Coutu, director of consumer experience for Wellness Natural Pet Food.

If your company does participate in the holiday, there are a few key things to remember. First, confirm that your workplace is a dog-friendly space – meaning, there should be no exposed wires or any dangerous appliances that they can chew on.

Remember to bring a water bowl, snacks, toys, and any other necessities for your dog to ensure that his office experience will be comfortable. Be mindful as well of your pup’s bathroom needs – you wouldn’t want to stink up the whole office, wouldn’t you?

To commemorate the event, make sure to take photos of your new “co-workers” this Friday! If you are from the UK, you may even win a dog-themed gift from event sponsors if you donate and upload a picture of your dog at work to the Dog with a Job Hall of Fame.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/bring-your-dog-to-work-day-is-happening/

Elephant rides to stop at Angkor Wat in Cambodia by 2020

metro.co.uk
Lucy MiddletonSaturday 8 Jun 2019 9:08 am
Author image

Cruel elephant rides at a famous temple in Cambodia are now coming to an end.

The overworked group of 14 elephants will no longer be forced to work at Angkor Wat, where over 2.5 million international tourists visit each year.

They will be transferred to a conservation and breeding centre by early 2020, the The Angkor Elephant Group Committee confirmed.

In 2016, an elephant collapsed and died while ferrying two tourists to the monument, sparking international outrage at the practice.

Two years later, a petition to end elephant rides gained over 14,000 signatures in just 48 hours after another animal died from exhaustion.

Oan Kiry, director of the Angkor Elephant Group Committee, said: ‘In early 2020, our association plans to end the use of elephants to transport tourists.

‘They can still watch the elephants and take photos of them in our conservation and breeding centre. We want the elephants to live in as natural a manner as possible.’

Campaign group Moving Animals, who work to raise awareness of the cruelty behind elephant riding, have welcomed the move, calling it a ‘great relief’.

A spokesperson said: ‘The end of elephant rides at Angkor Wat is truly a watershed moment that shows the tide is turning against cruel wildlife tourism.

‘More and more tourists no longer want to pay to see animals in chains or captivity, and attractions where elephant riding continues, need to ban these rides if they are to stay in favour with tourists and animal lovers.’

There are still believed to be around 70 domesticated elephants in Cambodia, while experts believe there are around 500 in the wild.

This includes around 110 living in the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary and nearly 200 in the Cardamom Mountains.
The number of wild elephants in Cambodia and other countries in Southeast Asia has declined over the past due to illegal hunting, the destruction of habitats and conflict between the animals and people, studies suggest.

Ministry of Environment spokesman Neth Pheaktra said: ‘The government is working with relevant organisations to formulate strategies to protect and preserve elephants in Cambodia for future generations.

‘To effectively protect natural forest habitats of elephants, law enforcement needed to be strengthened to tackle illegal wildlife hunting and the use of snares.’

He added that awareness among local farmers in protected forests needs to be raised as often they use chemicals on crops or harm elephants when they intrude on their farmland.

https://metro.co.uk/2019/06/08/elephant-rides-stop-cambodias-biggest-attraction-9871921/amp/?ito=cbshare&__twitter_impression=true

One of South Korea’s Largest Dog Meat Markets is Closed Down

dailymail.co.uk

Gupo dog meat market in Busan, South Korea is one of the largest in the country
It serves chilled canine flesh and it keeps live dogs in cages available on order
The area of the dog market will now be turned into a public park by city officials

A notorious dog meat market that serves chilled canine flesh and keeps live animals in cages to slaughter on order is being closed down.

The Gupo dog meat market in Busan, South Korea is one of the largest in the country.

Now, local authorities have reached an agreement with all 19 dog meat sellers at Gupo Livestock Market to shut down their businesses next month.

The agreement is part of an urban planning project to regenerate the area and turn the market into a public park.

Kaya, a mother dog, and her puppies are shown locked inside a green house at a dog meat farm in Namyangju, South Korea

The chilled meat on display at the Gupo dog meat market in Busan, South Korea. The market is now being closed

The closure of Gupo is the latest in a series of crack downs by officials on the dog meat trade.

In November last year, Seongnam city demolished Taepyeong, the country’s largest dog slaughterhouse, and closed down most of its related dog meat vendors.

Earlier this year, Seoul mayor, Park Won-soon, vowed to close all dog butcheries in South Korea’s capital city after watching an animated about abandoned dogs.

Nara Kim, dog meat campaigner for Humane Society International said: ‘We very much welcome the agreement reached to close Gupo market, home to one of the largest dog meat markets in South Korea.

