SIGN: Stop Trophy Hunters From Slaughtering 500 Elephants in Zimbabwe

trophy hunter elephant dead

ladyfreethinker.org

Lady Freethinker 2 minutes

Image Credit: Facebook (Jewell Crossberg)

PETITION TARGET: Ambassador of Zimbabwe to the United States Ammon Mutembwa

Trophy hunters may soon slaughter up to 500 endangered African elephants as Zimbabwe prepares to sell hunting licenses to legally kill these majestic creatures.

Selling “rights” to kill the endangered elephants to hunters who pay between $10,000 and $70,000 to participate, this horrifying plan is part of an effort to recoup pandemic-related tourism revenue losses. But why should defenseless elephants die for profit?

Zimbabwe’s Parks and Wildlife Management Authority claims the country’s “excessive” elephant population is responsible for violent encounters with humans, according to Bloomberg. But the government announced its intentions to permit the hunts just weeks after a new International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List assessment determined that African elephants are increasingly at risk of extinction and set the statuses for two species to “Endangered” and “Critically Endangered.”

These perilously threatened creatures do not deserve to have a price put on their lives. We must speak out to protect these elephants from government-sanctioned slaughter.

Sign this petition urging Zimbabwean Ambassador Ammon Mutembwa to oppose and fight against the government’s appalling decision to promote the needless killing of elephants and instead find humane solutions to human-wildlife conflicts.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-save-500-endangered-elephants-from-slaughter-in-zimbabwe/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Millionaire trophy hunter is caught boasting how he helped to shoot 13,000 doves

www.dailymail.co.uk

Michael Powell

By Michael Powell for The Mail on Sunday 01:55 02 May 2021, updated 02:12 02 May 2021

  • In phone call with undercover investigator, businessman Rob Weir recounted a £2,800 hunting trip
  • Mr Weir said: ‘There were five of us – one of them was a lady – and we shot 13,000 doves over four days’
  • Mr Weir owns H. J. Weir Engineering, one of world’s largest manufacturers of industrial laundry machines
  • He also said: ‘The very first time I went out there I wanted to shoot a baboon. I had a thing about shooting a baboon, I don’t know why but I did’

A millionaire trophy hunter has been caught boasting about helping to kill 13,000 doves and blasting a baboon.

In a phone call with an undercover investigator, businessman Rob Weir recounted a £2,800 hunting trip to Argentina, saying: ‘There were five of us – one of them was a lady – and we shot 13,000 doves over four days.’

He said he had limited himself to 1,500 shells a day, adding: ‘I tell you what, I’d love to go back. What an experience.’ BOASTS: Rob Weir (left), who boasted about helping to kill 13,000 doves and blasting a baboon, poses with a dead buffalo in 2017

Mr Weir, who owns H. J. Weir Engineering, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of industrial laundry machines, said he had also made repeated hunting trips to South Africa over the past seven or eight years.

Click here to resize this module

‘The very first time I went out there I wanted to shoot a baboon. I had a thing about shooting a baboon, I don’t know why but I did,’ he said.

‘I’ve shot buffalo out there, I’ve shot impala out there, I’ve shot warthogs out there, I’ve shot different gazelle-type animals out there.’ The 68-year-old businessman, who also owns the Weir Rallying motorsports team, made his comments to Eduardo Goncalves (above, at the Mirror Animal Hero awards in 2019) – the author and founder of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting

Approached for a comment, Mr Weir, who has not broken any laws with his hunting activities, said: ‘I’ve got nothing further to say.’

The 68-year-old businessman, who also owns the Weir Rallying motorsports team, made his comments to Eduardo Goncalves, the author and founder of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting.

Mr Goncalves has spent the past year posing as a trophy hunter in order to uncover the industry’s secrets for a forthcoming book.

It comes as pressure grows on the Government to implement its long-promised ban on trophy hunting, a pledge first made in the Queen’s Speech in October 2019 and repeated in the Tory Election manifesto two months later.

Despite an estimated 200 animals being killed by British trophy hunters every year, there is still no official date for introducing the ban, although it is thought it will be mentioned again in next month’s Queen’s Speech.

Campaigners are worried, however, that civil servants may try to water down legislation by including a clause allowing hunters to import trophies if they pay a ‘blood money’ fee to conservation projects.

Last night, a Government spokesman said: ‘The Government takes the conservation of endangered species in the UK and internationally very seriously, which is why we have committed to banning the import of hunting trophies from endangered species – as set out in the Government’s manifesto.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9533103/amp/Millionaire-trophy-hunter-caught-boasting-helped-shoot-13-000-doves.html?__twitter_impression=true

Unfair Game

Trophy Hunters Are Just Rich Psychopaths Who Like To Kill

PETITION TO STOP BIG CAT FACTORY FARMING!

Target: Cyril Ramaphosa, President – South Africa

MR PRESIDENT: SHUT DOWN YOUR BIG CAT FACTORY FARMS!

In 2019, the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting exposed how a South African company was breeding TIGER cubs… and then selling sick tiger trophy hunts.

We also revealed that there are now a staggering 300 factory farms in South Africa breeding LIONS in cages – for trophy hunters to kill for “fun”.

The animals are shot in fenced enclosures where they have NO CHANCE of escape. Their bones are often sold onto Asian dealers for so-called traditional Chinese ‘medicines’.

In our latest investigation, we reveal how over 17,000 tigers and tiger body parts have been traded or seized over the past 5 years. Over 80% were destined for the traditional Chinese ‘medicine’ market.

The figure includes a number of tigers that were shot in South Africa by trophy hunters …

We can also reveal that South Africa now breeds LEOPARDS – so they can be shot by trophy hunters for fun, and their skins sold to traders.

Leading conservationists and politicians from around the world are backing the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting’s call to BAN this sick trade.

Now we are launching this mass petition to the President of South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa. The South African government has just announced it is appointing a high-level ‘panel of experts’ to review its policies on breeding wild animals for trophy hunters to kill for kicks, and the terrible trade in lion bones and leopard skins.

We say: It’s time to BAN this wicked trade and CLOSE these sick Big Cat ‘Factory Farms’ NOW!

 

 

Please sign and share this petition – and help save endangered big cats TODAY!

To: Cyril Ramaphosa, President – South Africa
From: [Your Name]

I call on you to CLOSE South Africa’s Big Cat Factory Farms.

Breeding lion and tiger cubs to be cuddled for cash and killed for kicks is IMMORAL.
It is a stain on South Africa’s standing in the world.

It is time to end the big cat bone trade and to ban trophy hunting altogether.

Please act TODAY – for the good of wildlife, and for the good of South Africa’s reputation.

 

https://actionnetwork.org/petitions/stop-big-cat-factory-farming?source=twitter&

 

The BIG LIE about lion trophy hunting – Africa Geographic

africageographic.com

About Simon Espley

lion skin, trophy hunting

So often we hear from the pro-hunting lobby that by killing free roaming lions, trophy hunters are actually saving lions.

Well, if my aunt had balls she’d be my uncle.

That term “sustainable offtake” often creeps into the justification. The trophy hunting of free roaming lions is about as sustainable as putting ice cubes in a mug of steaming coffee. Let’s dig deeper into this issue of sustainable, shall we? A lion skin as a trophy from a hunt in Namibia ©Ton Koene/Alamy

Consider the following six examples of why the trophy hunting of free-roaming lions is NOT sustainable – from the very countries held high by the trophy hunting industry itself as being paragons of sustainable hunting practices:

1. The Namibian government does not know how many breeding-age desert-adapted lions are left, how many territory/pride males there are, or even how many of each sex are killed during human-lion conflict. They told me so – see this article written by me. And yet each year they set trophy hunting quotas for large male desert-adapted lions. The awarding of trophy hunting quotas off the back of no relevant statistics is NOT sustainable.

2. Namibian laws permit rural livestock owners to request for the lethal removal of predators targeting their livestock – so-called ‘problem animals’. Fair enough. BUT trophy hunters are often used to perform the execution, and we know that trophy hunters want to shoot big male lions. And communities benefit financially when ‘problem animals’ are identified and taken down by hunters. Is it coincidence then that there is a large bias towards male lions amongst those lions reported as being ‘problem animals’, and consequently executed by trophy hunters?

In the last scientific research report on Namibia’s desert-adapted lions, published in 2010, the author states, when referring to six collared male lions killed by trophy hunters as ‘problem animals’: “In all six cases, however, it is arguable whether the adult males that were shot, were in fact the lions responsible for the killing of livestock.”

