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The Walt Disney Company to Donate More Than $1 Million to Relief and Recovery Efforts in The Bahamas

disneyparks.disney.go.com

Mari Mendez
We all have watched with broken hearts as Hurricane Dorian brought devastation to the northern Bahamas. Having just traveled to Great Abaco for a community event one week before the storm hit, I can tell you firsthand that the people of Grand Bahama and Abaco are our friends, neighbors and co-workers.

We’re committed to helping them rebuild their homes, their communities and their livelihoods. And today, I’m proud to share with you that the Walt Disney Company, led by Disney Cruise Line, made a commitment of more than $1 million to help relief and recovery efforts in The Bahamas.

This commitment includes a $1 million donation to non-profit relief agencies who will be undertaking recovery and rebuilding efforts, as well as the provision of supplies – including food staples and basic construction materials – to those in impacted areas.

Earlier today, our Chairman and CEO Bob Iger shared, “The Walt Disney Company stands with the people of The Bahamas affected by Hurricane Dorian.” He went on to say, “We hope our $1 million donation will provide much-needed relief and help our neighbors, colleagues, and all those impacted by this devastating storm begin the long process of recovery as they work to put their lives and communities back together.”

Additionally, Disney employees with immediate needs in impacted areas of The Bahamas will have access to a range of resources. Disney Castaway Cay, Disney’s private island in The Bahamas, which experienced tropical force strength winds, employs more than 60 Bahamians from Abaco and Grand Bahama, as well as several employees from other Bahamian islands.

“The Bahamas is such a special place to us and our guests, and we have watched the devastation created by Hurricane Dorian with concern and heartache,” Jeff Vahle, president of Disney Cruise Line, said. “We stand with the Bahamian people, and especially those in Abaco and Grand Bahama, as they recover from the worst storm to ever make landfall in The Bahamas. As the needs in these communities are assessed, we are prepared to aid the relief and recovery efforts through funding, the provision of supplies and by providing support to our Bahamian Crew Members.”

We continue to monitor Hurricane Dorian and will coordinate on an ongoing basis with nonprofit organizations on emergency response efforts. This includes sharing lifesaving information with families before and during emergencies, prepositioning supplies at-the-ready to respond rapidly to natural disasters, and providing resources to activate large-scale responses as needed in the event of a disaster.
https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2019/09/the-walt-disney-company-to-donate-more-than-1-million-to-relief-and-recovery-efforts-in-the-bahamas/

Hurricane Dorian Update

“Hurricane Dorian hammers the Bahamas for more than 24 hours l ABC News”

 

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Update on Hurricane Dorian

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National Hurricane Center and Central Pacific Hurricane Center

NHC issuing advisories for the Atlantic on Hurricane Dorian

NHC issuing and advisories for the Eastern Pacific on Hurricane Juliette

Check out NHC latest updates on the hurricanes

All the best and stay safe…

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ 

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July 4th Quake Centered at Skytop Rocket Propulsion Test Facility; Quake Swarm Appears Mostly Centered in Low Risk Area-Away from Faults

Mining Awareness +


This area of the US Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake dates from the Manhattan Project. Common sense, as well as eye-witness testimony, indicate that there are underground facilities, as well as above ground ones. We can only speculate as to the extent of the underground network. There are likely old mines in the area, as well. Most likely old mines were expanded and turned into underground tunnel-test facilities. The original M 6.4 earthquake was centered in the area of the Skytop Rocket Propulsion Test Facility, described further below. The quakes appear to be apart from known earthquake faults, or at least apart from any major ones. They are almost entirely within the Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake. CalTech estimated that the original M 6.4 earthquake in the area of Skytop was at a depth of 8.7 km (more shallow the USGS). An article written by Dr. Jennifer Andrews…

View original post 2,355 more words

Petition · California Fish And Wildlife : To have Stanley the Giraffe and the other animals removed from Malibu Wine Safari. · Change.org

To have Stanley the Giraffe and the other animals removed from Malibu Wine Safari.
Christy Lee Ewing started this petition to California fish and wildlife and 1 other