‘The closure plan is the result of months of hard work between the local authorities and the market vendors, and both sides are to be commended for working towards this goal that will not only bring to an end to Gupo’s dog meat era, but will also see the area regenerated with new amenities and businesses for the benefit of the local, modern economy.
The Gupo dog meat market in Busan, South Korea is one of the largest in the country and has now been closed down

The HSI Animal Rescue Team rescues a dog at a dog meat farm in Namyangju, South Korea
A mother dog and her puppies are shown locked inside a green house at a dog meat farm in Namyangju14298666-0-image-a-170_1559564144279918629628.jpg

 

‘HSI has been working with dog meat farmers in South Korea for nearly four years helping them close their flagging businesses as more people in the county turn away from dog meat, so the closure of Gupo’s grimly iconic dog market, which follows the demolition last year of the country’s largest dog slaughterhouse complex, is a sign of more compassionate times.

‘This is the latest crack down on an increasingly unpopular dog meat trade, and we hope that it inspires further closures in future where dogs also suffer for the meat trade, such as Chilsung market in Daegu.’

Close to 2 million dogs a year are reared on thousands of dog meat farms across South Korea, the only country known to farm dogs for human consumption.

All across Asia, an estimated 30 million dogs are killed and eaten each year, mainly stolen pets and street dogs.
Close to 2 million dogs a year are reared on thousands of dog meat farms across South Korea, the only country known to farm dogs for human consumption

The notorious dog meat market in Busan serves chilled canine flesh and keeps live animals in cages to slaughter on order

The dogs live their whole lives on dog farms before being slaughtered.

Death by electrocution is most common, with dogs usually taking up to five minutes to die.

There have even been instances of dogs taking up to 20 minutes to die and hanging is also practiced. The animals are killed in full view of other dogs.

Most people in the country don’t regularly eat dog but it remains popular during July and August, when it is eaten as a soup called bosintang.

Lola Webber, Campaign Manager for South Korea of HSI, greets Kaya at a dog meat farm in Namyangju

Nara Kim, Campaign Manager in South Korea of HSI, cuddles George at a dog meat farm in Namyangju

Adam Parascandola, left, Director of Animal Protection and Crisis Response of HSI, and Lola Webber, right, Campaign Manager for South Korea of HSI, rescue Caroline at a dog meat farm
The closure of Gupo is the latest in a series of crack downs by officials on the dog meat trade. Some believe that the soup improves stamina and virility.

A South Korean court ruled last June that killing dogs for meat is illegal, in a landmark decision which animal rights activists said could pave the way to outlawing eating canines.

The meat has long been a part of South Korean cuisine, with about one million dogs eaten a year.

Consumption has declined in South Korea with the practice now something of a taboo among younger generations and pressure from activists mounting.

A survey in 2017 found that 70 per cent of South Koreans do not eat dogs, but only about 40 per cent believe the practice should be banned.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7099101/amp/One-South-Koreas-largest-dog-meat-markets-closed-down.html?__twitter_impression=true

Petition: They cut the claws of a lioness to play with tourists, rescue her!

sosvox.org

We can not continue to allow these abuses in the sight of everyone and that nobody does anything. This lioness was MUTILATED so that some people could approach her to play. This madness happened in the zoo of the Palestinian city of Rafah, a place that should be closed and its animals taken to sanctuaries, because they surely have done similar things with other animals.

Let’s do something, these places can not be anyone’s land to do what they want with animals, there are international laws, and if there are not there should be. Please, ask the Government of Israel to rescue the animals of that zoo and take them to a sanctuary or something similar where they can live happily without being mistreated.

SIGN AND SHARE THIS PETITION

https://www.sosvox.org/en/petition/they-cut-the-claws-of-a-lioness-to-play-with-tourists-rescue-her.html?fl

Today Is “Adopt a Dog”

IMG_20190520_163917IMG_20190520_164033

Police Officer Cuddles Up To Kittens He Rescued

thedodo.com
Arlington Police Department

Two police officers in Texas were finished dealing with a shoplifting call at a local TJ Maxx store when they suddenly got flagged down to help with something else — two tiny kittens stuck under a car in the store’s parking lot. Concerned for the kittens’ safety, the officers quickly went over to the car in question, and immediately heard tiny meows coming from somewhere underneath the car.

“They located the kittens inside the bumper where most likely the mother cat had placed them for some reason,” Jesse Minton, of the Arlington Police Department, told The Dodo. “The owner of the car advised she did not own a cat and had no idea how the kittens got in there.”

