Can we put a stamp on Biden and the rest of his clowns and send them to our enemies he’s really good at destroying countries

“Gravitas: Thanks to America, Taliban now has an Air Force”

U.S. Navy Not Ready For War, ‘Weathering A Crisis’ Of Woke Leadership And Culture: Report

www.dailywire.com

Emily Zanotti

A new report for Congress, prepared by retired naval officers Marine Lt. Gen. Robert Schmidle and Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, at the behest of Republican legislators, claims the United States Navy is an “institution adrift,” is not prepared for war, and is struggling through a “crisis” of woke leadership, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The report, commissioned by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton (AK), and Reps. Mike Gallagher (WI), Dan Crenshaw (TX), and Jim Banks (IN) was designed to uncover whether the ongoing efforts to improve “diversity, equity, and inclusion” (DEI) training was affecting military readiness — and whether the DEI efforts were impeding the duty of the United States Military.

“The impetus for the report was a series of recent catastrophes—a ship burning in San Diego last year; two destroyer collisions in the Pacific in 2017,” WSJ noted, adding that the legislators were concerned that “larger institutional issues that are degrading the performance of the entire naval surface force.”

The two retired naval officers “conducted long-form interviews with numerous active-duty and recently retired or detached officers and enlisted personnel about their insights into the culture of the United States Navy following a series of high-profile and damaging operational failures in the Navy’s Surface Warfare community.”

Among the key findings: “Many sailors found their leadership distracted, captive to bureaucratic excess, and rewarded for the successful execution of administrative functions,” rather than for their readiness for combat, per WSJ.

“I guarantee you every unit in the Navy is up to speed on their diversity training,” one “recently retired senior enlisted leader” reportedly told the outlet. “I’m sorry that I can’t say the same of their ship-handling training.”

“Sometimes I think we care more about whether we have enough diversity officers than if we’ll survive a fight with the Chinese navy,” one “anonymous active-duty lieutenant” told investigators per Fox News.

The report added that the Navy does not spend enough time or money on training its surface warfare officers, leaving its war rooms “ill-prepared.” The Navy’s deployments are too long, the report noted, risking efficiency, and commanding officers are trained to be “risk-averse,” because of a culture of “brutal accountability” for administrative decisions.

Retired Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery spoke about the report to Fox News on Wednesday, blasted the Navy’s apparent lack of preparedness, and suggested that relative peacetime has made the Navy a bureaucracy rather than a fighting force.

Montgomery “noted that there were ‘suspicions’ of ‘underinvestment in officer training and under-resourced ship maintenance,’ however, ‘what we didn’t know was how perceptive the young sailors, the men and women who crew our ships are,’” Fox reported. “Montgomery went on to say that the report showed that the sailors indicated there was an ‘overfocus’ on administration and training, which was ‘pulling us away from our focus on warfighting.’”

“When a Navy ship gets ready to get underway, it needs to focus on training and warfighting and not on administrative briefings on any issue or that issue,” he added but noted that with the right “investment” things could be turned around quickly.

“It’s got to be that focus on warfighting,” Montgomery said.  “The way you get there is the proper investments of the sailor’s time and the government’s and the taxpayer’s money.”

“The sailors’ time is in warfighting, not briefings,” he continued. “The government’s money is in high-end simulations and in the maintenance of the ships.”

The Daily Wire is one of America’s fastest-growing conservative media companies and counter-cultural outlets for news, opinion, and entertainment. Get inside access to The Daily Wire by becoming a member.

https://www.dailywire.com/news/u-s-navy-not-ready-for-war-weathering-a-crisis-of-woke-leadership-and-culture-report?%3Futm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=dwtwitter

Freedom Fighters 🦅🇺🇸

Archaeologists Propose 4,500-Year-Old Burial Mound Was World’s First Military Memorial

www.smithsonianmag.com

Bridget Alex

Roughly 4,500 years ago, some Mesopotamians living in present-day Syria decided to remodel and repurpose one of their community’s most prominent monuments: a rippled white dome that entombed the dead. For generations residents periodically climbed the monument’s exterior to pour libations and place offerings over graves beneath its surface. But the renovation around 2450 B.C. covered this communal space with earthen terraces, transforming the dome into a six-story ziggurat, or stepped pyramid. And those steps were packed with more than soil: The renovators also deposited assortments of human bones, skins from animals that drew wagons and two-inch-long clay bullets, handy for arming slingshot-like weapons.

These skeletons seem to have been fallen soldiers—wagon drivers and sling-shooters—exhumed and reburied to potentially create the world’s first military memorial, according to a study forthcoming in Antiquity. The Syrian site, known as the White Monument, could offer the best evidence yet that urban rulers wielded enough power to support standing armies by the third millennium B.C., in the Early Bronze Age. Unlike other tombs from the time, which included valuable metal weapons and jewelry, the remodeled White Monument contained partial skeletons of mostly adults and teens, buried with the ammo or animals needed for specific tasks in battle. Like the United States’ Arlington National Cemetery, the monument likely held soldiers, whose remains were retrieved from battlegrounds or other gravesites to be buried with co-combatants.

Such a massive memorial for battle-dead suggests the town had a standing army: “people who identify as soldiers, as opposed to people who go out and fight in the offseason or when someone’s attacking,” says Stephanie Selover, an archaeologist at the University of Washington who studies ancient warfare in nearby Anatolia, but was not involved in the study.

“The possibility of standing armies that are so controlled and centralized you’re even able to make a monument… There’s nothing else like this,” in the Early Bronze Age, she adds.