Problem

Malibu Safari was in the evacuation zone of the areas effected by the Woolsey Fires in California. Malibu Safari is responsible for the lives of close to 100 animals. Including Sanley the Giraffe, a zebra, water buffalo, horses, etc. When advised to evacuate their property, they chose not to evacuate the animals. When rescue groups went out to offer help, they refused the help. When rescue groups went out to check on the animals, most of the property had been destroyed by the fires. Images were taken of the fires still burning right next to the animals. It has been confirmed that there are animals unaccounted for. Animals who most likely parished due to their negligence. It was confirmed on Sunday. November, 11th, that the property was still burning and the animals are still at risk.

Solution

We are asking that these animals be removed from the property immediately, to a safer location. We are also asking that an investigation be put into action as to whether Malibu Safari should be allowed to keep these animals or any animal In their care. They do not have the animals In their best interest. The animals deserve to live in a safe haven where the people responsible for them will ensure their safety at ALL TIMES.

Personal story

My name is Christy Lee, Vice President of Protect Animals Worldwide. As a non profit organization we take great pride in ensuring the safety and welfare of our animal friends and work diligently in partnership with many other organizations across the world.

https://www.change.org/p/california-fish-and-wildlife-to-have-stanley-the-giraffe-and-the-other-animals-removed-from-malibu-wine-safari-fb949c32-1643-4bb5-b7b9-116e1fd96924?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=13882716&grid_position=2&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAHOe0wAAAAAAW%2FygATXhk0Y5NWMzZjQyMQ%3D%3D

 

© 2018, Change.org, PBCCertified B Corporation

More than 4 dozen sea turtles killed in Cape Cod cold snap

articles-masslive-com.cdn.ampproject.org
More than 4 dozen sea turtles killed in Cape Cod cold snap
By The Associated Press Close
1-2 minutes

Animal rescue volunteers say more than four dozen sea turtles have died of exposure after washing ashore in frigid conditions on Cape Cod.

The Cape Cod Times reports that low temperatures and high winds combined to kill most of the 50 turtles that washed up Thursday in Brewster, Orleans and Eastham on the lower part of the peninsula.

The Massachusetts Audubon Society’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary says about 350 sea turtles have come ashore since Oct. 22. They include Kemp’s ridley turtles, green turtles and loggerhead turtles.

Spokeswoman Jenette Kerr says most of the animals being brought to the sanctuary are dead and in some cases literally frozen.

Biologists say the turtles are stunned by the cold water in Cape Cod Bay, which shuts down their metabolisms and renders them unable to move.

https://articles-masslive-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/articles.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/11/more_than_4_dozen_sea_turtles.amp?amp_js_v=0.1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s

Firefighter Does Sweetest Thing For Two Terrified Donkeys Fleeing Wildfires

thedodo.com
Lily Feinn
6-7 minutes

Firefighter Chris Harvey and Sacramento Fire Chief Gary Loesch were driving down Honey Run Road in Paradise, California, on Saturday when they came across something entirely unexpected.

Just days before, the deadly Camp Fire had ripped through the Sierra Nevada foothill community of Paradise, leaving behind the charred remains of homes and husks of cars. The fast-moving blaze had claimed both human and animal lives, transforming a town of retirees and young families into something eerily deserted. Or so they thought.
While en route to investigate an accident caused by a falling tree, Harvey and Loesch spotted two weary animals emerging from the smoke.

The donkeys were slowly hobbling down the center of the road in the opposite direction, and it was clear to Harvey that they were very lost.

Firefighter Chris Harvey approaches two lost donkeys
Facebook/Sacramento Fire Department

“We pulled over to let them pass, and saw that they looked very tired, worn out and thirsty,” Harvey told The Dodo. “I tried to give them some water in my hand from a water bottle, but it kept spilling out.”

Firefighter feeds donkeys lost during Camp Fire
Facebook/Sacramento Fire Department

Harvey knew that after what the donkeys had been through the animals needed more than a few sips of water, so he grabbed the apples out of his and Loesch’s sack lunches and fed them to the donkeys.

