Found a Bug? | Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the U.S. | Texas A&M

Found a kissing bug?

/Precautions and Procedure

Citizen science offers the opportunity for non-scientists and scientists to work together to collect large amounts of data. This project is currently seeking the help of citizens scientist (like you!) To submit carefully collected kissing bugs from Texas and throughout the U.S.

We are interested in learning more about the distribution of different species of kissing bugs, their interactions with host species. If you have come across a suspected kissing bug in or around your home, kennel, yard, or other area, we are interested in hearing about it.

Continue reading here for more information and pictures.

https://kissingbug.tamu.edu/found-a-bug/#non-kissing-bugs

Advertisements

Caravans of Illegals Have Brought Deadly “Assassin Bug” and Chagas Disease to the U.S.

Absolute Truth from the Word of God

Many of us have been wondering about diseases brought into the U.S. by illegal immigrants.  Little did we know that deadly bugs never seen in our country have now invaded half of our States.  These bugs come from Mexico, Central America and South America.

The bug goes by various names.  One of these names has a rather endearing sound to it:  the Kissing Bug.  But don’t be fooled. When you see why it was named this, you will be alarmed.

The Kissing Bug name came about because when these insects enter your home, they wait till the middle of the night and bite around the mouth area and also around the eyes.

Here is a map of States where the Assassin bug has been spotted:

Picture of Kissing or “Assassin” Bug from the Internet. This bug was found in Maryland where we live:

Kissing Bug found on the screen of…

View original post 1,436 more words

This List Of The Dirtiest Beaches In America Shows There’s Fecal Bacteria In Many Public Swimming Areas

Summer is all fun and games until you find out there’s fecal bacteria contaminating your local beach.

That’s exactly what’s happening at public swimming areas around the country according to John Rumpler, the clean water program director at the Environment America Research and Policy Center.

The center released a study in July that examined dangerous bacteria levels at beaches in 29 coastal and Great Lakes states. The study shows the number of days in 2018 that the water had fecal bacteria counts exceeding Environmental Protection Agency standards, which can put swimmers at risk of getting sick.

“It’s hard to believe that 47 years after we passed the Clean Water Act that we are still concerned with poop in the water when people want to go swimming,” Rumpler told USA Today.

Nearly 60 percent of the 4,523 beaches tested nationwide had dangerously high contamination levels in the water on at least one occasion.

South Carolina, Myrtle Beach, Atlantic ocean, Myrtle Beach State Park, sunbather and fishing pier.Don’t be fooled by the view: Part of Myrtle Beach made the list!

JeffGreenbergGetty Images

While most states prioritize shutting down public swimming areas and posting warning signs to beachgoers when pollution levels are high, you should check water quality reports before hitting the sand.

Did your favorite summer hangout make the list of the dirtiest beaches? See below to find out.

Alabama

• Fairhope Public Beach, Baldwin

• Dog River, Alba Club, Mobile

• Camp Beckwith, Baldwin

• Volanta Avenue, Baldwin

• Orange Street Pier, Baldwin

California

• Inner Cabrillo Beach, Los Angeles

• Coronado Ave. Beach, Los Angeles

• Salt Creek Beach, Orange

• Molino Avenue Beach, Los Angeles

• 5th Place Beach, Los Angeles

Connecticut

• Byram Beach (South), Fairfield

• Byram Beach (North), Fairfield

• Seaside Park Beach (Southernmost), Fairfield

• Seaside Park Beach (South), Fairfield

• Seaside Park Beach (Mid), Fairfield

Delaware

• Slaughter Beach, Sussex

• Fenwick Island State Park Beach, Sussex

• Rehoboth Beach, Sussex

• Broadkill Beach, Sussex

• Lewes Beach North, Sussex

Florida

• Bayou Texar, Escambia

• Sanders Beach, Escambia

• Crandon Park on Key Biscayne, Miami-Dade

• Bird Key Park, Sarasota

• Venice Fishing Pier, Sarasota

Georgia

• St. Simons Island Lighthouse, Glynn

• Skidaway Narrows, Chatham

• Kings Ferry, Chatham

• Tybee Island, Polk St., Chatham

• Jekyll Driftwood Beach, Glynn

Hawaii

• Keehi Lagoon (North), Honolulu

• Keehi Lagoon (South), Honolulu

• Punaluu Beach Park, Honolulu

• MS2 (Kapoho Point), Honolulu

• Kalihi Channel, Honolulu

Illinois

• South Shore Beach, Cook

• Calumet South Beach, Cook

• 63rd Street Beach, Cook

• Rogers Avenue Park Beach, Cook

• Howard Street Park Beach, Cook

Indiana

• Jeorse Park Beach I, Lake

• Jeorse Park Beach II, Lake

• Buffington Harbor Beach, Lake

• Indiana Dunes State Park East Beach, Porter

• Washington Park Beach, LaPorte

Louisiana

• North Beach, Calcasieu

• Cypremort Point State Park, St. Mary

• Fontainebleau State Park, St. Tammany

• Rutherford Beach, Cameron

• Holly Beach 4, Cameron

Maine

• Goose Rocks Beach – Site 5, York

• Goose Rocks Beach – Site 1, York

• Willard Beach, Cumberland

• Ogunquit Beach, York

• Kennebunk Beach, York

Maryland

• Camp Pecometh, Kent

• Public Landing Beach near Snow Hill, Worcester

• Ocean City Beach 1, Worcester

• Purse State Park, Charles

• Ferry Park, Kent

Massachusetts

• Nahant Bay at Eastern Ave, Essex

• Tenean Beach, Suffolk

• Nahant Bay at Pierce Road, Essex

• Nahant Bay at Kimball Road, Essex

• Quincy Shore at Channing Street, Norfolk

Michigan

• St. Clair Shores Memorial Park Beach, Macomb

• Pier Park, Wayne

• HCMA/Lake St. Clair Metropark Beach, Macomb

• New Baltimore Park Beach, Macomb

• Singing Bridge Beach, Arenac

Minnesota

• New Duluth Boat Club landing, St. Louis

• Near Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, St. Louis

• Agate Bay, Lake

• Twin Points Public Access, Lake

• Flood Bay, Lake

Mississippi

• Gulfport East Beach, Harrison

• Shearwater Beach, Jackson

• Long Beach, Harrison

• Gulfport Central Beach, Harrison

• Courthouse Road Beach, Harrison
New Hampshire

• State Beach-Left, Rockingham

• State Beach-Center, Rockingham

• New Castle Island-Right, Rockingham

• State Beach-Right, Rockingham

• Sawyer Beach-Right, Rockingham

New Jersey

• Berkeley Township/Beachwood Beach West, Ocean

• Belmar Borough at L Street Beach, Monmouth

• Berkeley Township at West Beach Avon Road, Ocean

• Brick Township at Windward Beach, Ocean

• Highlands Borough at Highlands Recreation Center, Monmouth

New York

• Tanner Park, Suffolk

• Woodlawn Beach State Park, Erie

• Shirley Beach, Suffolk

• Venetian Shores, Suffolk

• Valley Grove Beach, Suffolk

North Carolina

• Sound access at the intersection of E. Main Street/Tooley Street, Belhaven, Beaufort

• NC Maritime Museum Sailing Camp, Carteret

• Pamlico River – City Park, Beaufort

• End of Shore Line Drive, Pender

• Pamlico River-Washington-Trestle, Beaufort

Ohio

• Bay View West, Erie

• Maumee Bay State Park (Inland), Lucas

• Villa Angela State Park, Cuyahoga

• Lakeview Beach, Lorain

• Euclid State Park, Cuyahoga

Oregon

• Sunset Bay State Park Beach/Big Creek, Coos

• Nye Beach turnaround/discharge pipe, Lincoln

• Harris Beach State Park at Harris Creek, Curry

• Sunset Bay, Seep Creek, Coos

• Sunset Bay State Park Beach/North Beach, Coos

Pennsylvania

• Beach 11 West in Thompson Bay, Erie

• Beach 11 East in Thompson Bay, Erie

• Beach 11 Center in Thompson Bay, Erie

• Barracks Beach West, Erie

• Barracks Beach East, Erie

Rhode Island

• Easton’s Beach, Newport

• Conimicut Point Beach – West, Kent

• Goddard Memorial State Park Center, Kent

• Sandy Point Beach – South, Newport

• Oakland Beach Center, Kent

South Carolina

• Withers Swash, Horry

• Myrtle Beach at 24th Avenue N, Horry

• White Point Swash, Horry

• Bear Branch Swash, Horry

• Cane Patch Swash, Horry

Texas

• Cole Park – Site 3, Nueces

• Ropes Park – Site 2, Nueces

• Cole Park – Site 4, Nueces

• Cole Park – Site 2, Nueces

• Poenisch Park, Nueces

Virginia

• North Community Beach, Norfolk city

• Captains Quarters, Norfolk city

• 10th View, Behind Quality Inn, Norfolk city

• 15th Street, Virginia Beach city

• 13th View, North End, Norfolk city

Washington

• Sooes Beach, Clallam

• Lummi Bay, adjacent to second tidegate, Whatcom

• Dakwas Park Beach, Neah Bay, Clallam

• Little Squalicum Park, Whatcom

•Cline Spit County Park, Clallam

Wisconsin

• Cupertino Park, Milwaukee

• McKinley Marina Roundhouse, Milwaukee

• Wolfenbuttel Park, Kenosha

• North Nicolet Bay Campground, Door

• Memorial Park in Chequamegon Bay, Ashland County

https://www.delish.com/just-for-fun/a28527611/dirtiest-beaches-in-america/

(h/t USA Today)

Content Strategy Editor Kelly O’Sullivan is the content strategy editor for CountryLiving.com and also covers entertainment news, from standout moments on “The Voice” to the latest drama on “Chicago Fire.”

Hundreds of Sunscreens Don’t Work or Have Unsafe Ingredients, Annual Review Finds

ecowatch.com
Sam Nickerson

Summer is fast approaching, which means it’s time to stock up on sunscreen to ward off the harmful effects of sun exposure. Not all sunscreens are created equally, however.

The nonprofit Environmental Working Group released its 13th annual Guide to Sunscreens this month, which rated the safety and effectiveness of more than 1,300 sun protection products on the market. It found that two-thirds of those products either contained chemicals the Food and Drug Administration says could be potentially harmful or provide inferior protection from the sun.

EWG experts found that only 40 percent of the products it examined — including sunscreens, moisturizers and lip balms — have active ingredients that meet draft safety regulations developed by the FDA in February.

According to the FDA, just two of the 16 common active ingredients in most sunscreens, zinc and titanium oxides, have been tested enough to show they are safe and effective. Another two ingredients, PABA and trolamine salicylate, were found to be unsafe according to the proposed standards, while the remaining 12 did not have enough data for the FDA to indicate whether or not they worked and could be considered safe.

“The good news is that the FDA has reaffirmed what EWG has advocated for 13 years: Based on the best current science, the safest and most effective sunscreen active ingredients are zinc oxide and titanium dioxide,” said Nneka Leiba, director of EWG’s Healthy Living Science program, in a press release. “It’s long past time that the chemicals used in sunscreens were tested to show that they will not harm our health.”

Many of the chemical ingredients were not tested enough because they had been grandfathered in when the FDA set more rigorous testing regulations in the 1970s, Time reported, as the belief then was that creams, lotions and sprays did not penetrate deep enough beyond the surface of the skin. A recent FDA study, however, confirmed that common sunscreen ingredients avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene and ecamsule all end up in the bloodstream at levels beyond the threshold for further testing.

Oxybenzone is an allergen and potential endocrine disruptor that can have adverse effects on human growth, development and reproduction, USA Today reported, and could be damaging coral reefs. Oxybenzone was found in more than 60 percent of the sunscreens reviewed by the EWG.

Time also reported that sunscreen manufacturers have put stronger chemicals in their products in response to skin cancer concerns or increased listed sun protection factor (SPF) values, while health experts have suggested more frequent use of these sunscreens, potentially increasing the likelihood the chemicals are absorbed.

Legislation has since been enacted to improve the FDA review process, and the EWG supports an FDA proposal to limit SPF ratings, as research has not shown that higher SPF ratings provide additional protection from all ultraviolet rays. If anything, the EWG says, SPF values greater than 50+ provide a false sense of security leading to increased exposure.

The EWG’s 2019 sunscreen guide did provide some good news: more than 260 sunscreens meet its safety guidelines and would also meet the FDA’s proposed standards. The full list of those products is on the EWG website.

https://www.ecowatch.com/safe-sunscreen-guide-ewg-2638024475.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=9ece4f9c5f-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-9ece4f9c5f-86074753

Petition To Apple: Add the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline to ALL IPHONES · Change.org

Add the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline to ALL IPHONES
Aditi Dixit started this petition to Apple

Suicide is a major health concern.

The summer before my freshman year of high school, I found out that two of my close friends had attempted suicide; and they’re not alone.

According to the CDC, in 2016 suicide was the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. It was also the second leading cause of death for people between the ages of 10 to 34.

With preteens, adolescents, and young adults at a high risk, Apple is in a perfect position to help. According to Business Insider, 82% of American teenagers own an iPhone as of April 2018.

