If you need to remove a tick

Keep a jar filled with alcohol on hand to dispose of the tick

FDA’s list of hand sanitizers to avoid grows again with more than 100 identified that may contain methanol

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Kelly Tyko | USA TODAY | 11 hours ago 13-16 minutes


As of Saturday, the FDA’s “do-not-use list of dangerous hand sanitizer products” now includes 101 varieties of hand sanitizer that should be avoided – some that have already been recalled and other products being recommended for recalls – as they may contain methanol, a potentially fatal ingredient. 

Methanol is a toxic substance when absorbed through skin or ingested.

“FDA continues to find issues with certain hand sanitizer products. FDA test results show certain hand sanitizers have concerningly low levels of ethyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol, which are active ingredients in hand sanitizer products,” the federal agency said. “The agency urges consumers not to use these subpotent products and has expanded its list to include subpotent hand sanitizers, in addition to hand sanitizers that are or may be contaminated with methanol.”

In a warning July 27, the FDA says it is “urging consumers not to use any hand sanitizer products from the particular manufacturers on the list even if the product or particular lot number are not listed since some manufacturers are recalling only certain – but not all – of their hand sanitizer products.”

The agency says that in most cases, methanol does not appear on the product label but that it is “not an acceptable ingredient in any drug, including hand sanitizer, even if methanol is listed as an ingredient on the product label.”

The FDA said it has taken steps to prevent the products from entering the country by placing them on an import alert. Most of the products appear to have been produced in Mexico and, according to the alert, should be avoided because they pose a health risk.

“We remain extremely concerned about the potential serious risks of alcohol-based hand sanitizers containing methanol,”  FDA Commissioner Stephen M. Hahn said in a statement. “Producing, importing and distributing toxic hand sanitizers poses a serious threat to the public and will not be tolerated.”

In June, the FDA warned consumers not to use nine kinds of hand sanitizers because they may contain methanol, and added to the list in early July and further expanded the list multiple times in July.

Methanol is used industrially as a solvent, pesticide and alternative fuel source, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Exposure to it can cause nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision, permanent blindness, seizures, coma, permanent damage to the nervous system and death.

The FDA says it has seen an increase in number of “adverse events, including blindness, cardiac effects, effects on the central nervous system, and hospitalizations and death, primarily reported to poison control centers and state departments of health.”

Hand sanitizer has been a popular product to combat the coronavirus since February, and many new types have entered the market after shortages of brands including Purell.

Avoid these hand sanitizers that may contain methanol

The FDA is advising consumers not to use the following hand sanitizers because tests found them to contain methanol or they were “purportedly made at the same facility as products in which FDA has tested and confirmed methanol contamination.” The FDA also says to avoid sanitizers from the manufacturers.

Find more information, including the product code where available, on the FDA website.

  • Eskbiochem’s All-Clean Hand Sanitizer
  • Eskbiochem’s Lavar 70 Gel Hand Sanitizer
  • Eskbiochem’s Esk Biochem Hand Sanitizer
  • Eskbiochem’s The Good Gel Antibacterial Gel Hand Sanitizer
  • Eskbiochem’s CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 75% Alcohol
  • Eskbiochem’s CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol
  • Eskbiochem’s CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol
  • Eskbiochem’s Saniderm Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • Grupo Insoma’s Hand sanitizer Gel Unscented 70% Alcohol
  • Mystic International’s Mystic Shield Protection hand sanitizer
  • Cosmeticas’ Antiseptic Alcohol 70% Topical Solution hand sanitizer
  • Cosmeticas’ Bersih Hand Sanitizer Gel Fragrance Free
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Be Safe Hand Sanitizer
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Wave Hand Sanitizer Gel
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Cleaner Hand Sanitizer Rinse Free 70%    
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Handzer Hand Sanitizer Rinse Free
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Urbane Bath and Body Hand Sanitizer    
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Britz Hand Sanitizer Ethyl Alcohol 70%    
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Parabola Hand Sanitizer  
  • Tropicosmeticos’ Kleanz Antibacterial Hand Sanitizer Advanced
  • AAA Cosmetica’s bio aaa Advance Hand Sanitizer 
  • AAA Cosmetica’s QualitaMed Hand Sanitizer  
  • AAA Cosmetica’s LumiSkin Advance Hand Sanitizer 4 oz
  • AAA Cosmetica’s LumiSkin Advance Hand Sanitizer 16 oz
  • 4E Global’s Blumen Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Clear Ethyl Alcohol 70%
  • 4E Global’s Blumen Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer with 70% Alcohol
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer Aloe
  • 4E Global’s Blumen Advanced Hand Sanitizer Aloe, with 70% alcohol
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Hand Sanitizer Clear
  • 4E Global’s Blumen Advanced Hand Sanitizer Lavender, with 70% alcohol
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Clear
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Clear
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Lavender
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Aloe Advanced Hand Sanitizer, with 70 Alcohol
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Aloe Advanced Hand Sanitizer, with 70 Alcohol
  • 4E Global’s Blumen Antibacterial Fresh Citrus Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Aloe
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear Advanced Instant Hand Sanitizer Lavender
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear LEAR Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Clear LEAR Advanced Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s Blumen Hand Sanitizer Fresh Citrus
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Instant Hand Sanitizer Aloe Vera
  • 4E Global’s BLUMEN Instant Hand Sanitizer Fragrance Free
  • 4E Global’s Hello Kitty Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s The Honeykeeper Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s Assured Aloe
  • 4E Global’s Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer (Aloe and Moisturizers)
  • 4E Global’s Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer (Vitamin E and Aloe)
  • 4E Global’s Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer Aloe and Moisturizers
  • 4E Global’s Assured Instant Hand Sanitizer Vitamin E and Aloe
  • 4E Global’s KLAR and DANVER Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • 4E Global’s KLAR AND DANVER Instant Hand Sanitizer (labeled with Greenbrier International Inc.)
  • 4E Global’s MODESA Instant Hand Sanitizer Moisturizers and Vitamin E
  • DDI Multinacional’s Earths Amenities Instant Unscented Hand Sanitizer with Aloe Vera Advanced
  • DDI Multinacional’s Hand Sanitizer Agavespa Skincare
  • DDI Multinacional’s Vidanos Easy Cleaning Rentals Hand Sanitizer Agavespa Skincare
  • Limpo Quimicos’ Andy’s
  • Limpo Quimicos’ Andy’s Best
  • Limpo Quimicos’ NeoNatural
  • Limpo Quimicos’ Plus Advanced
  • Liqesa Exportacion or Liq-E’s Optimus Lubricants Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Maquiladora Miniara’s Selecto Hand Sanitizer
  • Maquiladora Miniara’s Shine and Clean Hand Sanitizer
  • Cosmeticas’ Hand Sanitizer Gel Alcohol 70%
  • Yara Elena De La Garza Perez Nieto’s   DAESI Hand Sanitizer
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ Cavalry
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ ENLIVEN Hand Sanitizing Gel
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ Lux Eoi Hand Sanitizing Gel
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ Born Basic Anti-Bac Hand Sanitizer 65% Alcohol
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ Born Basic Anti-Bac Hand Sanitizer 70% alcohol
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ Scent Theory – Keep It Clean – Pure Clean Anti-bacterial Hand Sanitizer
  • Real Clean Distribuciones’ Scent Theory – Keep It Clean – Pure Clean Anti-bacterial Hand Sanitizer
  • MXL Comercial’s Hand Sanitizer Disinfectant Gel 70% Ethyl Alcohol
  • MXL Comercial’s Hand Sanitizer Disinfectant Gel 70% Ethyl Alcohol Rinse Free Hand Rub
  • Liqesa Exportacion or Liq-E’s Optimus Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Liqesa Exportacion or Liq-E’s Optimus Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Broncolin’s Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70% Alcohol
  • Broncolin’s Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70% Alcohol
  • Broncolin’s Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70%  Alcohol
  • Laboratorios Jaloma’s Jaloma Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer Ethyl Alcohol 62% with Vitamin E
  • Leiper’s Fork Distillery Bulk Disinfectant per 5 gallon
  • Leiper’s Fork Distillery 16-ounce bottle
  • Healthy Foods & Nutrition Lab de Mexico’s Medicare Alcohol Antiseptic Topical Solution
  • Incredible Products’ GelBact Hand Sanitizer
  • Incredible Products’ Hand Sanitizer
  • Incredible Products’ TriCleanz
  • JG Atlas Comercios’ Sayab Antisepctic Hand Sanitizer 100
  • Tritanium Labs USA’s TriCleanz Tritanium Labs Hand Sanitizer
  • Albek de Mexico’s NEXT Hand Sanitizer
  • Albek de Mexico’s Clear Advanced Hand Sanitizer with 70% Alcohol extra soft with glycerin and aloe
  • Albek de Mexico’s NuuxSan Instant Antibacterial Hand Sanitizer
  • Albek de Mexico’s NuuxSan Instant Hand Sanitizer
  • Albek de Mexico’s Assured Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Aloe and Moisturizers
  • Albek de Mexico’s Assured Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Vitamin E and Aloe
  • Albek de Mexico’s Modesa Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Moisturizers and Aloe Vera
  • Albek de Mexico’s Modesa Instant Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer with Moisturizers and Vitamin E