This gap in legislation – empowering the two beneficiaries of ‘problem animal’ execution to act as witness, jury, judge and executioner – is NOT sustainable.

3. The above report concluded: “The long-term viability of the desert lion population has been compromised by the excessive killing of adult and sub-adult males. There is an urgent need to adapt the management and utilisation strategies relating to lions, if the long-term conservation of the species in the Kunene were to be secured.”

Since then the situation has worsened as regards male lion offtake, with some areas now almost devoid of male lions. Even the last known adult male lion in the Sesfontein Conservancy was earmarked to be shot – again conveniently classified as a ‘problem animal’ – until international pressure forced the Minister to change his mind. A rapidly reducing male/female lion ratio is NOT sustainable.

4. Craig Packer, director of the Lion Research Center at the University of Minnesota, has led a series of studies identifying over-hunting as the major reason for the steep decline in lion populations in Tanzania, the lion hunting mecca. Packer was banned from entering Tanzania for exposing corruption with regard to lion trophy hunting.

Being tagged as the cause of crashing lion populations makes trophy hunting of lions in Tanzania NOT sustainable, and the widespread use of fraud and corruption as a business tool suggests a morally bankrupt industry.

5. When 13-year-old Cecil the lion was shot in Zimbabwe, the over-riding justification was that he was ‘too old’ to breed or to successfully hold a territory (as if those are the only uses of a mature lion). Then, Cecil’s son, Xanda, was also shot by a hunter, at the age of six – and the professional hunter Richard Cooke knew that Xanda was a pride male with cubs, and lied about the situation. In fact, Cooke also led the hunt that killed Xanda’s other son – at the age of four.

So, lions of all ages are being shot, and the trophy hunting industry lies and re-invents the justifications each time to suit their need to keep the business model rolling. That is NOT sustainable.

6. Rural communities living amongst wild lions have to see meaningful and sustainable benefit from having lions in the area. Lions are often a threat to lives and livelihoods and these people have the right to expect to be compensated to behave differently. After all, the rest of the world has mostly sanitised itself of large predators.

Surely for trophy hunting to be truly sustainable, these communities must receive a significant portion of the trophy fee? A 2013 study by Economists at Large, an Australian organisation of conservation-minded economists, found that on average only 3% of money generated by trophy hunting winds up in the hands of local people.

During research for my article referred to in point one above, Namibian government officials told me that the relevant community only receives about 12.5% of the trophy hunting fee for a quota lion (US$10,000 of the ± US$80,000 fee) – and only about 1% in the case of a ‘problem animal’ hunt. The rest goes to the professional hunting operator. This is NOT fair or sustainable.

This is what we do know about lions: Populations have crashed from about 450,000 in the 1940’s to about 20,000 today – mostly due to human-wildlife conflict, habitat loss, prey base loss and trophy hunting (US Fish and Wildlife Services).

The remaining pockets of lions are increasingly isolated from other populations, and no longer able to disperse and so maintain population genetic diversity and stability. When young males flee from dominant pride males, and seek out other lions, they leave protected areas and are picked off by hunters and livestock farmers – thus preventing the vital dispersal of young lions to other areas.

The surgical removal of big male lions by trophy hunters within the context of the above is NOT sustainable in any way, shape or form – regardless of what the other causes of lion population reductions are. The trophy hunting industry claim of sustainable practises is nothing but a lie. It’s a fiercely protected justification to continue the senseless and outdated fetish for killing off Africa’s big male lions for fun and ego. The fantasies of a few rich people are taking precedence over the survival of an African icon, over the proper functioning of Africa’s wild places and over the tourism industry which brings in many times more revenue, jobs, skills enhancement and societal benefits.

The trophy hunting of Africa’s wild, free roaming lions is NOT sustainable and has to stop.

https://africageographic.com/stories/trophy-hunting-wild-lions-big-lie-sustainability/

Urge U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to Cease Issuing Permits for Trophy Imports! | Born Free USA

The United States is the world’s top importer of wildlife “trophies.” Sign our petition to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), urging the agency to cease issuing trophy import permits!

The Petition

I strongly oppose trophy hunting and recognize that trophy hunting does not significantly aid in wildlife conservation efforts. Instead, because hunters frequently target animals of already imperiled species, such as elephants, lions, and rhinoceros, trophy hunting is just one more deadly pressure on these species.
  
The majority of Americans believe trophy hunting is an outdated and brutal sport without any conservation benefits. And, opposition to trophy hunting is not a partisan issue; people from across the political spectrum oppose it. Yet, the United States is the world’s top importer of wildlife trophies and of trophies of threatened and endangered CITES-listed species, with more imports than the next nine highest countries combined.

Therefore, I call on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to cease issuing permits for hunters to import wildlife trophies into the U.S.

Follow Born Free USA on Social Media

https://www.bornfreeusa.org/action-center/trophyhuntpetition/?eType=EmailBlastContent&eId=0114c23a-6707-4456-87b6-c944466b3b80

BREAKING: Emaciated Lions Found Again At Captive-Breeding Farm in Limpopo, South Africa

Walter Slippers is the one on the right.

The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) are in the process of laying animal cruelty charges in terms of the Animal Protection Act (APA), 71 of 1962, against Walter Slippers, owner of two captive predator breeding facilities in Alldays, Limpopo.

Leaked photos show the emaciated lions at Walter Slippers’ Lion Breeding Farm – March 2020. All photos supplied.

During inspections in April and May 2020, the NSPCA found deplorable conditions with underweight lions, lack of adequate shelter, lack of veterinary treatment, as well as unhygienic and small enclosures.

Slippers has 72 lions on his farm, which is in liquidation, and he allegedly feeds them a giraffe every two to three weeks.

On 12 May 2020, the NSPCA was informed that seven of the lions housed at one of Slippers’ facilities had escaped… which appears to support their findings that he is not only negligent in the way these lions are kept from a welfare point of view, but also in terms of public safety.Lions at Walter Slippers Lion Breeding Farm – April 2018

“We believe that permits should never have been granted to keep lions, or any other predators like the tigers, as not only was the fencing wholly inadequate, but there are specific dramatic shortfalls on the welfare of these animals – and their welfare has consistently been compromised,” said Senior Inspector Douglas Wolhuter (Manager NSPCA Wildlife Protection Unit).

The NSPCA has issued further warnings in terms of contraventions of the APA to all role players concerned. A deadline has also been issued for an action plan regarding the animals and the NSPCA is taking further legal action, which will see criminal charges brought about.Walter Slippers Lion Breeding Farm – July 2016

Sadly, this is not the first time that evidence of shocking animal neglect and cruelty has emerged from Slippers farms, with images of malnourished lions surfacing in 2015, 2016, 2018, and 2020. More in Home

In 2016, Slippers accepted responsibility and promised the NSPCA he would address the frequency and quantity of his lion feeding regime, as well as provide them with ongoing vet records.

With subsequent evidence of abuse in 2018 and now again in 2020, a consistent pattern of neglect is unfortunately emerging from his farm, putting Slippers in breach of his permit conditions and in further non-compliance with the APA, according to a press statement from Blood Lions.

“In the absence of national norms and standards for the captive keeping and breeding of big cats for commercial purposes, sadly animal cruelty and issues of neglect are rife in this industry,” says Dr Louise de Waal (Blood Lions Campaign Manager).

“Considering there are at least 8,000 lions in captivity in South Africa, but probably many more, the scale of such welfare issues is of huge concern.”

Paul Tully from Captured in Africa told SAPeople: “It’s quite absurd to think that the South African Government continues to allow what are clearly crimes against nature. The connected industries of lion parks (that offer tourists a chance to pet lion cubs) and the disgraceful lion bone trade – which is still legal in South Africa and clearly promotes the continued poaching of lions (both wild and captive) for their parts – must be industries that are ended sooner rather than later, before more lions are abused and tourists scammed out of their money.”‬

In October 2018, the Lion Coalition wrote a letter to Sam Makhubele (LEDET’s Director for Wildlife Trade and Regulation) asking for Slippers’ predator breeding permit to be revoked and to ensure he would never be allowed to breed big cats again.

Notwithstanding, Limpopo’s provincial nature conservation authority has renewed his permit every single time.