While there are resources to help those struggling with suicidality, many have trouble seeking them out.

I would like all iPhones in America to come with a contact already set up for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. The number is 1-800-273-TALK (8255).
Actually, I’d love to see it include the crisis textline https://www.crisistextline.org which handles a broad array of issues including suicide. Teens communicate more by text than calls.

Please Sign Petition!

https://www.change.org/p/apple-add-the-national-suicide-prevention-lifeline-to-all-iphones?utm_source=social_media&utm_medium=twitter_us

· © 2019, Change.org, PBCCertified B Corporation

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

How to avoid the bite of a kissing bug

treehugger.com
Melissa Breyer MelissaBreyer April 25, 2019

Kissing bugs can carry the parasite that causes Chagas disease, and they are now making their way through the US.

Meet the kissing bug; the contrary insect with a charming moniker and deadly habits. While its name may bring to mind ladybugs or other cute critters, the kissing bug is actually a nocturnal bloodsucker that comes with an inflammatory infectious disease. Good times.

Also known as triatomine bugs, kissing bugs can carry Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Once found only in Latin America, this creepy crawler has worked its way north to the U.S., where it can now be found in dozens of states. The CDC says that an estimated 8 million people living in Mexico, Central America, and South America have Chagas disease, most of whom do not know they are infected. If untreated, infection is lifelong and can be life threatening.

The first (acute) phase can last for a few weeks to a few months and often shows no symptoms, but may also present with fever, fatigue, body aches, headache, rash, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and vomiting. In the chronic phase, which can last for decades or forever, approximately 20 to 30 percent of infected people develop cardiac complications and/or gastrointestinal complications.

Called the kissing bug for its propensity to bite the face, the bug doesn’t directly deliver T. cruzi to the host. The pathogen lives in the bug’s feces; to infect a person, it finds its way into the bite, another area of broken skin, or through a mucous membrane.

kissing bugCDC/Public Domain

And while all of this is rather disturbing, the CDC points out that the transmission of the T. cruzi parasite from a bug to a human is not easy:

It is important to note that not all triatomine bugs are infected with the parasite that causes Chagas disease. The likelihood of getting T cruzi infection from a triatomine bug in the United States is low, even if the bug is infected.

That said, babies, people with compromised immune systems, and pets are all especially vulnerable. So if you live in a state in which kissing bugs have been confirmed, you can take these CDC precautions to keep them at bay and avoid being bitten.

kissing bugCDC/Public Domain

KNOW WHERE THEY LIVE

Beneath porches
Between rocky structures
Under concrete
In rock, wood, brush piles, or beneath bark
In rodent nests or animal burrows
In outdoor dog houses or kennels
In chicken coops or houses

When the bugs are found inside, they are likely to be in one of the following settings:

Near the places your pets sleep
In areas of rodent infestation
In and around beds and bedrooms, especially under or near mattresses or night stands

HOW TO PREVENT INFESTATION

An important precaution to avoid being bitten is to make sure they can’t get in your home in the first place. Since they bite at night, in bed will be the most likely place a person will be bitten.

Seal cracks and gaps around windows, walls, roofs, and doors.
Remove wood, brush, and rock piles near your house.
Use screens on doors and windows and repairing any holes or tears.
If possible, make sure yard lights are not close to your house (lights can attract the bugs).
Seal holes and cracks leading to the attic, crawl spaces below the house, and to the outside.
Have pets sleep indoors, especially at night.
Keep your house and any outdoor pet resting areas clean, in addition to periodically checking both areas for the presence of bugs.

For more information (and the sources used for this story), see the CDC pages: Chagas Disease, Triatomine Bug.

Kissing bugs can carry the parasite that causes Chagas disease, and they are now making their way through the US.

https://www.treehugger.com/health/how-avoid-bite-kissing-bug.html?utm_source=TreeHugger+Newsletters&utm_campaign=95a00d3832-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_11_16_2018_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_32de41485d-95a00d3832-243719061

The Top 10 Detox Herbs

wakeup-world.com
February 26th, 2019

By Dr. Edward F. Group Guest writer for Wake Up World

Today I want to explore ten of the best detox herbs used to cleanse various organs and systems of the body. Most of these herbs have been part of the therapeutic lexicon for hundreds, if not thousands, of years and are known across many cultures and borders to help with various ailments and health conditions. Due to their long history, popularity, and reported effectiveness, some of these herbs are also active ingredients in some of our most effective body cleansing products.

Top 10 Detox Herbs

1. Organic Gum Acacia

Made from the sap of the acacia tree, this substance has been used for centuries to help relieve symptoms of diarrhea by adding bulk to bowel movements and improving electrolyte absorption. It is also one of several ingredients in Oxy-Powder®. As a hydrocolloid, it is used as an emulsifier to stabilize and facilitate synergy between two ingredients which would not normally mix well together. [1]

2. Dandelion

For centuries, parts of the entire dandelion plant have been used to help with a wide range of maladies. It promotes bowel regularity and good hydration levels in the body. And, its famous derivative, dandelion tea, has been used to help with joint discomfort. Dandelion root is used in our liver-cleansing product, Livatrex®because it supports bile production, and bile helps transport toxins out of the body. Dandelion is also believed by some to help the body’s immune system. [2]

3. Organic Milk Thistle

This herb has been used to help the gallbladder and liver for over 2,000 years. It has been known to help produce bile, which in turn improves digestive function. Milk thistle is an active ingredient in Livatrex, which is our most popular liver and gallbladder cleansing product. [3]

4. Black Walnut

Europeans were first introduced to this herb in the 1600’s. Three active agents in black walnut, juglone, tannins, and iodine, make it particularly effective in natural health and wellness practices. Juglone is the black walnut’s natural defense mechanism, which helps fight against harmful organisms like bacteria and fungus. Tannins also help deter harmful organisms. Iodine, an essential mineral to all life forms, helps reduce the lifespan of many harmful organisms.

5. Wormwood

The subject of much folklore, wormwood’s potent reputation as a component of absinthe lead to it being banned in the United States for many years. Despite the momentary hiccup, wormwood is back and has been used since Egyptian times to fight harmful organisms such as pinworms and roundworms. It has also historically been used to aid with digestion.

6. Cilantro

Cilantro is instrumental in helping the body rid itself of dangerous toxic metals that accumulate in organ tissues. It is also a very popular herb that is talked about on almost every cooking show. Cilantro possesses natural cleansing agents that contain compounds which bind to toxic metals and help pull them out of various tissues. [4]

7. Alfalfa Leaf

Herbalists have used Alfalfa leaf for centuries to help with a variety of infections. Many believed that it also helped the body fight stomach ulcers and also helped stimulate a healthy appetite.

8. Peppermint

Peppermint has a soothing quality that helps with coughing associated with colds and flu. It also helps with sore throats and sinus irritation. Because it helps also aids the body in fighting off harmful organisms, it is an active ingredient in lung cleansing products like Allertrex®. [5]

9. Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is another herb that helps with lung cleansing. It possesses expectorant properties, helps fight bacteria, and attacks viruses. It can also be used as a topical ointment for chest congestion and a stopped up nose. Aboriginal medicine highly regarded it for its calming, soothing properties.

10. Stinging Nettle

Known for its ability to resist microorganisms, it also possesses antioxidant properties. Stinging nettle is also resistant to systemic redness and swelling and promotes normal blood pressure. [6]

Sources and References:

[1] Teichberg S, Wingertzahn MA, Moyse J, Wapnir RA. Effect of gum arabic in an oral rehydration solution on recovery from diarrhea in rats. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1999 Oct;29(4):411-7.
[2] Schütz K, Carle R, Schieber A. Taraxacum–a review on its phytochemical and pharmacological profile. J Ethnopharmacol. 2006 Oct 11;107(3):313-23. Epub 2006 Jul 22. Review.
[3] Saller R, Melzer J, Reichling J, Brignoli R, Meier R. An updated systematic review of the pharmacology of silymarin. Forsch Komplementmed. 2007 Apr;14(2):70-80. Epub 2007 Apr 23. Review.
[4] Aga M, Iwaki K, Ueda Y, Ushio S, Masaki N, Fukuda S, Kimoto T, Ikeda M, Kurimoto M. Preventive effect of Coriandrum sativum (Chinese parsley) on localized lead deposition in ICR mice. J Ethnopharmacol. 2001 Oct;77(2-3):203-8.
[5] Shkurupi? VA, Kazarinova NV, Ogirenko AP, Nikonov SD, Tkachev AV, Tkachenko KG. [Efficiency of the use of peppermint (Mentha piperita L) essential oil inhalations in the combined multi-drug therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis]. Probl Tuberk. 2002;(4):36-9. Russian.
[6] Testai L, Chericoni S, Calderone V, Nencioni G, Nieri P, Morelli I, Martinotti E. Cardiovascular effects of Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) roots extracts: in vitro and in vivo pharmacological studies. J Ethnopharmacol. 2002 Jun;81(1):105-9.

https://wakeup-world.com/2019/02/26/the-top-10-detox-herbs/

Recommended articles by Dr. Edward Group:

Learn How to Lower Cortisol Levels Naturally
Study Finds Antidepressants to be Depressingly Ineffective
The 9 Best Fermented Foods for Your Gut
14 Foods that Cleanse the Liver
Top 5 Foods for the Pineal Gland
The Importance of a Kidney Cleansing Diet
The 9 Best Herbs for Lung Cleansing and Respiratory Support
7 Best Foods to Support Kidney Function
How Fluoride Damages Pineal Gland Health
10 Uses for Organic Oregano Oil
Lung Cleanse: 10 Ways to Detox Your Lungs

About the author:

Dr. Edward F. Group III (DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM) founded Global Healing Center in 1998 with the goal of providing the highest quality natural health information and products. He is world-renowned for his research on the root cause of disease. Under his leadership, Global Healing Center earned recognition as one of the largest natural and organic health resources in the world. Dr. Group is a veteran of the United States Army and has attended both Harvard and MIT business schools. He is a best-selling author and a frequent guest on radio and television programs, documentary films, and in major publications.

Dr. Group centers his philosophy around the understanding that the root cause of disease stems from the accumulation of toxins in the body and is exacerbated by daily exposure to a toxic living environment. He believes it is his personal mission to teach and promote philosophies that produce good health, a clean environment, and positive thinking. This, he believes, can restore happiness and love to the world.

Thirsty? Here Are 9 Types of Water You Can Drink

ecowatch.com
By Jennifer Still

You hear it all the time: You should be drinking more water. How much depends on the person, but generally speaking, staying well hydrated offers a host of health benefits. That includes higher energy levels and better brain function, just to name a few.

But not all water is created equal, with some being cheaper or providing more nutrients than others.

Here are the different types of water and what you should know about them…

Tap Water

A piped water supply, tap water is found everywhere from the water that flushes a public toilet to the water that comes out of your kitchen sink or cleans your glassware in your dishwasher.

Pros

Though many people turn their noses up at the idea of drinking tap water over taste or safety concerns, the truth is that tap water is safe to drink across much of the U.S.

What’s more, tap water isn’t only good for you, it’s cheaper than buying various types of bottled water.

Cons

While there are industry regulations in place that are meant to keep lead and other harmful substances from contaminating the water supply, sometimes this doesn’t work. A prime example of this is the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan.

Moreover, the Guardian reported on research showing plastic particles in tap water supplies around the world.

Public water supplies can also contain pesticide residue, aluminum, and other undesirable substances. If, however, you’re worried that the treatments performed on your water supply aren’t up to par, you can always purchase a home filtration system for further cleansing.

Mineral Water

Pulled from a mineral spring, mineral water is, as the name states, full of minerals including sulfur, magnesium and calcium—all things that are good for you.

Pros

Mineral water does indeed have some health benefits, since it provides minerals your body can’t create on its own. It can also help aid in digestion, and many people even like the taste of it over tap water, though that’s down to personal preference.

Cons

One of the main downsides to mineral water is cost, especially when compared to tap water. Many of the minerals from this type of water can also be obtained from a healthy, varied diet.

Spring or Glacier Water

Spring or glacier waters are types of bottled waters that are claimed to be bottled at the source from where the water flows—either from the spring or glacier.

Pros

In theory, spring or glacier waters should be relatively clean and free of toxins. They also contain many of the same helpful minerals found in mineral water.

It also tends to be pretty readily available in stores, think well-known brands like Evian and Arrowhead, in both large and small bottles, which makes it easily accessible.

Cons

Depending on how much you drink, spring water could get pricey, especially in comparison to tap water. Also, some spring water is raw, unfiltered, and untested water, which could pose potential health risks depending on what it contains.

Sparkling Water

Sometimes referred to as carbonated water or soda water, sparkling water is infused with carbon dioxide gas while under pressure.

Pros

Sparkling water offers a different mouth feel to flat water, which could be a welcome change if you want something fizzy without sugar or artificial sweeteners.

That said, there are flavored sparkling waters available that do contain one or both types of sweeteners. Plus, because sparkling water tends to be mineralized—think Perrier and San Pellegrino—you’re getting the added bonus of health-promoting minerals with your carbonation.