View | 18 Photos

Recalled hand sanitizers

The following products have been recalled as of Aug. 1:

  • ITECH 361’s All Clean Hand Sanitizer, Moisturizer and Disinfectant: UPC code 628055370130.
  • Transliquid Technologies’ Mystic Shield Protection hand sanitizer: NDC numbers include 75477-435-02, 75477-435-10, 75477-435-12, 75477-435-25, 75477-435-50 and 75477-534-10.
  • Saniderm Advanced Hand Sanitizer, 1-liter bottles: Two distributors. The UVT hand sanitizer is labeled with lot number 0530 and an expiration date of 04/2022 and the Saniderm Products hand sanitizer is labeled with lot number 53131626 and “Manufactured on April/1/20.”
  • 4e Brands North America’s Blumen brand is “voluntarily recalling all lots of Hand Sanitizer brands to the consumer level.” This is an expansion of an earlier recall.
  • Real Clean Distribuciones is voluntarily recalling all lots it manufactured within expiry of the following brand names of hand sanitizers: “Born Basic ANTI-BAC HAND SANITIZER, Scent Theory KEEP CLEAN Moisturizing Hand Sanitizer, Scent Theory KEEP IT CLEAN Moisturizing Hand Sanitizer and Lux Eoi Hand Sanitizing Gel to the consumer level.”
  • LIQ-E S.A. de C.V. is voluntarily recalling all lots and all bottle sizes of “The OPTIMUS Instant Hand Sanitizer” manufactured between April 27 and May 8.
  • Resource Recovery & Trading LLC is “voluntarily recalling all the lots manufactured by MXL Comercial S.A. de C.V.” with the following information: “Hand Sanitizer 70% Ethyl Alcohol Disinfectant Gel, packaged in 6.7 FL Oz. (200 ml) bottles, UPC 650240026020 and Hand Sanitizer Non-sterile Solution 70% Topical Solution, packaged in 20L (5.28 Gal) liter plastic containers, UPC 37710600013 to the consumer level.”
  • Broncolin is “voluntarily recalling all lots of Herbacil Antiseptic Hand Sanitizer 70% Alcohol to the consumer level.” The hand sanitizer comes in four different sizes, according to the recall notice.
  • Albek de Mexico is “voluntarily recalling all lots and all brands of hand sanitizer currently in US distribution to the consumer level.”

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko

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Vaccines to implant tracking devices? Bill Gates goes public

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Billionaire responds to survey reflecting concern of many Americans

Billionaire Microsoft founder Bill Gates on Wednesay rejected accusations swirling on the internet that he wants to use coronavirus vaccines to implant tracking devices in people.

The philanthropist’s Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has donated millions to coronavirus vaccine and treatment research.

In an interview with CBS News, he commented on a Yahoo News/YouGov survey that found 28% of American adults believed Gates planned to use a COVID-19 vaccine to implant microchips in people so they can be monitored, CNBC reported.

“We need to get the truth out there,” he said. “I hope it’ll die down as people get the facts.”

TRENDING: Ex-FBI operative: Obama, Holder ‘turned their back on our country’

More than 100 vaccines are under development, and 23 are in human trials, according to the World Health Organization.

Gates’ foundation promised in February to donate $100…

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VERIFY: Face mask facts vs. falsehoods | fox43.com

https://media.fox43.com/embeds/mobile/video/507-b81fdfa2-d93c-45b6-b46a-6fecc2116010/amp#amp=1 verify

VERIFY: Face mask facts vs. falsehoods

The VERIFY team breaks down some of the most asked questions about wearing face masks. Author: VERIFY, Jason Puckett (TEGNA), David Tregde Published: 11:26 AM EDT July 21, 2020

The VERIFY team is constantly getting questions from viewers about wearing face masks. Here are some of the most frequently asked.

DO MASKS WORK?

While there is still research being done to determine how effective masks are – experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University all say that they serve an important purpose right now. null

The CDC explains that masks aren’t primarily meant to stop the virus from getting to you. They’re meant to stop you or other contagious people from spreading the virus to others.

COVID-19 typically spreads via respiratory droplets, Masks, even those made of cloth, are effective at catching those droplets as people expel them. Since COVID has been shown to be contagious before patients experience symptoms, experts say it’s important to wear a mask before you feel sick.

Do OSHA or other government groups warn against masks?

Multiple claims cited the Occupational Safety and Health Administration along with claims that face masks could be harmful and should be avoided.
The VERIFY team checked with OSHA, who said these claims are false. 

OSHA openly supports wearing masks in public and for employees returning to work. 

While some politicians debate the use of masks there are currently no government or medical groups that warn against wearing them.

Can wearing masks cause carbon dioxide poisoning or harm my oxygen levels?

One of the more popular claims against masks says they trap carbon dioxide and cause you to breathe it back in. According to the CDC, that claim is not true. 

The CDC explains that carbon dioxide build-up is incredibly rare and only really a concern with sealed respirators and medical-grade devices. 

The CDC explained: “Specific to the viral image, it is unlikely that wearing a mask will cause “anoxia,” “asphyxiation,” “hypercapnia,” or “hypercarbia.” While CO2 will slowly build up in the mask over time, any symptoms experienced with low levels of CO2 are resolved upon removal of the mask and breathing room air for a minute. null

Can I use the “Americans With Disabilities Act” to get out of wearing a mask?

Certain viral posts claim that you can cite ADA if you don’t want to wear a mask – there are even printable cards you can carry. But the Department of Justice says these aren’t real and don’t carry legal weight.

It’s also important to note that stores may not be able to force you to wear a mask, but they can legally refuse to serve you if you choose not to wear one.

RELATED: VERIFY: COVID-19 vaccine syringes to have trackers on the outside, not in vaccine

RELATED: VERIFY: ‘Rockefeller document’ doesn’t prove theory coronavirus pandemic was planned in 2010 https://d-20578272081057857687.ampproject.net/2007040248002/frame.html

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Now if you can find some…

How to relax in 5 minutes

FDA warning: These 9 hand sanitizer brands could be toxic

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The FDA is warning that the public should stop using 9 brands of hand sanitizer because the products may contain methanol, or wood alcohol. Author: TEGNA Published: 6:56 AM EDT June 23, 2020

WASHINGTON — The coronavirus pandemic has led to a surge in hand sanitizer purchases, but now the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning that nine brands may be potentially toxic. 

The FDA said Friday that consumers should stop using any hand sanitizer from Mexico-based manufacturer Eskbiochem SA de CV, due to the potential presence of methanol, or wood alcohol, in its products. The FDA warned that methanol can be toxic when ingested or absorbed through the skin.  null

The agency said that it contacted Eskbiochem last week to recommend the company remove its hand sanitizer from the U.S. market, but it has yet to do so. 

“Therefore, FDA recommends consumers stop using these hand sanitizers and dispose of them immediately in appropriate hazardous waste containers. Do not flush or pour these products down the drain,” the agency warned

The FDA warned that young children who accidentally ingest these potentially toxic hand sanitizers and those who may drink it as an alcohol substitute are most at risk of suffering methanol poisoning. The symptoms of substantial methanol exposure includes nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision, permanent blindness, seizures, coma, permanent damage to the nervous system or death. 

RELATED: Safety tips to consider when returning to restaurants

RELATED: FDA asks hand sanitizer producers to make them taste worse

“Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the agency warned. “Consumers who have been exposed to hand sanitizer containing methanol should seek immediate treatment, which is critical for potential reversal of toxic effects of methanol poisoning.”

The FDA listed the following products in its warning: 

– All-Clean Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-002-01)

– Esk Biochem Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-007-01)

– CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 75% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-008-04)

– Lavar 70 Gel Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-006-01)

– The Good Gel Antibacterial Gel Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-010-10) null

– CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-005-03)

– CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 75% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-009-01)

– CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-003-01)

– Saniderm Advanced Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-001-01)

According to the FDA, it tested product samples and found Lavar Gel contained 81% methanol and CleanCare No Germ had 28% methanol. 

The agency said Friday it’s not aware of any reports of illnesses related to these potentially toxic hand sanitizers. 

