University dumps professor who found polar bears thriving despite climate change

amp-washingtontimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org
By Valerie Richardson

Nobody has done more to sink the claim that climate change is endangering polar bears than zoologist Susan Crockford — and she may have paid for it with her job.

After 15 years as an adjunct assistant professor, Ms. Crockford said the University of Victoria rejected without explanation in May her renewal application, despite her high profile as a speaker and author stemming from her widely cited research on polar bears and dog domestication.

Ms. Crockford accused officials at the Canadian university of bowing to “outside pressure,” the result of her research showing that polar bear populations are stable and even thriving, not plummeting as a result of shrinking Arctic sea ice, defying claims of the climate change movement.

Her dismissal, which she announced Wednesday in a post on her Polar Bear Science blog, has spurred alarm over the implications for academic freedom and the rise of the “cancel culture” for professors and scientists who challenge climate catastrophe predictions.

“When push came to shove, UVic threw me under the bus rather than stand up for my academic freedom,” said Ms. Crockford, who earned a Ph.D. in interdisciplinary studies, specifically biology and anthropology, in 2004.

Ms. Crockford cited numerous instances of the university promoting her interviews and work, including her participation in a 2007 PBS “Nature” documentary about dog domestication and evolution, as well as her appearances at K-12 schools and adult groups for 10 years through the University of Victoria Speakers Bureau.

That supportive climate changed two years ago. In May 2017, her lectures were shut down after the speakers bureau received a complaint about her “lack of balance,” which “I believe poisoned support I might have expected from colleagues in the department,” she said.

“The speakers’ bureau incident made it clear the administration had no intention of protecting my academic freedom against complaints from outside the university,” Ms. Crockford said in an email to The Washington Times.

UVic Associate Vice President Michele Parkin responded with a letter challenging the assertion that Ms. Crockford was let go for “telling school kids politically incorrect facts about polar bears.” She was referring to a recent headline in the National Post of Toronto.

“There is no evidence to suggest that Dr. Crockford’s adjunct appointment was not renewed for ‘telling school kids politically incorrect facts about polar bears,’” said Ms. Parkin. “The University of Victoria, in both word and deed, supports academic freedom and free debate on academic issues.”

The statement fell short of denying that Ms. Crockford’s dismissal was linked to her polar bear scholarship, which almost single-handedly blew up the climate change movement’s promotion of the bears as iconic victims of anthropogenic global warming.

Her books include “The Polar Bear Catastrophe That Never Happened,” published in February, in which she said the bears are not threatened. She noted that the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s 2015 Red List of Threatened Species puts polar bear numbers at 22,000 to 31,000 despite a widespread belief that the population has dropped to a few thousand.

‘Cancel culture’ and academic freedom

Marc Morano, author of “The Politically Incorrect Guide to Climate Change,” said situations like Ms. Crockford’s have become “all too common in the climate debate.”

He cited examples of prominent scientists who “came out” as skeptics only after retiring.

“Professor after professor has been hounded, silenced, censured or fired for speaking out against the approved man-made climate crisis narrative,” Mr. Morano said. “The message to any climate dissenters in academia is once again reinforced: Stay silent with your skepticism or risk endangering your career.”

University of Victoria economics professor Cornelis van Kooten warned of the threat to free speech on campus. “I think the climate change movement has done extreme harm to academic freedom,” he said, and the movement isn’t alone.

“Put it this way: religion, race, evolution, gender, indigenous peoples, nuclear power, polar bears, deforestation. … Any views on these topics that don’t fall in line with the ‘consensus’ are taboo,” Mr. van Kooten said in an email. “Think the extent to which free speech has been banned from campuses across much of the West in the name of political correctness.”

In her letter, UVic’s Ms. Parkin noted that adjunct professors are unpaid, meaning “Dr. Susan Crockford’s work can carry on without this appointment,” but Ms. Crockford said losing the university position will harm her ability to secure grant funding.