The monument would have served as a conspicuous reminder that leaders had the means to maintain and memorialize an army—a message that would have been received by locals as well as outside foreigners. “Burying these people in the sort of function that they would have had in a military is really a statement of power at that point, both locally and externally, because this thing was really visible for miles,” says University of Toronto archaeologist Anne Porter, lead author of the Antiquity study.

Prior to this research, scholars have found ample evidence for violence during the Early Bronze Age, including massacre sites and daggers tucked in graves. “Nothing makes this a particularly crunchy or peaceful time,” says Seth Richardson, a historian of the ancient Near East at the University of Chicago, who was not involved in the study.

But the idea that professional soldiers existed then mainly comes from inscriptions and artifacts, like the Stele of the Vultures, limestone fragments that once constituted a roughly six-foot-tall carving, made between 2600 and 2350 B.C. Discovered in the late-19th century at the Iraqi site of Tello, the stele depicted battle scenes including ranks of spear-totting soldiers in helmets. It also showed a haphazard assemblage of bodies, thought to be slain enemies, and a carefully piled stack of bodies, interpreted as the victor’s lost soldiers. Artistic works like the Stele of the Vultures “are the propaganda. You always have this mighty king smiting somebody, the little men behind him and then the enemy soldiers with their heads cut off. It’s very formulaic,” explains Selover. But if the researchers are right about the White Monument, it would be the first physical example of memorial mound for a victor’s fallen soldiers, depicted on carvings. A jar packed with about 100 beads was found in the White Monument.

Miniature Jar

The artifact likely was placed as an offering before the structure was repurposed for soldiers. (Euphrates Salvage Project)

In the 1990s, the White Monument bulged from cotton fields like a dune-colored cone. “It was just this huge pile of dirt,” recalls Porter. But when sunlight struck, the mound twinkled white—thanks to gypsum and marl used as building materials—and earned its moniker.

The gleaming dirt stood several hundred feet from a more sprawling ruin-layered hill, or tell. Porter’s team excavated both spots, and called the White Mountain, “Tell Banat North,” and the more expansive feature, “Tell Banat.” Though in the 20th century, Tells Banat and Banat North looked like two distinct hills, back in the third millennium B.C. they belonged to a single urban center, which spread over 70 acres. Within Tell Banat the archaeologists found the town itself, including buildings, streets, pottery workshops and a stone tomb. The White Monument, or Tell Banat North, was solely a burial monument, which loomed just beyond the city walls.

“Everywhere we put a pick and a trowel revealed something truly remarkable,” recalls Porter. The full area “was a site… that you could spend a lifetime working.”

Though they knew at the time that wouldn’t happen: The ancient settlement, along with more than a dozen other sites, was in the planned flood zone of the Tishreen hydroelectric dam, which was being built in the 1990s. Pressed for time and resources, the team unearthed and documented as much as they could—and moved the finds to a storehouse in Syria—before floodwaters engulfed the ancient sites as well as modern villages in the area. Porter and excavation codirector Thomas McClellan of the Euphrates Salvage Project witnessed the flood. “It was a really traumatic experience, watching the water rise and all these mudbrick villages collapsing,” says Porter.

For the next decade, the team examined skeletal remains and artifacts recovered from the site, until ISIS razed the dig’s storehouse. The militants obliterated ancient bones, pottery and other items, and reportedly dumped the debris into the river. “I don’t think there is anything to retrieve there,” Porter says, based on secondhand accounts of the attack.

Though the site and the finds are gone, the researchers have continued making discoveries from archival data, as all professional digs do. As excavations unfolded, archaeologists compiled meticulous notes, photos and spatial measurements, which documented how each find was positioned, relative to the surrounding sediment and architectural remnants. For this site, experts on skeletal analysis described and measured the human and animal bones recovered, before ISIS destroyed them. The data survived in published reports as well as unpublished notebooks, photographs, sketches and spreadsheets, kept with Porter in Canada.

Sussing patterns and meaning from this data is the behind the scenes work of real archaeology, which the public or beginning students rarely glimpse. Porter and her professional colleagues chipped away at the Tell Banat and Banat North records after the dig wrapped in 1999. Several years ago, she realized the work could provide a unique learning opportunity. “I really wanted to teach a class where students actually did what archaeologists do, rather than seeing the world’s greatest hits or all the pretty stuff,” she says.

In 2018 Porter taught a seminar called “Death on the Euphrates” at the University of Toronto. About ten undergrads set out to answer: Who was buried in the White Monument?

“They learned very quickly that the life of an archaeologist isn’t all glamour and Indiana Jones, and that it’s really very tedious work, a lot of the time,” Porter says.

Through the semester, she lectured about Mesopotamian culture, ancient mortuary practices and what was already known about Tell Banat and Banat North. At the same time, the students tried to understand the burials in the White Mountain, based on the notebooks, photos and other documents.

Alexandra Baldwin, a 2019 graduate who took the class, recalls her first day: “I walked in and there were just these enormous folders of all of the data. I had never seen anything like it.”

Porter figured the class would be a valuable learning opportunity. She didn’t expect the group to discover something new about the ancient Near East. The students mapped out the clusters of bones and grave goods in the White Monument and compared the contents of each deposit. Through discussions and comparisons with other sites, it became clear that the human remains were deliberately placed in a manner that changed over time. “There was a meaning behind that,” explains Brittany Enriquez, a student in the class who graduated in 2018. “It wasn’t like there was just stuff all through the dirt.”