The FDA stressed that washing your hands with soap and water is one of the best defenses against coronavirus. But if soap and water isn’t available, the CDC recommends using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% ethanol.  https://media.fox43.com/embeds/mobile/video/602-99781d2c-509d-4b4f-be74-bb2f46138395/amp#amp=1 https://d-2941301612144650950.ampproject.net/2006050512001/frame.html

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Could flushing a public toilet really spread COVID-19?

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By Sarah Gibbens 10-13 minutes

PUBLISHED June 19, 2020

An employee places facial masks in the bathroom of a suite of Berlin’s famous Hotel Adlon Kempinski on May 26, 2020, one day after it reopened for tourism as restrictions were eased amid the novel coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP) (Photo by TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP via Getty Images) Photograph by Tobias Schwarz, AFP via Getty Images

Few people have the bladder fortitude to last through drinks, dinner, or long road trips without having to use the restroom. But as more restaurants, bars, and other public spaces start to re-open this summer, questions have been swirling around whether using a public toilet could become a more serious health risk in the era of COVID-19.

Such worries came to a head this week when researchers in China published a study suggesting that flushing a toilet can create a plume of coronavirus-laden particles, which are flung into the air by the watery vortex inside a toilet bowl.

Several studiesusing genetic tests have previously detected the SARS-CoV-2 virus in stool samples, and at least one investigation shows that the coronaviruses in these feces can be infectious. When a person infected with COVID-19 defecates, the germ at first settles into the toilet bowl. But then “the flushing process can lift the virus out of the toilet and cause cross-infection among people,” says Ji-Xiang Wang, a physicist at Yangzhou University in China and coauthor on the paper published June 16 in the journal Physics of Fluids.

While the toilet plume effect has been studied for decades in relation to other diseases, many questions remain over its role in spreading germs, including the one that causes COVID-19. Neither the World Health Organization nor the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention thinks it’s very likely COVID-19 can be spread by bowel movements leading to accidental consumption of virus particles, a route medically termed fecal-oral transmission.

Despite these uncertainties, experts say there are precautions you should take before answering nature’s call in publicly shared restrooms.

How risky are restrooms?

For the latest study, Wang’s team used computer models to show that tiny droplets called aerosols, created by the turbulence of water sloshing inside a toilet bowl, could be ejected up to three feet into the air. Shortly after flushing, water rushes into the bowl, striking the opposite side with enough force to generate a vortex that forcefully pushes not only the liquid, but also the air inside the toilet.

According to their simulations, this combination launches aerosols that can last in the air for just over a minute. The more water used in a toilet bowl, Wang’s team found, the greater the force of the flush.

So what does that mean if you use a restroom after someone infected with COVID-19 flushes? That depends a lot on whether the infectious virus survives in human feces, and that’s still an active area of research.

To start, studies of MERS, a coronavirus relative that flared up in 2012, indicate that this particular virus can survive in the human digestive tract, which is a sign the same might be true for SARS-CoV-2. Flu viruses and coronaviruses are considered “enveloped viruses” because they’re protected by a thin layer called a membrane. Unlike noroviruses, the most common culprit of food poisoning, enveloped viruses are easily degraded by acids, which make them vulnerable to the chemical make-ups of soap and stomach bile.

When cities were cesspools of disease

One hypothesis, based on influenza research, suggests that these kinds of viruses might survive in the human gut if mucus from infected patients protects the germs during their journey through the digestive tract. The question then is how long the virus lasts in fecal matter, and that’s another area that needs more research, says E. Susan Amirian, a molecular epidemiologist at Rice University in Houston.

“Fecal transmission is unlikely to be a major mode of transmission, even if it proves to be plausible,” Amirian says in an email. She notes that the CDC’s assessment of fecal-oral transmission cites one study in which scientists were able to detect only broken bits of the coronavirus’s genetic codein infected patients’ feces. These genetic snippets are an indicator the germ was once present in the body, but the virus has been degraded so much, it can no longer cause an infection.

However, these broken viral bits appear quite often in COVID-19 defecations. Another study published in April found traces of SARS-CoV-2 in the fecal matter of more than half of 42 patients tested. And a May 18 report published by the CDC found viable and infectious SARS-CoV-2 in fecal excretions from a handful of patients.

What’s more, past studies show that fecal-oral transmission may have occurred during the 2002-2003 outbreak of SARS, another coronavirus cousin of COVID-19. Airborne fecal matter was thought to have exacerbated a cluster of 321 SARS cases at a Hong Kong apartment complex in 2003. Later examination of the incident found poor ventilation, contact with neighbors, and shared spaces such as elevators and stairwells also contributed to the event.

“Using a public restroom, especially while taking precautions like maintaining physical distance from others and practicing good hand hygiene, is quite likely to be less risky than attending a gathering with people from other households,” Amirian says via email. She emphasizes that “the major mode of transmission for COVID-19 is person-to-person through respiratory droplets.”

What can you do to protect yourself?

Still, “less risky” isn’t the same as no risk, and exactly how well the virus survives in feces, on surfaces, and in the air are questions scientists are still trying to answer.

A study published last April in the New England Journal of Medicine showed the virus could live on steel and plastic surfaces for up to two and three days, respectively. A simple solution of soap and water can easily destroy the virus. But that means public restrooms can harbor COVID-19 germs if establishments don’t take care to wipe down surfaces.

“At the end of the day, we need to remember that stool can be a reservoir for many diseases, and people sometimes don’t wash their hands as well as they think they do,” says Amirian. “Good hygiene, especially thorough hand washing, is important for reasons beyond COVID-19.”

In public restrooms with multiple stalls that don’t limit the number of people allowed in, clusters of individuals represent an additional risk, as person-to-person contact is still the primary way people become infected with coronavirus.

Joe Allen is the director of Harvard’s Healthy Buildings Program, where he researches how our offices, schools, and homes can influence our health. In investigations of buildings that adversely impact human health, Allen says, “I always remind people to check the exhaust in the bathroom.” He adds that improving ventilation that moves dirty indoor air outside is one of the best ways to safeguard against a contaminated restroom.

“[Public] bathrooms should have exhaust fans that are constantly running,” Allen says.

If possible, he also recommends that establishments install touchless features such as water faucets, soap dispensers, and towel dispensers that turn on with the wave of a hand.

Absent more hygienic upgrades, Wang advises wearing a face mask when using a public restroom. And one of the most effective ways to keep potentially infected aerosols of any kind from flying into the air, Wang adds, is to simply install lids on public toilets.

“Manufacturers should design a new toilet, in which the lid is automatically put down before flushing,” says Wang.

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The right diet and exercise make a world of difference for this dog

600 Physicians Say Lockdowns Are A ‘Mass Casualty Incident’

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Grace-Marie Turner 6-7 minutes


224,476 views|May 22, 2020,12:00pm EDT

More than 600 of the nation’s physicians sent a letter to President Trump this week calling the coronavirus shutdowns a “mass casualty incident” with “exponentially growing negative health consequences” to millions of non COVID patients. 

“The downstream health effects…are being massively under-estimated and under-reported. This is an order of magnitude error,” according to the letter initiated by Simone Gold, M.D., an emergency medicine specialist in Los Angeles. 

“Suicide hotline phone calls have increased 600%,” the letter said. Other silent casualties:  “150,000 Americans per month who would have had new cancer detected through routine screening.”

From missed cancer diagnoses to untreated heart attacks and strokes to increased risks of suicides, “We are alarmed at what appears to be a lack of consideration for the future health of our patients.”  

Patients fearful of visiting hospitals and doctors’ offices are dying because COVID-phobia is keeping them from seeking care. One patient died at home of a heart attack rather than go to an emergency room. The number of severe heart attacks being treated in nine U.S hospitals surveyed dropped by nearly 40% since March. Cardiologists are worried “a second wave of deaths” indirectly caused by the virus is likely.

The physicians’ letter focuses on the impact on Americans’ physical and mental health.  “The millions of casualties of a continued shutdown will be hiding in plain sight, but they will be called alcoholism, homelessness, suicide, heart attack, stroke, or kidney failure. In youths it will be called financial instability, unemployment, despair, drug addiction, unplanned pregnancies, poverty, and abuse.

“It is impossible to overstate the short, medium, and long-term harm to people’s health with a continued shutdown,” the letter says. “Losing a job is one of life’s most stressful events, and the effect on a person’s health is not lessened because it also has happened to 30 million [now 38 million] other people.  Keeping schools and universities closed is incalculably detrimental for children, teenagers, and young adults for decades to come.” 

While all 50 states are relaxing lockdowns to some extent, some local officials are threatening to keep stay-at-home orders in place until August.  Many schools and universities say they may remain closed for the remainder of 2020.