Cons

While there are some minerals present in sparkling water, there aren’t enough to be truly beneficial to your health in a meaningful way. In addition, it can be expensive compared to both tap and certain types of bottled water.

Distilled Water

This type of water is boiled and the steam is collected and condensed back into a liquid.

Pros

Distilled water is a great option if you live somewhere—or are visiting somewhere—where the tap water supply is contaminated or possibly could be.

Cons

As there are no vitamins and minerals in distilled water, there are no health benefits. In fact, it has the potential to be detrimental as non-mineralized water tends to pull minerals from where it can—in this case, your body, or specifically your teeth.

Purified Water

Purified water is usually tap or groundwater which has been treated to remove harmful substances like bacteria, fungi, and parasites.

This means that drinking it is pretty much guaranteed to be safe.

Pros

Like distilled water, purified water is a great option if your immediate water source is contaminated. That said, many countries purify tap water, so you’re basically drinking purified water every time you fill a cup from your kitchen sink.

Cons

Because all potentially harmful substances are removed from purified water, you also miss out on some of the potentially beneficial ones that are added to tap water supplies like fluoride, which helps to reduce tooth decay.

In addition, purchasing purified water or even installing a filtration system at home can be pretty costly.
Flavored or Infused Water

Flavored water is water that’s sweetened with either sugar or artificial sweeteners, and contains natural or artificial flavorings.

Pros

Flavored water, like Hint and Propel, can offer a tasty alternative to plain water, which makes it easier to drink in larger amounts.

It can also add variation to your water intake since there are so many flavors available. Flavor can be added naturally by infusing fruit and vegetables into tap or bottled water, or you could purchase artificially flavored waters in most stores.

Cons

Often, flavored waters contain added sugar or artificial sweeteners. Varieties with sugar can lead to weight gain and have a negative effect on those with diabetes. What’s more, some people may react negatively to artificial sweeteners.

Alkaline Water

Alkaline water has a higher pH level than normal tap water and contains alkaline minerals and negative oxidation reduction potential (ORP).

Pros

The fact that this type of water has a higher pH level has led some people to believe that it may help neutralize acid in the body, help slow the aging process, or even prevent cancer.

There’s very little scientific proof, however, of this being true.

Cons

It’s generally safe to drink alkaline water, but it could reduce stomach acidity, thereby lowering its ability to kill off harmful bacteria.

In excess, it could also lead to metabolic alkalosis, which could produce symptoms like nausea and vomiting.

Well Water

Well water comes straight from the ground, though it’s untreated and carries with it a number of risks.

Pros

If you happen to live in an area where wells are plentiful, or you even have one in your own backyard, the convenient access to what seems like fresh water could be attractive.

While there are many proponents of raw, untreated water, the benefits may not outweigh the potential risks.

That said, there are steps you can take to ensure your well water is suitable for drinking. For example, testing your well water annually for bacteria, nitrates, and pH levels. It’s also possible to install a filtration system.

Cons

Because the water hasn’t been treated, there’s a big chance of contamination—particularly from bacterial and parasitic infections like giardia.

While well water used to be the norm, there’s a reason that city water supplies and the regulations surrounding them were put into place—you simply don’t know what you’re getting unless you test or treat the well water yourself.

The Bottom Line

While you may have a preference for which type of water is best, generally, there’s no one type that promises greater health benefits than the others.

So long as the water you’re drinking is clean and safe, the main focus is to make sure that you stay hydrated and to ensure you’re drinking enough water on a regular basis.

Jennifer Still is an editor and writer with bylines in Vanity Fair, Glamour, Bon Appetit, Business Insider, and more. She writes about food and culture. Follow her on Twitter.

Medically reviewed by Carissa Stephens, RN, CCRN, CPN.

https://www.ecowatch.com/types-of-water-2629621183.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=061e7b3f55-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-061e7b3f55-86074753

US Senator Sanders Investigates $375,000 Price On Old Drug Previously Available For Free

Mining Awareness +

The drug was invented in Scotland in the 1970s, and has been given away for free by Jacobus pharmaceuticals for 20 years. One need only look at this case to see why medical price caps are essential. Neither individuals nor insurance companies nor the US taxpayer can afford US medical charges. The Canadian system works only because of caps on charges, and not just drug charges. US doctors are gouging too.

The $375,000 would even take a big chunk out of the Catalyst CEO, Patrick J McEnany,’s $900.000 salary. US Senator Sanders explains: “Recently, Catalyst licensed the rights to the drug and received exclusive rights to market Firdapse for seven years under the FDA’s orphan drug designation. In December 2018, Catalyst announced to investors it would set the list price for Firdapse at $375,000 per year

Catalyst was sued by investors in 2013 for failure to disclose the…

View original post 806 more words

How often should you clean your water bottle?

treehugger.com
By MelissaBreyer January 30, 2019

An infectious disease physician dishes the dirt on water bottles.

Here’s a curious thing about modern humans. We went for most of history without needing to carry a bottle of water around with us everywhere we went. But now, many of us find it hard to manage without constant and immediate access to hydration. Since the rise of the now-ubiquitous single-use water bottle in the 1970s, we’ve become unusually attached to portable water. Now that plastic water bottles have become such an untenable source of pollution, at least we’re seeing the light and increasingly moving on to reusable versions.

The only thing is, unlike a water glass at home that gets washed on a somewhat regular basis, the water bottle may get a bit neglected in the washing department. I mean, it’s filled with water, how dirty can it get?

Writer Hana Asbrink at Food52 wondered the same thing and decided to explore the question of how often one should wash their reusable water bottle. She reached out to Dr. Brian Chow, an infectious disease physician at Tufts Medical Center, who told her:

“Ideally once per day. Or have a few bottles that you rotate through, and clean them all at once.”

Of the bacteria found on bottles, his take is similar to what I discovered when writing about whether or not day old water is safe to drink:

“They are bacteria that live in our mouth and throat that our bodies know, and they don’t make us sick. However, if you share bottles with someone else, they may not be used to your bacteria or viruses. The germs that cause strep throat, mononucleosis, colds and the flu, and even bacterial meningitis can be spread by sharing bottles.”

That said, if you are not washing your bottle daily, don’t fret. “In most cases, people with healthy immune systems will be okay going a day or two between washing bottles,” says Chow … as he goes on to explain that actually, there are germs everywhere that can end up on your bottle that you then drink out of. Thus:

“A quick wash and scrub at the end of the day and letting the bottle dry overnight is an easy step to keep you healthy while you stay hydrated.”

“Water that is hot to the touch is best,” says Chow. “While it may not kill all the germs directly, it does help dissolve the residue that allow germs to live on plastic and metal. Using soapy water and a scrub brush are as important (this removes the dirt and grime), and also dislodges the germs if they are stuck to the bottle.”

At my house we rinse all the water bottles in hot water at the end of the day and let them dry over night, and we seem to have survived, and without too many bouts of illness. That said, I may now start introducing some dish soap and a scrub brush every once in a while.

Importantly, check with the maker of your bottle to see what they advise for washing. Some can take the dishwasher, many can not. I did a little digging on some popular brands, which you can read below.

SIGG
You’re going to want to start by rinsing out the bottle and bottle top with hot water after every use. Leave open to dry and always store with the top off.

Our best tip is to fill your SIGG halfway with hot water. But be sure to be careful because the bottle can heat up quickly. Add one teaspoon of unscented dish soap and shake. Let sit for a few minutes then rinse with lukewarm water until the soapy water runs clear.

Remember to always make sure that the lip of the bottle is thoroughly cleaned in the same way as the bottle as this is the part that comes in the most contact with your mouth.

S’well
S’well products should be cleaned regularly—we recommend washing your bottle with warm water and soap after every use and drying and storing it with the top off. Our S’well Bottle Brush is a great tool to ensure your bottle stays thoroughly clean. Avoid submerging your bottle and cap in water for long periods of time as this will interfere with the vacuum seal. S’well bottles are NOT dishwasher safe! Running a S’well through the dishwasher can cause paint to chip and the vacuum seal to become ineffective. After washing your S’well, we recommend that you dry your beverage container by airing it out upside down and storing it with the lid off. This will help keep your S’well looking and smelling fresh.

Soma
Hand-wash with warm, soapy water or wash on the top-rack of your dishwasher. Do not remove the sleeve. Store with the cap off. Cap: Hand-wash only. Do not place in the dishwasher.

CamelBak
Cleaning Vacuum Insulated Stainless Steel Vessels: The Chute, eddy and KickBak stainless steel vessels can be easily cleaned with a bottle brush using warm water and mild soap.

Bottle caps, spout caps, tethers and bite valves can all be cleaned in the top rack of the dishwasher or by hand with warm, soapy water. Remove the cap, spout cap, tether or bite valve from the vessel before washing.

For a deeper cleaning, add a drop of mild soap or tablespoon of bleach to a clean glass jar filled with water. Drop the bite valve, straw and cap into the solution, and tightly close the jar’s lid. Shake the mixture around for 30 seconds, and then let the parts soak for about 15 minutes. Rinse and shake dry.

https://www.treehugger.com/health/how-often-should-you-clean-your-water-bottle.html?utm_source=TreeHugger+Newsletters&utm_campaign=fae7d0fd73-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_11_16_2018_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_32de41485d-fae7d0fd73-243719061

This is How Dairy Affects Your Hormones. Get Ready to #DitchDairy Today!

onegreenplanet.org
By Heather McClees

By now, it’s common knowledge that non-organic cow’s milk is one of the worst choices you can buy at the store due to the excess hormones, antibiotics, steroids, pesticides and who knows what else it all contains. The food industry has tried to mislead us into believing that organic cow’s milk (and its products) comes with pure innocence and is made from cows that graze gracefully and happily in fields all day with the cleanest of air, water, fresh grass and more. Regardless that most none of this is true, cow’s milk is still one of the worst health food choices you can make for many reasons, no matter what kind of cows it comes from. The main reason is for how it affects your hormones.

All cows that produce milk are pregnant, organically raised, fed, etc. or not. It makes no difference that their milk doesn’t have added hormones considering that alone, cow’s milk contains over 60 different hormones without anything being added to it. Now, while all of us have different hormone situations going on, there is no logical research that says we need to take in added hormones from another mammal.

Why Ditching Dairy is Important for Your Hormones:

Cows are pregnant nearly 300 days of the year and Harvard Health shares that the more times a cow has been pregnant during that year, the more hormones she produces through her milk every time. Cows were not made to stay pregnant 300 days of the year and they develop infections due to this high demand for production, not to mention may be subject to further disease and bacteria when antibiotics aren’t used (such as in organic farming practices).

So, what about a cow’s hormones so detrimental to our own health?

Here are some things to consider:

1. Insulin Issues

One of the primary reasons dairy is linked to acne is that it raises insulin in the body. All dairy contains IG1, or insulin-growth factor. It raises our levels of insulin, which causes blood sugar swings that lead to acne. Acne is strongly influenced by hormonal changes, which is one reason so many teenagers struggle during puberty. Why would we put ourselves through that anymore than necessary? No matter what kind of dairy you choose, you’re taking in excess insulin growth like factor. Sadly, it’s promoted as a healthy option for body builders looking to bulk up, but over time, it’s not a healthy choice and will likely cause insulin problems that lead to overeating, sugar cravings, and poor blood sugar control.

2. Mood Swings

Dairy also contains hormones that can lead to mood swings. Estrogen and testosterone are our sex hormones, and when they get out of balance according to our bodies’ needs, we suffer mood swings as a result. Dairy milk promotes excess estrogen in the body due to it containing estrogen from female cows. At the same time, milk naturally contains androgenic properties, so it raises testosterone in the body and can cause bulking quickly. It’s absolutely chock-full of all these hormones we don’t need scurrying throughout bodies. Think about it this way: the dairy you consume contains hormones from the female cow and the male cow that were used during impregnation. That doesn’t sound so healthy or appetizing, now, does it?

Dairy milk accounts for about 80 percent of estrogen consumed through the human diet, along with the fact that milk from pregnant cows (which is how all milk products are produced) contains about 33 times as much estrogen as milk from non-pregnant cows.

Mood swings inarguably happen due to swift hormone fluctuations and women aren’t the only ones to suffer. Men can too, which is one reason dairy isn’t a healthy choice for anyone looking to have a healthier, happy and more stable mood. How about some tastier, much healthier mood foods instead, all hormone-free?

3. Cancer-Causing

The jury is in: milk causes cancer in any form, organic or not. Check this out: Harvard Health studies show that dairy milk and cheese products led to testicular cancer in men ages 20-39 and has been found to affect breast, colon, and prostate cancer heavily as well. And then there’s the casein protein found in milk that has also been linked to cancer. Even without hormones or even lactose, casein is a detrimental protein to our health and should be avoided however possible.

Help Your Hormones: Ditch Dairy

Sadly, the food industry would have you believe you need to consume milk to be healthy, but we know that’s not the case. Quit believing the lies around cow’s milk and have some other calcium-rich options instead, all free of these scary hormones.

If you need a dairy replacement, look to these milk-free alternatives. So Delicious Dairy Free Coconutmilk Creamer is an amazing alternative. This Milkadamia Unsweetened Milk is a great choice. Good Karma Flaxmilk is a new way to enjoy grain-milk. And this Silk Soy Milk Vanilla is a must-have.