Immediately, Harvey could see the difference that his little act of kindness made to the survivors.
Fireman rescues lost donkeys during Camp Fire in California

Facebook/Sacramento Fire Department

“They ate the apples quickly and seemed grateful for the snack,” Harvey said. “We called base camp and had them dispatch animal control officers to get the donkeys.”

Facebook/Sacramento Fire Department

Harvey and Loesch waited with the donkeys until they were safely in the care of animal control. Though it is unknown whether the donkeys will be able to reunite with their family, their rescue is a ray of hope when people need it most.

https://www.thedodo.com/on-the-farm/firefighters-rescue-donkeys-camp-fire-paradise-california

To support the victims of the Camp Fire, you can make a donation to one of the nonprofit organizations helping in the wake of this disaster, such as the American Red Cross or the California Community Foundation’s Wildfire Relief Fund.

To support the HSUS’s ongoing animal rescue and relief efforts, you can make a here. https://www.thedodo.com/on-the-farm/firefighters-rescue-donkeys-camp-fire-paradise-california here.

For the Most Recent Updates on the Fire in California go to… http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents

http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents

Update! Animal Emergency Evacuation Information For Woolsey & Hill Fire Affecting Ventura & LA Counties – World Animal News

By Karen Lane –
November 12, 2018

Photo credit: Katie Cleary
Updated Information – Thousands of firefighters continue to battle the Woolsey Fire, which grew in size overnight Sunday. The fire has burned more than 91,500 acres, destroyed an estimated 370 structures, and is now 20% contained, according to a Monday morning update from Cal Fire.
Fire crews in Ventura and Los Angeles counties are trying to contain two new fires that broke out Monday morning, one in Thousand Oaks and the other east of Simi Valley near the 118 Freeway.
Santa Ana winds returned Sunday and are expected to last until 8 a.m. on Tuesday.
Below you will find emergency evacuation information for The Woolsey & Hill Fire that is affecting Ventura and Los Angeles counties.
Here is a list of evacuation centers for animals large and small:
Ventura County Fair Grounds – 10 W. Harbor Blvd., Ventura, CA 93001 (at capacity) Ventura County Animal Services (805) 388-4258
Ventura County Animal Shelter – 600 Aviation Dr, Camarillo, CA 93010 / Ventura County Animal Services (805) 388-4258 (Accepting small animals)
Humane Society of Ventura County – 402 Bryant St, Ojai, CA 93023 / (805) 646-6505 (Accepting small & large animals)
Earl Warren Showgrounds – 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 / (805) 687-0766 (Accepting large animals)
Simi Valley Animal Shelter – 670 W Los Angeles Ave, Simi Valley (805) 388-4341 (Accepting small animals)
Pierce College – 7100 El Rancho Drive Woodland Hills, CA 91371 (Entrance off Desoto Ave.) (at capacity)
Hansen Dam Equestrian Center – 11127 Orcas Avenue, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342 (Few spaces available for large animals)
Earl Warren Show Grounds – 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Check-in at Gate C off of Calle Real (Accepting large animals)
If you need large animal assistance, please call (805) 388-4258
For Fire Information, CALL (805) 465-6650
WAN will continue to update you as information is available.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-animal-emergency-evacuation-information-for-woolsey-hill-fire-affecting-ventura-la-counties/

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TAGS: Animal News,Animal Protection,Emergency Evacuation,Fire,Hill Fire,Los Angeles
Ventura County,Woolsey Fire

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Petition – Hyatt Hotels Must Waive Pet Fees for Families Fleeing Hurricane Florence!

thepetitionsite.com
by: Kelsey B.
recipient: Hyatt Hotels

40,613 SUPPORTERS – 45,000 GOAL

During an emergency, some folks display great humanity by helping out. But corporations are notorious for being heartless in these trying times. Last year after Hurricane Harvey, one hotel forced two family dogs to spend the night in their family’s car.