“Ending the lockdowns are not about Wall Street or disregard for people’s lives; it about saving lives,” said Dr. Marilyn Singleton, a California anesthesiologist and one of the signers of the letter. “We cannot let this disease change the U.S. from a free, energetic society to a society of broken souls dependent on government handouts.” She blogs about the huge damage the virus reaction is doing to the fabric of society

Dr. Jane Orient, executive director of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, also warns that restrictions are having a huge negative impact on non-COVID patients. 

“Even patients who do get admitted to hospital, say for a heart problem, are prisoners. No one can be with them. Visitation at a rare single-story hospital was through closed outside window, talking via telephone,” she wrote us.  “To get permission to go to the window you have to make an appointment (only one group of two per day!), put on a mask, get your temperature taken, and get a visitor’s badge of the proper color of the day.”

How many cases of COVID-19 are prevented by these practices? “Zero,” Dr. Orient says.  But the “ loss of patient morale, loss of oversight of care, especially at night are incalculable.”

Virtually all hospitals halted “elective” procedures to make beds available for what was expected to be a flood of COVID-19 patients.  Beds stayed empty, causing harm to patients and resulting in enormous financial distress to hospitals, especially those with limited reserves. 

Even states like New York that have had tough lockdowns are starting to allow elective hospital procedures in some regions.  But it’s more like turning up a dimmer switch. In Pennsylvania, the chair of the Geisinger Heart Institute, Dr. Alfred Casale, said the opening will be slow while the facility is reconfigured for COVID-19 social distancing and enhanced hygiene.  

Will patients come back?  COVID-phobia is deathly real.

Patients still are fearful about going to hospitals for heart attacks and even for broken bones and deep lacerations. Despite heroic efforts by physicians to deeply sanitize their offices, millions have cancelled appointments and are missing infusion therapies and even chemotherapy treatments. This deferred care is expected to lead to patients who are sicker when they do come in for care and more deaths from patients not receiving care for stroke, heart attacks, etc. 

NPR reported about a Washington state resident who had what she described as the “worst headache of her life.”

She waited almost a week before going to the hospital where doctors discovered she had a brain bleed that had gone untreated.  She had multiple strokes and died. “This is something that most of the time we’re able to prevent,” said her neurosurgeon, Dr. Abhineet Chowdhary, director of the Overlake Neuroscience Institute in Bellevue, Wash. 

As the number of deaths from the virus begin to decline, we are likely to awaken to this new wave of casualties the 600 physicians are warning about. We should be listening to the doctors, and heed their advice immediately.

Get the best of Forbes to your inbox with the latest insights from experts across the globe.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gracemarieturner/2020/05/22/600-physicians-say-lockdowns-are-a-mass-casualty-incident/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

Celiac Disease Linked to Common Toxic Chemicals

Chemical Free Life

Celiac disease is an immune disorder that triggers severe gut reactions, including diarrhea and bloating, to foods containing gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.  Now new research has linked an increase risk for celiac disease in young people to toxic chemicals commonly found in pesticides, nonstick cookware and fast food packaging, and fire retardants, among other sources.

Study overview

Researchers analyzed levels of toxic chemicals in the blood of 30 children and young adults, ages 3 to 21, who were newly diagnosed with celiac disease at NYU Langone Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital. Test results were compared with those from 60 other young people of similar age, gender, and race.

Results overview

The results of the scientific study revealed that children and young adults with high blood levels of pesticides, including high levels of pesticide-related chemicals called dichlorodiphenyldichlorethylenes (DDEs), were twice as likely to be newly diagnosed…

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Atlantic City casinos will look very different once they reopen. Here’s their new plan.

nj.com

By Jonathan D. Salant | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com 4-5 minutes


Atlantic City - coronavirus
Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, left, and The Water Club Hotel, right, are dark after Gov. Phil Murphy ordered the casinos to close Monday to help stop the spread of the coronavirus.Lori M. Nichols | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

No eating on the casino floor. Contactless check-ins for hotel rooms. And wear a mask unless you’re drinking while gambling.

MGM Resorts, owner of the Borgata, released the health and safety plan its casino properties will follow once state officials allow them to reopen during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Our properties will not look the way they used to for a while, and that’s not only okay, it’s critically important,” said Bill Hornbuckle, acting president and chief executive.

Gov. Phil Murphy ordered Atlantic City’s casinos closed in March. He said Monday that he hoped to provide “hard dates” as early as this week on when the state’s economy could begin reopening.

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Homepage

The MGM plan released Tuesday offered a first look at how Atlantic City casinos plan to operate to protect both employees and guests from the coronavirus.

The new rules include:

— Daily temperature checks for all employees, as well as screening measures to determine whether they have infection symptoms and where they are in contact with those who have been infected, such as someone in their household or someone they care for.

— Guests who think they may have been exposed will be “strongly encouraged” to stay at home and not travel.

— All employees must wear masks, and all guests will be encouraged to do so in public areas. The casino will hand out free masks to guests.

— Workers will be trained on proper cleaning procedures and other steps to protect against the virus.

— Employees who handle food, clean public areas and enter guest rooms must wear gloves. Other workers also may required to wear personal protective equipment.

— Guests still will be able to order beverages but not food on the casino floor, and can remove their masks to drink.

— Frequent cleaning and disinfecting of slot machines, tables and kiosks.

— Stations for handwashing and hand sanitizing in high-traffic areas.

— A six-foot social distancing policy will be followed whenever possible, with signs and floor guides to help separate patrons. In areas where the distancing policy cannot be followed, plexiglass barriers will be installed or employees will be given eye protection.

— Poker rooms may not reopen when the rest of the casino does, depending on guidance from state officials and medical experts.

— Plexiglass barriers throughout the casino and lobbies.

— Medical personnel on staff to respond in case a guest or employee tests positive for COVID-19. Exposed areas will be sanitized and efforts will be made for contact tracing, notifying those who may have been in contact with the individual.

— Limits on how many people can share an elevator cab.

— Allowing guests to check in to their hotel rooms digitally without having contact with anyone at the front desk.

— Digital menus and text notifications when tables are ready, eliminating the need to wait in line.

It remains to be seen if the steps are sufficient to win the approval of Unite Here, the union that represents 10,600 Atlantic City workers. Their plan called for having the state gaming commission ensure that the casinos were taking the necessary steps to protect employees and guests.

The union said that the six-foot distance between customers needed to be followed at slot machines and table games, dice and chips needed to be frequently sanitized, buffets needed to be suspended and spas and pools needed to close temporarily.

“It’s good that the company is talking about it, but we need them to work in partnership with frontline workers to come up with a full plan to protect guest and workers,” said Mayra Gonzalez, a line server at Borgata and a member of Unite Here.

Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

Jonathan D. Salant may be reached at jsalant@njadvancemedia.com.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

https://www.nj.com/coronavirus/2020/05/atlantic-city-casinos-will-look-very-different-once-they-reopen-heres-their-new-plan.html

To prevent the next pandemic, it’s the legal wildlife trade we should worry about

National Geographic Logo

Wildlife WatchCoronavirus Coverage

Millions of live animals enter the U.S. each year without disease screening—leaving us vulnerable to another outbreak, a former wildlife inspector says.

By Jonathan Kolby PUBLISHED May 7, 2020

Camels, the source of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak that started in 2012, await sale at a market northwest of Cairo in 2015. The legal trade in wildlife is as serious a risk for the spread of zoonotic diseases as the illegal trade, experts warn.
Photograph by Ahmed Gomaa Xinhua / eyevine/R​edux

Twenty thousand live bullfrogs from China that will be cooked and eaten as frog legs. Forty green monkeys from St. Kitts and Nevis for biomedical research. Three hundred giant clams from Vietnam and 30 stingrays from the Brazilian Amazon for home aquariums. null

That motley assortment is a miniscule glimpse of what the legal international wildlife trade might look like on a given day in any of the 41 ports of entry staffed by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service inspectors. I routinely saw consignments like these—alongside crates filled with shampoo bottles, cucumbers, and freshly cut roses—at the Port of Newark, New Jersey, when I was a wildlife inspector, from 2004 to 2010.

At airports, seaports, and land border crossings in 2019, $4.3 billion of legal wildlife and wildlife products was imported into the U.S. Approximately 200 million live animals are imported to the U.S. annually, according to a five-year trade report: 175 million fish for the aquarium trade, and 25 million animals comprised of an array of mammals, amphibians, birds, insects, reptiles, spiders, and more. On top of that, thousands of illegally traded shipments of wildlife are intercepted each year. In 2019 alone, the agency opened more than 10,000 illegal wildlife trade investigations.

The diseases that hitchhike into the country on legally imported wildlife continue to go largely unnoticed.