Once they figured out exactly where the kittens were, Officer Joe Bob Adkins was able to carefully reach under the car …and gently remove the kittens…

As soon as they were safe, Officer Adkins took the kittens back to the police car and just held them, trying to make them feel safe and loved, and the kittens simply couldn’t get enough of him. They absolutely adored cuddling with their new friend, and curled up on his chest in the sweetest way.

The officers immediately took the kittens to get checked out by a vet, who determined they were around 6 weeks old, and were relieved to hear that they were in fairly good condition. They assumed the kittens must be hungry, having no idea how long they’d been under the car, and so the officers fed them some formula out of a tiny bottle, falling more and more in love with them by the minute.

The more time they spent with their new friend Officer Adkins, the more the tiny kittens fell in love with him — so it didn’t take long for him to decide to officially adopt them into his family.

“He thinks he may name them ‘TJ’ and ‘Max,’” Minton said.
The two kittens are now settling wonderfully into their new home, and could not love their new dad more if they tried. He may not have been planning on taking home two new family members that day, but as soon as they cuddled up to him, he simply couldn’t resist.

https://www.thedodo.com/amphtml/close-to-home/police-officer-cuddles-up-to-kittens-he-rescued?__twitter_impression=true

This Shelter is Closing

IMG_20190505_212638

Those that are not adopted will either be euthanized or transfer to a different shelter, no decision has been made yet!

Image

He belongs to a dying veteran and Mr. Morris would like to see him one last time

IMG_20190414_011255

URGENT PETITION TO SIGN: These Zoo Owners Have Abandoned Their Animals. Now Their Fate Is Up in the Air.

thepetitionsite.com
by: Care2 Team
recipient: SEPRO

Wild animals should never be kept in zoos. They were born with all the instincts they need to help them survive and thrive in the wild. While that fact may be true, there are still hundreds of thousands of non-domesticated animals still living in zoos today.

Once in captivity, however, animals are no longer self-sufficient. They are, for the rest of the lives, 100% dependent on the zoo staff for food, care, and stimulation. So when a zoo closes, it can’t simply, pull down the blinds, padlock the doors and walk away. No, before slapping on the “Closed” sign they first must figure out how they will care for the animals in their care.

Of course, that is the “ideal” situation. Some zoos, simply choose to abandon their animals, locking the door behind them as their menagerie stares back at them from behind the metal bars. This is exactly what happened to the zoo animals at Parque Zoologico Prudencio Navarro on Spain’s Costa de la Luz.

After years of complaints from concerned citizens, the zoo finally stopped even pretending to care for its critters and closed shop. This was supposed to be good news for the animal activists that fought hard to push the zoo to treat its animals better but now, the lions, tigers, and bears have nowhere to go, no dedicated caretaker and have only been provided with water and food because of some unknown good Samaritans who have taken it upon themselves to tend to the animals. Meanwhile, the zoo operators are long gone.

Of course, these heroes can only do so much. According to reports, the animals are festering in their own feces and urine. Their water moats are dirty and their overall condition is horrific. Additionally, since park staff has left, the security at the park is next to nothing. Dangerous animals could easily escape, putting both people and other zoo animals at risk.

The clock is ticking for these animals. They need to be rehomed to accredited sanctuaries at once so they can get the care they need and finally have a life free from zoo captivity. Please help Care2 call on Spain’s Nature Protection Service (SEPRONA) to rescue the animals and find them sanctuaries today.

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/249/620/291/these-zoo-owners-have-abandoned-their-animals.-now-their-fate-is-up-in-the-air./?TAP=1724

Success! Cruel Beagle Fungicide Test Ends at Corteva Agriscience | Care2 Causes

care2.com

Less than a week after the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) released the disturbing report that 36 beagles were being force-fed a fungicide in a test commissioned by Coreteva Agriscience, a division of Dow DuPont, the company announced it will end this terrible study.

An undercover HSUS investigator at Charles River Laboratories in Michigan discovered that the beagles were being fed Adavelt, a new Coreteva Agriscience fungicide, in gelatin capsules for a year. According to the report released March 12, some of these dogs “were being subjected to very high doses – so high that up to four capsules had to be shoved down their throats.”

All the surviving beagles were scheduled to be euthanized in July. Their organs would then be removed and examined for any damage from the fungicide.

This study is horrible for many reasons. For one thing, it does not replicate how Adavelt would be ingested by humans. Even worse, the United States government hasn’t even required this test for over 10 years, ever since scientists realized it provides no worthwhile information.

Corteva Agriscience said it had to conduct the test—which it admitted was unnecessary—to meet a Brazilian regulatory requirement. However, Brazil’s pesticide authority, ANVISA, told the HSUS it will waive the test for companies that don’t want to conduct it.