“No one suggested funds were involved,” she said. “The point is that I will not be able to apply for research grants and in most cases will be unable to collaborate with colleagues on their research projects without a university affiliation.”

Ms. Crockford has drawn the ire of environmental activists and scientists with whose views she disagrees, based in part on her associations with climate skeptical organizations such as The Heartland Institute and the Global Warming Policy Foundation.

Her Polar Bear Science blog came under fire in a 2017 study in the journal BioScience by 14 academics, including Penn State climatologist Michael E. Mann, decrying the influence of “denier blogs,” which Georgia Tech professor emeritus Judith Curry blasted as “absolutely the stupidest paper I have ever seen published.”

Heartland spokesman Jim Lakely slammed Ms. Crockford’s dismissal as “outrageous, an affront to academic freedom, and a new, troubling step in modern #cancelculture,” adding that “all honest scientists should take up her cause.”

“The people who oppose her, and those who dismissed her, are not interested in science, but pushing political dogma,” Mr. Lakely said in an email. “This is a sad day for academic freedom and science, not dogma, ruling our public discourse.”

Now on a European speaking tour, Ms. Crockford, a co-founder of Pacific Identifications, said her critics should know that her loss of adjunct status will primarily discourage her work on “speciation and domestication mechanisms in evolution,” not polar bears.

“What a lack of academic affiliation has not done — and cannot do — is stop me from investigating and commenting on the failures and inconsistencies of science that I see in published polar bear research papers and reflected in public statements made by polar bear specialists,” she said. “I am still a former adjunct professor and I will not be silenced.”

https://amp-washingtontimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/amp.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/oct/20/susan-crockford-fired-after-finding-polar-bears-th/?usqp=mq331AQCKAE%3D&amp_js_v=0.1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s&ampshare=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtontimes.com%2Fnews%2F2019%2Foct%2F20%2Fsusan-crockford-fired-after-finding-polar-bears-th%2F

UVic bows to outside pressure and rescinds my adjunct professor status

polarbearscience

As you may have heard, this summer I lost my status as Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada (UVic), a position I had held for 15 years. This action followed my expulsion from the roster of the university’s volunteer Speakers Bureau in May 2017. However, until April 2017 the university and the Anthropology department proudly promoted my work, including my critical polar bear commentary, which suggests someone with influence (and perhaps political clout) intervened to silence my scientific criticism.

Crockford skull

Journalist Donna LaFramboise has exposed this travesty in the National Post (16 October 2019), which you can read here. I have provided more background below and Donna’s blog post is here.

Losing my adjunct status

An adjunct professorship is an unpaid position with a few responsibilities that in return allow a scholar to operate as a qualified member of…

View original post 2,602 more words

Lost and starving polar bear seen scavenging in Russian city

dailymail.co.uk

By Will Stewart In Russia For Mailonline 09:07 18 Jun 2019, updated 09:44 18 Jun 2019

Lost and starving polar bear was spotted wandering in amongst traffic in Russia
Motorists in the nickel mining city of Norilsk watched as the beast dodged cars
Bear thought to have walked nearly 1,000 miles from Russian Arctic Ocean shore
Animal appeared too weak to attack humans and was seen scavenging for food

A starving polar bear has wandered into an industrial city in Russia after ‘walking almost 1,000 miles in the wrong direction’.

The lost beast headed south and inland from shore of the Arctic Ocean, far from its natural feeding habitat.

Motorists in the nickel mining city of Norilsk watched in amazement as the bear crossed busy roads.

The bear was scavenging for food and appeared too weak to attack people who were watching the wild animal – but local officials have warned of the threat to human life.

Locals said it is the first time a wild polar bear has been spotted in the city since the 1970s.