But along with such a diversity of wildlife, a kaleidoscope of pathogens is also entering the country. My experience with the Fish and Wildlife Service, where I worked for 10 years, first as a wildlife inspector and most recently as a policy specialist regulating and managing the international wildlife trade, showed me that although many controls have been implemented to combat illegal trade, the diseases that simultaneously hitchhike into the country on legally imported wildlife continue to go largely unnoticed.

Importing any live animal brings with it the risk of disease—to native wildlife, to livestock, and to people. The outbreak of the novel coronavirus in China, theorized to have jumped from bats into humans and then spread at a wet market in Wuhan, possibly through an intermediate host, has shined a spotlight on how easily zoonotic diseases can emerge from wildlife. Indeed, an estimated 60 percent of known human diseases originated in animals, according to the World Organization for Animal Health.

Much of the public discussion around COVID-19 has focused on the potential role of the illegal wildlife trade in spreading pathogens. But as a wildlife trade specialist and conservation biologist—I studied the spread of disease among imported frogs—I’ve learned that we need to think just as critically about the risks and vulnerabilities presented by the massive legal trade, which continues to place both ourselves and the world at risk of more pandemics. null

With few exceptions, the U.S. has no laws specifically requiring disease surveillance for wildlife entering the country, and the vast majority of wild animal imports are therefore not tested. Inspectors with the Fish and Wildlife Service are the first to set eyes on an imported shipment of animals, and they’re charged with enforcing a variety of national and international laws, regulations, and treaties that focus on preventing illegal and unsustainable trade. But its mandate doesn’t extend to monitoring animal or human health. Its only responsibilities related to disease are the enforcement of rules limiting trade in certain fish and salamander species, which have the potential to spread devastating disease to other animals of their kind.

In fact, no federal agency is tasked with the comprehensive screening and monitoring of imported wildlife for disease.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regulates the importation of wildlife and wildlife products known to “present a significant public health concern,” focusing primarily on bats, African rodents, and nonhuman primates, Jasmine Reed, a CDC spokesperson, wrote in an email. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) intervenes only if there’s a disease risk to poultry or livestock animals of agricultural importance.

This leaves millions of animals that come into the U.S legally each year unchecked for diseases that have the potential to spill over to humans or other animals. null

The CDC insists it’s keeping an eye out. “CDC works closely with other federal agencies to ensure animals and animal products that present a public health concern are regulated,” Reed says. “Through our partnerships with international agencies, we are constantly evaluating and assessing what we and the international public health community do to detect, prevent, and control zoonotic disease threats.”

“I’m confident that our authorities are doing the best they can with the resources they have,” says Catherine Machalaba, a policy advisor for EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit focused on the connections between human and wildlife health. “But I’m not confident that’s a good enough benchmark when we’re talking about leaving the door open [to potential diseases that are] a threat to our health and security.”

About two million American bullfrogs are imported live to the U.S. from factory farms abroad each year to be eaten. Legally imported frogs have been found to carry the devastating chytrid fungus at high rates, putting all North America’s amphibians at risk. With no government agency responsible for comprehensive pathogen screening and monitoring of imported wildlife, scientists have little understanding of the range of diseases being imported.Photograph by Jonathan E. Kolby

The problem isn’t unique to the U.S.—most countries do not have a government agency that comprehensively screens wildlife imports for pathogens. “The absence of any formal entity dedicated to preventing the spread of diseases from the wildlife trade is such a chronic gap around the world,” Machalaba says. “When multiple agencies have to be called in for any given shipment, personnel is limited, and coordination is lacking, there’s bound to be gaps—a false sense of security that another agency has it covered.”

Outbreaks from legal trade

Many recent zoonotic outbreaks affecting people sprang from trade that was allowed at the time, says Lee Skerratt, a wildlife biosecurity fellow at the University of Melbourne, in Australia. null

In 2003, for example, people in six U.S. states became ill from exposure to the monkeypox virus after it entered the country in a pet trade shipment of 800 rodents from Ghana. In that shipment, African giant pouched rats, rope squirrels, and dormice carried the virus. It spread to prairie dogs held in the same pet trade facility, which were then sold to the public, starting the animal-to-human outbreak. Luckily, although human-to-human transmission of monkeypox can occur, no cases were confirmed.

Three months after the infected animals had been imported, the CDC banned the import of all African rodents into the U.S. That gave the Fish and Wildlife Service the legal power to detain shipments in violation of the ban and alert the CDC, which could choose to require quarantine, re-exportation, or euthanization of the animals.

https://assets.nationalgeographic.com/modules-video/stable/assets/ngsEmbeddedVideo.html?guid=00000169-c514-d209-a9fd-d7b585d70000&account=2423130747#amp=1 Amphibians ‘apocalypse’ driven by globalization, wildlife trade

Although this outbreak led to an import ban on African rodents, the government stopped short of doing any risk assessments to consider whether rodents from other places might also carry diseases that would require regulation, Machalaba says.

“Wildlife coming into the U.S. are sourced from many countries that are ‘hot spots’ for emerging diseases—of potential concern for human health but also posing threats to other sectors via our food systems and ecosystems,” Malachaba says.

Warnings about shortcomings

Officials have long known about the gaps in the U.S.’s regulatory system. In 2005, the National Academies of Science published a report that found a “significant gap in preventing and rapidly detecting emergent diseases” from imported wildlife.

Five years later, the U.S. Government Accountability Office, which audits government spending and operations, published a report on live animal imports and diseases. It found that the Fish and Wildlife Service “generally does not restrict the entry of imported wildlife that may pose disease risks.” Furthermore, the report says, the CDC doesn’t use its full power to prevent the import of live animals that pose a risk of zoonotic diseases.

The 2010 report recommended that the CDC, the Fish and Wildlife Service, and USDA develop and implement a coordinated strategy to prevent the import of animals that may be carrying diseases. But a follow-up assessment in 2015 found that the agencies did not take action. There simply weren’t the economic or staffing resources to make it happen, it says. null

The ability to prevent and control emerging zoonotic diseases requires an understanding of the diversity and abundance of pathogens being imported. But without monitoring and surveillance of imported wildlife, we don’t have this information, Skerratt says. “This is a problem for the wildlife trade as there is much that we don’t know, especially for diseases that could affect other wildlife,” he says.

The CDC also acknowledges the lack of research. “We need more data through risk assessments and basic research before adding any new regulations,” Reed says.

But it’s a Catch-22: For an agency to systematically collect pathogen data from wildlife imports, it would need a legal mandate from the government. But the government is only likely to do that once it has pathogen data to guide its decisions.

Amphibian cataclysm

Pathogens passed from animals to humans aren’t the only cause for concern. Amphibian chytrid fungus, the aquatic fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is the first disease known to infect hundreds of species simultaneously and drive many of them toward extinction. It’s so dangerous because it can jump between nearly any amphibian—a class with more than 8,000 species. It has already spread to remote protected areas around the world. From my Ph.D. research, I discovered that imports of factory-farmed American bullfrogs—nearly 2.5 million a year, more than any other live amphibian species—introduce frighteningly high numbers of chytrid-infected animals into the U.S.

The deadly amphibian chytrid fungus, introduced to the U.S. through the legal wildlife trade, has spread to native frog species across North America, even in protected areas like King’s Canyon National Park, in California. The U.S. continues to allow the import of species known to carry the disease.
Photograph by JOEL SARTORE, Nat Geo Image Collection

Scientists note the role of legal transcontinental trade in driving the chytrid pandemic—yet the trade continues, despite the biological and economic cost. Domestically, for example, the Fish and Wildlife Service has spent millions of dollars to prevent chytrid-driven extinctions of native species, such as the endangered Wyoming toad, through captive breeding and reintroduction efforts, while continuing to allow legal importation of amphibians that spread the very pathogen threatening those native species.

Humans have never been part of a pandemic on the scale of that now affecting amphibians. Even tragedies such as the Black Death, in the mid-1300s, and the 1918 influenza pandemic devastated only one species of mammal: humans. By contrast, emerging wildlife diseases, notably chytrid, have been much less picky in the diversity and numbers of animal hosts they infect and kill. Imagine what it would be like if the next pandemic could infect hundreds of the world’s 5,000 species of mammals—including humans—causing many to become extinct.

The best way to minimize risk

An enormous variety of plants and animals are involved in the international wildlife trade, and many are a regular part of our daily lives: Imported seafood for dinner; timber for building homes and musical instruments; pet birds and frogs and aquarium fishes; mother-of-pearl buttons on dress shirts; medicinal plants like ginseng; cosmetic essential oils such as argan and frankincense; and even many of the orchids and cacti for home decoration. This is why ending the legal trade in wildlife seems unlikely, and why, Skerratt says, controlling disease at the source is the best way to minimize the risk to public health.