Images from Walter Slippers Lion Breeding Farm – February 2015

Slippers has a history of controversy going back as far as 2010, when he attempted to purchase two white rhino bulls for pseudo-hunts involving Vietnamese citizens. It was also reported that he used to transport cubs from his breeding facility to his restaurant, Toeka Plaas Kombuis, for visitors to interact with.

The NSPCA is the statutory body tasked with responding to wild animal welfare complaints, conducting its own welfare investigations and attempting to regulate good welfare practices without state funding or resources. They need your help to carry out their duty of looking after the welfare of our wild animals. Please help by donating HERE.

https://www.sapeople.com/2020/05/13/breaking-starving-emaciated-lions-found-at-slippers-limpopo-breeding-farm-again/

Petition Ban Canned Hunting

Ban Canned Hunting! You came to knife fight with a loaded rifle.. Next time, come barehanded we’ll call it fair.

Born to be murdered.. South Africa is a dream for hunters – Thousand of hunting tourists from Europe and the USA travel to the region for one brutal reason, they then bring home dead animals instead of photos as souvenirs, totally unnecessary and cruel.

Nearly all wild species are available – even protected species like elephants: it’s just a question of money. An especially perfidious form of trophy hunting is “Canned Hunting” of lions.

Canned Hunting

The most extreme variety of trophy hunting is “Canned Hunting”. Most of the victims are lions, which are served to their hunters on a silver platter: The animals are kept in fenced areas and then simply shot and many have suffering because of bad aiming or handling of rifles.

The lions are bred on farms and raised by hand. They hardly demonstrate any shyness of humans. The animals can’t escape from the cages. Occasionally they are attracted with bait, sometimes they are even sedated with medicine.Anyone can go and hunt lions in South Africa – a hunting licence or proven hunting experience isn’t usually necessary. This means that many lions aren’t killed by the first shot which results in them experiencing an agonising death.

Rapid boominq breeding farms and shootings

For trophy hunting in South Africa, lions are bred on more than 190 farms, usually raised by hand and accustomed to humans. In the last six years, the number of farm lions has risen by 250 percent. Today, more than 6,000 captive animals are threatened with the same gruesome fate – more than ever before.

First a pet …

Many of the young animals must then serve as tourist attractions where people can pet them, take photos with them and take them for walks. Unwitting tourists visit these farms and pay money to look at or touch young lion cubs. That they are thereby supporting a horrific industry, an industry that even many hunting associations reject as being unethical, is something that most of the tourists don’t know.

… then shot

The lions reach the trophy age after four to seven years and are then offered to the hunters for shooting. In many cases the ‘hunting’ isn’t carried out on the same farm that the animal was bred at. Instead the lions are transported to other areas and shot there.

Danger for wild lions

The supporters of Canned Hunting claim that Canned Hunting serves to protect the species. In fact the opposite is the case: The increasing number of trophy hunting tours on offer is increasing the pressure on the lion populations living in the wild. An increasing number of animals are captured in the wild for breeding purposes

Please sign Gabo’s Petition, I will personally hand it to the government this summer when I will be working on a conservation project on South African this year..

https://www.change.org/p/south-african-government-ban-canned-hunting?recruiter=69500809&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=Search%3ESAP%3EUK%3ENonBrand%3EExact&fbclid=IwAR21MVjv3Nq3blq4zDwyQOKoIDovG6fwvoyhXZ9KCYeRuJtjcZHbGQS8kao

Urgent: Your Help is Needed…Please Share

Trophy Hunters think we are bullying them….

Trophy Hunters are not Conservationist

The Mind of Trophy Hunters are Seriously Flawed

Sign Petition: Children Are Being Forced to Trophy-Hunt Endangered Animals, and Then Show Off in Photos. Stop This

Photo from the African Hunt Lodge website.

thepetitionsite.com
by: The Care2 Petitions Team

If you thought trophy hunting was bad, then you’re not going to like the most recent news.

We all know by now that various callous, money-hungry companies exist that cater to rich international tourists who want to feel powerful by murdering something innocent and wild. Charging tens of thousands of dollars, these groups arrange for guns, outings, and the cold-blooded deaths of specific desired animals.

But one company — Africa Hunt Lodge in South Africa — takes it a step further. They also arrange these trophy hunts for children.

They even brag about it on their website: “We can accommodate hunters of any age and experience level. We love to have 1st time hunters join us. We take great pride in helping to educate children and beginner hunters about the responsibilities of hunting.” Their website also features dozens of photos of murdered animals, while waxing eloquent about all the “beautiful animals you will be able to hunt!”

Some of the most popular “hunting packages” include tours designed to maim and kill baboons and vervet monkeys, as they are cheaper to slaughter than, say, a lion. Africa Hunt Lodge charges £81 ($101 USD) to help you violently assault a vervet monkey and take its lifeless body home as a trophy.

In fact, one recent trophy hunting tourist in South Africa brought along their young child, Nolan, on one such vervet monkey hunt. Their child successfully slaughtered the small animal, a relative of humans. Then, they snapped a disgusting photo: little Nolan, kneeling next to his “prize,” grinning and holding up his dead and bloodied monkey by its ears as though it were a toy.

This is a hideous message to be sending to any child — suggesting that murder and conquest are positive things to strive for.

In recent years, Old World primate populations have plummeted from being in the millions to now, just 250,000 individuals. But these types of hunts are still legal until international law.

These perverse trophy hunts designed for children must end now. Sign the petition!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/709/604/701/?TAP=1732

 