The animal is believed to have made a lonely trek of at least 950 miles crossing Arctic islands and frozen sea to reach Norilsk, according to reports.
The emaciated polar bear was seen on the streets of Norilsk dodging in and out of traffic and the animal scavenged for food
It is thought the polar bear walked nearly 1,000 miles from the Russian Arctic shore south to the mining city of Norilsk

Irina Yarinskaya, a photographer of Zapolyarnaya Pravda newspaper, snapped the bear dodging cars in the city’s traffic.

She told local media: ‘He is seriously hunger-bitten, he is hardly able to blink and keep his eyes open, almost unable to walk.

‘He was lying for a long time, having a rest, then he crossed the road and entered the industrial zone.

‘He went towards the gravel and sand factory. Then he crossed one more road and headed to a dump.’

Earlier, the same bear was spotted at Talnakh on the outskirts of Norilsk.

The animal has become a star attraction in a barren area normally populated by brown not polar bears, reported The Siberian Times.
The lost and starving wild animal appeared too weak to attack humans but was being monitored by the authorities as it still posed a threat to life
During the bear’s long walk it was pictured by residents of Norilsk and at one point was seen lying on the ground in the industrial city’s outskirts
The polar bear reportedly walked around 950 miles south from the Arctic shore to Norilsk

The bear had the ‘wrong compass settings’, and walked across the Taymyr Peninsula to reach the Soviet-era nickel city which is normally closed to foreign visitors.

Local police and emergency services are closely monitoring the bear – which poses a threat to residents.

But they are awaiting a decision from Moscow on whether to sedate the beast and return it to the Arctic shoreline – or move it to a zoo in Krasnoyarsk, the regional capital, come 950 miles further to the south.

Initially the local emergency services refused to believe there was a polar bear in the Talnakh district of the Arctic city which is some 350 miles inland.

Anatoly Nikolaychyuk, head of Taymyr department of state hunting control, said: ‘This is a unique and rare case.
The polar bear was seen wandering around industrial area of Norilsk and walking in busy roads looking for food
Norilsk is an industrial city in Krasnoyarsk Krai region above the Arctic Circle, east of the Yenisei River. It is what’s known as a ‘closed city’ as foreigners cannot visit and during the Soviet-era did not appear on maps, road signs or connect to public transport
Residents took videos and pictures of the emaciated polar bear as it made its long journey from its natural habitat over the Taymyr Peninsula

‘There are two options now – either to relocate him to the shore, or, perhaps, some zoo will take him.’

Local campaigners are demanding the bear is returned to its natural habitat.

Oleg Krashevsky – who specialises in tours to the remote Putorana Plateau – posted: ‘I don’t understand how the bear could have walked such distance, across Taymyr and not come across anyone.

‘He must have encountered many hunters. The same thing happened in 1970’s when a polar bear showed up at an explosives warehouse around the same place as this time.’

Polar bears are an endangered species in Russia’s Red Book.

The bear’s mammoth journey is believed to have started on islands deep in the Arctic either in Krasnoyarsk or Yakutia regions.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7153051/amp/Lost-starving-polar-bear-seen-scavenging-Russian-city-nearly-1-000-miles-natural-habitat.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ico=taboola_feed&__twitter_impression=true

Sign Petition: 50 Starved Polar Bears Came Into Town and Now They May Be Killed

thepetitionsite.com

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Russian Officials

The town of Novaya Zemlya has had quite a week: 50 starved polar bears have invaded their small Russian town looking for food! People in the town are both scared and excited. They get to see polar bears up close, which is really cool, but some of them have tried to enter people’s homes. The fear is that, even though polar bears are a protected species, people who feel scared and trapped will act out and kill the animals.

Sign now to make sure Russian officials do everything they can to keep the polar bears safe and humanely remove them from the town!

One particular garbage in the town seems to be the biggest draw for them, so officials may just try to move that. They are also discussing sedating and relocating them, but that would likely be expensive, difficult and very stressful to the bears who just wanted something to eat.

Polar bears have lost so much from climate change. They are born on land but then spend most of their lives in the water or on ice barges, which are melting rapidly. Experts believe the polar bears have invaded the town because their habitat and food (seals) are disappearing due to climate change.