There seems to be a lack of economic incentive to create a wildlife health law in the U.S. to regulate the pathways of spread of wildlife pathogens.

Priya Nanjappa, Director of Operations, Conservation Science Partners, Inc.

Key to reducing the spread of pathogens is a “clean trade” program, in which private industry and government officials work together to implement safer strategies, according to Matthew Gray, associate director of the University of Tennessee Center for Wildlife Health, in Knoxville.

Gray says that clean trade could involve testing either before transport or at the border, so that animal health certificates could accompany wildlife—similar to what’s required for livestock. “If clean trade is not economically sustainable, government subsidies could be provided, as done often with agriculture,” he says.

It shouldn’t be too difficult to develop a program in the U.S. to monitor imported wildlife for pathogens and develop risk assessments, says Peter Jenkins, senior counsel for Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, an environmental nonprofit. “We have a very good model of this, and it’s the U.S. livestock trade.” The USDA’s Animal Plant and Health Service implements a comprehensive system of veterinary services and trade controlsto reduce the risk of importing pathogens that can harm animals, including cattle, sheep, poultry and others.

Jenkins estimates such a program could be implemented for a reasonable cost, with just $2 million and six full-time government employees, a figure developed with Congressional staff in 2015 when Jenkins was lobbying to expand the Fish and Wildlife Service’s “injurious wildlife” program. “We’re not talking about a Cadillac program. We just need people doing the research, making risk-based predictions, and then operationalizing those predictions to reduce risk.”

Yet it hasn’t happened.

“There seems to be a lack of economic incentive to create a wildlife health law in the U.S. to regulate the pathways of spread of wildlife pathogens, but the COVID-19 disease highlights the consequences of our lack of understanding of these pathogens,” says Priya Nanjappa, director of operations at Conservation Science Partners, Inc., a nonprofit that provides research and analysis for conservation projects.

The lack of incentive, Najappa says, seems to stem from the false belief that if an imported disease doesn’t immediately threaten public health or agricultural animals, it’s not a major threat to economic interests. But take white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has decimated millions of bats, across several species, in the U.S. Some of these bat population crashes led to Endangered Species Act protections, which in turn place restrictions on economic activities such as logging within the species’ habitats.

The CDC, Fish and Wildlife Service, and USDA did not comment on what kinds of resources the agencies would need to do additional risk assessments, implement monitoring for diseases in the wildlife trade, or whether the pandemic would prompt them to push for increased disease surveillance.

With COVID-19 aiming a spotlight on long-existing deficiencies, now is the time for the best minds in the Fish and Wildlife Service, CDC, USDA, industry and academia to come together and consider what steps can be taken to sew this hole shut, before the next animal-origin pandemic is thrust into our daily lives.

Jonathan Kolbyis a former U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service law enforcement officer and policy specialist focusing on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). His Ph.D. research at James Cook University focused on biosecurity and the spread of wildlife pathogens through international trade. He is a National Geographic Explorer and helped establish the Honduras Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Center, working to combat the amphibian extinction crisis caused by chytrid fungus. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

Wildlife Watch is an investigative reporting project between National Geographic Society and National Geographic Partners focusing on wildlife crime and exploitation. Read more Wildlife Watch stories here, and learn more about National Geographic Society’s nonprofit mission at nationalgeographic.org. Send tips, feedback, and story ideas to ngwildlife@natgeo.com.

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Take Action, Sign a Petition | The Autism Site, a GreaterGood project

The Autism Site

In order to support medical personnel and struggling families during this crisis you can now click 4 times daily. Learn more >

As those who help shape public mindset about disabilities, journalists must do better to represent and respect this population.

We Need Ethical Standards for Journalists Writing About Autism and Disability

5,113 signatures toward our 30,000 Goal 17.04% Complete

Sponsor: The Autism Site

As those who help shape public mindset about disabilities, journalists must do better to represent and respect this population.


Tell the Society of Professional Journalism (SPJ) to create a guide for journalists writing about disability.

The way the media portrays disabilities can have a profound effect on the way the rest of the world views them, as many people do not have firsthand experience with them — after all, only about 12.6 percent of the U.S. population has some sort of disability [1] — so the general public must derive their opinions from what they read or hear. That is why journalists need to write about disabled people in the way they want to be portrayed.

Oftentimes, however, the worldwide media is not terribly good at this. Though journalists have certainly improved at covering stories about disability, [2] they sometimes still fall short of writing about it in a way that is respectful, neutral (rather than negative), and humanizing.

For example, people with disabilities who are able to speak for themselves deserve to have their voices heard, but oftentimes their words are treated as an afterthought, if even included at all. News stories often focus on how the parents or caregivers, rather than the individuals themselves, are affected by the disability.

People with disabilities also deserve to be treated like human beings, but the media often treats them more like pets or objects — things that should be treated with love and care but don’t really have their own thoughts, feelings, or autonomy. They are infantilized, treated like burdens on families and societies, [3] and portrayed as pitiable creatures that deserve praise for doing average, everyday things (such as graduating from school or holding down a job). They are often characterized by their deficits, which sometimes can be very personal and private (i.e. inability to use the toilet).

Even in cases of filicide, journalists often get things backwards and sympathize with the parents “who killed their child out of ‘mercy‘” or “snapped under the immense burden of caregiving.” [4]

When people read these stories, they may begin to internalize these negative messages and form the subconscious opinion that those with disabilities are sub-human and less worthy of life than “normal” people.

We simply cannot let this happen.

The Society of Professional Journalism (SPJ) is an organization that, in part, strives “to stimulate high standards and ethical behavior in the practice of journalism.” [5] As part of that, they have a Code of Ethics that gives guidance to journalists. We believe that this organization should include guidelines on writing ethically about disability. Doing this may lead more journalists to cover it the way they should: with respect.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

[1] Lu, W. (2017, September 5). What journalists can do better to cover the disability beat. Retrieved January 12, 2018, from https://www.cjr.org/the_feature/journalism-disability-beat.php

[2] Rosa, S. D. (2013). Autism in the Media: Stop with the Awful Stories! Retrieved January 12, 2018, from http://www.sheknows.com/community/parenting/autism-media-stop-awful-autism-stories

[3] Lohr, D. (2017, March 15). How Murder Victims With Disabilities Get Blamed For Their Own Deaths. Retrieved January 12, 2018, from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/murder-victims-disabilities-mercy-killings_us_58bd5abfe4b05cf0f401b603

[4] SPJ Missions – Society of Professional Journalists. (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2018, from https://www.spj.org/mission.aspTo Top

The Petition:

Dear Society of Professional Journalism,

We believe that the press has immense power in our society. The simple act of stringing together words to form a story can do an incredible amount of good in our world…but it also has the potential to do just the opposite.

For too long now, journalism has been unintentionally harming some of the most overlooked individuals in our society: those with disabilities. Through subtle word choices and overarching tone, people with disabilities have been portrayed as burdens, sets of deficits, and objects of pity or inspiration for doing nothing out of the ordinary (called “inspiration porn”).To Top

https://theautismsite.greatergood.com/clicktogive/aut/petition/autism-journalism?utm_source=aut-ta-health&utm_medium=email&utm_term=04292020&utm_content=takeaction-f&utm_campaign=petition-autism-journalism&oidp=0x4a568a63ec7cab2cc0a82937

The Navajo Nation Has Only One Official COVID-19 Relief Fund If You Wish To Donate

Mining Awareness +

It appears best and safest to give directly to the official Navajo Nation Covid-19 Relief Fund through their governmental web site. They take monetary and non-monetary donations. Donations are tax deductible. Some other fundraising activities may or may not be legitimate, and may take a percentage.

Click on the Donate button on this Navajo Nation Governmental (Dept. of Health) web site to donate: https://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19

At the Donate Button linked page it explains:
Navajo Nation COVID-19 Relief Fund
The Navajo Nation COVID-19 Fund has been established to help the Navajo Nation respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. This is the Navajo Nation’s only official COVID-19 fundraising and donation effort.

The Navajo Nation is accepting monetary and non-monetary donations to address immediate medical and community needs. Charitable donations to the Navajo Nation are deductible by the donor for federal income, estate, and gift tax purposes…” Read more here, including

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Shock As It’s Revealed An Enzyme Called Luciferase Is What Makes Bill Gates Implantable Quantum Dot Microneedle Vaccine Delivery System Work • Now The End Begins

Bill Gates Human Implantable Quantum Dot Microneedle Vaccination Delivery System needs an enzyme called Luciferase to power the Mark of the Beast system 666

Source: Shock As It’s Revealed An Enzyme Called Luciferase Is What Makes Bill Gates Implantable Quantum Dot Microneedle Vaccine Delivery System Work • Now The End Begins

10 Tips for Troubled Sleep During Lockdown

onegreenplanet.org

By Chelsea Debret 13-17 minutes


Getting quality sleep is a major issue for many of us during this lockdown phase of the pandemic.