The team’s analysis convincingly showed that the White Monument was really a series of tombs, built over several centuries. Like a Russian nesting doll, the ~2,450 B.C. final construction encased a prior monument erected between 2450 and 2,700 B.C., which contained a still older mound. Porter’s excavation reached the smooth, white surface of this third-inner monument, but the flood occurred before the team could dig its contents—and see if even earlier monuments nested within.

Enigmatic rituals took place at the middle monument. Its numerous tombs contained assorted bones from about two to five individuals, along with animal remains and pottery. The Banat morticians covered these modest graves with white gypsum, rammed into horizontal bands, which made the full monument look like a groomed ski hill. Later, the Banat individuals dug through the surface to bury more partial skeletons, possibly of ordinary residents, this time sealed with layers of plaster. They also seem to have left offerings, including beads, alabaster bowls, human shinbones and ritual libations—suggested from soak stains on the plaster.

Gypsum and Earth Surface

A rammed gypsum and earth surface covered the burial mound that preceded the possible soldier memorial. (Euphrates Salvage Project)

According to the researchers, the monument’s last renovation around 2450 B.C. marked a drastic change: The communal tomb became a monument for slain soldiers. Within the added steps, the renovators buried at least 29 individuals in discrete patches with rings, figurines and other artifacts. In one corner of the monument most of the burials included skulls and appendages of donkey-like animals, probably interred as hides with heads and hooves still attached. These equids likely pulled battle wagons. In another corner, loads of clay bullets or pellets accompanied the human bones.

Those pellets “are the unsung heroes of the ancient near,” says Selover. Though the artifact has long puzzled scholars, evidence has mounted that, when shot from slings, they hailed down on foes and could be lethal. “It’s a really sophisticated weapon for being a very simple weapon,” she adds.

“The means of violence in deep antiquity didn’t need to be particularly scary by our standards to be effective by theirs,” explains Richardson. Even if some weapons were simple, and the monument only held a few dozen soldiers, it sent a message of might.

Given the scale of the renovations, it’s doubtful they came about in a grassroots fashion. Rather, the White Monument remodel suggests leaders around 2450 B.C. had enough authority within the settlement to take over a long-used community tomb and devote it to their soldiers. And at 72-feet-tall, the monument could be spied from afar, deterring potential invaders and raiders.

Former students Baldwin and Enriquez know that their take is one plausible interpretation of the available evidence, but that other explanations are possible. Still, Baldwin says she’s proud of their work, “sifting through all this material to leave a narrative… something probable that supports looking at the distant past with more depth and with more humanity.”

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/archaeologists-propose-4500-year-old-burial-mound-was-worlds-first-military-memorial-180977981/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20210621-daily-responsive&spMailingID=45182129&spUserID=MTI2NjAzMzY5NDQ2OAS2&spJobID=2025542710&spReportId=MjAyNTU0MjcxMAS2

A caring hand and heart

Sign the Petition: Honoring Major Andrew D. Myers

www.change.org

Daniel Glor started this petition to President, Board of Education Michael Fuchs and 6 others

Honoring Major Andrew D. Byers

Proposal:
We propose to name the Clarence High School pool after Major Andrew D. Byers, a distinguished Clarence Swimming Alumnus.  Doing so will honor and commemorate how he lived and the example he set through his bravery, character, and the ultimate sacrifice he made in defense of our nation.

Clarence alumni swimmers and divers often return to the pool to visit the team and share stories, provide advice, and enjoy the camaraderie. The students gain insight and inspiration from these alumni visits. Andy will never be able to share his brave story and rich insights with current and future swimmers, so we propose doing so on his behalf by memorializing him in a noted place in his life: The Clarence High School pool. Naming the pool after this beloved husband, son, brother, dear friend, distinguished student athlete and selfless guardian of our nation’s freedom will provide an example for future generations of Clarence swimmers and students.

Andy’s Story:
Major Andrew Byers (US Army Special Forces) was killed in action in Kunduz, Afghanistan on November 3, 2016 while conducting a ‘Train, Advise, and Assist’ mission with Afghan special operations forces. Byers was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for selflessly running into a kill zone to retrieve a fallen Afghan comrade, for maintaining positive control of a 59-man force during a seemingly hopeless situation, and for sacrificing his life by leading from the front to rescue his men.

By putting himself in harm’s way to selflessly save his comrades, Andy died in a manner consistent with the way he lived. Those that knew Andy best were not surprised by the accounts of the selfless valor he displayed that day. Andy’s strength of character was apparent to those he interacted with throughout his life. His peers and friends would often tell others how he served as a shining example of the very best that Clarence High School has to offer.


Andy especially shined in the pool as a four-time All-American Swimmer and team captain. As detailed by his swim coach Eric McClaren, “It was Andy’s distinct ability to lead and to motivate the people around him that set him apart from others. He was a role model from the first day he walked into the pool. Even the upperclassmen would tell you that Andy was the driving force behind our team. It is no coincidence that Andy’s class never lost a dual meet in his entire high school career.”

Andy was known to have the strongest work ethic on the team and an unmatched drive to not only be his best, but to help others around him realize their true potential. While Andy was a formidable example of strength, he also possessed genuine kindness and compassion when interacting with those who needed some encouragement. Andy was welcoming to all. Andy excelled in academics at Clarence and participated in student council and the yearbook committee. Despite his many achievements, Andy remained the same modest person his peers came to know.


After graduating from Clarence, Andy attended The United States Military Academy at West Point, where he graduated 12th in his class of 972. Following graduation, Andy joined the Green Berets, successfully completed Jump School, and became a ranking officer of a High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) Parachutist team. Andy had a distinguished military career, highlighted by a posthumous award of the Silver Star, the United States’ third highest decoration for valor in combat.