I don’t know about your dog, but mine is terrified of storms and I could never leave him in the car. After public pressure in the form of this petition, the hotel changed their minds and donated money for the mistake!

At the same time, evacuating is expensive and difficult and coorporations should do what they can to ease that for people.

That’s why I’m asking Hyatt Hotels to waive all pet fees to make it easier for people to evacuate and bring their pets along.Often times during natural disasters, families don’t bring their pets with them because they don’t know where they will be able to stay or they can’t afford it. While this is certainly a horrible choice to make, Hyatt is a huge successful corporation who could make it easier for folks to bring their pets! Hotels should not profit from this tragedy, they should do their best to offset costs and truly be a part of their communities.

Please sign my petition to ask Hyatt Hotels to waive all pet fees and accept pets in all their hotels where evacuees may stay.

Right now Hyatt Hotels are only allowing pets and waiving fees on a case-by-case basis. Let’s get them to make it a short-term corporate policy.more

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/548/566/350/hyatt-hotels-must-waive-pet-fees-for-families-fleeing-hurricane-florence/?TAP=1732&utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=14f17ead09-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_05_07_COPY_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-14f17ead09-106049477

 

Petition · Award the Cajun Navy the Congressional Gold Medal · Change.org

Campaigns Lab started this petition to U.S. Senate and 1 other

The “Cajun Navy” has worked tirelessly over the last few years to help tens of thousands of people who have been pummeled by some of the worst storms in American history. This volunteer group of private boat owners have put their lives on the line to help people in need during natural disasters.

They helped rescue survivors in Texas in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. They worked directly with politicians to rescue victims of Hurricane Irma in Florida.

And just this month they traveled to North Carolina to be on the frontlines during Hurricane Florence, rescuing countless people as flood waters and torrential storm conditions hit communities in the Carolinas hard.

Last year President Trump called out the work of the “Cajun Navy” during his State of the Union address. Now it’s time to go one step further, and honor this volunteer group of heroes with one of the highest civilian honors in the country — the Congressional Gold Medal. Sign this petition to support honoring the “Cajun Navy” with the Congressional Gold Medal.

Previous recipients of this honor include the Native American Code Talkers, the Tuskegee Airmen, Billy Graham, and the Women Airforce Service Pilots, among dozens of other men, women and groups who have made a direct impact on American history. What better way to honor a group that has literally saved thousands of American citizens in times of need than by giving them one of the nation’s highest civilian honors?

Let’s ask Congress to hold up the work the “Cajun Navy” has done during these last few years and continues to do each and every year during natural disasters. Their work can be life-saving, and Congress has a unique moment to thank these folks for volunteering to save their neighbors from floods, hurricanes, tropical storms and more.

https://www.change.org/p/award-the-cajun-navy-the-congressional-gold-medal/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_impact&utm_campaign=427878&utm_content=&sfmc_tk=Y65ELrEVwnOSO7%2bDYTtOcdk13J9MBpW9KMcC2bQ9x2gcexa0DjXb2c9w77aJT%2b0B&j=427878&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=65463576&mid=7233053&jb=554

Hurricane Florence threatens spills from hog farms, sewage plants

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mcclatchydc.com
By Stuart Leavenworth And John Murawski
13-16 minutes

Hurricane Florence threatens to kill thousands of farm animals and trigger catastrophic spills of waste as it bears down on a Carolina coastal region dotted with sewage treatment plants, hog waste lagoons, poultry farms and coal ash ponds.

Past hurricanes, including Matthew in 2016, caused numerous spills from sewage treatment plants and livestock farms, complicating the task of cleaning up after the storm. Florence poses an even more serious risk, especially if the Category 4 hurricane parks itself over the region and dumps record amounts of rain.

Soil in much of the Carolinas is already saturated by several months of rainfall, adding to the potential risk of flooding and the collapse of earthen lagoons containing hog manure, coal ash or other types of waste.

“It heightens the risk,” said Frank Holleman, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. “The fact that the soil is already wet means surrounding land has less capacity to absorb the water. That means these lagoons are at greater threat of being overwhelmed.”