I’m not simply talking about falling and staying asleep but this is also referencing what’s going on in our heads once we are asleep. On top of the tossing and turning into the wee hours of the morning, recent polls discovered that many of us are having some strange and upsetting dreams, as well as recurring nightmares to boot!

The stress, anxiety, and fear caused by the pandemic — ushered in by social distancing, self-isolation, drastic changes in our daily life, loss of employment, to mention a few — have seeped into our subconscious and are wreaking havoc with our ability to get a good night’s rest.

While this may not seem like a huge deal, getting the proper amount of quality sleep is an integral part of a healthy body and a robust immune system.

Therefore, no matter what your daily plans in lockdown are, getting at least eight hours of uninterrupted sleep should top the priorities!

The Negative Sleep-Effects of Shelter-in-Place

Pexels/Pixabay

When it comes to trouble sleeping during this pandemic, there are a few psychological tweaks going on in our heads.

First and foremost, we need to acknowledge that our fatigue-driven sleeplessness caused by the “mental workload associated with COVID-19,” such as the unprecedented psychological stressors it has forced upon us including stress and anxiety. Plus, this trouble sleeping may also be caused by “the monotony of the situation,” which increases fatigue during the day and makes it more difficult for us to obtain quality sleep when we actually need it.

One such “unprecedented psychological state” includes phases of adjustment.

The country — and most parts of the world — are experiencing what psychologists call “phases of adjustment” as we transition from our normal life and routine into lockdown. This includes massive readjustment to accommodate the shelter-in-place guidelines — from homeschooling to working from home to new exercise routines to creating strange virtual social parameters with friends and families.

On top of these “phases of adjustment,” the change in daily routine has also made our circadian rhythm go a bit haywire.

Your circadian rhythm “is an essential internal ‘clock’ that plays a key role in regulating our sleep pattern,” by controlling “body temperature and hormones in order to make us feel alert during the day and tired a night.”

From the moment you wake up in the morning to the last cup of coffee to your commute home that evening walk or jog, dinner and then your relaxation time, these are all landmarks throughout the day that help define your circadian rhythm and signal the production of sleep hormones — such as melatonin and serotonin.

Why Should We Focus on Sleep?

The three pillars of a healthy body come down to nutrition, exercise, and sleep. In fact, some scientists even put sleep above these other two pillars in some cases.

Getting quality sleep is linked to a slew of health benefits including healthy weight management, better concentration, more productivity, increased athletic performance, reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, — due to healthier glucose metabolism — decreased risk of depressive feelings, lower rates of bodily inflammation, and an improved immune system.

This last health benefits may be the most important to focus on right now.

According to research, “even a small loss of sleep has been shown to impair immune function.” The study found that “those who slept less than [seven] hours were almost [three] times more likely to develop a cold than those who slept 8 hours or more.”

This was upheld by an analysis of 15 years of sleep-immune system research, which “accumulated surprisingly strong evidence that sleep enhances immune defense, in agreement with the popular wisdom that ‘sleep helps healing.’”

Even though you may not have a reason to go to sleep or wake at specific times during lockdown, these parameters give your body cues to begin releasing those sleepy-time hormones and obtain good-quality, adequate sleep!

10 Tips to Troubleshoot Troubled Sleep

Fotorech/Pixabay

Now you know why you need to get quality sleep.

Of course, this knowledge isn’t helpful when you’re lying awake at one in the morning staring at your bedroom ceiling.

Luckily, there are a few active steps you can take — starting from the moment you wake to the hours before you sleep — which will help train your body to grow sleep. Here are a few tips to get you started down the road to quality sleep!

1. Start a Reflective Journal

Writing has always been seen as a wonderful psychological tool to help unwind and unload the thoughts in your head to make room for clarity, reduce stress, and alleviate anxieties. Using this incredibly powerful tool in order to dump your brain for sound sleep is a great place to start. Reflective journals are a great place to privately “note down your thoughts and feelings” before bed — or anytime during the day! — plus it allows you to “review your progress and see how you adjust” to the lockdown.

2. Create a Morning Routine

Morning is oftentimes the hardest for most of us.

We’re used to an alarm getting us up, a hurried shower, picking an outfit for the day, packing a lunch, and then hopping in the car to commute to work.

Just because you may not have employment or a commute doesn’t mean you can’t incorporate a healthy morning routine!

Trying filling those extra “commute” hours with healthy habits such as cooking a solid healthy breakfast, — such as this Grilled Asparagus and Smoked Tofu Benedict, Cocoa “Zoats”, Hearty Buckwheat Waffles with Strawberries, or these Pumpkin Oatmeal Lentil Cups — exercise, meditate, or even indulge in a tranquil hobby — such as a puzzle, writing, or early morning gardening. By creating a strict morning routine, you will find it “easier to stick to a nighttime routine and therefore fall asleep at a reasonable hour.”

3. Create a Bedtime Routine

While your morning routine dictates the vibe of your day, a bedtime routine dictates the quality of your sleep!

This is especially important during lockdown as it “can help you separate your workday from your evening,” signaling your body that it’s time to begin “cooling down.” Try to turn off all screens — phone, computer, and television — at least an hour before you want to fall asleep. Integrate peaceful activities such as a puzzle, reading, or relaxing yoga, meditating, or breathing exercises into this time. This also includes stopping all work at least an hour before bed!

4. Choose Late Night Snacks Wisely

Part of your bedtime routine should be a food cutoff time.

It’s recommended to not eat within at least three hours of when you will lay down. This rule is great for those suffering from heartburn, but it’s also just a great rule to follow if you’re looking to fall asleep easier. You don’t want your digestive system hard at work when you’re trying to get some shut-eye!

With that said, if your stomach is really asking for a little bit of something, choose wisely!

You’ll want to avoid alcohol, heavy metals, and sugar. Instead, focus on getting magnesium-rich foods, foods that promote serotonin and melatonin, and naturally calming agents — such as lavender and chamomile.

Here are a few late-night snack recipes to give a try: White Bean and Walnut Cookies, Banana Coconut Cashew Granola, Almond and Chamomile Panna Cotta, No-Bake Oat Bars, Peach and Chamomile Ice Pops, or this Chamomile Ginger Lemon Raw Energy Bars.

5. Make the Bedroom a Place of Tranquility

A very popular guilty pleasure is turning your comfy, big bed into an “everything” space. Some of us eat, work, and watch television in bed. While this may have worked before lockdown, when we all had the daily rigmarole to deal with, during lockdown this will wreak havoc with your brain’s ability to recognize the bedroom as a “sleep zone.”

Therefore, make sure to “remove electronic devices and make the room cool, dark, and quiet.”

Don’t eat in bed.

Don’t work in bed.

Don’t watch television, use your phone, or have your laptop in bed.

If you have to have electronic devices in the bedroom — as most of our alarms are on our phones now — make sure to set these devices to “night” mode or “airplane” mode.

6. Avoid Napping

When it comes to napping during the day, it’s important to find a happy balance. Keeping in mind that we’re all suffering from slight forms of pandemic-bred trauma, mourning, and grief, it’s okay to let your body recuperate by getting a few moments of extra shut-eye during the day. With that said, too much napping during the day will throw off your natural circadian rhythm and can interfere with the release of “sleep time” hormones such as melatonin and serotonin.

Basically, if you nap too much during the day, then you may be up all night.

7. Stop Drinking Caffeine after Noon

That cup of coffee in the morning may be the one thing getting you going during lockdown. It may also be part of a healthy, positive morning ritual.

Definitely don’t sacrifice your coffee!

With that said, caffeine — in all forms including coffee, tea, and energy drinks — does have a nasty habit of messing with the natural production, release, and flow of our sleep hormones including serotonin and melatonin.

Therefore, it’s important to cut yourself off from caffeinated beverages or products by at least 12 pm. Research has found that this cutoff time allows your body enough time to get back into the natural rhythm of those hormones by the time you need to fall asleep later that evening.

8. Get Outside!

Most cities have specific lockdown guidelines. These include leaving the house for essential trips — such as medical appointments and grocery shopping — many cities are still allowing their residents to enjoy the outdoors as long as they respect the rules of social distancing.

Take advantage of this leniency!

Getting outside not only breaks up the day and provides a great excuse for physical activity, but “exposure to both natural light and dark during this time will help us keep our circadian rhythms in balance, and make us tired.”