Locals have declared a state of emergency. Now we just need to be sure that they don’t harm the polar bears in trying to get them out of this town.

Please sign on demanding that authorities do not use fatal force to evacuate the polar bears!

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/324/351/187/

More information with links in comment section below…

Breaking! South Korea’s Last Remaining Polar Bear, Tongki, Will Live The Rest Of His Life In Peace At Yorkshire Wildlife Park In The UK – World Animal News

By WAN – June 11, 2018

Photos from Yorkshire Wildlife Park
WAN is thrilled to share that the only living polar bear in South Korea is being relocated later this year from the Everland Zoo, to the world-class facilities of Yorkshire Wildlife Park (YWP) in Doncaster, United Kingdom.
Tongki, 24, will be re-homed at YWP’s award-winning Project Polar, an international center for the conservation and rehabilitation of polar bears both in captivity and in the wild, which is especially important as Polar Bears are increasingly threatened by global warming.
YWP staff and vets have already visited Tongki and performed health checks to check if he is fit to travel the 5,500 miles from Korea to Yorkshire this November.
“We are delighted to accept Tongki and give him a wonderful retirement in the ten-acre reserves here at YWP,” John Minion, CEO of the park said in a statement. “Our top priority is to keep him healthy and happy. The journey from Korea will be long, but we have plans in place to make it a smooth and comfortable transition.”
Tongki was born in a zoo in Masan, Gyeongsangnam, and relocated to Everland in 1997.
Reaching the age of 70-80 in human years, the retired polar bear is ready to enjoy a comfortable life alongside current residents of Project Polar, Victor, Pixel, Nissan and Nobby, who can often be spotted roaming in Project Polar, which includes dens, pools, lakes in a rolling landscape, and is designed to reflect the habitat of the summer Arctic tundra.

Working in association with Yorkshire Wildlife Park Foundation (YWPF), which was created in 2013 to be a dynamic catalyst for inspiring people to support conservation and welfare, and Polar Bears International (PBI), Yorkshire Wildlife Park’s Project Polar is YWP and YWPF’s flagship project. It combines all three key objectives, conservation, welfare and education, working towards saving and improving the welfare of one of the most iconic species, the polar bear.

YWP welcomes 750,000 visitors annually who enjoy the spacious reserves and walkthrough animal areas. In addition to the polar bears, YWP is also home to some of the most endangered and beautiful animals on the planet, including Amur Leopards, Amur Tigers, Giant Otters, Grevy’s Zebra, and the latest addition, the rare Okapi.

Since opening in 2009, YWP has become the UK’s fastest growing and most innovative wildlife sanctuary, combining conservation, welfare and education all in one.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-south-koreas-last-remaining-polar-bear-tongki-will-live-the-rest-of-his-life-in-peace-at-yorkshire-wildlife-park-in-the-uk/
© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Petition: Meet Yupik, a Polar Bear Suffering at Roadside Zoo in MEXICO | Save Animals

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Meet Yupik, a Polar Bear Suffering at Roadside Zoo in MEXICO | Save Animals
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For over 25 years, Yupik the polar bear has been languishing in Mexico’s sweltering heat at Morelia Zoo in Michoacán. Can you imagine … a polar bear living in Mexico?

This insanely deprived animal spends her days in a barren enclosure with nothing to do. Desperate to get out, she’s chewed on the cage bars so much that she sustained dental trauma. And for years, Morelia Zoo ignored her condition, which led to a serious dental infection.

A veterinarian and bear expert assessed Yupik’s health at the request of Zoocheck and found that she was thin, had poor muscle tone, and suffered from arthritis—conditions that are all likely caused by her restricted environment, poor diet, lack of exercise, and terrible life.