Looking for other reasons to ditch dairy? Here are 5 signs to look out for and also see our easy tips for making your own milk without one stitch of dairy!

Ready to #DitchDairy with us? Tweet to us #IMAGREENMONSTER Ready to #DitchDairy!

We also highly recommend downloading our Food Monster App, which is available for both Android and iPhone, and can also be found on Instagram and Facebook. The app has more than 8,000 plant-based, allergy-friendly recipes, and subscribers gain access to ten new recipes per day. Check it out!

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/how-dairy-affects-your-hormones/

Lead Image Source: Day Donaldson/Flickr

Get Better Sleep With These 15 Natural, Vegan Friendly Calm-Inducing Natural Products – One Green PlanetOne Green Planet

Do you have trouble falling asleep? Are you struggling with insomnia or just want to be able to wind down smoothly for bed? perhaps prescribed medication isn’t working for you or you would like to try some more natural products first. Well we’ve got you covered. A good night sleep is important for our mental and physical wellness. There are natural plants, herbs, and roots that are blend into teas, essential oils, capsules, and gummies to help you.

Here are 15 natural, vegan calm – inducing products available on Amazon to help you to a better night’s rest.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/get-better-sleep-with-these-15-natural-calm-inducing-natural-products/

12 Foods to Help You Survive Winter Allergies, Colds and The Flu – One Green PlanetOne Green Planet

Chills, sneezing, achy joints…it’s hard to be all smiles and full of cheer.

The best way to prevent having to deal with a cold, the flu, or allergies during the jolliest time of the year, is to prevent them from coming on in the first place. It’s also a good idea to have an arsenal of natural remedies up your sleeves that you can turn to when signs of any sickness or allergy reaction start to appear. Thankfully, nature has some pretty tasty foods that can help us to do just that. Certain foods contain just the right vitamins, minerals, or micro-nutrients that our bodies need to feel their best. Here are some of the best:

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/foods-for-winter-allergies-colds-and-the-flu/

Best Plant-Based Foods to Help You Retain Iron

onegreenplanet.org
By Chelsea Debret

Eating a primarily plant-based diet has many incredible benefits including healthy weight loss and management, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and even a reduced risk of cancer. With that said, one of the hurdles that plant-based dieters face, especially strict vegetarian and vegan practices, is a condition called anemia, in which “your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body” due to insufficient iron levels.

For those that suffer from this condition, how do you continue to uphold your plant-based eating values, while also maintaining overall health? You’re in luck! There is a range of plant-based foods that help the human body retain iron and avoid anemia altogether.

What is Iron?

Hemoglobin, iron-rich proteins moving through the body

qimono/Pixabay

Let’s take a deep dive into what iron is and what it does for your body. In its basic form, iron is simply an essential mineral. Once absorbed, iron-rich proteins called hemoglobin attach to oxygen and are carried throughout the body. Via this transport vessel, iron is carried to tissues throughout the body producing energy (referred to as myoglobin), as well as playing a crucial role in removing carbon dioxide. Iron is also an incredibly important nutrient for brain development and overall growth of babies and children.

One misconception regarding iron is that the only reliable source is found in animal products such as “meat, seafood, and poultry.” The truth is that there are actually two types of iron that can be absorbed from food called heme and non-heme. While heme iron is meat-based, non-heme iron is said to be accountable for 85 to 90 percent of your total iron and can be absorbed via plant-based foods including “spinach and beans, grains that are enriched, like rice and bread, and some fortified cereals.”

The Relationship between Iron and Anemia

jarmoluk/Pixabay

First off, anemia isn’t relegated to plant-based dieters. In fact, anemia is the most common blood disorder in the United States affecting over three million people for a variety of reasons including pregnancy, infections, chronic diseases, and poor diet, to name just a few risk factors.

So, what exactly is anemia?

There are a handful of incredibly serious types of anemia including aplastic anemia, a rare bone marrow failure disorder; hemolytic anemia, when red blood cells are broken up and therefore unable to carry iron-rich protein to the necessary tissues; and sickle cell anemia, when hemoglobin protein is abnormal. The most common type of anemia is iron-deficiency anemia, which occurs “when you don’t have enough iron in your blood.” If you’re given a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia it means that you don’t have enough hemoglobin (those iron-rich proteins). Basically, your body lacks oxygen. People with anemia generally experience dizziness, shortness of breath and overall weakness, headaches, chest pain or irregular heartbeat, or less obvious symptoms such as cold hands or feet and pale skin.

Luckily, the human body is designed to self-regulate the appropriate levels of iron via absorption. If you’re looking to give your body a helping hand, the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron vary depending on age and gender. Women between the ages of 19 and 50 are recommended an intake of 18 milligrams, while a male over the age of 19 is recommended 8 milligrams.

Plant-Based Foods that Help Absorb and Retain Iron

Sponchia/Pixabay

It’s not just about an iron-rich diet. While you may stock up on those plant-based sources of iron, such as spinach and legumes, it’s also important to account for your body’s ability to absorb and retain the iron you’re consuming. Luckily, there are a few nutrients readily available in plant-based food products that help your body retain that essential iron!

Vitamin C

pasja1000/Pixabay

Vitamin C is an acid, more specifically an L-ascorbic acid, that is not produced by the human body and therefore must be consumed via diet or supplements. While vitamin C is popular for its immune boosting properties, this vitamin is oh so much more! Vitamin C is “required for the biosynthesis of collagen, L-carnitine, and certain neurotransmitters,” is part of protein metabolism, is an “essential component of connective tissue” and wound healing, and is also an antioxidant. It has also been shown to help the body absorb and retain iron by capturing the plant-based iron (non-heme), transforming it into a more absorption friendly form, and stores it for use.

While this may incline you to stock up on oranges, there are a host of vitamin C-rich plant-based foods that are lower in sugar content. These include dark green and leafy veggies such as kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, red and green bell peppers, chili peppers, melons, strawberries, and other citrus fruits. Try out a few of these vitamin C-rich recipes: Spicy Broccoli Pasta with Lemon Breadcrumb, Strawberry and Raspberry Jam, Dark Chocolate and Orange Pecan Loaf, or Sunflower Seeds and Brussels Sprouts Pesto.

Vitamin A and Beta Carotene

jackmac34/Pixabay

Vitamin A is not just one nutrient, but a “group of fat-soluble retinoids, including retinol, retinal, and retinyl esters.” Yet, when it comes to consumption via diet, there are only two forms of vitamin A: preformed vitamin A (retinol and retinyl ester) and provitamin A carotenoids. Vitamin A begins as beta-carotene, a red-orange pigment found in plants, which is then transformed into vitamin A when consumed. While it’s most widely-known as essential for healthy vision, vitamin A is also involved in immune function, cellular communication and growth, and reproduction, as well as the “formation and maintenance of the heart, lungs, kidneys, and other organs.” Recent studies have also illuminated a connection between vitamin A and the efficacy of iron. The Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Research discovered that vitamin A and beta-carotene actually enhanced the absorption on plant-based iron (non-heme), specifically from wheat (by 80 percent), rice (by 200 percent), and corn (by 140 percent).

When upping your plant-based sources of vitamin A and beta-carotene think orange and red foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, squash, red peppers, apricots, and peaches. Vitamin A-rich recipes are plentiful for plant-based dieters including staples such as these Sriracha Sweet Potato Chips, salads like this Sweet Potato and Spinach Salad With Almond Dijon Vinaigrette, vegan burgers such as Roasted Red Pepper Chickpea Burger, and fruit-based desserts like Apricot Bars.

Supplements

stevepb/Pixabay

With all that goes on in your daily life, it’s often a challenge to fit all the necessary nutrients into your waking hours. This is where supplements become a great and quick source to get some of those essential vitamins that you may be lacking. If you’ve been diagnosed as anemia or on the verge of anemia, it’s a great idea to take iron supplements. With that said, you can also increase how efficient iron supplements are by integrating absorption and retention supplements such as such as this Garden of Life Non-GMO Vitamin C supplement, or this Bronson Vitamin A 10,000 IU Premium Non-GMO Formula.

With thousands of archived plant-based recipes, the Food Monster App makes it incredibly easy to incorporate those iron-absorbing foods! The app is available for both Android and iPhone, and can also be found on Instagram and Facebook. The app has more than 10,000 plant-based, allergy-friendly recipes, and subscribers gain access to new recipes every day. Check it out!

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/best-plant-based-foods-to-help-you-retain-iron/

Lead Image Source: Shutterstock

Diet Soda May Be Hurting Your Diet

ecowatch.com
The Conversation

By Eunice Zhang

Artificial sweeteners are everywhere, but the jury is still out on whether these chemicals are harmless. Also called non-nutritive sweeteners, these can be synthetic—such as saccharin and aspartame—or naturally derived, such as steviol, which comes from the stevia plant. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved six types of artificial and two types of natural non-nutritive sweeteners for use in food.

That’s been great news for those working hard to curb their sugar consumption. Aspartame, for example, is found in more than 6,000 foods worldwide, and about 5,000-5,500 tons are consumed every year in the U.S. alone.

The American Diabetes Association—the most well-respected professional group focusing on diabetes—officially recommends diet soda as an alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages. To date, seven U.S. municipalities have imposed a sugary beverage tax to discourage consumption.

However, recent medical studies suggest that policymakers eager to implement a soda tax may also want to include diet drinks because these sweeteners may be contributing to chronic diabetes and cardiovascular diseases as well.

Why are These Sweeteners Calorie-Free?

The key to these virtually calorie-free sweeteners is that they are not broken down during digestion into natural sugars like glucose, fructose and galactose, which are then either used for energy or converted into fat.

Non-nutritive sweeteners have different byproducts that are not converted into calories. Aspartame, for example, undergoes a different metabolic process that doesn’t yield simple sugars. Others such as saccharin and sucralose are not broken down at all, but instead are absorbed directly into the bloodstream and excreted in the urine.

Theoretically, these sweeteners should be a “better” choice than sugar for diabetics. Glucose stimulates release of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body no longer responds as well to insulin as it should, leading to higher levels of glucose in the blood that damages the nerves, kidneys, blood vessels and heart. Since non-nutritive sweeteners aren’t actually sugar, they should sidestep this problem.

Artificial Sweeteners, Your Brain and Your Microbiome

However, there is growing evidence over the last decade that these sweeteners can alter healthy metabolic processes in other ways, specifically in the gut.

Long-term use of these sweeteners has been associated with a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. Sweeteners, such as saccharin, have been shown to change the type and function of the gut microbiome, the community of microorganisms that live in the intestine. Aspartame decreases the activity of a gut enzyme that is normally protective against Type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, this response may be exacerbated by the “mismatch” between the body perceiving something as tasting sweet and the expected associated calories. The greater the discrepancy between the sweetness and actual caloric content, the greater the metabolic dysregulation.

Chart: The Conversation, CC-BY-ND Source: FDA

Sweeteners have also been shown to change brain activity associated with eating sweet foods. A functional MRI exam, which studies brain activity by measuring blood flow, has shown that sucralose, compared to regular sugar, decreases activity in the amygdala, a part of the brain involved with taste perception and the experience of eating.

Another study revealed that longer-term and higher diet soda consumption are linked to lower activity in the brain’s “caudate head,” a region that mediates the reward pathway and is necessary for generating a feeling of satisfaction. Researchers have hypothesized that this decreased activity could lead a diet soda drinker to compensate for the lack of pleasure they now derive from the food by increasing their consumption of all foods, not just soda.

Together these cellular and brain studies may explain why people who consume sweeteners still have a higher risk of obesity than individuals who don’t consume these products.

As this debate on the pros and cons of these sugar substitutes rages on, we must view these behavioral studies with a grain of salt (or sugar) because many diet soda drinkers—or any health-conscious individual who consumes zero-calorie sweeteners—already has the risk factors for obesity, diabetes, hypertension or heart disease. Those who are already overweight or obese may turn toward low-calorie drinks, making it look as though the diet sodas are causing their weight gain.

This same group may also be less likely to moderate their consumption. For example, those people may think that having a diet soda multiple times a week is much healthier than drinking one case of soda with sugar.

Chart: The Conversation, CC-BY-ND Source: CDC

These findings signal that consumers and health practitioners all need to check our assumptions about the health benefits of these products. Sweeteners are everywhere, from beverages to salad dressing, from cookies to yogurt, and we must recognize that there is no guarantee that these chemicals won’t increase the burden of metabolic diseases in the future.

As a physician of internal medicine specializing in general prevention and public health, I would like to be able to tell my patients what the true risks and benefits are if they drink diet soda instead of water.

Legislators considering soda taxes to encourage better dietary habits perhaps should think about including foods with non-nutritive sweeteners. Of course, there is an argument to be made for being realistic and pursuing the lesser of two evils. But even if the negative consequences of sugar substitutes doesn’t sway our tax policy—for now—at least the medical community should be honest with the public about what they stand to lose or gain, consuming these foods.