Conservation Scientists and Specialists Oppose Ban on Hunting Trophy Imports

africasustainableconservation.comTrophy hunting is under pressure: There are high-profile campaigns to ban it, and several governments have legislated against it (1). In the United States, the CECIL Act (2) would prohibit lion and elephant trophy imports from Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe and restrict imports of species listed as threatened or endangered on the Endangered Species Act. Australia, the Netherlands, and France have also restricted trophy imports (1), and the United Kingdom is under pressure to follow. Calls for hunting bans usually cite conservation concerns. However, there is compelling evidence that banning trophy hunting would negatively affect conservation.In African trophy hunting countries, more land has been conserved under trophy hunting than under national parks (3), and ending trophy hunting risks land conversion and biodiversity loss (4). Poorly managed trophy hunting can cause local population declines (5), but unless better land-use alternatives exist, hunting reforms—which have proved effective (6)—should be prioritized over bans (7). Positive population impacts of well-regulated hunting have been demonstrated for many species, including rhinos, markhor, argali, bighorn sheep, and many African ungulates (7).Embedded ImageBanning trophy hunting can have unintended consequences for species such as lions.”PHOTO: KEN SILLS”Trophy hunting can also provide income for marginalized and impoverished rural communities (7). Viable alternatives are often lacking; opponents of hunting promote the substitution of photo-tourism, but many hunting areas are too remote or unappealing to attract sufficient visitors (8). Species such as lions fare worst in areas without photo-tourism or trophy hunting (9), where unregulated killing can be far more prevalent than in hunting zones, with serious repercussions for conservation and animal welfare (10). Focusing on trophy hunting also distracts attention from the major threats to wildlife.The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), a global conservation authority, clearly concludes that “with effective governance and management trophy hunting can and does have positive impacts” on conservation and local livelihoods (7). Although there is considerable room for improvement, including in governance, management, and transparency of funding flows and community benefits (11), the IUCN calls for multiple steps to be taken before decisions are made that restrict or end trophy hunting programs (7). Crucially, as African countries call for a “New Deal” for rural communities (12) that allows them to achieve the self-determination to sustainably manage wildlife and reduce poverty, it is incumbent on the international community not to undermine that. Some people find trophy hunting repugnant (including many of us), but conservation policy that is not based on science threatens habitat and biodiversity and risks disempowering and impoverishing rural communities.Supplementary Materials for
Trophy hunting bans imperil biodiversity
Amy Dickman, Rosie Cooney, Paul J. Johnson*, Maxi Pia Louis, Dilys Roe,
and 128 signatories
*Corresponding author. Email: paul.johnson@zoo.ox.ac.uk
Published 30 August 2019, Science 365, 874 (2019)
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaz0735Full list of signatories for “Trophy hunting bans imperil biodiversity” by Amy Dickman, Rosie
Cooney, Paul J. Johnson, Maxi Pia Louis, Dilys Roe
1. Aaron Nicholas, Wildlife Conservation Society, Tanzania
2. Adam G. Hart, University of Gloucestershire, UK
3. Agostinho Jorge, Niassa Carnivore Project, Mozambique
4. Alayne Cotterill, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
5. Alexandra Zimmerman, Chair, IUCN SSC Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force
6. Amy Hinks, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford
7. Amy Hinsley, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
8. Ana Grau, Ruaha Carnivore Project, Tanzania
9. Andrew Jacobson, Catawba College Salisbury, NC 28144 USA.
10. Andrew James Hearn, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University
of Oxford, UK
11. Andrew Parker, Vice President of Strategy & Programs, Africa Division, Conservation
International
12. Angus Middleton, Executive Director, Namibia Nature Foundation, Namibia
13. Arash Ghoddousi, Humboldt-University Berlin, Germany
14. Asser Ndjiteuza, %Khaodi//Hoas Conservancy Chairperson, Namibia
15. Axel Moehrenschlager, Chair, IUCN Species Survival Commission Conservation Translocation
Specialist Group, and Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoological Society, Calgary,
Alberta, Canada
16. BenJee Cascio, Ruaha Carnivore Project, Tanzania
17. Brian Child, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Center for Africa Studies,
University of Florida, USA
18. Byron Du Preez, Jesus College, University of Oxford, UK
19. Catherine E. Semcer, Research Fellow, Property and Environment Research Center, USA
20. Charles Jones Nsonkali, OKANI, Cameroon
21. Charles Jonga, Director, CAMPFIRE Association, Zimbabwe
22. Charlotte Searle, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
23. Chris Brown, Namibian Chamber of Environment, representing a membership of 65 Namibian
environmental NGOs
24. Colleen Begg, Director, Niassa Carnivore Project, Mozambique
25. Cory Whitney, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn, Germany
26. Craig Packer, Director, Lion Research Center, University of Minnesota, USA
27. Damian Bell, Honeyguide, Tanzania
28. Dan Challender, Oxford Martin Fellow, Oxford Martin Programme on the Illegal Wildlife Trade,
Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
29. David Mallon, Co-Chair, IUCN Species Survival Commission, Antelope Specialist Group;
Manchester Metropolitan University, UK30. Debbie Peake, Botswana Coalition for Conservation, Ngamiland Council of Non-Governmental
Organisations and Botswana Wildlife Producers Association
31. Diogo Veríssimo, Department of Zoology and Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, UK
& Institue for Conservation and Research, San Diego Zoo, USA
32. Dominik T. Bauer, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
33. Duan Biggs, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
34. Ed Sayer, Country Director & Programme Manager, Frankfurt Zoological Society Zambia
35. Edson Gandiwa, School of Wildlife, Ecology and Conservation, Chinhoyi University of
Technology, Zimbabwe
36. EJ Milner-Gulland, Director, Interdisciplinary Centre for Conservation Science, Department of
Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
37. Elizabeth L. Bennett, Vice President, Species Conservation, Wildlife Conservation Society, USA
38. Enrico Di Minin, Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, Finland
39. Eric Xaweb, Tsiseb Conservancy Manager, Namibia
40. Gail Potgieter, Felines Communication and Conservation Consultants, Namibia
41. George Wambura, CEO – Community Wildlife Management Areas Consortium (CWMAC),
Tanzania
42. Gerhard R Damm, Conservation Frontlines Foundation
43. Ghulam Mohd Malikyar, Environmental Analyst, Afghanistan
44. Haibin Wang, Ph.D., China Wildlife Conservation Association
45. Hans de Iongh, Leo Foundation
46. Harriet T. Davies-Mostert, Endangered Wildlife Trust, South Africa and Mammal Research
Institute, University of Pretoria, South Africa
47. Himla Angula, NACSO Institutional Support Coordinator, Namibia
48. Hollie Booth, University of Oxford, UK
49. Holly Dublin, Member, IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group
50. Hongjie Wang, Vice President, China Wildlife Conservation Association
51. Hugo van der Westhuizen, Gonarezhou Conservation Trust, Zimbabwe
52. Isla Duporge, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
53. James Stevens, Member, IUCN SSC Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force
54. Janet Matoka, Assistant Director, Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation,
Namibia
55. Janusz Sielicki, Vicepresident, International Association for Falconry and Conservation of Birds
of Prey
56. Jenny Anne Glikman, Member, IUCN SSC Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force
57. Jeremy Cusack, Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, UK
58. John Kasaona, Executive Director, Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation,
Namibia
59. Juan Herrero, Co-chair, IUCN SSC Caprinae Specialist Group; and Technical School, University
of Saragossa, Spain
60. Judie Melikie, Huab Conservancy Chairperson, Namibia
61. Julia Jones, University of Bangor, UK62. Julian Fennessy, Director, Giraffe Conservation Foundation, Namibia
63. Juliette Claire Young, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK
64. Julius G. Bright Ross, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University
of Oxford, UK
65. Justin Brashares, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley,
USA
66. Justin Seymour-Smith, Trans-Kalahari Predator Programme, Wildlife Conservation Research
Unit, University of Oxford, UK
67. Karen Laurenson, Interim Director, Africa Department, Frankfurt Zoological Society
68. Keith Somerville, Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, University of Kent, UK
69. Khalil Karimov, Tajikistan Snow Leopard Programme Field Scientist; Central Asia Regional
Chair, IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group
70. Kim S Jacobsen, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
71. Korsh Ararat, Nature Iraq/University of Sulaimani, Iraq
72. Laura Perry, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford,
UK
73. Lisanne Petracca, Conservation Scientist, Panthera, USA
74. Liz Rihoy, Director, Resource Africa UK
75. Lovemore Sibanda, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
76. Luke Dollar, Department of Environment & Sustainability, Catawba College Salisbury, NC
28144 USA
77. Luke Hunter, Executive Director, Big Cats Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, USA
78. Marco Festa-Bianchet, Département de biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada
79. Marco Pani, Member, IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group
80. Marion Valeix, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Centre National de la Recherche
Scientifique (CNRS), Université de Lyon, France
81. Mark Stanley-Price, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
82. Mathew Bukhi Mabele, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of
Dodoma, Tanzania
83. Matthew Becker, CEO, Zambian Carnivore Programme, Zambia
84. Matthew Wijers, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
85. Michael Archer, PANGEA Research Center, School of Biological, Earth & Environmental
Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
86. Michael ‘t Sas-Rolfes, School of Geography and the Environment and Oxford Martin School,
University of Oxford, UK
87. Mike Hoffmann, Head, Global Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, UK
88. Mike Knight, Chair, IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group
89. Mohammad Farhadinia, Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, UK
90. Moses Selebatso, Wildlife Ecologist, Kalahari Research and Conservation, Botswana
91. Munavvar Alidodov, President, Association of Nature Conservation Organisations of Tajikistan92. Nafeesa Esmail, Oxford Martin School & Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
93. Niall Hammond, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
94. Niki Rust, School of Natural & Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, UK
95. Nils Bunnefeld, Professor in Conservation Science, Biological and Environmental Sciences,
University of Stirling, UK
96. Nyambe Nyambe, Executive Director, Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area
97. Paolo Strampelli, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
98. Paolo Wilfred, Department of Life Sciences, Open University of Tanzania
99. Peadar Brehony, University of Cambridge, UK
100. Pete Coppolillo, Executive Director, Working Dogs for Conservation, USA
101. Peter Coals, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK; School of Animal, Plant & Environmental Science, University of the Witwatersrand,
Johannesburg, South Africa
102. Peter Tyrrell, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University
of Oxford, UK
103. Peyton West, Executive Director, Frankfurt Zoological Society U.S.
104. Philippe Chardonnet, Co-Chair, IUCN Species Survival Commission, Antelope Specialist
Group
105. Rebecca Klein, Cheetah Conservation Botswana
106. Richard W. S. Fynn, Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana
107. Rob Morley, Flora Fauna & Man
108. Robert Kenward, Chair for Sustainable Use and Management of Ecosystems in IUCN
Commission on Ecosystem Management
109. Robert Thomson, Felines Communication and Conservation Consultants, Namibia
110. Robin Sharp, retired Director of Wildlife and Countryside, UK Department of
Environment
111. Rodgers Lubilo, Chairperson, Zambia Community-Based Natural Resources
Management (CBNRM) Forum
112. Rosalie Iileka, Namibia Nature Foundation
113. Ruth Feber, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of
Oxford, UK
114. Sándor Csányi, Institute for Wildlife Conservation, Szent István University, Hungary
115. Sandro Lovari, Co-Chair, IUCN Caprinae Specialist Group; and Maremma Natural
History Museum, Grosseto, Italy
116. Sarah Durant, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, UK
117. Shadrach Mwaba, Zambian Carnivore Programme and Wildlife Conservation Research
Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
118. Simon Hedges, Asian Arks; Lao PDR; IUCN SSC Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force
119. Simon Pooley, Department of Geography, Birkbeck University of London, UK
120. Stefan Michel, IUCN Caprinae Specialist Group, IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods
Specialist Group
121. Stein Katupa, Kunene Conservancy Regional Association Secretary, Namibia
122. Stephen Redpath, University of Aberdeen, UK123. Sugoto Roy, Member, IUCN SSC Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force
124. Teo Ntinda, Namibia Development Trust, Namibia
125. Tim Tear, Executive Director, Africa Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, USA
126. Vanessa M Adams, Discipline of Geography and Spatial Sciences, University of
Tasmania, Australia
127. Vernon Booth, Member, IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group
128. Wei Jl, Member, IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Grouphttps://africasustainableconservation.com/2019/08/30/conservation-scientists-and-specialists-oppose-ban-on-hunting-trophy-imports/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