At Corteva Agriscience’s request, ANVISA sent a formal, written version of this policy to the entire Brazilian pesticide industry. But Conteva Agriculture refused to stop the test until the industry received confirmation that it was no longer required. If that confirmation took longer than four months, those beagles would die in July.

The HSUS and Humane Society International (HSI) have been working for months to make Corteva Agriscience end its cruel fungicide test and release the beagles, so they can find loving homes. More than 122,000 people signed HSUS’ petition on Care2 making this demand.

On March 18, just six days after the HSUS released its report, Corteva Agriscience announced it had secured a waiver from ANVISA and had immediately ended the test. The company promised it would make “every effort” to rehome the beagles.

We’ve been working to refine, reduce, & replace animal tests for years. Today we’re pleased to announce our efforts resulted in a waiver & we can stop the study. We’ll make every effort to rehome the animals. Please read our full statement. pic.twitter.com/SQc5RJg41M

— Corteva Agriscience™ (@corteva) March 18, 2019

“We applaud Corteva for making the right decision,” Kitty Block, HSUS president and CEO, wrote on her blog. “The company has been a valuable partner to us in the past on important measures to decrease animal testing and we hope that we can work with them on a happy ending for these dogs.”

The surviving beagles owe their lives to the efforts of the HSUS and HSI, as well as everyone around the world who urged Corteva Agriscience to stop the test. Here’s hoping the HSUS is successful again in finding loving homes for every one of these survivors.

Creating a Care2 petition is easy. If you have an issue you care deeply about, why not start your own petition? Here are some guidelines to help you get started, and soon the Care2 community will be signing up to support you.

https://www.care2.com/causes/success-cruel-beagle-fungicide-test-ends-at-corteva-agriscience.html

Photo credit: mus15house

“Freedom for Hoover the Tiger After Life Spent in Circus Cage”

A Heartwarming Story! Wolf That Rescuers Thought Was A Dog Saved From Freezing River In Estonia – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
February 22, 2019

A wolf, first thought to be a dog, is warming hearts everywhere after being rescued this morning from a freezing river in Estonia, a country in Northern Europe.
The heroic rescuers, reportedly named Robin Sillamae and Rando Kartsepp, were working nearby when they noticed the distressed animal in the Parnu River.
After pulling the wolf, who was described as exhausted, hypothermic, and frozen,” from the icy water, the kind-hearted men covered the animal in a blanket and placed it in their car to warm up.
The Estonian Union for the Protection of Animals (EUPA), which received the call for “help with a dog that might be a wolf,” shared the news on its Facebook page; admitting that the situation presented a bit of a challenge.

Fortunately, the young men who saved the wolf were able to drive the animal to a clinic where he received immediate treatment that was funded by the EUPA.
The organization shared an update from the clinic which confirmed that the wolf, believed to be born last year, is slowly recovering and sustained no other injuries.
“We have been contacted by the head of the environment agency’s Wildlife Department, Marko Hat, who confirmed that if the wolf is in top-notch health, then they will put a collar on him and release him into the wild,” noted the organization.
The EUPA shared their appreciation for the young men who saved the struggling young wolf, as well as the staff of the clinic, and Marko Hat, who gave them peace of mind, ensuring that the animal would be released to freedom.
The Estonian Union For The Protection Of Animals is a donation-based organization. Please consider making a contribution to the work that they do to save animals in their region.

https://worldanimalnews.com/a-wolf-that-rescuers-thought-was-a-dog-saved-from-freezing-river-in-estonia/

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Rescued Birds Are Helping Veterans Manage PTSD | Care2 Causes

PTSD can be a terrible and insidious health problem and a hard one to treat because of the many layers of trauma that can underpin the condition.

But animal companions, and recently birds, like parrots, have proved to be a powerful source of

joy and wellness for people dealing post traumatic stress. To understand why birds are particularly good companion animals for people with PTSD, it’s first worth learning a bit about the health problem.

What is PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is usually caused by a significantly traumatic event or prolonged exposure to trauma that may span months to many years. PTSD usually occurs right after the event itself, but in some cases it may show up several months or even years after the catalyst event.

The way PTSD manifests can be different for every person dealing with this condition and can depend on the trauma that person endured. However, common symptoms can include flashbacks or nightmares of the traumatic event itself or stress responses such as pain, sweating, feeling sick and trembling, to name just a few. These may occur as a result of stimuli that “trigger” the memory or may come on without warning.