Reposted with permission from our media associate The Conversation.

https://www.ecowatch.com/diet-soda-health-risks-2624805533.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=c669446345-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-c669446345-86074753

Cutting Out Bacon And Booze Could Reduce Your Risk Of Cancer By 40%

delish.com

By Lindsay Funston

We already know that the best things in life—fatty bacon, crisp beer, greasy cheeseburgers—are also the worst things for us. But we eat them any way; everything in moderation, right? Welp, not exactly. Ditching bacon and booze from our diet could reduce your risk of cancer up to 40 percent, according to major new findings from the World Cancer Research Fund.

The WCRF’s research surveyed more than 50 million people and this year focused more on specific dietary recommendations than ever before. The researchers urged people to eat moderate amounts of red meat, limit consumption of soft drinks and processed foods—especially meats, like bacon—and reduce drinking.

Unsurprisingly, the researchers also recommend ditching fast food and sugars from our diet, so… 2019 is looking bleak.

https://www.delish.com/food/a25706304/cutting-out-bacon-booze-cancer-study/?source=nl&utm_source=nl_del&utm_medium=email&date=123118&src=nl&utm_campaign=15479352

Processed meats linked to increased cancer risk

Chemical Free Life

This is not new information from us, of course; we have been reporting on the scientific research on this topic for many years now.  It is more like a shot in the arm or important reminder as you make your rounds to all those holiday parties with trays and trays of processed meats–and other highly processed foods, for that matter. Here are some takeaways from a new piece in the mainstream media:

.

  • Eating red meat and processed meat has been linked to higher cancer rates.
  • Research is increasingly finding that processed meats are much worse for you than other kinds.
  • The average consumer may be eating more processed meat than is healthy.

The reason processed meats and highly processed foods in general are risky* to eat on a regular basis is thought by a growing number of researchers to be a function of myriad of synthetic and industrialized…

View original post 257 more words

Two more blood pressure drugs recalled for potential cancer risk

usatoday.com
Two more blood pressure drugs recalled for potential cancer risk
Brett Molina
5-6 minutes
| USA TODAY Updated 5:56 p.m. EST Nov. 30, 2018

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2018/11/30/blood-pressure-drugs-two-more-medications-recalled-cancer-risk/2159850002/

More blood pressure pills recalled for cancer concerns

Teva Pharmaceuticals has launched a voluntary recall into two drugs used to treat high blood pressure as more medications face concerns over a possible cancer risk.

Teva Pharmaceuticals has launched a voluntary recall into two drugs used to treat high blood pressure as yet more medications face concerns over a possible cancer risk.

In a statement from Teva posted by the Food and Drug Administration, the recall affects all lots of combination tablets featuring the drugs amlodipine and valsartan and another combo drug featuring amlodipine, valsartan, and hydrochlorothiazide.

The drugs could contain an impurity called N-nitroso-diethylamine (NDEA), which has been classified as a possible human carcinogen, the FDA said.

Patients taking either drugs should contact their doctor or pharmacist for advice or alternative treatments. Stopping the drugs immediately with no comparable alternative could pose a greater risk to patients’ health, said Teva.

More: Doctors: Blood pressure drug substitutes are available for patients affected by recalls

More: FDA chief: Blood pressure medicine recalls reflect increased scrutiny on drug safety

More: Want more news like this? Subscribe to get the Daily Briefing in your inbox.

Customers and patients with questions can contact Teva by phone at 888-838-2872, or email at druginfo@tevapharm.com.

In August, the FDA announced an expanded recall of valsartan because products may contain the impurity. Last month, two more recalls were announced: one for the drug irbesartan and a second recall for losartan potassium hydrochlorothiazide tablets.

During an interview in November with USA TODAY, FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said the blood pressure drug recalls reflect an increased focus on drug quality to ensure no impurities are present.

Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @brettmolina23.
Originally Published 6:07 a.m. EST Nov. 30, 2018

Updated 5:56 p.m. EST Nov. 30, 2018

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2018/11/30/blood-pressure-drugs-two-more-medications-recalled-cancer-risk/2159850002/

Keeping Pets Safe this Autumn: How to Avoid Toxic Plants – Katzenworld

Keeping pets safe this autumn PDSA offers advice on how to avoid toxic plants Temperatures are starting to drop and that fresh, crisp autumnal feel is in the air. Autumn can be a brilliant time for you and your pets, and a time to enjoy the beautiful scenery as trees change from green to an […]

Source: Keeping Pets Safe this Autumn: How to Avoid Toxic Plants – Katzenworld

Pets OK for Kids with Asthma, say researchers – FIREPAW, Inc.

firepaw.org
Published by firepawinc View all posts by firepawinc
3 minutes

The findings of a recent scientific study are good news for families who have pets and a child with asthma. The takeaway: Having a pet or not was insignificant in determining whether the child’s asthma improved. What did matter was the child and family closely following the asthma guidelines. This was true even for families with pets. In other words: According to the research findings, if you have a child with asthma, as long as you carefully follow the guidelines, there may be no need to get rid of the family cat or dog.
Have asthma and a pet? Re-homing your cat or dog may not be necessary

A study analyzed environmental exposures, like pet and secondhand smoke, to determine if they have a role in asthma control among children whose asthma is managed per NAEPP (EPR-3) guidelines. Researchers found that once asthma guidelines are followed, environmental exposures to pets or secondhand smoke were not significant factors in overall asthma improvement over time.

.

Study overview

Three hundred and ninety-five children, ages 2 to 17 years, were included in this study; 25 percent were exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke, and 55 percent were exposed to a cat or dog at home.

Children with the diagnosis of uncontrolled asthma and were followed at a pediatric asthma center were provided asthma care as per NAEPP guidelines. At each visit (3-6 months), families completed asthma questionnaires including acute care needs, symptom control and asthma control test (ACT). Asthma control in patients was evaluated at each visit. Results were compared between patients with or without exposure to secondhand smoking and between patients with or without exposure to pets (cats or dogs) at home at baseline and over time.

.

Findings

Environmental exposure to pets and secondhand smoke were not significant co-variants in asthma improvement over time. When closely following the asthma guidelines, both groups of asthma patients improved over a three-year period–regardless of whether there was a pet in the house.

Journal Reference: Shahid Sheikh, Judy Pitts, Ann Salvator, Christopher Nemastil, Swaroop Pinto. IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES (SECOND HAND SMOKING AND/OR PETS) ON LONG-TERM ASTHMA CONTROL IN CHILDREN. Chest, 2018; 154 (4): 738A

Study abstract: DOI: 10.1016/j.chest.2018.08.666

Overview of findings

https://firepaw.org/2018/10/05/pets-ok-for-kids-with-asthma-say-researchers/

An army of deer ticks carrying Lyme disease is advancing. It will only get worse.

grist.org
By Kristen Lombardi and Fatima Bhojani on Aug 11, 2018
23-29 minutes

This story was originally published by the Center for Public Integrity and was co-published with Mother Jones. It is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

Maine’s invasion came early this year. In recent hotbeds of tick activity — from Scarborough to Belfast and Brewer — people say they spotted the eight-legged arachnid before spring. They noticed the ticks — which look like moving poppy seeds — encroaching on roads, beaches, playgrounds, cemeteries, and library floors. They saw them clinging to dogs, birds, and squirrels.

By May, people were finding the ticks crawling on their legs, backs, and necks. Now, in midsummer, daily encounters seem almost impossible to avoid.

Maine is home to 15 tick species but only one public health menace: the blacklegged tick — called the “deer” tick — a carrier of Lyme and other debilitating diseases. For 30 years, an army of deer ticks has advanced from the state’s southwest corner some 350 miles to the Canadian border, infesting towns such as Houlton, Limestone, and Presque Isle.

“It’s horrifying,” says Dora Mills, director of the Center for Excellence in Health Innovation at the University of New England in Portland. Mills, 58, says she never saw deer ticks in her native state until 2000.

The ticks have brought a surge of Lyme disease in Maine over two decades, boosting reported cases from 71 in 2000 to 1,487 in 2016 — a 20-fold increase, the latest federal data show. Today, Maine leads the nation in Lyme incidence, topping hot spots like Connecticut, New Jersey, and Wisconsin. Deer-tick illnesses such as anaplasmosis and babesiosis — a bacterial infection and a parasitic disease similar to malaria, respectively — are following a similar trajectory.

The explosion of disease correlates with a warming climate in Maine where, over the past three decades, summers generally have grown hotter and longer and winters milder and shorter.

Today, Maine leads the nation in Lyme incidence, topping hot spots like Connecticut, New Jersey, and Wisconsin.

It’s one strand in an ominous tapestry: Across the United States, tick- and mosquito-borne diseases, some potentially lethal, are emerging in places and volumes not previously seen. Climate change almost certainly is to blame, according to a 2016 report by 13 federal agencies that warned of intensifying heat, storms, air pollution, and infectious diseases. Last year, a coalition of 24 academic and government groups tried to track climate-related health hazards worldwide. It found them “far worse than previously understood,” jeopardizing half a century of public health gains.

Yet in Maine, Governor Paul LePage — a conservative Republican who has questioned the science of global warming — won’t acknowledge the phenomenon. His administration has suppressed state plans and vetoed legislation aimed at limiting the damage, former government officials say. They say state employees, including at the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), have been told not to discuss climate change.

“It appears the problem has been swept under the rug,” says Mills, who headed the Maine CDC from 1996 to 2011. In the 2000s, she sat on a government task force charged with developing plans to respond to climate change; those efforts evidently went for naught. “We all know this response of ignoring it and hoping it goes away,” she says. “But it never goes away.”

In an emailed statement, LePage’s office denied that the governor has ignored climate change. It cited his creation of a voluntary, interagency work group on climate adaptation in 2013, which includes the Maine CDC. “To assume … that the governor has issued a blanket ban on doing anything related to climate change is erroneous,” the statement said. A recent inventory of state climate activities performed by the group, however, shows that most of the health department’s work originated with the previous administration.
Tripling of vector disease cases

Climate’s role in intensifying diseases carried by “vectors” — organisms transmitting pathogens and parasites — isn’t as obvious as in heat-related conditions or pollen allergies. But it poses a grave threat. Of all infectious diseases, those caused by bites from ticks, mosquitoes, and other cold-blooded insects are most climate-sensitive, scientists say. Even slight shifts in temperatures can alter their distribution patterns.

In May, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a tripling of the number of disease cases resulting from mosquito, tick, and flea bites nationally over 13 years — from 27,388 cases in 2004 to 96,075 in 2016. Cases of tick-related illnesses doubled in this period, accounting for 77 percent of all vector-borne diseases. CDC officials, not mentioning the words “climate change,” attributed this spike partly to rising temperatures.

Heedless officials like LePage are one reason the government response to the human impacts of climate change has been so sluggish. But discord within the health community has stymied action, too, according to interviews with more than 50 public health experts and advocates, and a review of dozens of scientific studies and government reports. State and local health department employees may believe climate change is happening but don’t necessarily see it as a public health crisis, surveys show. Many find it too taxing or nebulous a problem to tackle.

“Like most health departments, we are underfunded and our list of responsibilities grows each year,” wrote one investigator from Arizona, echoing the 23 professionals who responded to a Center for Public Integrity online questionnaire.

The fraught politics of climate change also loom large. Chelsea Gridley-Smith, of the National Association of City and County Health Officials, says many local health departments face political pressures. Some encounter official or perceived bans on the term “climate change.” Others struggle to convey the urgency of threats when their peers don’t recognize a crisis.

“It’s disheartening for folks who work in climate and health,” says Gridley-Smith, whose group represents nearly 3,000 departments. “When politics come into play they feel beat down a little.”

This reality is striking in Maine, among 16 states and two cities receiving a federal grant meant to bolster health departments’ responses to climate-related risks. Under the program — known as Building Resilience Against Climate Effects, or BRACE — federal CDC employees help their state and local counterparts use climate data and modeling research to identify health hazards and create prevention strategies. National leaders have praised the Maine CDC’s BRACE work, which includes Lyme disease.

But the Maine CDC employees declined requests to interview key employees and didn’t respond to written questions. Instead, in a brief email, a spokesperson sent a description of initiatives meant to help people avoid tick bites and Lyme disease. Sources close to the agency say the LePage administration is concerned about tick-related illnesses but not their connection to climate. In its statement the governor’s office said this relationship “is of secondary concern to the immediate health needs of the people of Maine.”

The ticks, meanwhile, continue their northerly creep. In Penobscot County — where the Lyme incidence rate is eight times what it was in 2010 — the surge has unnerved residents. Regina Leonard, 39, a lifelong Mainer who lives seven miles north of Bangor, doesn’t know what to believe about climate change. But she says the deer tick seems “rampant.”

In 2016, her son Cooper, then 7, tested positive for Lyme disease after developing what she now identifies as an expanding or “disseminated” rash, a classic symptom. Red blotches appeared on his cheeks, as if he were sunburned. The blotches coincided with other ailments — malaise, nausea. Weeks later, they circled his eyes. The ring-shaped rash spread from his face to his back, stomach, and wrists.

Leonard says Cooper could barely walk during his 21-day regimen of antibiotics. His fingers curled under his hands. He stuttered. The thought of being bitten by another tick terrifies him to this day.