End Trophy Hunting of Vulnerable Puffins – ForceChange

The puffin is rapidly moving towards extinction, in part due to trophy hunting. Tours, advertised primary to British hunters, boast that one hunter can kill up to 100 puffins at a time. Ban importation of these vulnerable birds as trophies.

Source: End Trophy Hunting of Vulnerable Puffins – ForceChange

PETITION: Stop ‘Canned Hunts’ of Factory-Farmed Animals Killed for Trophies in S Africa

ladyfreethinker.org

PETITION TARGET: SA Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries, Barbara Creecy

Canned hunting is a grotesque industry in which hunters pay to kill endangered creatures confined to fenced-in enclosures with no way of escape. Facilities force-breed animals, steal young from their mothers, raise them in appalling conditions and profit from hunters who kill the animals for fun.

This abhorrent practice exploits animals and abuses them from the day they are born to the day they are slaughtered by paying killers.

Raised in factory farms, these animals spend most of their lives in tiny, crowded cages, often without water or adequate nutrition. Malnourished and deprived of natural behaviors, their short lives end when they are put into a fenced area to be shot with a crossbow or shotgun. Animals may be baited or drugged to make them an easy target.

Lions are big business in this industry, particularly in South Africa. Cubs as young as three days old are stolen from their mothers, bottle-fed and used in fake “sanctuaries,” where naïve volunteers pay to care for them under the pretense of conservation. Lion walks and lion petting are further avenues to profit from their suffering.

In reality, these beautiful creatures are forced to live in filthy conditions and often fall ill due to poor nutrition and stress. Once older, they are violated through forced impregnation and eventually killed for paid ‘hunts’ — if they survive that long. Many also suffer severe illnesses from inbreeding.

South Africa has around 200 lion breeding facilities containing an estimated 6000 big cats. There are three times more lions in captivity in South Africa than in the wild. Tigers and other exotic animals also fall victim to this ruthless trade.

Canned hunting does not benefit conservation. It is purely a money-making endeavor that supports abusing and murdering majestic animals for a quick thrill.

Sign this petition urging South Africa’s Minister of Environment, Forestry, and Fisheries Barbara Creecy to call for a ban on all canned and captive hunting in South Africa, saving thousands of animals from needless torture and cowardly slaughter.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-stop-cruel-canned-hunting-of-factory-farmed-exotic-animals/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

BREAKING: Popular Lion Killed by Hunters on World Lion Day, in Zimbabwe

sapeople.com
Jenni Baxter

A popular male lion, which had been photographed frequently by hundreds of visitors to Hwange National Park in west Zimbabwe, was shot dead by hunters this last weekend on World Lion Day (10 August).
Male lion Seduli has been shot dead by hunters in Zimbabwe. Photo: Drew Abrahamson

In a heartbreaking message on social media on Wednesday evening, Captured in Africa (CIA) Foundation founder Drew Abrahamson announced the devastating news, which she had found out today.

The lion was apparently on the outskirts of the park. CIA had regularly published posts about Seduli and another male lion, Mopane, who had been photographed together by many international safari visitors over the past few years.

Abrahamson said: “Despite our previous attempts as a community online to prevent these two males from being hunted, Seduli has unnecessarily lost his life at the hands of hunters and Mopani now roams the wilds without his companion.”

She posted two photos – one of Seduli, and another showing other Hwange male lions who have been killed in this region over the past decade. One of the most famous lions to be killed was one named Cecil in 2015.

Other Hwange male lions killed by hunters in the past decade. Photo: Drew Abrahamson

“Does this number of male lions shot over 10 years in one region appear sustainable to you given that lion populations have declined across Africa by 43% in the last 25 years?

“Add to this that with each of these males taken out of a pride, came the loss of either lionesses and cubs dying in the change-over or conflict it caused.

“Dispersal of youngsters fleeing into external areas creating potential human-wildlife conflict issues with communities living on the borders of the park is not uncommon and is proven in some cases to be as a direct result of these pride males being taken out by hunters,” said Abrahamson.

Supporters of hunting claim that the sport’s focus is on sustainability, and that the areas in which hunting takes place are not suitable for photographic safaris and therefore by using them for hunting it generates revenue to maintain these wild habitats.

“But how are you protecting the wildlife if you are taking out males from prides who frequent the National Park?” asks Abrahamson.

It’s time, she says, for an independent scientific study on the sustainability of the numbers taken from this region, and the impact these losses are having on the lion pride dynamics, as well as the knock-on affect to communities in these areas.

According to Abrahamson, these are healthy lions being taken out of the gene pool, and lions which are still breeding and actively part of a healthy pride. These lions traverse the park and viable protected photographic areas. She says their loss contradicts the hunters’ philosophies.

Abrahamson asked that readers “share this far and wide to raise awareness of the continued unsustainable hunting taking place on the outskirts of Hwange, and to raise a call for the photographic operators and stakeholders in dialogue with Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Management Authority to address the issue of continued losses of lions known to and photographed by the hundreds of visitors who pay to visit Zimbabwe annually.”

https://www.sapeople.com/2019/08/14/breaking-popular-lion-seduli-killed-by-hunters-on-world-lion-day-in-zimbabwe/amp/

Supermarket Owners Lose Their Store After Vile Trophy Hunting Photos Go Viral

ladyfreethinker.org
Image Credit: Facebook

A French couple who posed with the dead animals they’d slaughtered during a trophy hunt in Africa have lost their jobs after the grotesque pictures were posted on social media, causing public outrage.

Jacques and Martine Alboud (pictured above, left and right), who ran a branch of the Super U co-operative supermarket in L’Arbresle, eastern France, were pictured standing over the bodies of a number of lifeless animals — including a zebra, lion, leopard and hippopotamus — that they had ruthlessly killed during safaris in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and Tanzania in 2014 and 2015.

After the images went viral on Twitter and there were calls on Facebook for customers to boycott the store, last week the supermarket group announced that the couple had given up their franchise with immediate effect.

“In the face of condemnation provoked by these actions at the heart of the co-operative and the legitimate public feeling, the store managers have decided to quit immediately the brand and their l’Arbresle store,” Super U said in a statement, adding that it did not condone safari hunting and that the couple’s actions were “in total opposition with the values defended by us.”

The French animal rights organization 30 Millions d’Amis commented that this story was reminiscent of the death of Cecil the lion — who was murdered in Zimbabwe in 2015 by an American dentist and hunter, Walter Palmer — that sparked widespread condemnation. It says that around 8,000 lions have been reared specifically to be hunted down and killed in the last decade in South Africa, and that there has been a 90% fall in the lion population over a century. “The species could disappear by 2050,” it adds.

The couple have so far declined to comment on their actions.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/supermarket-owners-lose-their-store-after-vile-trophy-hunting-photos-go-viral/

GOVE explains why he is launching drive to stamp out big-game hunters

dailymail.com

By Michael Gove, Secretary Of State For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs For The Daily Mail 21:04 14 Jul 2019, updated 22:01 14 Jul 2019

During the passionate debates inspired by Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species, one churchman sceptical of evolution asked his contemporaries, ‘are we the relatives of apes or angels?’

We know now, of course, that we are indeed related genetically to our primate cousins. Indeed, more than that, we are connected by the process of evolution to all the other species with which we share this planet.

That knowledge should incline us to treat animals with thought and care. Not least because we know they are, like us, sentient beings who can experience fear and pain alongside contentment and comfort. If we abuse and mistreat animals we are diminishing our own humanity. To accord them the dignity they deserve is to be true to what Abraham Lincoln called ‘the better angels of our nature’.