PTSD is perhaps most widely understood by the general public as a condition effecting combat veterans, whose prolonged exposure to scenes of war and combat have had an impact on their mental wellbeing. However, PTSD can occur among almost all demographics. Women—for example those who have been in an abusive relationship—or children who have undergone prolonged stress or suffered the loss of a parent can also suffer from PTSD

PTSD can manifest through persistent negative self-talk that reinforces the person’s feelings of anguish surrounding the event. It can also lead to a state known as “hyper arousal” which might best be explained in this context as someone always being on edge. This can lead to sufferers having short tempers or being quick to anger or upset. In some extreme cases, PTSD can cause angry or even violent outbursts, though the actual number of PTSD sufferers who are violent is much smaller than media portrayals lead us to believe, and there is surprisingly little evidence to specifically link PTSD with violence.

Other problems that can manifest because of PTSD include an inability to concentrate, a “mental fog” state and an avoidance problem where sufferers will attempt to minimize their negative feelings. This can lead to sufferers not seeking treatment, avoiding responsibilities or stressful situations like employment, or attempting to medicate themselves in a variety of ways. Self-medication can manifest as obsessive behaviors, like over-exercise, through to alcohol and drug use, casual sexual encounters and more.

How is PTSD treated?

It is possible to successfully treat PTSD, but it is among the more complex class of mental health disorders. PTSD is distinct from panic disorders and depression, but the conditions can overlap, meaning that treatment has to take in some or many of these factors.

Treatment often involves therapy of some kind, sometimes underpinned by various medications designed to give the emotional breathing room for that therapy to take effect. These can include:

CBT, where patients learn to challenge negative thought patterns and introduce new thoughts to replace those old systems
eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, where eye movements are used during the recounting of past traumas as a means of helping a patient walk through the trauma while distracted (though exactly why this works isn’t fully understood)
group therapy medications specifically used for PTSD, like paroxetine and sertraline.

However, PTSD sufferers can find it hard to undergo therapy precisely, because it’s difficult to relive or deal with the past trauma that they have struggled with. This is where support animals can be effective.

Support animals don’t magically make PTSD symptoms go away, but they do offer love and support that can anchor people dealing with PTSD. Dogs and other support animals are also good at picking up when their human companions are in distress and lend support without their human needing to specifically communicate their distress, something that PTSD sufferers can find very difficult.

In addition, the very act of having to care for an animal can help bring a focus to the lives of PTSD sufferers that is outside of their own distress, thus helping to break the negative thought patterns or at the very least offering distraction.

Why Birds are so Helpful for People Dealing with PTSD

Some birds, such as ravens and parrots are incredibly intelligent and can learn to understand or even mirror basic language skills. Birds also display some surprisingly “human-like” behaviors, but at the same time have particularized and often demanding needs to which a human companion will have to attend. This creates a new dimension of interactivity for PTSD sufferers.

While there is a lack of specific wide-scale research on birds as animal companions for PTSD sufferers, there is growing anecdotal support for their abilities to help. So much so, in fact, that a number of groups, including Parrots for Patriots, have launched with the specific aim of matching abandoned birds with veterans who may be in need of an animal friend to care for and from whom they can take support. These birds don’t just help PTSD sufferers, but they may be particularly well-served by this scheme.

Below is a video from Serenity Park Sanctuary that demonstrates what a difference various schemes like this can have for veterans and people dealing with PTSD:

It’s worth noting that service birds which help with diagnosed mental health conditions have a complex status under the Americans with Disabilities Act and may not be protected in all spheres like other service animals are. It is important to know your rights, if you are thinking about adopting a rescued bird as a service animal, and the facility from which you are receiving your animal will likely be able to give you all the information you will need.

https://www.care2.com/causes/rescued-birds-are-helping-veterans-manage-ptsd.html

Photo credit: Getty Images.

“Mother Humpback Stays by Calf While Rescuers Free it From Shark Net”

“Humpback Whale Shows AMAZING Appreciation After Being Freed From Nets”

 

Two Blind Cows Saved From Slaughter Find Friendship At Farm Sanctuary

 

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Farm Sanctuary

The gentle moo of a cow named Tricia was one of the first sounds to reach Sweety upon her arrival at our New York Shelter. Unfamiliar places are frightening to blind animals like Sweety, so this simple greeting from another cow must have been a great comfort to her. By the next morning, Sweety had already begun to relax. It was clear that this new place offered only peace, comfort, and kindness.

 

life began at a dairy farm in Canada where she was kept on concrete floors inside a bleak industrial building with no access to the outdoors. Once she was old enough to be impregnated, Sweety entered production. Like all dairy cows, she endured an unrelenting cycle of insemination, pregnancy, and birth. All of her babies were taken from her just moments after they were born. Because they are of no use to the dairy industry, her sons were sold for veal or cheap beef. Her daughters were raised as replacements for the dairy herd, but none were ever allowed to remain with their mother.