“At this rate,” Leonard says, “we’re all going to end up with Lyme.”
‘A huge epidemic’

The spread of Lyme disease has followed that of deer ticks. The incidence of Lyme has more than doubled over the past two decades. In 2016, federal health officials reported 36,429 new cases, and the illness has reached far beyond endemic areas in the Northeast to points west, south, and north.

The official count, driven by laboratory tests, underplays the public health problem, experts say. In some states, Lyme has become so prevalent that health departments no longer require blood tests to confirm early diagnosis. The testing process — which measures an immune response against the Lyme-causing bacteria — has limitations as well. It misses patients who don’t have such a reaction. Those who show symptoms associated with a later stage — neurological issues, arthritis — can face inaccurate results. The CDC estimates the actual caseload could be 10 times higher than reported.

Dr. Saul Hymes heads a pediatric tick-borne disease center at Stony Brook University on Long Island, a Lyme epicenter since the disease’s discovery in 1975. He’s noticed a change: Patients file into his office as early as March and as late as November. Often, they appear in winter. Deer-tick samples collected from 2006 to 2011 at the university’s Lyme lab show a jump in tick activity in December and January.

States where Lyme hardly existed 20 years ago are experiencing dramatic changes. In Minnesota, deer ticks and the illnesses they cause appeared in a few southeastern counties in the 1990s. But the tick has spread northward, bringing disease-causing bacteria with it. Now, in newly infested areas, says David Neitzel, of the Minnesota Department of Health’s vector-borne disease unit, “We haven’t been able to find any clean ticks. They’re all infected.” Minnesota ranks among the nation’s top five states for Lyme cases; it places even higher in incidence of anaplasmosis and babesiosis.

A similar transformation is under way in Maine, where the 2017 count of 1,769 Lyme cases represented a 19-percent increase over the previous year. Anaplasmosis cases soared 78 percent during that period, babesiosis 42 percent.

“It’s quite a remarkable change in a relatively short period,” says Dr. Robert Smith, director of infectious diseases at Maine Medical Center in Portland. Researchers at the hospital’s vector-borne disease laboratory have tracked the deer tick’s march across all 16 of Maine’s counties since 1988. Through testing, they’ve identified five of the seven pathogens carried by deer ticks. That’s five new maladies, some life-threatening.

Betsy Garrold, 63, lives on 50 acres amid dairy farms in Knox, a rustic town of 900 in Waldo County, where the Lyme incidence rate is three times the state average. A retired nurse midwife, Garrold says she long viewed the disease as many in the health profession would: mostly benign when treated with antibiotics. In 2013, she tested positive for Lyme after a red, brick-shaped rash covered her stomach and legs. She lost her ability to read and write and struggled to form a simple sentence.

“It was the worst experience of my life,” says Garrold, who previously had weathered bouts of tropical intestinal diseases.

Lisa Jordan, a patient advocate who lives in Brewer, just southeast of Bangor, says she’s already inundated with phone calls from people stricken by Lyme. On her cul-de-sac, she counts 15 out of 20 households touched by the disease. Three of her family members, herself included, are among them. “It’s a huge epidemic,” she says.
A vector-borne ecologist collects ticks at a site in Maine. John Ewing / Portland Press Herald / Getty Images
‘Disease emergency’ in Canada

The link between Lyme disease and climate change isn’t as direct as with other vector-borne diseases. Unlike mosquitoes, which live for a season and fly everywhere, deer ticks have a two-year life cycle and rely on animals for transport. That makes their hosts key drivers of disease. Young ticks feed on mice, squirrels, and birds, yet adults need deer — some suggest 12 per square mile — to sustain a population.

Rebecca Eisen, a federal CDC biologist who has studied climate’s influence on Lyme, notes that deer ticks dominated the East Coast until the 1800s, when forests gave way to fields. The transition nearly wiped out the tick, which thrives in the leaf litter of oaks and maples. The spread of the deer tick since federal Lyme data collection began in the 1990s can be traced in part to a decline in agriculture that has brought back forests while suburbia has sprawled to the woods’ edges, creating the perfect habitat for tick hosts.

Eisen suspects this changing land-use pattern is behind Lyme’s spread in mid-Atlantic states like Pennsylvania, where the incidence rate has more than tripled since 2010. “It hasn’t gotten much warmer there,” she says.

But climate is playing a role. Ben Beard, deputy director of the federal CDC’s climate and health program, says warming is the prime culprit in Lyme’s movement north. The CDC’s research suggests the deer tick, sensitive to temperature and humidity, is moving farther into arctic latitudes as warm months grow hotter and longer. Rising temperatures affect tick activity, pushing the Lyme season beyond its summer onset.

Canada epitomizes these changes. Over the past 20 years, Nicholas Ogden, a senior scientist at the country’s Public Health Agency, has watched the tick population in Canada spread from two isolated pockets near the north shore of Lake Erie into Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Ontario, the front lines of what he calls “a vector-borne disease emergency.”

Scientists say ticks can use snow as a blanket to survive cold temperatures, but long winters will limit the deer tick, preventing it from feeding on hosts and developing into adults. In the 2000s, Ogden and colleagues calculated a threshold temperature at which it could withstand Canada’s winter. They surmised that every day above freezing — measured in “degree days,” a tally of cumulative heat — would speed up its life cycle, allowing it to reproduce and survive. They mapped their theory: As temperatures rose, deer ticks moved in.

By 2014, the researchers had published a study examining projected climate change and tick reproduction. It shows higher temperatures correlating with higher tick breeding as much as five times in Canada and two times in the northern United States; in both places, the study shows, a Lyme invasion has followed.

The Canadian health agency reports a seven-fold spike in Lyme cases since 2009. “We know it’s associated with a warming climate,” Ogden says.

The U.S. EPA concluded as much in 2014, when it named Lyme disease an official “indicator” of climate change — one of two vector infections to receive the distinction. In its description, the EPA singles out the caseloads of four northern states, including Maine, where Lyme has become most common.

Maine researchers have found a strong correlation between tick activity and milder winters. According to their projections, warming in Maine’s six northernmost counties — which collectively could gain up to 650 more days above freezing each year by 2050 — will make them just as hospitable to deer ticks as the rest of the state.
Maine’s governor nixes climate change research

Research like this is crucial, experts say. Yet the federal government has failed to prioritize it. From 2012 to 2016, the National Institutes of Health spent a combined $32 million on its principal program on climate change — 0.1 percent of its $128 billion budget, says Kristie Ebi, a University of Washington public health professor. NIH spending has gone up in the past two fiscal years, to an average of $193 million annually. But that’s still less than the $200 million Ebi says health officials need annually to create programs that will protect Americans. And NIH spent 38 times as much on cancer research during the two-year period.

Congress has done little to fix the problem. Last year, U.S. Representative Matt Cartwright, a Democrat from Pennsylvania, sponsored legislation calling for an increase in federal funding for climate and health research and mandating the development of a national plan that would help state and local health departments. The bill, sponsored by 39 House Democrats, is languishing in committee. Sources on Capitol Hill say it has no chance of advancing as long as climate-denying Republicans hold a majority.

The only federal support for state and city health officials on climate change is the CDC’s BRACE grant program. George Luber, chief of the CDC’s climate and health program, considers it “cutting-edge thinking for public health.” He intends to expand it to all 50 states, but funding constraints have kept him from doing so.

Republicans in Congress have tried repeatedly to excise BRACE’s $10 million budget, to no avail. Its average annual award for health departments has remained around $200,000 for nearly a decade.

The modest federal response has shifted the burden to state and local health departments, most of which have “limited awareness of climate change as a public health issue,” according to a 2014 Government Accountability Office report. Of the two dozen responding to the Center’s questionnaire, only one said her agency had trained staff on climate-related risks and drafted an adaptation plan.

By contrast, BRACE states are hailed as national models for climate health adaptation. In Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont — where deer ticks and their diseases are moving north — health officials have modeled future climate change and begun education campaigns in areas where Lyme is expected to rise.

Dora Mills, the former Maine CDC chief, oversaw the department’s bid for a BRACE grant in 2010. State epidemiologists already were surveying tick-related illnesses, but no one was asking why deer ticks were spreading or which areas were in jeopardy.

One year later, the department launched a program prioritizing vector-borne disease and extreme heat. Some employees worked with experts to model high-heat days and analyze their relationship with heat-induced hospital visits, among other activities. Much of the funding went to climate scientists and vector ecologists, who looked at the relationship between deer ticks and warming temperatures and did a similar study involving mosquitoes. They planned to develop a broader tick model that would examine the climate and ecological processes underlying the spread of Lyme disease in Maine and project its future burden.

By 2013, the administration of Governor LePage, elected in 2010 as a denier of what he called “the Al Gore science” on climate change, was clamping down. Norman Anderson worked at the Maine CDC for five years and managed its climate and health program. He recalls department public relations officials warning him not to talk about his work and refusing to green-light his appearances.

Eventually the governor eliminated the department’s climate change research. Scientists say they had to replace their ambitious modeling plan with rudimentary activities and spend their remaining BRACE funds on “tick kits” — complete with beakers of deer ticks in nymph and adult stages — to distribute to school children.

“Governor LePage said, ‘No one is doing climate change research,’” says Susan Elias, a vector ecologist at the University of Maine’s Climate Change Institute who worked on the tick-climate research and is developing the broader model for her Ph.D. dissertation. “That message came down from on high through official state channels.”

LePage’s office defended the governor’s decision, arguing that scientists studying the relationship between climate and disease “are best funded in research settings such as large universities,” not the Maine CDC.

LePage did approve a proposal by the Maine CDC to renew its BRACE grant, but only after narrowing the scope. Employees had to abandon planned climate research related to the health impacts of extreme weather and worsening pollen, records show. Their heat research yielded results — indeed, the threshold at which officials issue dangerous heat advisories was lowered from 105 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit after their analysis had found it didn’t protect Mainers’ health. But employees had to scrap their heat-response plans nonetheless. The only BRACE work that LePage approved involved Lyme prevention.

In 2014, Anderson, frustrated by what he calls the “repressive” environment, quit the Maine CDC. The department’s larger “strategy around climate and health had just been whittled away,” he says.
‘Trying to plug holes in the dam’

Today, the Maine CDC’s climate and health program amounts to little more than a half dozen initiatives on ticks and tick-borne diseases. Health officials have developed voluntary school curricula and online campaigns targeting the elderly, for instance. They’ve launched training videos for school nurses and librarians.

The department’s “main prevention message is encouraging Maine residents and visitors to use personal protective measures to prevent tick exposures,” it said in a 2018 report.

That report, filed by the Maine CDC with state legislators, hints at the department’s myopic focus on the accelerating public health problem. Its vector-borne disease work group, consisting of scientists, pest-control operators, and patient advocates, has extensive knowledge on ticks and tick-borne diseases, yet has no mandate to draft a statewide response plan, members say. Its published materials make no mention of Lyme’s connection to climate change.

Sources close to the Maine CDC say the prevention work is the best it can do with limited resources. At $215,000 a year, the BRACE grant — which totals $1.1 million over five years — isn’t enough to cover a 38,385-square-mile state with 1.3 million residents, they say. No state money is directed toward the surge in tick-related illnesses.

LePage’s office cites the governor’s leadership in building an $8 million research facility at the University of Maine, which opened last month. The laboratory — the product of a ballot initiative in 2014 — houses the university’s tick-identification program. Director Griffin Dill considers it a major upgrade from the converted office in which he logged tick samples for five years. It will enable him to expand tick surveillance and test ticks for pathogens. Still, he’s candid about the bigger picture.

“We’re still so inundated with tick-borne disease,” Dill says. “We’re trying to plug holes in the dam.”

Already, another threat is looming. Scientists consider the Lone Star tick a better signal of climate change than its blacklegged counterpart — it has long thrived in southern states like Texas and Florida but is advancing northward. In Maine, tick ecologists have logged samples of the Lone Star species since 2013. Dill has surveyed fields and yards in search of settled populations, dragging what looks like a white flag on a stick over brush. He says the tick isn’t surviving Maine’s winters — yet.

It may be bringing new and unusual diseases here nevertheless. Patty O’Brien Carrier suffered what she describes as a bizarre reaction — itchy hives, a reddened face, a swollen throat — twice before learning that she has Alpha Gal Syndrome, a rare allergy to meat. In February, lab tests identified its source: a Lone Star tick bite. A “ferocious gardener” from Harpswell, 37 miles northeast of Portland, O’Brien, 71, believes she was bitten in her yard. She spends her time in the dirt surrounded by roses, daisies and other perennials. She notices more ticks in her garden, she says, much like she notices the ground thawing earlier each spring.

In November, O’Brien pulled a bloated tick from her neck. It was as large as a sesame seed, concave-shaped and bore a white dot on its back — just like the Lone Star. “Its face was right in my neck and its legs were squirming,” she says. “It was quite disgusting.”

Now O’Brien performs the same ritual every time she goes outside: She applies tick repellant on her clothes and skin. She fashions elastic around her pants, and pulls her knee socks up. She adds boots, gloves and a hat.