According to the veterinarian, Yupik’s health conditions cannot be addressed in her current environment and a “move to a more natural enclosure in a colder climate would improve her body condition score, allow for natural feeding and foraging behaviors, build her muscle mass, support her joints and reduce her behavioral frustration.”

She was all set to go to a facility better able to meet her needs, but just two weeks before her scheduled move, Morelia Zoo and the governor of Michoacán backed out of an agreement that had been years in the making—dooming Yupik to more of the same suffering and misery that she’s endured for the last quarter of a century.

As Yupik’s legal owner, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has the power—and the responsibility—to step in and ensure that she’s moved to Yorkshire Wildlife Park, where she can get the veterinary care, enrichment, and happy ending that she deserves.

Tell the FWS not to abandon Yupik and to see to it that she’s moved to Yorkshire Wildlife Park, where she can get the care that she desperately needs.

https://action.peta2.com/page/5126/action/1?utm_source=peta2::E-Mail&utm_medium=E-News&utm_campaign=0518::gen::peta2::E-Mail::P2%20Missions%20Recap%20May%2020%20EA::::p2%20e-news&ea.url.id=81393&forwarded=true

Save Starving Polar Bears

Polar bears are starving to death and heading towards extinction more rapidly than scientists originally expected. Sign this petition to urge the United States to combat climate change and protect these magnificent animals.

Source: Save Starving Polar Bears

Tiny Paws Are No Match For Powdery Snow. Mama Polar Bear Has To Show Her Cubs A Thing Or Two On How To Get Through The Snow ❄ 


https://mobile.twitter.com/WorldAnimalNews/status/945748399973945345/video/1

Fat polar bears [and lots of them] drive public confidence in future of the species

!Wildlife

polarbearscience

What is causing the death of the polar bear as a climate change icon? Fat bears are part of it, but mostly it’s the fact that polar bear numbers haven’t declined as predicted.

Western Hudson Bay polar bears around Churchill, Manitoba appear mostly in good shape this summer despite thevery late freeze-up last fall, including the very fat bear caught on camera below (see more great pictures here):

Churchill_PolarBears_FAT bear post_21 Aug 2017

Not only have we been seeing pictures of fat bears rather than starving bears in recent years butthere are lots of them, in Western Hudson Bay and other seasonal sea ice regions where there should be none (if the models had been correct). No wonder polar bears arefalling out of favour as an icon for catastrophic human-caused global warming.

[Here’s another picture of a fat bear, this one from Svalbard]

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By Nancy Posted in Uncategorized Tagged

Petition: SeaWorld: Don’t Separate Polar Bear Best Friends!


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/870/884/771/seaworld-don%E2%80%99t-separate-polar-bear-best-friends/

Save Baby Polar Bears From Toxic Chemicals

Baby polar bears are exposed to more than 1,000 times the safe limit of toxic chemicals through their mothers’ milk. Sign this petition to save the polar bears.

Source: Save Baby Polar Bears From Toxic Chemicals

Petition · Max Sieben Baucus: Pizza the Polar Bear needs our help! · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/max-sieben-baucus-pizza-the-polar-bear-needs-our-help?source_location=update_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=4

Zoo Holding “World’s Saddest Polar Bear” Must Not Imprison More Animals

 mall already notorious for imprisoning the “world’s saddest polar bear” has announced plans to acquire other endangered species for the amusement of shoppers. Demand that these precious animals be spared a life of captivity in the confines of these cruel and inhumane exhibits.

 

Source: Zoo Holding “World’s Saddest Polar Bear” Must Not Imprison More Animals        

 

Heartbreaking News: Tundra The 29-Year-Old Polar Bear Passes Away At Detroit Zoo – World Animal News


Heartbreaking News: Tundra The 29-Year-Old Polar Bear Passes Away At Detroit Zoo
By Margot Ryan –
September 28, 2016

Tundra, a 29-year old female polar bear who was living at the Detroit Zoo had passed away Monday morning after battling an illness suddenly caught the day before.