In addition to receiving the Silver Star, throughout his distinguished career, Andy was awarded the Purple Heart, three Army Commendation Medals, Army Achievement Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Iraq Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Global War on Terrorism Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon, Combat Infantryman Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, Parachutist and Military Free Fall Parachutist badges, the Ranger tab, and the Special Forces tab.


The fellow alumni of Clarence High School are honored to have Andy as an alumnus. There are no words to properly encapsulate the quality of Andy’s character, but Coach McClaren comes closest with “exceptional.” Andy was a beloved husband, son and brother, a dear friend, distinguished student -athlete, and a selfless guardian of our nation. Naming the Clarence High School pool after Andy is a permanent and tangible way to honor him, recognize the way he lived his life, and enables his story to serve as an example for future generations of Clarence students.


Be thou at peace Andy. May we forever honor your bravery and sacrifice.

Please find further details of Andy’s heroics in the article included below: https://www.army.mil/article/181848/until_dawn_surviving_the_battle_of_boz_qandahari

https://www.change.org/p/michael-fuchs-honoring-major-andrew-d-byers?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=1780490&grid_position=7&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAGieyQAAAAAAYLUrAUXMDSY3YjY2YTExNg%3D%3D

Is this the new military?

Wokeism Is Destroying This Nation

Navy Secretary’s Resignation Highlights ‘Feminization’ Of American Military

Ride Along With The Blue Angels

Man seeks veteran’s family to return lost WWII regalia, including Bronze Star

 

ROY, Utah — A Utah man is searching for the family of a World War II hero.

Jim Thorpe has held onto a casket flag and war medals for nearly a year. He’s hoping he can finally return them to Thomas D. Walker’s family.

Walker was a World War II hero, a brave soldier in the Pacific Theater. He was honored for his conduct in the military and heroism in battle.

“He was obviously someone special that did something to earn those medals,” Thorpe told KSTU sitting on his porch on Memorial Day.

A Purple Heart and Bronze Star engraved with his name are among the five medals in a shadow box. Above them, a folded flag once draped over a casket. In front, a black and white picture of a helmeted young man holding a mortar.

“I feel it belongs with the family,” Thorpe said.

Thorpe never knew Thomas D. Walker. He doesn’t know where he lived or even which branch of the military he served. But in his possession, symbols of Walker’s courage and character.

“I can’t imagine this isn’t missed,” Thorpe said. “Somebody knows this is missing.”

It was found dirty and forgotten, in the back of the closet of a 31st Street Ogden apartment. Thorpe’s friend discovered it and gave it to him last summer.

The grandson of two WWII veterans contacted the US military and searched online for the soldier’s family.

“Honestly, I figured somebody would claim it right away. I didn’t think that I’d be holding onto it for so long,” Thorpe said.

The common name of Thomas Walker overwhelmed Thorpe while searching among 16 million WWII American soldiers.

In the middle of cancer treatment himself, Thorpe discovered two possible connections: one in Oregon, and another in Illinois. While nothing is concrete yet, Thorpe’s not giving up.

“I’d like to learn more about him. He’s been with me for a minute but I would like to get him back to his family. That’s the ultimate goal,” he said.

If you have information on Thomas D. Walker, Thorpe can be contacted through britneythorpe34@gmail.com.

https://fox13now.com/2019/05/27/roy-man-seeks-veterans-family-to-return-lost-wwii-regalia/

Heroic Pigeons

Humane PA

By Elissa Katz, President, Humane PA PACSee the source image

During World War I, a pigeon named Cher Ami flew for the US Army Signal Corp in France, and served on the front lines for many months. She is credited with single-handedly saving the lives of over 200 American soldiers by flying 25 miles and through a sky of bullets, sustaining serious injuries in the process, to deliver a life-saving message to the Allied lines on behalf of the embattled 77th Infantry Division.  Cher Ami was awarded the French Croix de Guerre and the “silver medal” by General Pershing for his heroism and bravery.

What a contrast with how we treat pigeons in Pennsylvania.

In Pennsylvania, pigeons like Cher Ami are netted, often unlawfully and from out of state, stockpiled, and then used for live target shooting competitions known as pigeon shoots.

The British depended on pigeons so extensively during…

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Belgian Students Commemorate 100 Years By Restoring Graves of WW1 Soldiers «TwistedSifter

twistedsifter.com

Belgian students commemorate 100 years by restoring graves of ww1 soldiers 2 Belgian Students Commemorate 100 Years By Restoring Graves of WW1 Soldiers

© Benny Proot

To commemorate 100 years since the end of World War I; Belgian students cleaned, repainted and restored 250 graves spread over 5 cemeteries in Oostkamp and surrounding municipalities.

The idea was to honour and remember the brave soldiers of World War I, and ensure that their identification and data remains clearly legible for all visitors wishing to pay their respects.