“It’s like a war zone out there,” O’Brien says, “and I cannot be bitten by another tick.”

https://grist.org/science/an-army-of-deer-ticks-carrying-lyme-disease-is-advancing-it-will-only-get-worse/

Identifying Poison Ivy and Poison Oak (and Natural Remedies for When It’s Too Late)

onegreenplanet.org
Jonathon Engels
The green of summer feels great. All the plants are in full go, and fresh veggies are coming out of the garden. Berries are stocked at the you-pick-‘em farms, and butterflies and bees are flittering. It might be a little hot, but it seems like all the world is right. Then, on a hike like any other, a leg brushes up against some poison ivy, and things go askew.

Poison oak, poison ivy or poison sumac can quickly dampen a flying spirit and cause a month of the summer to be mixed up in skin irritations and lotions. Getting a rash from any of these plants, which have a common offending component called urushiol, leads to itching so intensely that it feels painful. Urushiol can even reach our skin via airborne specks.

The best way to avoid getting the itch is to give the plants a wide berth, and the only way for us to do that is knowing what they look like.
Poison Ivy

Poison ivy can sometimes be a nightmare to identify because it is a bit of a shapeshifter. It can be a vine, or it can be a bush. It can have green leaves, or reddish and yellowish leaves. The leaves can have widely varying edges as well, sometimes smooth and other times jagged.

However, what all poison ivy plants have in common is that their leaves come in groups of three, and those three leaves will all come to a point at the end, as opposed to being rounded or lobed. Additionally, the changes in leaf color tend to be seasonal, with reds and oranges being in springtime, green being in summer, and back to reds and oranges in the fall.

Because many plants have leaves of three, other characteristics to help identify poison ivy is that mature vines appear hairy due to aerial roots (Note: While the leaves drop in winter, the vines can still give us a rash) and, in the fall, distinct white berries form on the plants. As far as the leaves, the middle leaf of the trio has a noticeably longer stem as well.
Poison Oak

Like poison ivy, poison oak has leaves of three, though it has been known to have groups of up to seven, and it can grow as either a vine or shrub. It gets its name because poison oak leaves resemble the leaves of young oak saplings sprouting up. In the case of poison oak, the three leaves connect to a single stem with the side leaves alternating up it rather than being directly across from one another.

Luckily, poison oak is less common than poison ivy, which grows everywhere in the US except California, Alaska, and Hawaii. Poison oak is more or less relegated the Pacific Coast or the Southeast. It, too, gets clusters of white berries (or greenish-yellowish) in the fall.
Poison Sumac

Even less common than poison oak, poison sumac is prone to boggy areas in the Southeast and occasionally the Northeast. It grows as a shrub or small tree and has between seven and thirteen leaves per stem. The stems can have a reddish appearance, and the leaves are green in the summer and turn yellow to red in the fall. Sumac, too, has clusters of green berries that turn white in autumn.
Common (and Harmless) Lookalikes

Some plants are commonly mistaken for poison ivy or oak, so it’s good to be familiar with them as well. Virginia creeper looks just like poison ivy and is often in the same location, but it has leaf groups of five. Wild raspberry and blackberry vines can look almost identical to poison ivy, but they’ll have thorns to distinguish them. Neither poison ivy nor poison oak have thorns. Hog peanuts have leaves of three but are lighter in appearance than poison ivy, have ubiquitously smooth leaves, and are notably daintier. Box elder is another lookalike, and it has a much shrubbier look about it than does poison ivy. As well, box elders have opposite leaves rather than alternate.
Dealing with the Rash

Unfortunately, no matter how careful we are, sometimes accidents happen, and the urushiol gets the better of us. When that day comes, it’s nice to know that there are some natural remedies (or soothers) available to us.

A baking soda paste (three-to-one with water) relieves itching and helps to dry out the rash.
Apple cider vinegar also relieves itching and helps to pull toxins out of the skin’s pores.
An oatmeal paste (cook the oatmeal very thick and apply it while warm but not hot) can help dry the rash out.
Jewelweed, often growing near poison ivy, is a natural remedy as well. Just crush the stalk and get the juices from it, applying the juice to suspect areas of infection.

As a last comforting word, a good thing to know for those infected (or the loved ones of those infected) is that the rash is not contagious. Once the initial urushiol has been washed away, the resulting rashes can’t spread to others. The blisters do not have the chemical in them. So, in the case of having poison ivy, at least getting some hugs and comforting is still an option.

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/lifestyle/identifying-poison-ivy-poison-oak-natural-remedies/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=c4574fe86e-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-c4574fe86e-106049477

Lead Image Source: Pixabay

Hospital exposure to BPA may put babies at risk for serious heart conditions – Chemical Free Life

chemical-free-life.org
Hospital exposure to BPA may put babies at risk for serious heart conditions – Chemical Free Life
Published by Chemical-Free-Life.org
4-5 minutes

Despite scientific evidence that it disrupts the human endocrine system, BPA continues to be a widely used chemical in the U.S.–one that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to maintain is safe for consumers and therefore has not banned. While it is at least now prohibited in the manufacturing of baby bottles, it has been detected in baby teething rings and other items babies and children may put inside their mouths. Additionally, as we have reported earlier, it can still be found in some dental products and inside food containers such as canned goods and plastic beverage bottles–as well as in plastic tubing and equipment used in food production (including organic milk) and in hospital equipment and medical products.

If the FDA says it is safe, what is the problem? As we have reported for a number of years now, there have been many hundreds of original scientific studies and replication studies linking BPA to a variety of serious health outcomes. (See a few of some recent ones here: a, b, c, d)

Now a new animal study has demonstrated that short-term, early exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemical BPA–such as from hospital and medical equipment used during the birthing process and in newborn care settings–may pose a risk for babies to cardiac problems.

At-a-Glance:

This new study documents the elevated risk short-term BPA exposure, for a period of 15 minutes, may have in pediatric intensive care settings.*

*The potential impact from even a short-term, 15-minute exposure is relevant given that many medical devices and hospital equipment contain BPA.

Overview:

“Epidemiological studies find BPA exposure in adults correlate with adverse cardiovascular events, ranging from abnormal heart beats, or arrhythmias, and angina, chest pain, to coronary artery disease, the narrowing of the arteries, commonly referred to atherosclerosis — the leading cause of death in the United Sates. Now, based on a study using neonatal rat heart cells, researchers find that the immature heart may respond to BPA in a similar fashion — with slower heart rates, irregular heart rhythms and calcium instabilities.”

Importance of this study:

“Current research explores the impact endocrine disruptors, specifically BPA, have on adults and their cardiovascular and kidney function. We know that once this chemical enters the body, it can be bioactive and therefore can influence how heart cells function. This is the first study to look at the impact BPA exposure can have on heart cells that are still developing.”

-Nikki Gillum Posnack, Ph.D., study author and assistant professor at Children’s National Heart Institute and the George Washington University*

Real-world implications of the findings:

As stated earlier, BPA can commonly be found in medical devices and hospital equipment. Babies who are exposed to BPA in the hospital setting may be at increased risk for cardiac problems.

“We’re investigating whether these hospital-based exposures may cause unintended effects on cardiac function and looking at ways to mitigate chemical exposure. We hope this preliminary research incentivizes the development of alternative products by medical device manufacturers and encourages the research community to study the impact of plastics on sensitive patient populations.”

–Nikki Gillum Posnack, Ph.D., study author and assistant professor at Children’s National Heart Institute and the George Washington University*

*Dr. Posnack’s ongoing research examines the impact environmental influences — including BPA and other endocrine disruptors — have on cardiac function

https://chemical-free-life.org/2018/05/15/hospital-exposure-to-bpa-may-put-babies-at-risk-for-serious-heart-conditions/

source

Journal Reference: Manelle Ramadan, Meredith Sherman, Rafael Jaimes, Ashika Chaluvadi, Luther Swift, Nikki Gillum Posnack. Disruption of neonatal cardiomyocyte physiology following exposure to bisphenol-a. Scientific Reports, 2018; 8 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-25719-8

Tips for Using Apple Cider Vinegar to Treat Chronic Yeast Overgrowth (Candida)

onegreenplanet.org
Tips for Using Apple Cider Vinegar to Treat Chronic Yeast Overgrowth (Candida)
Heather McClees
8-10 minutes

Chronic yeast overgrowth is something that’s often referred to as candida. If you’re not familiar with it, then basically, all you need to know is that we have all types of yeasts and bacteria in our bodies. Some are good and some are bad, and most live within our digestive tracts. The good “bugs” keep us healthy, energized, and protect us from the harmful toxins and everyday contaminants we encounter. They also help keep us regular and keep our skin, weight, and immune system in check.

Bad yeasts and bacteria do the opposite, and sadly, things that we eat in our diets can often fuel these bad “bugs” to become predominant in our systems, outnumbering the good bacteria.
What is Candida?chickpea flour omelet

lead8

Everyone has a type of yeast known as candida albicans in the gut. It’s one of the most well-known because it’s easy to get out of hand since it’s fed through sugar, or anything that converts to sugar in the digestive tract (like refined carbs, breads, pastries, cookies, very high starch foods eaten in abundance, candies, sweets, most processed foods, and some moldy foods like cheese, beer and wine). Candida thrives on these foods and can grow at rapid speeds. When this happens, chronic yeast overgrowth occurs and is seen through symptoms such as: constant fatigue and headaches, depression, jock itch, possibly skin yeast infections like ringworm and psoriasis, multiple types of food reactions or allergies, brain fog, and a sensitivity to certain types of moldy, fermented foods (cheese, dairy, wine, beer). Some natural health experts also believe that sugar addictions stem from yeast overgrowth because the yeast needs “food” to survive, leading one to eat more and more.
How Natural Remedies May Helpkale-tomato-salad

kale-tomato-salad

Many natural remedies are available and you’ve likely seen all kinds of anti-fungal pills at health food stores that promise to help get rid of candida. While some of these may in fact fight the symptoms of candida and even cure mild cases, it’s best to treat the root of the problem first: removing the harmful foods and replenishing the good gut bacteria. One natural remedy that can help you restore good gut bacteria is an old time classic treatment known as ACV, or apple cider vinegar. Apple cider vinegar is fermented with a beneficial yeast that acts as a prebiotic for healthy bacteria in your gut, so essentially it helps your good bacteria grow as you eliminate harmful foods that feed the harmful yeasts like candida. Apple cider vinegar is even applied topically to the skin to treat skin fungal infections, acne, and even used as an alternative treatment to chemical-filled creams for jock-itch.
The Most Important Part About Fighting CandidaGolden Hummus With Curried Chickpeas b

golden-hummus-with-curried-chickpeas-b

First, it’s important to remove all the processed, refined, and even naturally sugary foods on your diet. Stick to lots of greens, low-starch root vegetables like turnips, green vegetables and other low-starch vegetables, raw nuts and seeds that are fresh (to prevent mold encounter), as many fresh foods as possible, and low sugar fruits like berries, green apples, cucumber, limes, tomatoes, lemons, and some people handle citrus fine. You can also eat naturally sweet, healthy foods instead, and emphasize healthy fats from coconut, which contains anti-fungal properties naturally.

 

Some recipes you could enjoy might be: Jazzy-licious Kale, Mesquite Avocado Kale Salad, Escarole and White Bean Soup, Low-Carb Sugar-Free Vegan Protein Bars, Kale and Grilled Tomato Salad or a Chickpea omelet for something hearty. You can also learn to make lower sugar smoothie recipes without so much fruit, with a few of these natural, healthy tips.

After a while, once the yeast is under control, many people can add back low-starch grains like oats and quinoa, and some can even keep them in the beginning. Lentils, chickpeas, avocados, and even winter squash are also usually tolerated just fine on a yeast-free diet. The lower the sugar content of a food, the better. Once you’ve replaced the harmful ‘food’ that candida thrives on, it’s important to add other items to your menu that can possibly help fight bad bacteria.
How to Use Apple Cider Vinegar as Part of a Candida Treatment Regim

ACV-1200x797

 

Apple cider vinegar is a stellar choice to help your body heal naturally because it’s known for so many healing benefits, including acting as an antifungal and antibacterial food. You’ll need to take it internally as it can help flush out toxins, mucus, and all types of harmful bacteria that can cause a back up during digestion and cause yeast to fester even more. Take a tablespoon diluted in some room temperature or warm water in the morning, in the afternoon and at night after or before your meals. You can add some lemon and stevia if you need it to taste better. You can even add it to herbal teas over ice if you want (it’s actually pretty refreshing!). Try adding ginger to fight bacteria further, and whatever you do- buy the right kind of apple cider vinegar.

You need to purchase raw, organic apple cider vinegar so you know that the ‘mother’ is still in tact, which is the good bacteria the vinegar grows on. (This is the cloudy appearance you see in the bottom of the jar.) A good brand is Bragg’s, though some others are available too. Be sure it’s also non-GMO and organic, whatever you do, to avoid pesticides and harmful chemicals that only feed bad bacteria.
How Apple Cider Vinegar HelpsEasy Green Casserole 1

easy-green-casserole-1

Since apple cider vinegar is a prebiotic (which feeds the good bacteria), you need to be sure you’re taking in plenty of good bacteria so they can thrive. You can eat fermented foods that are helpful, such as sauerkraut, raw kimchi, and miso. You’ll want to avoid dairy, gluten and most wheat products, and other allergenic foods that can sometimes aggravate yeast overgrowth as well. Also, eat plenty of prebiotic-rich foods that can also help your good gut bacteria and take a plant-based probiotic as well.