Industry and municipal officials say they are taking steps to minimize the chance of spills. Some accuse environmentalists of exaggerating the threat.

“The preparations for a hurricane began long before the past few hours or days,” said Brandon Warren, president of the North Carolina Pork Council, in a statement. “Our farmers take hurricane threats extremely seriously.”

Hurricane Florence is so large it is certain to cause pollution releases in the Carolinas and Virginia, especially in urban areas that have combined sewer and storm-water systems. In 2016 and 2017, there were 136 sewage spills in an eight-county of eastern North Carolina, 36 of which were caused by severe weather, including 11 caused by Hurricane Matthew, according to the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality.

 

North Carolina is also one of the nation’s top livestock producers, ranking third in poultry production and second in hog production, with more than 2,000 permitted swine farms and 9.3 million pigs. Sampson and Duplin counties are the two biggest producers and, as of Tuesday afternoon, both were within the projected path of Florence.

Most hog farms manage their waste by depositing it in earthen pits, known as lagoons, and spraying it on nearby fields. During big storms, uncovered lagoons — especially those that haven’t been drawn down — can fill up with rain and overflow.

Although the pork industry says that instances of lagoon failure are rare, there have been cases of earthen berms breaking and spilling lagoon waste into waterways. One of the most famous occurred in Onslow County in 1995, causing the worst agricultural spill in state history and leading to a 1997 state moratorium on new hog lagoons.

During Hurricane Floyd in 1999, thousands of hogs were drowned by flood waters, with some found floating down creeks and rivers. That storm also inundated more than 50 hog lagoons, according to figures by the North Carolina Pork Council, which represents both farmers and big pork processors, such as Smithfield Foods.

Floyd5.ST.091899.MBN.JPEG

Struggling to stay alive, hogs from a hog farm approximately 10 miles south of Trenton, NC wait for rescue on the roof of a swine barn as flood waters from the Neuse River claim the hogs too tired to swim anymore following Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

 

In preparation for Florence, the pork council released a statement saying its farmers were moving animals to higher ground, protecting feed stocks and assessing levels of waste in lagoons. Under their state permits, hog farmers must monitor the waste levels in their lagoons at least weekly and after every weather event causing one-inch of rain or more, according to Bridget Munger, a spokeswoman for the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality.

Munger added that, following Hurricane Floyd, North Carolina created a program to provide financial assistance for shutting down lagoons located in the 100-year flood plain. Some 43 swine farms and 100 lagoons in floodplains were closed as a part of the program, she said.

On Tuesday, hog farmer Tom Butler of Harnett County said he’s confident his operations can withstand the storm. But he’s watching the track closely.

“It’s been a wet summer. Five weeks of almost continuous rain,” Butler said. “I have covered lagoons. I can’t imagine guys with open lagoons.”

In its statement, the pork council took a shot at environmental groups for stoking hurricane fears.

“Despite dire predictions from activist environmental groups, North Carolina farmers were well prepared for Hurricane Matthew when it arrived in October 2016,” it said in its statement. The group added that only one waste lagoon failed because of the storm, with 14 others inundated.

Overall, 2,800 hogs and 1.8 million poultry birds died in that storm, according to Heather Overton, a spokeswoman with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture.

Holleman said that coal ash pits managed by Duke Energy, Dominion and other utilities are one of his biggest worries. Some of these pits have failed and caused spills even in relatively good weather.
Floyd2.ST.091899.MBN.JPEG

A farmer rescues a hog from drowning at a hog farm approximately 10 miles south of Trenton, NC. Hogs had climbed on top of their swine barn as flood waters from the Neuse River rose after the passage of Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

Mel Nathanson newsobserver.com

One of the largest spills occurred in February 2014, when 39,000 tons of coal ash flowed into the Dan River from a broken drainage pipe at Duke Energy’s facility in Eden, N.C. Environmentalists also claimed that Duke Energy was responsible for a coal ash spill in the Neuse River during Hurricane Matthew, an accusation the DEQ rejected at the time.