One of the practices we must look to tackle is the phenomenon called trophy hunting – whereby tourists pay huge sums to kill some of our planet’s most iconic species and then bring home parts of the animal’s corpse to decorate their homes. Pictured: Michael Gove with Tusk Trust rhino art statues outside the Foreign Office

Improving the welfare of animals, both domestic pets and farm livestock, has been one of the missions of this Government. And we have also been determined to do all in our power to protect wildlife from exploitation and cruelty.

That is why we have taken steps to end puppy farming, ban wild animals in circuses, increase sentences for those who abuse animals, protect service animals, invested in higher standards of animal welfare in our farms, installed CCTV in abattoirs to eliminate cruel practices, and will restrict the live export of animals for slaughter when we leave the EU.

We have also introduced one of the toughest bans on ivory sales in the world. But there is still more to do. And one of the practices we must look to tackle is the phenomenon called trophy hunting – whereby tourists pay huge sums to kill some of our planet’s most iconic species and then bring home parts of the animal’s corpse to decorate their homes.

This practice raises profound ethical concerns for me. Trophy hunting involves pursuing another animal in conditions which cause it stress, fear and pain. Trophy hunters do not kill for food, to control pests or to protect other species. For them it is a form of entertainment.

This practice raises profound ethical concerns for me. Trophy hunting involves pursuing another animal in conditions which cause it stress, fear and pain. Trophy hunters do not kill for food, to control pests or to protect other species. For them it is a form of entertainment. Pictured: Outrage – Hunter Larysa Switlyk (far right) posted this picture after shooting an alligator

And what often makes this practice worse is when these hunters glory in the animal’s death with pictures of its slaughtered body by their side on social media. But we must ensure we proceed on the basis of evidence and respect for others. There are thoughtful voices and concerned organisations who do make the case for some measure of ‘conservation hunting’ as a way of bringing income into countries with rich wildlife populations but poor economies.

They argue that commercial hunting provides a strong incentive for those nations to manage and safeguard their wildlife populations. It is said that without income from hunting, the countries would be under pressure to replace wildlife-rich habitats with farmland or other economically productive land uses – which would mean the precious species were without a home. And many say the money raised can be used to safeguard other valuable natural resources from exploitation.

I appreciate the sincerity with which those arguments are made. And I recognise that there must always be, from time to time, the culling of some species to keep nature in balance and the control of predators to protect other species.

And what often makes this practice worse is when these hunters glory in the animal’s death with pictures of its slaughtered body by their side on social media. But we must ensure we proceed on the basis of evidence and respect for others. Pictured: Gove (right) and Zac Goldsmith with Tusk Trust rhino art statues outside the Foreign Office

But I find it hard to see how those justifications can be used to defend those who ‘hunt’ animals which have been bred in captivity for the specific purpose of dying for others’ entertainment. We need to act to stop this sort of exploitation, and because we need to establish just how defensible the arguments for ‘conservation hunting’ are, I plan to issue a call for evidence on trophy hunting overall.

I want to know whether countries with rich wildlife populations couldn’t make just as much, if not more, income from wildlife tourism than from hunting. I want to establish what we can learn from other nations, such as Australia and the Netherlands, which have much tighter restrictions on importing these ‘trophies’.

I hope that as we gather the evidence, we also gather the momentum for action.

And we ensure that this Parliament is remembered for what we did for nature.

Michael Gove aims to crackdown on big-game hunters by banning them from bringing trophies from their kills back to the UK

by Claire Ellicott and Jack Doyle

Michael Gove will take the first steps towards banning imports from trophy hunting, he tells the Mail today.

The Environment Secretary will issue a call for evidence to decide whether to outlaw hunters bringing the souvenirs into the country.

He will also consult on what the UK can do to end its role in the rearing of animals in fenced reserves where they are shot by trophy hunters.

Trophy hunting is the shooting of certain animals – usually big game such as rhinos, elephants, lions, pumas and bears – for pleasure.

The trophy is any part of the animal – its head, skin or any other body part – that the hunter keeps as a souvenir.

Mr Gove said there was an important debate about whether trophy hunting in poorer countries could be used to enhance their economies.

But he added that it was important to explore whether these countries would not benefit more from wildlife tourism.

He also criticised the practice of ‘lion canning’ which involves thousands of lions in South Africa being bred and kept in fenced areas to be shot by wealthy travellers.

He said: ‘I find it hard to see how those justifications can be used to defend those who ‘hunt’ animals, who have been bred in captivity for the specific purpose of dying for others’ entertainment.’

Trophy hunting is rife in certain parts of the world, with 1.7 million trophies legally traded between 2004 and 2014. About 200,000 were from threatened species.

Of those, 2,500 were brought home by British hunters, including hundreds of heads, feet, tails, hides, tusks and horns from some of the most endangered species, including rhinos and elephants.

Lions were hit with the biggest increase in trophy hunting among the big five – despite their numbers decreasing by 43 per cent between 1993 and 2014.

Quite often, hunters cause outrage by showing off their prizes in pictures on social media.

And not all have to travel to far-flung plains to satisfy their blood lust.

Last year, a self-styled ‘Hardcore Huntress’ proudly posted pictures of herself beside the carcasses of sheep and goats she had shot on a trip to Scotland.

American television host Larysa Switlyk had been on a two-week hunting trip to Islay, a remote Scottish island, when she tweeted the images.

The 33-year-old labelled one picture of a dead goat ‘such fun’, prompting a furious online backlash.

Mr Gove has already banned ivory to prevent its trade in the UK and protect threatened species.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7246745/amp/MICHAEL-GOVE-explains-launching-drive-stamp-big-game-hunters.html?__twitter_impression=true

We Have Confirmation on The Trophy Hunter And Hunting Safari Responsible For Voortrekker’s Death

inki-mandt2320194256.jpgIMG_20190702_013338IMG_20190702_013310IMG_20190702_013303

Iconic desert-adapted elephant ‘Voortrekker’ killed by trophy hunter in Namibia – Africa Geographic

africageographic.com

Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant before his tusks snapped off © Ingrid Mandt

In yet another blow to big elephant genes, the iconic desert-adapted elephant bull known by millions of fans worldwide as ‘Voortrekker’ was killed by a trophy hunter after being declared a ‘problem-animal’ by Namibian authorities. The surgical removal of Africa’s big-gene animals by trophy hunters continues, and Namibia’s desert-adapted elephants now rely on a small population of mature bulls after two were killed in 2016.

In their announcement on Facebook, Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) said “the elephant bull concerned was put down after it was declared a problem. The animal alongside others have been destroying properties and infrastructure in the area of Omatjete.” On the issue of whether this bull was the legendary Voortrekker, MET responded to Facebook questions by refusing to name the hunted elephant. Several conservation charities have confirmed that the bull in question is indeed Voortrekker. ‘Voortrekker’ is Afrikaans for ‘pioneer’.

MET spokesperson Romeo Muyunda Lee advised that the price paid was N$120,000 (+/- US$ 8,500), but it is unclear at this stage whether this was the total price paid or the portion paid to communities.

A study published in Ecology and Evolution in 2016 found not only that the Namibian desert-adapted elephants were different from their savannah cousins, but that their adaptations are also not genetically transferred to the next generation, rather through the passing on of knowledge by mature individuals. Morphological differences, like the adapted elephants’ thinner bodies and wider feet, also distinguish them from typical savannah elephants.

Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant before his tusks snapped off © Ingrid Mandt

WAS THE WRONG ELEPHANT KILLED?

A Facebook post, written by Informante reporter Niël Terblanché, asks whether it was in fact Voortrekker who was causing problems for inhabitants of the Omatjete area.

Terblanché reports that an urgent letter addressed to MET official Christoph Munwela by management of conservancies neighbouring the Ohungo Conservancy in the area of Omatjete to prevent the killing of Voortrekker, suggests that a flagrant error was made when the hunting license was issued. The letter points out that Voortrekker is in fact not part of the herd that has been bothering the community of the Ohungu Conservancy in the area of Omatjete.

MET responded publically that “The communities who objected to the hunt were not affected by the elephants as the elephants were mainly causing problems in the Omatjete area.”