In large industrial farms, dairy cows are typically considered “spent” at around four years old and are then sent to slaughter. Sweety was kept in production for eight long years, which is unusual. When she began suffering from a foot infection that rendered her lame and after giving birth to two sets of twins, Sweety’s value to the dairy dropped considerably. The birth of twins is undesirable to the dairy industry because the males are usually small and the females in fraternal pairs are typically sterile.

Emaciated, ailing, and exhausted from years in production, Sweety was soon slated for slaughter. The slaughter line is awful for all animals, but it is especially terrifying for those who are blind. With their other senses heightened, these creatures are overwhelmed by an onslaught of alarming noises and odors: the clanking of metal gates and shackles, the bellows of their herd mates, the smell of blood. Sweety was already bound for the slaughterhouse when the dairy owner relinquished custody of the cow.

Someone at the dairy had recounted Sweety’s story to an acquaintance named Rose who runs a horse rescue organization named Refuge RR. On learning of Sweety’s plight, Rose quickly persuaded the dairy to spare the cow. Unable to keep Sweety, she began seeking permanent placement. When Rose’s search came to our attention, we eagerly offered Sweety a home in hopes that the arrangement would benefit not only Sweety but also one of our other rescued residents named Tricia.

Like Sweety, Tricia is a blind dairy cow. In 2008, we welcomed her to our New York Shelter when she too was being sent to slaughter because the farmer felt it was too difficult to handle her. At that time, we introduced Tricia to Linda, a cow with a hip injury, because both had disabilities that kept them from living with our larger main herd. The two became best friends, forming one of the closest bonds we’ve ever witnessed. After Linda passed away last year from cancer, it was plain to see that Tricia was at a loss without her cherished friend. Companionship is profoundly important to cattle, so it was exciting to think that by giving Sweety a new life, we might also give Tricia another chance to enjoy her own.

Tricia and Sweety nuzzling.

Rose transported Sweety to our shelter with a Farm Sanctuary team following behind to ensure that all went smoothly. The caravan made it to our shelter at night, and Sweety stayed up late to savor a feast of hay before settling into the deep bedding of her pen, a comfort she relished after a lifetime of standing and lying on concrete. From an adjacent pen, Tricia could smell Sweety immediately. Although the two would not meet face to face until the following day, Tricia circled and mooed, clearly eager to get acquainted.

When it was time for the introduction, we led Sweety into Tricia’s stall. Tricia was busy enjoying some hay, and it took her a moment to realize that the newcomer was beside her. As Sweety leaned in for a sniff, however, Tricia perked up and began investigating this intriguing stranger. Within moments, the two cows were gently nuzzling one another and sharing a meal. By evening, they were nestled together for a night of quiet comfort.

In the days to come, Sweety will be examined by our veterinarian to ensure that her eyes aren’t causing her any pain, and she’ll need to be carefully monitored as she puts on some much-needed weight. Because Sweety was kept indoors, she does not have a winter coat so she’ll wear a horse blanket until the warmer days of spring arrive. With Tricia by her side, Sweety has already ventured outside to enjoy the winter sunshine and fresh air. We can already see a beautiful friendship blooming.

https://www.farmsanctuary.org/the-sanctuaries/rescued-animals/2014-rescues/sweety-blind-cow-gets-a-new-life-and-a-new-friend/

 

 

Heartbreaking News! Beloved Bear Named Cinder Who Was Rescued & Rehabilitated From Wildfires Was Killed By A Hunter In Washington – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
December 13, 2018

Photos from Idaho Black Bear Rehab (IBBR), Facebook
It is with heavy hearts that WAN shares the sad news that Cinder, the inspiring bear who was brought to recover in Idaho after her paws were tragically burned in a wildfire four years ago, was shot dead a little more than one year ago, by a heartless hunter.
According to Idaho Black Bear Rehab (IBBR), which cared for Cinder before her release into the wild, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) shared the devastating update with the nonprofit organization yesterday.
As noted in one of numerous posts on the IBBR’s Facebook page, WDFW explained that the department had recollared Cinder in her den two years after her initial release. When Cinder’s collar stopped transmitting in October 2017, the department believed she was still hibernating in her den.

Due to heavy snow in the spring, and the cougar creek fire in the summer, the department was not able to go back and retrieve their cameras until September 2018.
“Unfortunately, instead of finding a den,” noted the explanation on Facebook, “we found Cinder’s skeletal remains. It appears that she was killed by a hunter in October 2017.”