Try to integrate outdoors time first thing in the morning to help you wake up, as well as a nice evening stroll at twilight to signal your brain that the sun has gone down and therefore it’s time for bed!

9. Exercise

You probably knew this one was coming! So, here it is.

Exercise!

Physical activity of any kind — walking, Pilates, gardening, running, weight lifting, yoga, stretching — have amazing benefits for the health of your body and your mind. This is especially prevalent when it comes to the health of your brain! In fact, it’s been found that regular exercise can actually make a brain more youthful.

This is also linked to your brain and body’s ability to fall asleep.

With that said, make sure “avoid vigorous exercise one hour before bedtime as this may reduce our sleep duration, quality, and make it more difficult to fall asleep in the first place.” Choose to integrate exercise first thing in the morning, midday, or late afternoon. If you were addicted to the gym or those butt-kicking classes, try some of these online services offering lockdown deals!

10. Melatonin

As with any supplement, it’s important to speak with your doctor before integrating it into your diet.

With that said, if you’re having trouble sleeping and nothing else is working, incorporating melatonin into your evening routine may help get your circadian rhythm back on track in a more natural way.

There are two types of melatonin: the melatonin hormone released “in the brain [which] is connected to time of day, increasing when it’s dark and decreasing when it’s light” and melatonin supplements created in a lab to mimic natural melatonin hormone. A melatonin supplement is far preferred over sleep medications due to the fact that “you are unlikely to become dependent on melatonin, have a diminished response after repeated use (habituation), or experience a hangover effect.”

After getting the thumbs up from your doctor, try a few of these vegan-friendly supplements out: SOURCE NATURALS Vegan True Melatonin for $6.29, Herbatonin Natural Plant Melatonin for $18.99, or this Natural Nutra Vegan Melatonin for $16.95.

Learn How to Cook Plant-Based Meals at Home

almond-joys_frosted_2

Raw Almond Joys/One Green Planet

Reducing your meat intake and eating more plant-based foods is known to help with chronic inflammationheart healthmental wellbeingfitness goalsnutritional needsallergiesgut health and more! Dairy consumption also has been linked many health problems, including acnehormonal imbalancecancerprostate cancer and has many side effects.

For those of you interested in eating more plant-based, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App — with over 15,000 delicious recipes it is the largest plant-based recipe resource to help reduce your environmental footprint, save animals and get healthy! And, while you are at it, we encourage you to also learn about the environmental and health benefits of a plant-based diet.

Here are some great resources to get you started:

For more Animal, Earth, Life, Vegan Food, Health, and Recipe content published daily, subscribe to the One Green Planet Newsletter! Lastly, being publicly-funded gives us a greater chance to continue providing you with high quality content. Please consider supporting us by donating!

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New Guidelines for Pet Owners from CDC

onegreenplanet.org

By Eliza Erskine 4-5 minutes


The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has released new guidelines for pet owners and coronavirus. After two cats tested positive for the coronavirus in different parts of New York, the new guidelines are out to share with pet owners how to care for pets in the pandemic and how to keep them safe.

Public health officials stated that there is “no evidence” that pets are part of spreading the virus. The CDC stressed the importance of the need for additional information and testing to be able to provide specific guidelines for pet owners. The CDC recommends treating pets like family members and to practice social distancing for animals too.  In the meantime, the CDC has reocmmended:

  • “Do not let pets interact with people or other animals outside the household.
  • Keep cats indoors when possible to prevent them from interacting with other animals or people.
  • Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining at least 6 feet from other people and animals.
  • Avoid dog parks or public places where a large number of people and dogs gather.”

If you’re sick with coronavirus, suspected or confirmed, follow the CDC guidelines and let someone else care for your pet while you’re sick, avoid contact until you’re well and use face coverings and hand washing if you must care for your animal during your illness.

IDEXX Laboratories said it would be providing a COVID-19 test to veterinarians. The agency also said it would continue to provide updates as more information was available.

Learn more about pets and coronavirus, including transmitting the virus to pets, how to keep pets healthy during coronavirus,  how to adopt a pet during social distancing, shelters struggling during coronavirus, and the man that fostered 100 dogs in the pandemic.

Read more about protecting yourself from coronavirus. Check the CDC website for more information on how to protect yourself and check our latest article to learn how COVID-19 differs from the flu.

Scientists believe that the spread of COVID-19, or coronavirus, started at an exotic animal market in Wuhan, China. You can help stop the incidence of viruses like these by signing this petition to ban the wildlife trade.

Eating more plant-based foods is known to help with chronic inflammation, heart health, mental wellbeing, fitness goals, nutritional needs, allergies, gut health and more! Dairy consumption also has been linked to many health problems, including acne, hormonal imbalance, cancer, prostate cancer and has many side effects.

Interested in joining the dairy-free and meatless train? We highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App — with over 15,000 delicious recipes it is the largest plant-based recipe resource to help reduce your environmental footprint, save animals and get healthy! And, while you are at it, we encourage you to also learn about the environmental and health benefits of a plant-based diet.

Catch up on our latest coronavirus coverage in One Green Planet, check out these articles:

For more Animal, Earth, Life, Vegan Food, Health, and Recipe content published daily, subscribe to the One Green Planet Newsletter! Lastly, being publicly-funded gives us a greater chance to continue providing you with high-quality content. Please consider supporting us by donating!

They are there to help 24/7

Please listen to this important video about COVID-19…it can save a loved one’s life and take notes!!!

“Dr. Erickson COVID-19 Briefing, Pt. 2”

“Dr. Erickson COVID-19 Briefing”

 

“Fauci: There will be a surprise outbreak” ( This is from 2017)

“2020 Virus 19 | Ep.14 | Robert F Kennedy Jr response to Bill Gates | Shocking content”

Petition to Allow EBT recipients to order groceries online during COVID-19 pandemic.

change.org Erin Fickas started this petition to United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and 2 others

I think during this crisis all the food delivery services like Instacart and Shipt should accept EBT as a form of payment for the food, and offer EBT customers reduced or free shipping. Most of us people on food assistance are disabled and at high risk for catching COVID-19. Some states allow EBT recipients to order groceries on Amazon, but most states don’t have this option. Please share so people with disabilities can also get food safely!! It’s a problem when the people most in need of grocery delivery cannot access this much needed service and use their EBT card to pay for their food. Offering a waived or reduced delivery fee would help ease the burden of the most vulnerable population of our society. My husband and I are both disabled and at risk for catching COVID. We have a toddler as well who would suffer greatly if I brought home this terrible illness. My physical limitations also make grocery shopping difficult and incredibly painful. Offering grocery delivery services to people who are on EBT helps us to continue being responsible and practicing social distancing.

https://www.change.org/p/instacart-allow-ebt-recipients-to-order-groceries-online-during-covid-19-pandemic

PETITION: Immediately Shut Down All Live Animal ‘Wet’ Markets in New York

ladyfreethinker.org

PETITION TARGETS: NY State Health Commissioner Howard A. Zucker, M.D., J.D.; NYC Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot; and NY Governor Andrew Cuomo New York state should lead the world by example. How? By immediately closing down and permanently banning all cruel and dangerous live animal “wet” markets. New York is the epicenter for the global COVID-19 pandemic, and just like the wet markets in China that gave birth to the crisis, more than 80 dangerous live animal markets are operating today in New York City alone, despite the New York State of Pause Executive Order. Soaked wet with blood, guts, feces, and other bodily fluids and parts, these markets are ideal environments for the incubation and spreading of zoonotic diseases, as a mix of animals are jam-packed into tight cages awaiting slaughter. NYC is particularly susceptible to a new, even more uncontainable virus spreading through its population of over 8 million people, as all residents live in relatively close quarters. As live animal wet markets remain open, public health and safety are at risk. In addition to the current uncontained COVID virus, new variants of COVID could emerge, reinfecting humans and causing a global viral pandemic relapse. Such introductions could be more deadly, and plague even more people globally. The facts are clear: live animal markets — whether in Wuhan, China or on the streets of New York — are breeding grounds for deadly zoonotic diseases that then become communicable human-to-human viruses. The government must immediately shut them all down in the interest of public health and safety. Sign this petition urging lawmakers to do everything in their power to shut down all live animal markets in the state of New York.

SIGN: Immediately Shut Down All Live Animal ‘Wet’ Markets in New York 

How to SEW a REUSABLE FACE MASK with FILTER POCKET// Medical Mask

This is my favorite one, easy to make and for extra protection use a 3M air filter cut to fit.

In our state non-essential stores are closed, but Dollar tree is open and they sell small fabric swatches in their craft section the rest you can purchase at your local hardware store.

Take care.

This Is Just The Start… Please Wear Your Face Masks

Protecting Yourself and Others

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