Erin Culbert, a spokeswoman for Duke Energy, said the company has been working to prepare ash basins and cooling ponds for the hurricane. Duke has “pre-staged field staff and equipment” to several ash basin sites, including four in North Carolina and one in South Carolina. “These sites already have lower levels of water in the ash basins due to our basin closure work and can hold significant rainfall,” she said in an email.

Following any flood event, state and federal environmental officials recommend caution in cleaning up property and items that could have become contaminated by flood waters. Such water could be contaminated by toxins and fecal bacteria that could trigger a range of health problems, including rashes and severe food poisoning.

https://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/nation-world/article218184535.html

The News & Observer’s Craig Jarvis contributed to this report.

WAN Update: Important Information Regarding The Aftermath Of The Volcanic Eruption For People, Pets & Exotic Animals On The Big Island Of Hawaii – World Animal News

WAN Update: Important Information Regarding The Aftermath Of The Volcanic Eruption For People, Pets & Exotic Animals On The Big Island Of Hawaii
By Lauren Lewis – May 8, 2018

Sadly, as the local residents on the Big Island of Hawaii continue to grapple with aftermaths of the Kilauea volcano eruption on Thursday and a 6.9-magnitude earthquake on Friday, they must still plan ahead should there be any more disasters.
As of this morning, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory confirms that active venting of lava and hazardous fumes continues in the Leilani Estates Subdivision and a total of 10 fissures have occurred.
Since the initial eruption, more than 1700 people have had to evacuate their homes; sometimes with little notice.
What about the animals?
While some people either evacuated with their pets in tow, others were allowed to briefly stop by their homes yesterday to rescue pets that were left behind. Tragically, many remain in peril.

The Hawaii County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno said that while they are currently not letting people in the area with the proper respiratory gear, they have discussed rescuing animals with the Humane Society.
According to KHON News, a Hawaii County worker who is also an animal lover, is currently working Humane Society staff to enter the area with a fire department technician.
While they have not set up a formal mechanism yet, Magno said, “if residents contact the Humane Society and let them know where their residence is located, what the situation is in their home, and what animals they need to be rescued, they will work out a process.”
Contact the Hawaii Island Humane Society at 808-329-8002.
Pets
People with pets can find temporary shelter at either the Pāhoa Community Center located at 15-3022 Kauhale Street or the Kea‘au Community Center at 16-186 Pili Mua Street.
The Pet-friendly shelters are in need of volunteers to help register people and their pets as they arrive. If you are available, the Hawaii Island Humane Society requests that you call the Keaau shelter at 808-966-5458. They are also in need of dog and cat food and new or used sheets and towels.

The Hawaii Island Humane Society has also issued the following guidelines to help keep animals safe in the event of an evacuation:

All pet owners should be safe and prepared. If you are advised to evacuate, please consider your pet’s safety. Do not leave animals behind.
Develop your plan now for their ongoing care including transportation requirements. Reach out to family and friends to discuss arrangements in the event of an evacuation.
If you need to organize boarding elsewhere, get in touch with a boarding facility for advance arrangements.
The HIHS Keaau Shelter does not board animals. Do not drop off animals here.
Pahoa Community Center and Keaau Senior Center are pet-friendly shelters. The dogs and cats are being housed at the shelters with their owners. Note that 61 dogs and 35 cats have been dropped off since the evacuation notice was issued.
Larger animals including horses and livestock may need to be moved well in advance. Call friends or family members to locate alternate pastures.
Gather items for your pet’s emergency kit which should include the following items: Crate, Leash, Food, Water, Bowls, Towel, Identification, and Medication if applicable.
Donations can be made to the Hawaii Island Humane Society, here. http://worldanimalnews.com/wan-update-the-big-island-of-hawaii-important-information-for-people-pets-exotic-animals/!