Sally Maugan of IBBR shared memories of Cinder, as well as insight into the countless animal rescuers who worked so hard to save her life.
“Not many of us can know the pain and suffering that accompanies burns of that magnitude, the pain of recovery, bandage changes, and all that goes along with it. Yet Cinder was a definite inspiration to humans who also knew that pain and suffering, and to the many supporters around the world who followed her story,” Maugan shared in an emotional post. “I think most of us felt if she could do it, if she could fight to recover, if she could regain her freedom, then we humans could also face our own traumas and survive to live again.”

“As wildlife rehabilitators, we all face the goal of recovery and release,” continued Maugan. “However, we also face the inevitable knowledge that once released, the animals are in charge of their own lives and there is little we can do to impact that.”

IBBR has helped save more that 200 bears over the past 29 years.
“I never met a bear who would consider living in captivity as really living,” said Maugan. “Our tribute to Cinder is to never forget her, to thank her for showing us how to heal in the worst of times, and for her courage and fight to survive to live free again.”
Maugan also made a point to appreciate the WDFW, Pilots N Paws, Lake Tahoe Wildlife Care, Inc., and everyone involved for all of their “care and kindness in giving Cinder a second chance.”

WAN echoes their appreciation! R.I.P. sweet angel Cinder!

https://worldanimalnews.com/heartbreaking-news-beloved-rescued-rehabilitated-bear-saved-from-wildfires-was-killed-by-a-hunter-in-washington/

 

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© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

WAN Exclusive With Humane Society International’s, Dr. Peter Li, About Rescue Of Nearly 400 Cats From Illegal Slaughterhouse In China – World Animal News

 

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By Lauren Lewis –
December 14, 2018

Exclusive photos shared with WAN by Dr. Peter Li, China policy specialist at Humane Society International
In a remarkable rescue operation, a covert coalition of animal advocates throughout China saved close to 400 cats from certain death from an illegal slaughterhouse in Tianjin.
While a relief, the plight of the cats and the heroes who saved them is far from over, as they continue to fight against and try to end the barbaric dog and cat meat trade that runs rampant across the country.
To delve deeper and help raise awareness about this lesser-known but equally harrowing aspect of the deplorable trade, WAN talked exclusively this morning with Dr. Peter Li, China policy specialist at Humane Society International (HSI).
Li explained that 375 cats crammed tightly together in 24 wire cages were discovered earlier this month by China Animal Protection Power (CAPP), a rescue group HSI helped to form in 2016, together with other activists from Tianjin and Beijing.

Li shared that CAPP is made up of action-oriented animal advocates scattered across the country that range in age from their mid-20’s to 30’s, ready to quickly mobilize when needed. He also emphasized the need to protect the identities of CAPP members from the “formidable evil force” of the Chinese dog and cat meat trade “that finds anyone they can to attack.”
That is why, Li told WAN, they never use members full names.
In this case, Li explained that Mr. Huang, a CAPP member, chaired the negotiation sessions with law enforcement and presented authorities with arguments against the slaughterhouse for food safety, public health, animal disease control policy, and criminal law violations.
As per Li, there are no animal protection laws in China, it is the environmental and health regulations that animal activists like CAPP increasingly use to persuade the police to crack down on the dog and cat meat trade.
Huang, who described the event as “heartbreaking,” was one of the first rescuers to arrive at the illegal slaughterhouse.
CAPP further reported that the cats at the slaughterhouse were in terrible condition, many emaciated and sick. They also found piles of cat hair outside, with the remains of thousands of cats that had been slaughtered at the site.

“The way cats are killed for China’s meat trade is notoriously brutal. They are grabbed around the throat with large iron tongs and then beaten over the head with a metal or wooden stick while their terrified cage mates look on. Some may still be conscious when they are thrown into a pot of boiling water to remove their hair,” noted Li, further explaining that the cats are disemboweled, beheaded, and de-footed to disguise the species, before being shipped to buyers. “This is the fate of an estimated four million cats a year in China, a mixture of stolen pets and urban strays.”
“If the authorities enforced existing food safety, animal disease control, and property protection laws, we would see a huge decline in China’s brutal dog and cat meat trade,” continued Li. “A legislative ban on the trade is our ultimate goal, but we don’t need to wait for that to make a difference. We just need police forces willing to act like this one in Tianjin.”
It has been reported that Tianjin police have received more than 1,200 phone calls from people across China urging them to crack down on this illegal slaughterhouse, an indication that news of the raid had spread on Chinese social media WeChat.

