WAN’s Most Wanted: Urgent Help Needed To Identify Sub-Human Who Left A Severely Emaciated Pit Bull To Die; $3,000 Reward – World Animal News

WAN’s Most Wanted: Urgent Help Needed To Identify Sub-Human Who Left A Severely Emaciated Pit Bull To Die; $3,000 Reward
By Lauren Lewis –
October 16, 2018

Another heartbreaking case of animal cruelty has resulted in the death of an innocent pit bull in Syracuse, New York.
The painfully emaciated dog, named Mavis, may tragically be gone but the sub-human that abhorrently abused her remains at large; and now, there is a $3,000 reward for information that results in the perpetrator’s arrest and conviction.
“It is with immense heartbreak and sadness that we let you all know Mavis passed away this morning,” Fetch A Friend Rescue, which was caring for the dog who was at an animal hospital, posted on its Facebook page yesterday. “Her extremely frail state could not handle all that occurred within the last week. She put up a good fight and is now free from her pain.”
On October 12th, Mavis had exploratory surgery after a foreign body was discovered in an ultrasound.

Cuse Pit Crew, which originally rescued Mavis and is offering the reward, also handed out flyers Sunday around Rider Avenue in Syracuse, near where the suffering pit bull was found by a Good Samaritan.
Yesterday, in an updated post on its Facebook page, Cuse Pit Crew updated Mavis’ status sharing that “Sweet Mavis passed away this morning, but we’ll continue to advocate for her. Please share.”
This sad case should also create more awareness about the tragic consequences of abuse and neglect of animals.

“So, if you see something, say something,” said Stephanie Heath, Cuse Pit Crew founder.
Anyone with information about Mavis and her former abuser, or any other tips of suspected animal abuse, should contact the Cuse Pit Crew at (315) 442-5336 or email cusepitcrew@gmail.com.

https://worldanimalnews.com/wans-most-wanted-urgent-help-needed-to-identify-sub-human-who-left-a-severely-emaciated-pit-bull-to-die-3000-reward/

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TAGS:Animal Abuse,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,animal welfare organizations,
New York,Pit Bull

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WAN Talks With Center For Biological Diversity’s, Ileene Anderson, About $15,000 Rewards Offered For Information Regarding The Killing Of 2 Endangered California Condors – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
October 12, 2018
Photo from Scott Frier, USFWS

This week, the Center for Biological Diversity tripled rewards from $5,000.00 to $15,000.00, for information leading to the arrests and convictions of the person or people responsible in two separate cases of the killing of California condors.
Condors, the largest flying land birds in the Western Hemisphere, are protected under California law and the federal Endangered Species Act.
The first condor was killed in Tulare County, California, in May of this year but was not announced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service until September.
Ileene Anderson, a senior scientist with the Center, told WAN that while the details are “sketchy” as to why it took the division so long to report the incident, it may have been because they were waiting for the results of a necropsy to confirm that the bird was in fact, shot to death.
Sadly, the first condor’s cause of death was ultimately determined to be due to trauma from a gunshot wound. The condor was reportedly found dead on private property near the Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuge; an area where the condors have been returning over the past few years.

Photo from Gary Kramer, USFWS
The second condor was also unlawfully shot and killed in July; this time in Kern County. The bird was discovered near the Bitter Creek Wildlife Refuge.
Two dead condors within several months? It’s unfathomable.
Justice must be served for the condors who were tragically killed, as well as for the remaining birds which are repopulating in the state.
“In 1987, there were only 22 condors believed to be left on the planet,” Anderson told WAN. “Now, there are an estimated 200. It’s exciting.”
Anderson explained that as the condors continue to move up the Sierras, they will most-likely move into other states such as Oregon and Washington.
While the growth of the condor population is positive, the shooting and killing of them is NOT!
“We hope this additional reward pushes anyone with knowledge to come forward so that these ugly crimes can be fully prosecuted,” said Anderson.
The Fish and Wildlife Service is contributing $5,000.00 to both reward funds with the Center of Biological Diversity offering an additional $10,000.00 to each as well.
Anyone with details of the incident should call the U.S. Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement in Sacramento at (916) 569-8476. Callers can remain anonymous.

https://worldanimalnews.com/wan-talks-with-center-for-biological-diversitys-ileene-anderson-about-15000-00-rewards-offered-for-information-regarding-the-killing-of-2-endangered-california-condors/

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,California Condors,Endangered Species Act

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Conservation Groups Offer $15,000 Reward After Endangered Wolf Killed in Washington

Wolf Is My Soul

From:  Center for Biological Diversity

For Immediate Release, November 14, 2014

Contacts:Amaroq Weiss, Center for Biological Diversity, (707) 779-9613
Jasmine Minbashian, Conservation Northwest, (360) 319-3111
Shawn Cantrell, Defenders of Wildlife, (206) 508-5475
Dan Paul, The Humane Society of the United States, (206) 913-2280
Gigi Allianic, Woodland Park Zoo, (206) 548-2550

SEATTLE— Conservation groups are offering up to a $15,000 reward for information leading to conviction of those responsible for the illegal killing of the breeding female wolf of the Teanaway pack in Washington’s Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. The killing is one of several in the past year jeopardizing the recovery of Washington’s gray wolves, which are fully protected under the federal Endangered Species Act in the western two-thirds of Washington and throughout the state under state endangered species law.

Teanaway Pack wolf
Teanaway pack wolf courtesy Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. This photo is available for media…

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