The pupils who volunteered for the effort were art students currently enrolled in painting classes.

picture of the day button Belgian Students Commemorate 100 Years By Restoring Graves of WW1 Soldiers

twistedsifter on facebook Belgian Students Commemorate 100 Years By Restoring Graves of WW1 Soldiers

https://twistedsifter.com/2018/09/belgian-students-restore-graves-of-ww1-soldiers/#like-118311

Categories: ART, BEST OF, HISTORY, PICTURE OF THE DAY
Tags: · belgium, cemetery, painting, restoration, tribute, war, world war 1

WAN Exclusive For International Assistance Dog Week with “Dogs Of Service” Founder Saralyn Tartaglia Who Helps Rescue Dogs For Military Veterans – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
August 9, 2018
Air Force veteran Eric Pina with his family which now includes his service dog, Loki. Photos from Dogs of Service.
With so much negative attention focused on service animals as of late, WAN is thrilled to acknowledge International Assistance Dog Week by featuring a unique and much-needed non-profit organization dedicated to providing service dogs and emotional support animals that have been rescued to help military veterans.
International Assistance Dog Week, which was created to recognize all the devoted, hardworking assistance dogs helping individuals mitigate their disability related limitations, began on August 5th and runs through August 11th.
Fortunately, Los Angeles-based Dogs of Service makes rescue dogs and veterans in need, a priority every day, as it works to maintain a community of support and resources for all military members and their animals.
“We chose to focus on veterans because there was a great need for innovative solutions to help veterans dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries. Sadly, the average suicide rate of veterans is 22 per day. Veterans and dogs can find a mutual understanding and provide a sense of comfort other humans can’t, and that relationship can be used to bridge further healing and treatment,” Dogs of Service Founder Saralyn Tartaglia told WAN. Further explaining that it is important that the organization, which is authorized to pull animals from city shelters, only pairs veterans with dogs who have been rescued from shelters.
“We love the unspoken understanding and bond that happens when a veteran meets a rescue dog, it’s amazing. We were inspired by the ability of rescue dogs to sense emotions and be compassionate,” continued Tartaglia. “I started this organization because veterans have made many sacrifices, so this is our way to give back to them.”

Most recently, Dogs of Service paired Air Force veteran Eric Pina, who suffers from PTSD, with a new service dog that will be trained to help him. As per Tartaglia, a service dog can provide support and comfort to help its person push through difficult situations to make progress.
“The dogs we were looking at for Eric and his family just were not working out; then this puppy walked into the shelter on her own and literally checked herself in. After a meeting, it was clear she was the dog for them. She was even playing with lil Eric,” Dogs of Service posted on its Facebook page noting they will train the dog, now named Loki, to be a PTSD service dog for Eric.
“Dogs of Service connected me with not only a service dog but a loyal friend that has become my family,” shared Pena.
Having to care for a dog also gives many people a sense of purpose that enables them to “get up every morning to be part of the world,” said Tartaglia who shared that the routine the dog sets can also be helpful to maintain a healthy and consistent lifestyle.
“On the downside, because of all the negative attention and lack of knowledge about service dogs and emotional support animals, it has become a struggle for many veterans to go out in public or travel with their dog,” Tartaglia told WAN. “Veterans are being pressed for details about their dogs, bullied out of housing, being forced to adhere to illegal requirements, and having to deal with untrained fake service dogs in public spaces that may put real service dogs and their handlers at risk.
The American Disabilities Act (ADA) has defined a service dog as one that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. The tasks performed by the dog must be directly related to the person’s disability.
ADA guidelines in regard to service dogs are written loosely to enable all people to have access to a service dog: it does not discriminate in regard to “finances, location, type of disability, and access to urban areas.
It is important to note, as per Tartaglia, that many people do not understand that the ADA only covers public spaces; it does not cover housing, airports, trains and flights.
Tartaglia also encourages people to be wary of any online registry offering service dog certification and ID Cards, because service dogs and emotional support animals do not need to be registered or certified in any way.
“Having a service dog is a choice to be made with medical and care providers, it is a big responsibility and undertaking, but for some people, it can be life-changing,” continued Tartaglia, noting that service dog costs can range anywhere from $5000.00 to $25,000.00 with owner trained service dogs being on the low-end.
Dogs of Service currently offers weekly service dog training classes in Sherman Oaks, California, and is looking to expand into the Santa Clarita Valley, and possibly the South Bay, with more classes in 2019.
The classes are designed to teach dogs the vital socialization skills they need while also allowing veterans to connect and interact with each other.

.
Dogs of Service has an application process so that they can figure out what the veteran needs and find a dog that is the best fit for them and their life.
Tartaglia also often helps veterans navigate the legal side, as well as ensuring that they can have dogs in their residences and assisting them with travel guidelines. To ensure a good pairing, Dogs of Service works with behaviorists and trainers for training to ensure that the veterans can learn how best to work with their dogs.

https://worldanimalnews.com/wan-exclusive-for-international-assistance-dog-week-with-dogs-of-service-founder-saralyn-tartaglia-who-helps-rescue-dogs-for-military-veterans/

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

North Korea returns remains of soldiers missing since Korean War

nypost.com
North Korea returns remains of soldiers missing since Korean War
By Joe Tacopino

North Korea has turned over the potential remains of US soldiers who have been missing since the Korean war — part of a commitment made by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to President Trump.

A US Air Force plane carrying 55 cases of remains landed at Osan Air Base in South Korea where a formal ceremony will be held on August 1, the White House said in a statement Thursday night.

Also on the plane were technical experts from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

“It is a solemn obligation of the United States Government to ensure that the remains are handled with dignity and properly accounted for so their families receive them in an honorable manner,” the statement read.

The agreement to return the remains were made during a historic summit between Kim and Trump in Singapore last month.

The White House said the move was the first step in achieving the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

https://nypost.com/2018/07/26/north-korea-returns-remains-of-soldiers-missing-since-korean-war/?utm_source=maropost&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=news_alert&utm_content=20180726&mpweb=755-7148561-719298164

Veteran’s service dog has a touching reunion with the inmate who trained him

positiveoutlooksblog.com

It takes a lot of guts to be a part of the military, you have to be physically fit, mentally stable, and emotionally strong. The time that soldiers spend in the battlefield, away from their family, friends and loved ones surely have an adverse effect on our honorable military men.