“While temporarily closed, activists are putting pressure on local government to shut down the slaughterhouse permanently,” said Li, who immediately began contacting local activists, organizations, and HSI partners, once he was alerted to the situation.
The rescued cats were subsequently handed over to Capital Animal Welfare Association (CAWA), one of the country’s most credible organizations. Among its many distinctions, CAWA helped stop the introduction of rodeos into the country in 2012.
While some cats are hospitalized, many have been sent to different groups, including ones in Beijing. Sadly, Li estimates that there are still approximately 200 in Tianjin that are waiting for safe accommodations.

“We always encourage adoption rather than purchasing dogs or cats from stores,” Li told WAN, explaining people interested in adopting any of the rescued cats should contact HSI which will then arrange to address the requests.
“Compared to dogs, it is much easier and less expensive to coordinate and facilitate adoptions of cats from China to the United States and around the world,” Li told WAN.
The illegal slaughter operation in Tianjin is now under police investigation.
People outside of China that are interested in adopting one of these precious cats, should contact Humane Society International at (202) 452-1100 or, from North America, at (866) 614-4371. HSI can also be reached by email HERE!

https://worldanimalnews.com/wan-exclusive-with-humane-society-internationals-dr-peter-li-following-rescue-of-nearly-400-cats-from-illegal-chinese-slaughterhouse/

 

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© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

 

 

 

Breaking! South Korea Closes Its Largest Dog Meat Slaughterhouse, Taepyeong; Much More Needs To Be Done To End The Horrific Dog Meat Trade – World Animal News

A dog is shown locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Namyangju, South Korea, on Monday, May 7, 2018. The operation is part of HSIs efforts to fight the dog meat trade throughout Asia. In South Korea, the campaign includes working to raise awareness among Koreans about the plight of meat dogs being no different from the animals more and more of them are keeping as pets.

Photo by: Jean Chung/For HSI

By Lauren Lewis

November 26, 2018

Taepyeong, the largest dog slaughterhouse in South Korea has been shut down by local authorities, bringing the country one step closer to ending its brutal dog meat trade.
As per Humane Society International (HSI), Seongnam city council intends to build a community park on the land, creating a vibrant public space where once hundreds of thousands of dogs were slaughtered for human consumption.
Sadly, as per an update on the Korea Animal Rights Advocates Facebook page yesterday, a delay by Seongnam-si resulted in the slaughterhouse owner having time to transfer the dogs to another location.
“We could not ‘rescue’ the dogs this time. However, it is important for dog farm owners to show the downfall of the largest dog slaughterhouse, to show the change of the largest traditional dog market, and to drive their compliance,” the organization noted in the post. “In doing so, we must reduce the number of dog farms and dog slaughterhouses that we need to shut down. Also, we must do more to pass the dog slaughter ban.”
Taepyeong is comprised of six individual slaughterhouses, five of which will be bulldozed immediately. Permission to destroy the sixth building was not secured in time for the closure, however, all of its cages will be destroyed and equipment removed so that it is no longer operational.

“Both as a Korean citizen and an animal campaigner, it was incredibly moving for me to be a part of the historic closure of this notorious dog slaughterhouse,” stated HSI Korea’s Nara Kim in a statement. ” This really feels like a landmark moment in the demise of the dog meat industry in South Korea, and sends the clear message that the dog meat industry is increasingly unwelcome in Korean society.”
The closure of Taepyeong comes at a time when dog meat consumption is declining rapidly in South Korea, particularly among younger generations. A survey by Gallup Korea conducted in June 2018 claims that 70% of South Koreans state that they will not eat dog meat in the future, and recent moves to curb the dog meat trade reflect a society increasingly ill at ease with the industry. Most recently, last September, a Supreme Court struck down a lower court decision to allow dog electrocution.
“We have been making constant efforts to shut down the Taepyeong-dong dog slaughterhouse through investigations and putting pressure on Gyeonggi province and Seongnam-si. As Korea’s biggest, brutal, illegal dog slaughterhouse, Taepyeong-dong is notorious for supplying huge amounts of dog bodies to nearby Seongnam Moran traditional market. Its closure is a historical event, and hopefully may trigger the closure of other illegal dog slaughterhouses throughout the country,” said Hyunji Kim of Korea Animal Rights Advocates. “Until we achieve this, we really appreciate the support of both Korean people and global citizens who love animals for helping our campaigns to completely end dog meat in Korea.”
Korea Animal Rights Advocates recently teamed up with HSI International to present a petition of nearly one million signatures to the President’s Blue House, calling for an END to the dog meat trade!

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-south-korea-closes-its-largest-dog-meat-slaughterhouse-taepyeong-much-more-still-needs-to-be-done-to-end-the-horrific-dog-meat-trade/

 

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