Prior to the hunt, the management committees of the Otjimboyo, Sorris Sorris and Tsiseb conservancies asked Munwela for a meeting to discuss ways to avoid the killing of Voortrekker, one of the oldest living bull elephants in Namibia. Their letter said: “Our people are in general accepting of the elephants’ presence and want them to remain in the area … it is our belief that the shooting of elephants does not solve the problem. In fact, this only makes it worse. We want to keep our communities safe and to do this we need to ensure that our elephants are calm and relaxed when entering villages. It is our belief that the shooting of elephants or scaring them off with gunshots, screaming or chasing them off results in aggressive animals and this cannot be tolerated.”

ELEPHANT DAMAGE

MET published photographs that they feel illustrates damage caused to property and infrastructure by Voortrekker, to justify the issue of the hunting license. Some of the images appear to show poorly neglected fences and other infrastructure, but some easily-replaced water pipes and tanks do appear to reflect damage.

Damage to infrastructure by Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant, as per MET © MET

VOORTREKKER WAS PREVIOUSLY SAVED FROM TROPHY HUNTERS

In 2008 Voortrekker fans donated US$12 000 to MET in an effort to save him from professional hunters who had their eyes on his trophy tusks. At the time, six hunting permits were issued and only Voortrekker was saved from trophy hunter guns – the remaining five elephants were killed.

According to Johannes Haasbroek of Elephant Human Relations Aid, in the period since then, “the hunting outfitters and their sick clients conspired to get this gentle giant declared a problem to justify a hunt”. He went on to say: “We remember Voortrekker as an incredibly gentle, peaceful and magnificent elephant. His presence has often calmed other inexperienced elephants around him. He was known locally as the ‘Old Man’, that was always welcome because he never caused any problems or induced fear.”

Voortrekker the desert-adapted elephant after his tusks snapped off. This photo was taken 7 weeks before his death © Aschi Widmer

VOORTREKKER’S STORY

According to respected safari guide Alan McSmith, Voortrekker was a pioneer elephant for the desert-adapted elephant population in the Ugab and Huab rivers region. This giant elephant was one of the first to venture back to the region after populations were decimated during the turbulent warfare years in southern Africa. A small group of these uniquely desert-adapted elephants took refuge during the war in the remote and desolate gorges of Kaokaland in the north.

Says McSmith: “Voortrekker, one of the bulls to trek north during the conflict years, returned home in the early 2000’s, commencing a relay of south-bound expeditions, penetrating deeper and deeper into the dry and uncertain landscape before commencing with an epic traverse through to the relative bounty of the Ugab River. It was a marathon across arid plains and ancient craters that would ultimately redefine what we know of elephant endurance, intuition and behaviour. Just how he navigated, or knew where to find water, is anyone’s guess. For over two successive summer seasons he returned north to Kaokaland, returning each time to the Ugab with a small family unit in tow. An elephant patriarch. These elephants are still resident in the region and have formed the nucleus of three distinct breeding herds, making the Ugab/Huab Rivers perhaps the most viable desert elephant habitats in the world. Voortrekker continues as the Godfather, a true legend of the Ugab. His ancestral knowledge has been passed down to a new generation of desert dwellers. What a legacy! For me, all of this addresses one of the most crucial fallacies of elephant conservation, trophy hunting, and the notion of sustainable consumption: that older bulls have no value to an elephant community and can be hunted under the banner of ecological benefit.”

A Facebook page has been set up to ‘actively pursue the truth behind the killing of Voortrekker, the Iconic Desert Elephant, and then decide on appropriate action’

https://africageographic.com/blog/iconic-desert-adapted-elephant-voortrekker-killed-by-trophy-hunter-in-namibia/

Stop Selling Wildlife for Relief Funds

Over 1,000 wild animals will be auctioned off in exchange for emergency relief funds. Not only is selling wildlife like property inhumane, but the measure is also counterproductive as it risks the lives of many animals to save others. Help stop these cruel auctions as soon as possible.

Source: Stop Selling Wildlife for Relief Funds

PETITION: Stop Trophy Hunters from Driving Giraffes Extinct

ladyfreethinker.org
Image Credit: Facebook – Tess Talley

PETITION TARGET: US Fish and Wildlife Service

Lying crumpled on the dusty ground, long legs tangled underneath them and graceful necks wilting into the dirt as trophy hunters raise their arms in victory.

Photo after photo highlights the tragic slaughter of these magnificent giraffes, hunted by the thousands only to be turned into trinkets in America.

With numbers estimated to have fallen by 30 percent since the 1980s, this incredible species is disappearing right before our eyes. Between 2006 and 2015, 40,000 giraffe parts were legally imported into the US.

Thanks to pressure from conservation groups, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is now finally considering listing giraffes as endangered.

Doing so would ensure that restrictions are placed on their import into the country, and conservation efforts could be supported with federal funding.

Only around 110,000 giraffes are left in the wild. Already struggling under the assault of habitat loss and poaching, these beautiful animals deserve to be protected from trophy hunters.

Sign the petition urging the USFWS to add giraffes to the Endangered Species List, so trophy hunters no longer get a free pass to gun down one of the planet’s most unique animals.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-stop-trophy-hunters-from-driving-giraffes-extinct/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Sign Petition: This Jerk Shot a Lion While It Was Sleeping and Celebrated as It Slowly Died on Video

thepetitionsite.com

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Zimbabwe’s Minister of Environment, Water, and Climate

For years, Guy Gorney, 64, of Manhattan, Illinois got away with the perfect crime. It was premeditated, plotted down to the very minute and, with the help of another man, he walked up to his prey, aimed and pulled the trigger. His victim stood little chance, he was unaware he was even being stalked. In fact, he was sleeping when the first bullet entered his body, jolting him awake with burning pain. Seconds later he was dead after Guy shot him twice more.

But now that video evidence has come to light and made its way to the internet, everyone knows exactly what Guy did, and what type of person he is — a coward and a killer. Guy’s victim was an African lion, laying down, basking under the African sun when he and his guide took aim and murdered the feline.

In the clip, Guy’s guide whispers instructions on how best to kill the sleeping beast and then the two celebrate as the lion — that was alive just minutes before — slowly extinguishes.

The video has now gone viral and people all over the world are shocked at what this “hunter” did. But Guy couldn’t care at all. In an interview, he showed no remorse. He bragged about having killed at least 70 other big game animals including elephant, lion, leopard, rhino, and buffalo. One might ask how many of those poor creatures were also sleeping.

There really is nothing more pathetic than a tiny man with a big gun who bases his manhood on his ability to shoot animals.

Is this the type of “hunting” Zimbabwe allows in their country? Where wealthy men pay large sums of money to kill defenseless animals? Is this considered “sportsmanship” and good for conservation? People who behave in such despicable ways, don’t deserve to own guns, and they definitely shouldn’t be allowed to travel and kill animals willy nilly just to stroke their ego.

Zimbabwe should make an example of Gorney’s deplorable behavior and permanently ban him from hunting within their country. Sign the petition if you agree.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/894/706/592/this-jerk-shot-a-lion-while-it-was-sleeping-and-celebrated-as-it-slowly-died-on-video/?TAP=1007&cid=causes_petition_postinfo

Sign Petition: Bill Honoring Cecil the Lion Will Protect Wildlife from Trophy Hunters

thepetitionsite.com

When an American trophy hunter killed a beloved lion known as Cecil in 2015, the backlash was swift, but the sad reality is that he is hardly alone and imperiled species continue to be put at risk by poaching and trophy hunting – even Cecil’s own son, Xanda, met a similar fate just two years later.

Now, however, there’s a chance to change the way things are done with the Conserving Ecosystems by Ceasing the Importation of Large Animal Trophies Act (CECIL Act), which was just reintroduced by Rep. Raúl Grijalva.

This legislation would protect wildlife from trophy hunting in a few different ways; It will amend the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to ban the unpermitted take or trade of species proposed for listing, which would mean they’re treated like they already have protection, and it would increase transparency by requiring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to publish permit import applications and hold a public comment period before issuing permit.

It would also ban imports of elephant and lion trophies from countries including Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Zambia, where both of these species have experienced severe population declines.

Lastly, it directs the Government Accountability Office to determine whether or not trophy hunting in foreign countries contributes to wildlife conservation, and recommend reforms for the industry, and it will shut down the International Wildlife Conservation Council, a forum created by the Trump administration to promote international trophy hunting.

Passing this legislation will ultimately help imperiled species who are in need of greater protection from further exploitation by trophy hunters and the wildlife trade.