The zoo wrote in a Facebook post that zoo officials decided to euthanize her after they noticed a rapid decline in her health while officials tended to her Sunday night and Monday morning. The exact illness she was suffering from has not been determined however, a necropsy will be performed in attempts to figure out the cause.


“We are happy we were able to provide Tundra with a great home for the short period of time she was with us,” the zoo said. “Our hearts go out to the animal care staff and visitors – both in Detroit and Indianapolis – who knew and loved her.”

Tundra was originally from the Indianapolis Zoo and had arrived at the Detroit Zoo only several months ago.

Tundra was moved out of Indianapolis after renovations were being made to the polar bear exhibit where Tundra had lived alone. Staff then decided to relocate her to the Detroit zoo which is advertised to have one of the largest polar bear habitats in North America, called the Arctic Ring of Life. This habitat is a 4-acre exhibit which features indoor and outdoor portions with a pool that holds 300,000 gallons of water.


Scott Carter, chief life sciences officer for the Detroit Zoological Society (DZS), told the Indianapolis Star in June: “The Arctic Ring of Life is an incredible facility for this polar bear to spend the remainder of her golden years.”

Although Tundra’s time at the Detroit Zoo was short lived, visitors enjoyed seeing her in The Arctic Ring of Life habitat which is also home to two 11-year-old polar bears named Talini and Nuka as well as three foxes and five seals.


On Average, polar bears in captivity live between 21-24 years, while wild polar bears pass away at an even younger age of about 15 to 18 years old. Tundra well surpassed this average and lived an unusually long life. The Detroit Zoo says that animals in captivity have a longer lifespan due to better health care and nutrition.
Photo Credit: Detroit Zoo, freep.com
“One Person CAN Make A Difference”

petition: Stop polar bear hunting as a sport!

image

                          http://www.thepetitionsite.com/741/648/359/stop-polar-bear-hunting-as-a-sport/

OCEANCARE | Trophy hunting

egoistic_website_header_1223 

https://www.oceancare.org/en/supportus/petitionsandprotests/hunting_petition/?utm_source=OceanCare+eNews_en&utm_campaign=fe9f26699e-Troph%C3%A4enjagd+EN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b7060de7ab-fe9f26699e-%5BLIST_EMAIL_ID%5D&ct=t%28Troph%C3%A4enjagd+EN%29&mc_cid=fe9f26699e&mc_eid=%5BUNIQID%5D

Alaska’s Polar Bears Win Their Day in Court | TakePart

Polar-bears-win-alaska-MAIN

Polar bear mother and cub emerge from there den in springtime along the Arctic cost of Alaska
(Photo: Steven Kazlowski/Barcroft Media/Getty Images)

Polar bears, the Obama administration, and conservationists scored a major victory on Monday, when a federal appeals court affirmed the boundaries of a 187,000-square-mile area in the Arctic that wildlife scientists deem crucial to saving the bear from extinction.

The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit struck down a lower court’s ruling that sided with a coalition of petroleum industry groups, the state of Alaska, and several far-northern Alaska Native corporations, which sued the Obama administration over its “critical habitat” designation for polar bears under the Endangered Species Act.
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“The court soundly rejected the oil and gas industry’s attempt to shrink critical habitat for the polar bear, and that’s a great thing,” said Rebecca Riley, a senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council, which was not involved in the lawsuit.

The area set aside for polar bears under the law “is enormous, in part because it covers these huge areas of sea ice,” said Holly Doremus, director of the environmental law program at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law.

RELATED: Alaska’s Polar Bears Could Be in Big Trouble Within 10 Years
Related
Starving Polar Bear Is the Face of the Future

“But that’s not what’s being argued about here—it’s the denning habitat and the barrier islands, access to the sea,” she said. “The parts of their lives that the polar bears spend off the sea ice and how they get back and forth.”

The court found that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service used the best available science to set the land-based critical habitat boundaries, which include areas polar bears use now as well as places they will need as climate change continues to thaw the Arctic.