Exotic Animals
Three Ring Ranch, Hawaii’s only fully-accredited, USDA licensed, exotic animal sanctuary, updated its Facebook page on May 4th while assuring their followers the volcanic eruption is on the other side of the island so the flow is in no way endangering the facility.
“We are offering our services to owners of exotic animals that may need to be sheltered via the disaster management group and the Humane Society. Only for exotics. We are in touch with the USDA who are offering help should we need it,” the organization explained in the post. “For those on the island, please consider being prepared to help if needed. Email or message if we can count on your aide. For those on the mainland, this would be a great time to go online and make a donation. We are ordering feed in advance via USPS as shipping may be disrupted and this is insanely costly.”
Contact Three Ring Ranch at 808-331-8778 or email Animals@ThreeRingRanch,org.
The postal address is as follows: Ann and Norm Goody at Three Ring Ranch, Inc., 75-809 Keaolani Dr., KAILUA KONA, HI 96740-8815.
As of now, the sanctuary has not been called to help any animals but if anyone hears of any exotics in need of help, they are ready to lend a hand noting that their “quarantine room is ready and waiting and we can capture, and sedate if needed.”
Donations to Three Ring Ranch can also be made here. http://worldanimalnews.com/wan-update-the-big-island-of-hawaii-important-information-for-people-pets-exotic-animals/!
People can also call The Salvation Army at 808-756-0306 for information concerning in-kind or monetary donations, or prepared meals.
WAN will continue to update this story.

http://worldanimalnews.com/wan-update-the-big-island-of-hawaii-important-information-for-people-pets-exotic-animals/

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Petition: Don’t Force Wildfire Victims Out of Their Homes, California


https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/466/802/759/

The Animals of Natural Disasters – FI weREPAW, Inc.

animals-in-natural-disasters

The Animals of Natural Disasters
firepawincSeptember 16, 2017Uncategorized

Natural disasters like the recent hurricanes can take a terrible toll on animals–and their humans…’In 1999, Hurricane Floyd caused 2.9 million pet and livestock deaths, and thousands more owners lost their pets. The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina was particularly devastating. The Louisiana SPCA estimates that 15,500 animals required rescue, and that 80-85 percent of these animals were never reunited with their owners.’ The big question: What measures are in place to help prevent death, injury and separation of animals in natural disasters? And, what can we do to improve the odds?

What happens to Rex and Kitty after a natural disaster?

The ASPCA conducted the first ever nationwide assessment of emergency response capabilities for animals, the results of which were reported in Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in an article entitled, “The National Capabilities for Animal Response in Emergencies (NCARE) Study: An Assessment of US States and Counties.” This survey of officials who oversee emergency preparedness in US States and counties — led by Vic Spain, DVM, PhD, veterinary epidemiologist for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) — investigated which American communities are prepared to deal with the animal victims of an emergency and how and where emergency response planning can be improved.

The results of the study were mixed — much progress has been made, but there is still much to be done. Most states and about half of high-population cities and counties had organizational infrastructure for managing animals in a disaster, such as a State or County Animal Response Team. In contrast, only about one in four smaller population counties had such an organization, even in regions of the country prone to frequent natural disasters. People with pets are more likely than people without pets to refuse to evacuate in an emergency situation, putting their lives, as well as the lives of the people sent to rescue them, in danger. Only a little more than half of US counties, however, reported having plans for emergency shelters in which pets and people could be housed together.

A loss of animal life not only has an economic, but also a psychological impact. Studies show that pet loss after a disaster can be devastating for humans. Fifty-six percent of Americans now have pets. In the future, due to population growth, and the increase of not only the percentage of Americans living in disaster-prone areas, but also the number of natural disasters, the problem is going to get bigger.

Journal Reference: C. Victor Spain, R.C. Green, Lacie Davis, Gregory S. Miller, Susan Britt. The National Capabilities for Animal Response in Emergencies (NCARE) Study: An Assessment of US States and Counties. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, 2017; 0 (0) DOI: 10.1515/jhsem-2017-0014

 

source ; photo: @darkbluedaddy

animals death injury and separation from humans in natural disasters, animals in natural disasters

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Copyright FIREPAW, Inc., 1999-2017

 

Republican solution to wildfires: Sell the trees!