In the Vietnam war alone, 15 percent of the Vietnam veterans were diagnosed with PTSD or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD is a mental health disorder acquired after experiencing a traumatic, shocking, scary or dangerous event.

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, there are a lot of ways to help one cope up with PTSD. The site advises people with PTSD to consult a psychologist or psychiatrist for professional mental health care. It also encourages people with PTSD to engage in positive activities such as sports to distract themselves with. Another way to overcome PTSD is to surround yourself with a support group and as well as acquiring the help of a service dog.

A 47-year-old veteran named Sgt. Bill Campbell who suffers from PTSD, chose to be assisted by a service dog called Pax. The veteran who also suffers from memory loss, and fear of crowds, was given a yellow Labrador, Pax, to help him cope.
According to the veteran, Pax has been a great help especially when he’s having an episode of PTSD. Without the yellow Labrador, he would have a lot of difficulties. Hence, Sgt. Bill was really interested to meet the trainer who nurtured Pax with the skills he has today.

Wanting to express his gratitude in person, Sgt. Bill reached out to Pax’s trainer, who turned out to be a woman named Laurie Kellog. After learning that Pax used to live at Bedford Hills Correctional Facility, taken care of by a number of female inmates, as a part of the service dog training program, Sgt. Bill made his move.

The veteran traveled to meet Laurie, Pax’s trainer, to express his sincere gratitude for nurturing Pax. There, Sgt. Bill learned that Laurie had taken delight in training Pax to be a PTSD service dog. According to the trainer, she too suffered from PTSD after being a victim of domestic violence.

Laurie admitted that even when Pax was still in training, the dutiful dog had brought her back to live in the present when she was having a PTSD attack. She recalled how the service dog made her feel safe around him. Thus, when she found out that Pax would lend his assistance to a soldier who also suffered from PTSD, she was more than happy.

Laurie was not the only one who was thrilled to be reunited with the dog who changed her life. Evident in the way Pax wagged his tails upon seeing his old trainer, the dog was happy and excited as well. Pax, remembering Laurie, wasted no time and ran right up to her, showering her with lots of kisses!

With both of them understanding how it feels like to have a PTSD, Laurie, and Sgt. Bill greeted each other with an embrace. Pax also had the best moment of his life when his former and present owners, bonded with each other.

True enough, any baggage carried by more than one person, gets lighter and easier to carry. Fortunately for us humans, we have our pawed pals to entrust our life and share our problems with! Indeed, dogs are man’s best friend!

Watch the heartwarming reunion between Pax and his inmate trainer Laurie that will surely pull strings to your heart.

 

https://positiveoutlooksblog.com/2018/07/26/veterans-service-dog-has-a-touching-reunion-with-the-inmate-who-trained-him/

Photo and Video l The Ophra Winfrey Show

Please Sign The Card To Thank Our Heroes | USO

75,000 signatures needed to hit our goal!

From patrolling the sweltering deserts of Afghanistan to providing critical hurricane relief for Gulf Coast communities, our brave military men and women sacrifice so much for all of us. Let’s make sure they know we’re grateful for their service. Sign the thank-you card today.

Thank you for everything you do.

https://action.uso.org/1709_REC?sc=WM17RECN08&utm_source=1709_Recognition_FB_acq&utm_medium=fb_ad&utm_campaign=1709_Recognition_FB_acq_WM17RECN08&utm_content=1709_Recognition_FB_acq&donate=WM17RECN08

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Navy Investigates Bible on “Missing Man Table” Tribute

reclaimourrepublic.wordpress.com
https://reclaimourrepublic.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/navy-investigates-bible-on-missing-man-table-tribute/#like-103495

Navy Investigates Bible on “Missing Man Table” Tribute
April 9, 2018 by Todd Starnes
The U.S. Navy is investigating complaints lodged by a sailors and Marines about a Bible and a “One Nation under God” placard placed on a POW/MIA table at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Okinawa, Japan.

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation, a radical group that has a history of targeting public displays of Christianity, filed the complaint on behalf of 26 military personnel and civilian staff.

They wrote a seven-page complaint alleging that a Christian Bible was placed on a Prisoner of War/Missing in Action display in the hospital’s public gallery.

“Why is that Bible there,” MRFF president Mikey Weinstein demanded to know in an interview with Stars & Stripes. “Can you imagine if somebody put a Quran there, or the book of Satan, or the Book of Mormon? It’s violates the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause as well as DoD and Navy regulations.”

Rear Adm. Paul D. Pearigen ordered an investigation into the public display at the Navy’s largest overseas hospital, the San Diego Union Tribune reports.

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation also wants the Navy to remove a placard explaining the reason why the Bible is a part of the display.

“The Bible represents the strength gained through faith to sustain those lost from our country, founded one nation under God,” the placard reads.

The MRFF was grossly triggered and offended by the statement – calling it unconstitutional and a “slap in the face to every non-Christian.”

“The statement on the Exhibit’s placard is nothing more than an illegal, unconstitutional proselytization from an extremist, fundamentalist Christian sect,” their attorney wrote. “It ignores all followers of other religions and totally ignores all those who subscribe to no religion – all in blatant violation of DoD and DON regulations.”

However, according to the U.S. Navy the Bible and the placard are on the table for a reason. Click here to read it for yourself.

The white tablecloth draped over the table represents the purity of their response to our country’s call to arms.

The empty chair depicts an unknown face, representing no specific Soldier, Sailor, Airman, or Marine, but all who are not here with us.