“The plaintiffs wanted them to draw a little dot around every known den,” Doremus said, and set critical habitat boundaries based on those locations. But “that hasn’t happened with past critical habitat designations, at least not the way the plaintiffs wanted here.”

“We all know that’s not a practical way to think about this,” said Riley. “We have to look at what habitat is really valuable to polar bears and what they could use or might use, and that’s what the court upheld here.”

Under the Endangered Species Act, any federally regulated activity within critical habitat boundaries, such as oil and gas development on federal lands or waters, needs to account for harm to endangered species in its planning.

The Alaska Oil and Gas Association and the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, an Alaska Native company, did not respond to TakePart’s requests for comment.

The American Petroleum Institute, which was among the lead plaintiffs in the lawsuit, declined an interview request. “We are reviewing the court’s decision and considering all options,” the group said in a statement.

The Alaska Department of Law called the decision “disappointing” in a statement, adding that it “will be reviewing the options for further judicial review.”

http://www.takepart.com/article/2016/03/02/alaska-polar-bears-win-criticial-habitat-lawsuit?cmpid=tpdaily-eml-2016-03-02-ST

Demand Justice for Tortured Polar Bear

A polar bear suffered greatly after ingesting explosives. Evidence indicates that this was a deliberate act of torture. Demand that the person responsible for this heinous act receive the maximum punishment by law.

Source: Demand Justice for Tortured Polar Bear

Petition · A new chance for Arturo the polar bear! · Change.org

https://www.change.org/p/a-new-chance-for-arturo-the-polar-bear

Save Polar Bears from Global Warming

Save Polar Bears from Global Warming.

Polar bears out on the sea ice eat few seals in summer and early fall

polarbearscience

We hear endlessly about the polar bears ‘forced’ to go without food for months because of receding summer sea ice — what about all the bears that stay out on the ice over the summer? Presumably, those bears keep hunting for seals – but how many do they actually catch?

Polar Bear Breaks Ice


As it turns out, not very many – and for some unlucky bears in late summer, probably none. While they probably eat a bit better in late fall, if they’re lucky and persistent, by the time winter comes, biologists assume most bears again eat very little. This explains why all polar bears are at their lowest weight in late winter (March), just before Arctic seal pups are born.

[Winter – January to March; Spring – April to June; Summer – July to September; Fall – October to December (e.g. Pilfold et al. 2015, in press)]

To put it another…

View original post 2,157 more words

By Nancy Posted in Uncategorized Tagged

Stop the Slaughter of Polar Bears

Stop the Slaughter of Polar Bears.

Stop Politicians From Threatening Wolves and Polar Bears

Stop Politicians From Threatening Wolves and Polar Bears.

Editorial calls for more jobs for polar bear biologists

polarbearscience

An editorialin the Edmonton Journal this morning (“Stand on guard for polar bears”) takes a most extraordinary position: that the results of two recent papers of dubious value should motivate Canada to create more jobs for polar bear biologists, “protect” the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (from what, they don’t say), and galvanize Canada’s position with respect to curtailing carbon dioxide emissions. In that order.

Edmonton Journal editorial photo 22 January 2015 Edmonton Journal editorial photo 22 January 2015. Munich Zoo bears.

First, the unnamed editors1 say: “This country needs more eyes and ears monitoring the health, numbers and locations of its polar bear populations.

Why would they come to that conclusion? They quote University of Alberta’s Andrew Derocher (who supervises a number of students doing polar bear research in Western Hudson Bay):

“If Canada was doing the right thing, we’d have extensive monitoring,” University of Alberta polar bear researcher Andrew Derocher said to…

View original post 871 more words

Beaufort Sea polar bear subpopulation boundary has been changed

polarbearscience

Environment Canada recently posted a set of maps on its website that show it has moved the boundary between the polar bear subpopulation it shares with the USA — without a word to the media or a note anywhere.