Please sign and share this petition urging members of Congress to protect wildlife from trophy hunters by passing the CECIL Act.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/781/265/836/bill-honoring-cecil-the-lion-will-protect-wildlife-from-trophy-hunters/

Sign Petition: President Mokgweetsi Masisi ~ PLEASE Do NOT lift Botswana’s trophy hunting ban!

thepetitionsite.com

A report by cabinet ministers in Botswana has recommended lifting a four-year hunting ban and the introduction of elephant culling.

After months of public meetings and consultations, the report by ministers also recommends the “establishment of elephant meat canning” for pet food.

The number of elephants in Botswana is estimated to be about 130,000, which some argue is too many for the ecosystem – there is increasing conflict between wildlife and people.

But others say the country’s tourism has grown dramatically since the ban came into place and that lifting it would affect the country’s international reputation for conservation.

Shortly after coming into office in April 2018, President Mokgweetsi Masisi asked ministers to review the hunting ban which was implemented by his predecessor Ian Khama in 2014.

Public meetings were held and organisations, communities and individuals were asked to comment.

But many conservationists are against the idea of culling elephants or hunting them and warn there may be a backlash from international tourists.

Tourism is Botswana’s second largest source of foreign income after diamond mining.

With an election due in October, the government has to balance lifting the hunting ban to win rural votes, against the impact it may have on Botswana’s international reputation as a luxury safari destination.

Please sign the petition asking President Mokgweetsi Masisi NOT to lift the ban on trophy hunting.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/503/320/529/president-mokgweetsi-masisi-~-please-do-not-lift-botswanas-trophy-hunting-ban/?TAP=1724

Petition: United Nations BAN Trophy Hunting STOP Poachers END Imports

change.org
Ban International Travel for Hunting.

More than 7,666,830,009 (billion) humans on Earth.

Two-thirds of all animal species are being wiped out.
100,000 elephants killed in the last 3 years. Too many species with once robust populations now reduced to a few thousand, a few hundred or even less. Humans are rapidly destroying the natural world in a blood-soaked pursuit of greed, false-power, ego, ignorance and stupidity.

We are witnessing The Great Animal Extinction, this animal holocaust caused entirely by soulless humans. Tigers, elephants, bears, rhinoceros, wolves, leopards, jaguars, cheetahs, gorillas, orangutans, so many bird species, sea life, are on the brink of extinction, and in a few years will be gone. The list is frighteningly long. Wild animals we love are being massacred at a terrifyingly rapid rate of destruction. Extinction is forever.

EXTINCTION IS FOREVER!

Natural habitat destruction, climate-change and greed are BIG problems, but the worst and most grotesque offenders are vile poachers and mentally diseased trophy hunters. These killers are an appalling example of mental illness. Aided by companies that profit from killing these beautiful creatures. These businesses & clubs are guilty of lobbying governments to let them break the law by importing exotic animals and their body parts and promoting death.
They must be stopped right NOW! It’s nearly too late.

We must act right NOW or we will be living in a world devoid of nature. A dead planet.
There is no time left to save the Earth’s great land, air and sea animals. Actions taken by organizations and individuals have helped but are not enough to stop the massacre. You sir, and we, must all act today, we must tip the balance for the animals!
WE MUST BE THEIR PROTECTORS.

What will the world look like if you do nothing?
Please do something Mr. Secretary-General, we know you have the heart and courage to make changes happen in the world!

Please sign the petition and share it with everyone. It will be hand delivered to the United Nations. I thank you. The animals thank you. Mother Earth thanks you.

https://www.change.org/p/united-nations-ban-trophy-hunting-stop-poachers-end-imports?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=14284765&grid_position=7&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAAVEEQAAAAAAXGXVBn6qrKEyZmJlZDc3Ng%3D%3D

Breaking! American Trophy Hunter Kills Endangered Markhor Goat In Pakistan – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
January 18, 2019

Yet another American trophy hunter proudly standing over an animal that he killed with a boastful smile, clouded eyes, and the misguided conscious of a heartless sub-human who kills innocent animals, including endangered species, for so-called “sport.”
It’s a haunting image, yet tragically familiar.
This week, according to the National Parks of Pakistan Facebook page, one such American hunter, identified by the Pamir Times as Christopher, paid $92,000 for one of four permits allotted by the government of Pakistan to kill a Markhor Goat, the country’s national animal.
Strange, especially since with an estimated population of only 6,000 of these rare goats living in the mountains of Pakistan and Afghanistan, they are supposed to be protected by local and international laws under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.
Christopher reportedly hunted, shot and killed the poor animal in the Chitral Region of Pakistan, then displayed his bloodied so-called “trophy” next to him and his team in photos.
As per the post, “Although hunting the markhor is illegal in Pakistan, the government has introduced a scheme which makes the hunt legal. The scheme is known as trophy hunting.”
A hunting trophy license was issued to Christopher after a “proper auction by Peshawar’s wildlife department.” The highest bidder earns the opportunity to hunt one markhor. Without the appalling human conflict, the endangered animals, also known as screw-horn goats, are estimated to live between 10 to 12 years in the wild.
There are reports that permits were also granted to another American trophy hunter who recently killed his fourth markhor, as well as a tourist from New Zealand.
These hunting expeditions are reportedly monitored by village representatives, as well as government officials to ensure that laws are not broken.
What? Ensure that laws are not broken? Remember the part about the “scheme” called trophy hunting!

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-american-trophy-hunter-kills-enangered-markhor-goat-in-pakistan/

Please Go Plant-Based!

“One Person CAN Make A Difference”

TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,
endangered, hunting,Pakistan,Trophy hunting

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Sign Petition: Save Mufasa the White Lion

Mufasa is a white lion. There are less than 300 of his kind left in the world, of which only 13 exist in the wild.

Mufasa was confiscated by law enforcement and handed to a wildlife rehabilitation center to be cared for. The rehab centre acquired a second cub Suraya, as a companion for Mufasa. Mufasa and Suraya are now three years old and are inseparable.

Nature conservation officials refused permission for Mufasa to be relocated to a sanctuary, who offered to care for both Mufasa and Suraya for their natural lives, free of charge. Instead, the rehab centre was told telephonically that Mufasa will be auctioned to raise funds for the department.

We ask you to sign our petition, asking for both Mufasa and Suraya to be donated to a sanctuary chosen by the people who took care of them for the past three years, to prevent them from being exploited.

The Honourable Member of the Executive Counsil, Department of Rural Environmental and Agricultural Development, North west South Africa.

RELOCATION OF CONFISCATED LION MALE- MUFASA AND FEMALE SURAYA

We hereby petition you to review the decision of the Northwest Department of Rural, Environment and Agricultural development (READ) to refuse a relocation permit for Mufasa and to grant a permit only for the lioness who has been Mufasa’s companion for almost three years.

In terms of an agreement with READ , the rehab centre who cared for the two lions, and carried the costs thereof up to date, has the right to propose a sanctuary, where the lions are to be cared for. Sanwild has agreed to take the lions and to care for them free of charge, and the rehab put in an official proposal for the two to be released in Sanwild. This proposal was refused

The reasons why we believe the existing decision should be overturned are as follows:

1) Mufasa has had a vasectomy and is no longer able to breed and is therefore of no interest to a breeder. The only commercial value he has, is to be hunted in a put and chase hunt, otherwise known as a canned hunt.

2) Mufasa and Suraya have formed an inseparable bond. If the two are separated, both will suffer trauma and stress.

3) You are no doubt aware of the decision reached at COP 17 of CITES in Johannesburg during 2016 and the amendment noted in Conf 17-8 concerning the Disposal of illegally traded and confiscated specimens of CITES-listed species. We specifically draw your attention to the decision tree analysis for captive options, formulated in Resolution Conf. 17.8 – 14. We will not dwell on the contents, but only wish to highlight the first two requirements

a. As a point of departure the confiscating authority should consider releasing the specimen in the wild.

b. If that is not feasible and there is space available in non-commercial captive facility (e.g. a lifetime-care facility) the confiscating authority should execute an agreement and transfer the animal.

4) Mufasa is a text book case of the above and we believe it will be a transgression of both the spirit and the fabric of CITES to treat him otherwise.

5) There are no other suitable sanctuaries in the North west province that are able to care for both lions and the best practical nvironmental option in the interest of the welfare of the two lions are to be released to Sanwild.

We therefor petition you to intervene and to authorise the relocation permit for both lions to Sanwild.

Yours truly

Friends of Mufasa

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/894/071/669/save-mufasa-the-white-lion/