The table itself is round to show that our concern for them is never ending.

The Bible represents faith in a higher power and the pledge to our country, founded as one nation under God.

The black napkin stands for the emptiness these warriors have left in the hearts of their families and friends. A Purple Heart medal can be pinned to the napkin.

The single red rose reminds us of their families and loved ones. The red ribbon represents the love of our country, which inspired them to answer the nation’s call.

The yellow candle and its yellow ribbon symbolize the everlasting hope for a joyous reunion with those yet accounted for.

The slices of lemon on the bread plate remind us of their bitter fate.

The salt upon the bread plate represent the tears of their families.

The wine glass, turned upside down, reminds us that our distinguished comrades cannot be with us to drink a toast or join in the festivities of the evening.

Hiram Sasser, general counsel for First Liberty Institute and a former Army Reserve officer, urged the Navy to resist the demands of the militant MRFF.

“The Bible is on the table because it is part of the tradition that predates our current demands for political correctness,” Sasser told the Todd Starnes Radio Show. “When we telegraph to our global military competitors that the mere presence of a Bible mentally destroys some of us, we are doomed.”

So why is the Navy wasting its time to investigate the unfounded allegations made by Mikey Weinstein and his minions?

This is nothing more than a despicable attack by the Military Religious Freedom Foundation on the families of those with a loved one who is missing in action.

It’s time for the Trump Administration’s Pentagon to stop this radical group from bullying military families and desecrating any more Missing Man tables.

https://www.toddstarnes.com/show/navy-investigates-bible-on-missing-man-table-tribute/

Petition: Demand an End to the U.S. Military Housing Dog Breed Ban!

by: Laura G
target: Residential Communities Initiative

15,471 SUPPORTERS
16,000 GOAL

The movie “Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero” tells the tale of the most decorated war dog in U.S. history. Thanks to his ability to sniff out mustard gas and hear the whine of artillery shells before his fellow human soldiers could, Stubby saved countless lives during World War I. He was the only military dog ever promoted to sergeant.

It’s hard to believe, but today, this hero would likely be turned away from military housing on U.S. Army (and Marine Corps and Air Force) bases. Why? Because Stubby could be considered a pit bull mix, one of several “dangerous” breeds (Staffordshire bull terriers, bull mastiffs, Rhodesian ridgebacks and Doberman pinschers are some of the others) banned from the housing.

After military housing was privatized in 1996, the Residential Communities Initiative (RCI) Privatization Program consortium, consisting of six private companies, was created to develop consistent housing policies. Sadly, those policies included a dog breed ban.

Breed bans and breed-specific legislation (BSL) are unfair because they single out certain types of dogs. There is no evidence that they’ve increased public safety where they’ve been enacted. They are opposed by almost every major animal welfare organization.

Members of the military who are bravely serving our country shouldn’t have to make the terrible decision of either giving up their beloved dogs or moving to off-base housing. Please sign and share this petition urging the Residential Communities Initiative to drop its unfair breed ban.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/905/424/527/demand-an-end-to-the-u.s.-military-housing-dog-breed-ban/

Petition · Defence Animal Centre: Save our veteran dogs · Change.org

Plans to put down hero service dogs Kevin, Dazz and Driver are in place to happen next week. Experience handlers have come forward to say they want to house the much love dogs, who have helped save hundreds of lives. Kevin and Dazz served in Afghanistan where they searched for explosives and Driver worked for the police force. Service dogs have saved my life on numerous occasions. We have a duty to save them.  In Afghanistan when I was on patrol the dogs found an IED in front of us, I was number three in line I was very very lucky to survive.

https://www.change.org/p/defence-animal-centre-save-our-veteran-dogs?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=1&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAOV5wwAAAAAAWiK9ORCHailiYmNjYjZmMA%3D%3D

THANK YOU VETERANS FOR YOUR SERVICE

 

NFL’s finest- 656 arrested

The Goomba Gazette

NFL Team Arrests Since 2000

Minnesota Vikings 42
Cincinnati Bengals 40
Denver Broncos 36
Tennessee Titans 33
Miami Dolphins 28
Kansas City Chiefs 28
Jacksonville Jaguars 27
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 27
Cleveland Browns 26
San Diego Chargers 25
Indianapolis Colts 24
Chicago Bears 23
Seattle Seahawks 20
New Orleans Saints 20
Washington Redskins 18
Oakland Raiders 18
Baltimore Ravens 18
Carolina Panthers 18
Green Bay Packers 17
Pittsburgh Steelers 17
Atlanta Falcons 16
San Francisco 49ers 16
Detroit Lions 15
New England Patriots 15
Buffalo Bills 14
Dallas Cowboys 13
New York Giants 13
Arizona Cardinals 12
New York Jets 11
Philadelphia Eagles 10
Houston Texans 9
St  Louis Rams 8


Total 656 Arrests

1532  4

Can’t help but wonder how many of these PROFESSIONAL characters take a knee when the National Anthem is being played?? I can only guess.

http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-super-bowl/0ap2000000136099/Alicia-Keys-wows-singing-national-anthem

These are the same people many diehard fans are supporting…

View original post 363 more words

Soldier’s dog adopted to someone else while away at training

 

http://www.kktv.com/content/news/Soldiers-dog-adopted-to-someone-else-while-away-at-training-395921831.html

Petition: Congress: Support the Wounded Warrior Service Dog Act!