EC S_N Beaufort boundary change Sept 8 2014_cropped PolarBearScience


While a change to the Canada/US Beaufort Sea boundary has been discussed by polar bear researchers for some time (e.g. here), there are no links on the EC website or references listed to explain to readers why this change was made.

In fact, the boundary move between the Southern and Northern Beaufort subpopulations is noted on only one of the five maps posted and even then, the “notification” is present only as a footnote in blurred print. So if you didn’t happen to look closely at that particular map, you might not even realize that the boundary on all the other maps was new.

[The map with the boundary…

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Status of Canadian polar bear populations has been changed – more good news

polarbearscience

According to maps dated June 2014, Environment Canada (EC) has changed the trend status of several Canadian subpopulations — without any announcement or publicly-available documents explaining the basis of the changes.

Figure 3. "Series of Circumpolar Polar Bear Subpopulation and Status Trend Maps 2010, 2013 & 2014" Note the asterisk below the 2014 map, which is dated "June 2014" and is different in its status assessment from the one released in February 2013 by the PBSG. Original here. Figure 1. Environment Canada’s “Map 4: Series of Circumpolar Polar Bear Subpopulation and Status Trend Maps 2010, 2013 & 2014.” Original here.

And would it surprise you to learn that virtually all of these status changes reveal more good news about polar bears?

Surprisingly, the June 2014 EC status assessments for many Canadian subpopulations are very different from the 2013 assessment released by the Polar Bear Specialist Group back in February 2014.

Have a look at the map above (Fig. 1), number 4 in the EC series, where the boundary change discussed in my last post is noted below the 2014 map.

Data sources for this composite map are stated to be “Canadian subpopulation status provided by…

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Rescue Polar Bear from Overheated Mexican Zoo – ForceChange

yupi-polar-bear

XrERescue Polar Bear from Overheated Mexican Zoo – ForceChange.

Ian Stirling now says the polar bear that “died of climate change” last year was “in his prime”

polarbearscience

With Barents Sea ice way above average this summer, Polar Bear Specialist Group biologist Ian Stirling now claims the old polar bear that he said died of climate change last year on Svalbard was “in his prime” and still blames the bear’s death on lack of sea ice — despite all evidence to the contrary.

Figure 1. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) says the September minimum for 2014 is “imminent” and suggests the low may come in at 5.1 million square kilometers (far short of the 4.1 m2km low reached in 2012. About the much larger than average amount of ice around Svalbard and Franz Josef Land, they said only: “As was the case for the beginning of the month, extent remains below average in all sectors of the Arctic except for a region in the Barents Sea, east of Svalbard.” Figure 1. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) says the September minimum for 2014 is “imminent” and suggests the low may come in at 5.1 million square kilometers (far short of the 4.1 m2km low reached in 2012. About the much larger than average amount of ice around Svalbard and Franz Josef Land, they said only: “As was the case for the beginning of the month, extent remains below average in all sectors of the Arctic except for a region in the Barents Sea, east of Svalbard.”

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“The Politics of Polar Bears” lengthy excerpt airs across Canada – cue the outrage

polarbearscience

Umbrage alert! Last night, a half-length short form of the powerful and balanced documentary “The Politics of Polar Bears” aired across Canada on the CBC’s flagship TV news program, The National.

Polar_Bear_2004-11-15_Wapusk Nat Park_Wikipedia

Right after it aired, they followed up with a lengthy online summary by the producer of the film, Reg Sherren (Polar bears: Threatened species or political pawn?”, September 2, with video of the 19 minute short program). Check out the comments below it! Excerpts and my comments below.

[Links to the full length film here and in my previous posts here and here]


From Reg Sherren’s (2 September) summary article:

“For some time now the suggestion has been that polar bears are in trouble and that many sub-populations of Ursus maritimus are decreasing, making them an iconic symbol in the fight against global climate change.

But there remains an ongoing debate within…

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