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/491/786/196/?z00m=28167627&redirectID=2131020059

Petition · Senate Committee on Veteran’s Affairs: Military Survivor’s Education Benefits · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/senate-committee-on-veteran-s-affairs-military-survivor-s-education-benefits

PETITION  UPDATE: Urgent Call to Action for Marley

 

Operation Save Marley
by Please Help Marley · 157,141 supporters
PETITION UPDATE

URGENT Call to Action for Marley

Please Help Marley

JUL 28, 2016 — CALL TO ACTION #1
We need everyone on board for this, this could be what saves his life. We can do this!!!

1)Email the County Commissioners and let them know how you feel about this issue. Stay polite and professional! http://www.co.bay.fl.us/bocc.php

2) Call ANY Florida State House Representatives or Senators | Jay Trumbull Phone: (850) 717-5006 Don Gaetz Phone: (850) 487-5001 Gwen Graham Phone: (202) 225-5235 William Clarence Nelson Phone: (202) 224-5274 Marco Rubio Phone: (202) 224-3041 Ask that they reach out to Bay County and have Marley returned back to his family and a combat veteran

3) Contact local media(newspapers,tv and radio) and get them involved. This shouldn’t be happening, over 150,000 people understand something is wrong!

4)Reach out to regional and local media near Marley and ask for them to get involved. Panama City, Florida is the location.

Email us with how things went! pleasehelpmarley@gmail.com

LINK: http://www.rrta.org/petitions/unresolved-petitions/call-to-action-marley-in-florida/

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https://www.change.org/p/operation-save-marley?recruiter=44240641&utm_source=petitions_show_components_action_panel_wrapper&utm_medium=copylink

Video

Four Hero Military Dogs Receive First-Ever Medal Of Courage Awards | Care2 Causes

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When men or women in the U.S. military perform exceptionally heroic acts, they are awarded with a Medal of Honor, the highest recognition of personal valor above and beyond the call of duty.

But what about military dogs who are exceptionally brave? No dog has ever been awarded a Medal of Honor. And the Purple Heart, awarded to military personnel who have been killed or injured while serving, hasn’t been awarded to a dog since World War II.

“The use of military decorations is limited to human personnel who distinguish themselves in service to the nation,” Department of Defense spokeswoman Eileen Lainez said in 2010, the American Kennel Club reports.

Although the Department of Defense may refuse to honor these four-legged heroes, they are finally getting some of the recognition they deserve.

The inaugural American Humane Lois Pope LIFE K-9 Medal of Courage awards were presented earlier this month to four dogs at a ceremony on Capitol Hill. The awards are sponsored by the American Humane Association (AHA), which has worked with the U.S. military for a century, and philanthropist Lois Pope.

“In the Army, we don’t honor our dogs,” said Retired Army Specialist Brent Grommet, whose partner, Matty, received an award. “They don’t get the recognition they deserve. They don’t get the medals. So, I think it’s perfect. I think it’s about time we recognize our dogs for what they are.”
Love This? Never Miss Another Story.

Meet Matty and the three other military heroes who received the first-ever Medal of Courage awards.

 

 

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Matty

Grommet and Matty, a Czech German shepherd, worked together as a bomb-detection team in Afghanistan. Matty saved the lives of Grommet and others in their unit more than once. While dodging mortar fire during an ambush, Matty and Grommet managed to clear a helicopter landing zone of IEDs (improvised explosion devices).

The two were riding in a truck when it was hit with roadside bombs. Both were flown back to the U.S. to be treated for their injuries. Although Grommet had completed the paperwork to adopt Matty, his beloved partner was mistakenly given to someone else. With the help of AHA, they were eventually reunited. Now Matty is a service dog for Grommet, continuing to have his back as he helps him deal with his visible and invisible war wounds.

Fieldy

This black Lab served four combat tours in Afghanistan as an explosives-detection dog, saving many lives by tracking down IEDs buried in the sand and hidden out of sight. For seven months, Fieldy also provided emotional support to his handler, U.S. Marine Corps Corporal Nick Caceres.

After Fieldy was honorably discharged from the service, AHA helped reunite him with Caceres, and they continue to be inseparable.

Bond

Bond, a Belgian Malinois, served on 50 combat missions, with three tours in Afghanistan. As a multi-purpose dog, Bond helped saved plenty of lives by apprehending enemies and detecting explosives. But both Bond and his handler, who was not identified due to security reasons, suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

When he returned to the U.S., poor Bond knocked out his own teeth trying to chew his way out of a kennel during a thunderstorm. He was adopted by his former handler, and the two support each other as they deal with the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. His handler said Bond will help make his transition back to civilian life much easier.

Isky

For a year, Isky, a German shepherd, and his handler, U.S. Army Sgt. Wess Brown, worked together to protect the lives of VIPs, from the Secretary of State in Africa to the President of the United States in Berlin. While on tour in the Middle East as an explosives-detection dog, Isky discovered five IEDs and 10 weapon caches. He also found a 120-pound bomb buried nearly two feet underground.

Unfortunately Isky lost a leg when he was struck by an IED, but he continues to work – as a PTSD service dog for Brown. “I feel safe with him every time we go anywhere,” Brown told ABC News. “That’s why he’s around.”

Photo credit: American Humane Association.

Virginia motorists spot white UN ‘combat vehicles’ on the interstate | Daily Mail Online

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3661842/What-military-trucks-doing-Virginia-Bemused-motorists-spot-white-combat-vehicles-interstate.html

petition: Stop redeploying war dogs for profit. Allow soldiers to adopt their heroic war dogs.

596147-1455652309-wide

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/596/147/002/stop-redeploying-war-dogs-for-profit.-allow-soldiers-to-adopt-their-heroic-war-dogs/