You may find in the beginning of healing and battling yeast that you suffer a detox reaction where you feel worse before you feel better, but after several days or weeks, you’ll probably feel much better. You might also see some changes during digestion at this time, but keep in mind that your body is healing and getting rid of bad bacteria. Use warm baths, take magnesium or eat magnesium-rich foods if you find you have a hard time sleeping or with regularity, and be sure to get some fresh sunlight daily if you can. If you’re tired, allow your body to rest, and overall, just focus on eating healthier foods while your body adjusts.
What to Remember About Candida and Yeast OvergrowthRaw Turnip Ravioli 1

raw-turnip-ravioli-1

Keep in mind that chronic yeast overgrowth can lead to larger health problems later on, so do your best to take care of your body. Though apple cider vinegar may not cure it completely, it can be used as a helpful tool in fighting candida. For professional advice on treating yeast overgrowth, see Body Ecology, a world-wide leading organization known for treating candida, The Candida Diet, and Ricki Heller, a renowned candida expert with recipes and tips for plant-based eaters.

Also see how to eat a healthy lower carb diet as a plant-based eater from one of our health experts, Registered Dietitian, Ginny Messina.
Recommendation: Download the Food Monster AppCashew Cream Stuffed Avocado

cashew-cream-stuffed-avocado

If you enjoy articles like this and want more, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App. For those that don’t have it, it’s a brilliant food app available for both Android and iPhone. It’s a great resource for anyone looking to cut out or reduce allergens like meat, dairy, soy, gluten, eggs, grains, and more find awesome recipes, cooking tips, articles, product recommendations and how-tos. The app shows you how having diet/health/food preferences can be full of delicious abundance rather than restrictions.

The Food Monster app has over 8000+ recipes and 500 are free. To access the rest, you have to pay a subscription fee but it’s totally worth it because not only do you get instant access to 8000+ recipes, you get 10 NEW recipes every day! You can also make meal plans, add bookmarks, read feature stories, and browse recipes across hundreds of categories like diet, cuisine, meal type, occasion, ingredient, popular, seasonal, and so much more!

Lead Image Source: Emma/Flickr

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/how-to-treat-chronic-yeast-overgrowth-with-apple-cider-vinegar/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=ca149bddb5-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-ca149bddb5-106049477

Meet the tick that’s forcing Americans to give up their meat

grist.org
Meet the tick that’s forcing Americans to give up their meat
14-18 minutes

When Peter Coughlin was in his sophomore year at James Madison University in northern Virginia, he was besieged by a strange and unsettling illness. At random times throughout the night, Coughlin would wake up with hives, full body chills, and raging fevers. These episodes always ended up with him in the bathroom, throwing up until his stomach was empty.

After keeping a food journal for nearly a year, Coughlin realized his symptoms occurred after eating meat, primarily pork. “I essentially spent a week proving my point,” Coughlin says. “I’d eat a bunch of red meat, and go through a series of pretty severe reactions.”

When he finally went to the hospital in 2016, the doctor tested him for all the usual allergies and was flummoxed by the lack of results. She gave him a strong antihistamine and an EpiPen and sent him home.

Frustrated by the lack of answers, Coughlin started researching. He found similarities between his symptoms and documented cases of something called alpha-gal allergy. A major study on the allergic reaction had been done right across the Blue Ridge Mountains at the University of Virginia.

Suddenly, his hiking trips in that very mountain range came into focus: “I kept pulling ticks off of me,” he says. According to the research, those little brown bugs, marked by a telltale white spot, were to blame for his meat allergy. Coughlin was bit by lone star ticks.

Alpha-gal isn’t your typical hayfever-like allergy. It’s a severe, delayed-reaction immune response, which means it hits hours after someone who suffers from the allergy eats meat. People with alpha-gal describe their episodes as terrifying experiences that can land you in the emergency room and change the way you live your life.

“I was disheartened,” Coughlin says. “I’m a big eater.”

CDC

Even a decade ago, only small populations of lone star ticks were found in the northeastern U.S. As climate change shifts temperatures and humidity levels across the country, many types of ticks, which thrive in warm, humid weather, are able to expand their ranges. The EPA even uses Lyme disease, which is transmitted by blacklegged ticks, as an indicator to track where the country is warming. The spread of lone stars has been linked to climate change, and now, the ticks have made it all the way up through Maine, imparting severe red meat allergies on unsuspecting carnivores — and offering a window into our changing world and its effect on human health.

As lone stars expand into new communities this summer, the ticks are poised to catch people off guard. And just like Coughlin, these little fellows are big eaters.

As you read this, millions of tiny, black-and-brown-legged creatures are beginning to reawaken after laying dormant underneath layers of last year’s leaf cover.

Ticks are only second to mosquitoes as vectors for human disease. This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a report showing illnesses from ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes are on the rise. Disease cases in the U.S. more than tripled between 2004 and 2016, and the report found that we’re ill-equipped to tackle the growing problem.

Large swaths of the eastern U.S. are already dealing with an epidemic of Lyme disease, an illness that can rob you of your short-term memory, your motor functions, and, very rarely, even your life.

And every so often, it seems, the ticks that rouse themselves from the leaf litter are armed with unexpected and mysterious pathogens, like the resurfaced Powassan virus or Pacific Coast tick fever. The CDC report says seven new tick-borne infections have been recorded since 2004. The organization hasn’t recognized alpha-gal allergies yet.

“It’s scary,” says Graham Hickling, the director of the University of Tennessee’s Center for Wildlife Health. “Pretty much every year, we’re finding something new.”

A combination of factors has allowed lone stars to conquer territories far outside their known range.

Climate change is among them. It’s likely affecting the viability rates for the thousands of eggs that a single lone star can lay at a time. “When we start getting these warm seasons, high rainfall kind of years, that probably means that those 2,000 baby ticks do a lot better,” Hickling says.

That’s not the only way climate change is aiding survival rates. Many ticks go dormant during the winter, when consecutive below-freezing days and nights turn them into sesame-sized popsicles. But as warming keeps taking days out of the region’s cold season, ticks are able to stay active for longer.

Hickling says a benign climate is helpful for ticks and what they carry: “There are more opportunities for those viruses to start infecting us.”

Holly Gaff, a tick-borne disease expert at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, also points to one of the tick’s favorite hosts, the white-tailed deer. Deer can travel several miles in the days or even weeks it takes for lone stars feed on them, eventually dropping the ticks a long way from where they first picked them up. Reforestation efforts in the eastern U.S. that began in the 20th century, coupled with a slump in hunting, have led to an explosion in white-tail deer populations. The growth of suburbs means there are plenty of people pressed up against these wooded areas.
Raymond Gehman/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Gaff calls this combination of factors — higher deer populations, people living next to fragmented forests, a friendlier climate — the “perfect storm” for lone star–tick proliferation. “When you have nature in balance you get some ticks, but not like this,” Gaff says.

Already, at least 600 known cases of alpha-gal have occured north of the Mason-Dixon line, according to University of North Carolina allergist Scott Commins, one of the researchers who discovered the connection between ticks and alpha-gal. But that’s probably only a fraction of the incidences. It’s a difficult pathology to diagnose, and doctors aren’t required to report alpha-gal to the CDC.

Compared to blacklegged ticks, lone stars are much more aggressive. Blacklegged ticks behave in relatively predictable ways — they hang out in leafy undergrowth, arms and legs outstretched in case a hapless animal or human passes by. According to Ellen Stromdahl, a researcher with the United States Army Public Health Center, blackleggeds are relatively small and weak.

Lone stars, on the other hand, hunt in packs and travel at surprising speeds, emerging from the leaf litter like a swarm of thirsty, galloping lentils.

“If you sit in the middle of the woods breathing out CO2, you’ll get a fan club of lone stars pretty quickly,” Hickling says.

On top of lone stars’ rapacious mentality, Old Dominion’s Gaff says that after conducting a series of experiments, the bugs “seem to be invincible.”

She’s tried freezing them — but they came crawling out of the freezer after seven days on ice. Next, she tried drowning them, figuring that sea-level rise on Virginia’s coast could end up doing humanity a favor by drowning out tick populations. Her team submerged lone stars in salt, fresh, and brackish water. Every single tick lasted for at least 30 days in each condition — the last lone star died after 74 days.

It only takes one bite from a lone star tick for an unsuspecting victim to develop a meat allergy that can last months, years, or even an entire lifetime.

Here’s how scientists think it goes down: Alpha-gal is a sugar molecule found in nearly all mammals, except humans and a few other primates. A lone star carrying alpha-gal (or an alpha-gal-like substance) bites a person and spreads it to their blood through the tick’s saliva. Then, the molecule essentially rewires the body’s immune system, prompting it to produce an overload of alpha-gal antibodies. When that person goes in for a cheeseburger, their body has a life-threatening reaction to the sugar in the meat.

As recently as a few years ago, the link between lone stars and this allergic reaction was controversial. In 2011, a team of University of Virginia allergists presented its hypothesis in front a group of tick experts. The scientists’ reaction was dismissive.

“We thought, ‘These guys are full of stuffing,’” Gaff recalls.

That team was led by Thomas Platts-Mills, who initially made the connection between lone stars and alpha-gal. Platts-Mills applied insights from his study of patients who were taking the cancer drug cetuximab. Some patients were allergic to the drug, which contains alpha-gal. The team looked into what could be causing the reaction and discovered the link between lone stars and alpha-gal antibodies.

As more people started turning up in emergency rooms with sudden and inexplicable reactions to meat, other researchers began coming around to the idea that a sesame-sized insect could, in fact, instill a lifelong aversion to red meat in full-sized human beings. While the CDC has a comprehensive map of Lyme disease cases in the U.S., state health departments aren’t required to report incidents of alpha-gal as they are with Lyme. Platts-Mills is now working on mapping cases of the allergy.

Lone star ticks. Ben McCanna/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

One such case took place in Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. John Beckett, a self-professed meat lover, was besieged by a pack of lone stars when he was cleaning out underbrush from an old car lot in 2014. Two weeks later, he was chowing down on hamburgers with some friends at a dock party on the lake when he started breaking out in hives.

Over time, Beckett figured out that he felt sick every time he ate red meat.

The hives weren’t enough to make him stop, though. It wasn’t until he wound up in the emergency room — after eating a cowboy rib eye from one of his favorite restaurants — that he decided to kick red meat out of his diet once and for all.

“The hives had closed my airways,” Beckett says. “I thought I was going to die that night.”

When he finally went to an allergist and got his blood tested, his doctor told him the levels of alpha-gal antibodies in Beckett’s system were the highest he had ever seen. “You gave me bragging rights,” Beckett remembers his doctor telling him.

That was four years ago. Beckett stopped eating meat, and the amount of alpha-gal antibodies in his blood declined only slightly.

Mark Vandewalker, an allergist who’s been treating patients in Missouri since 1990, has noticed an uptick in patients exhibiting anaphylaxis, or a systemic allergic reaction, to meat. He sees patients come in with hives, swelling, itching, and, occasionally, some respiratory difficulties.

“Initially, I didn’t even believe that the condition was real,” Vandewalker says. “But now, having seen so many cases of my own, I think that it’s impossible to deny that this is a very unusual, but a very real, form of food-induced anaphylaxis.”

The vast majority of food-related anaphylaxis occurs within minutes after eating, but alpha-gal is one of the rare allergies that doesn’t work that way.

“What’s odd is that it’s happening in the middle of the night,” Vandewalker explains. “These episodes have occurred three, four, five, even up to eight hours after eating.”

That makes it harder to diagnose, which is why patients with alpha-gal are often sent home from medical facilities without answers.

On a trip to visit his family in Leesburg, Virginia, last year, Peter Coughlin was bitten by a blacklegged tick. He contracted Lyme disease, which required him to go on a regimen of antibiotics.

A few months later, he reunited with a bunch of his high school friends, and the group decided to go out to eat. It had been two years since his alpha-gal symptoms began popping up, and Coughlin explains he was ready to jeopardize his health in the name of grilled steak.

“I just said, ‘Fuck it,’” he recalls. “I filled my pocket with Benadryl and went to Korean barbecue.”

This time Coughlin didn’t have an allergic reaction. The Benadryl he had brought stayed in his pocket.

According to Vandewalker, the Missouri physician, alpha-gal can eventually retreat to the point where eating red meat again is possible. Doctors and researchers don’t know, however, how long the antibodies will linger patient to patient — remember, John Beckett’s levels were still high four years after he was bit — and they don’t know how to counteract it besides telling patients to lay off the red meat.

Though alpha-gal remains somewhat mysterious, there is some good news about the ticks that carry it. While in some areas up to 50 percent of blacklegged ticks carry some kind of infectious disease — Lyme, Babesia, Anaplasmosis — the rate of transmissible illnesses found in lone stars (like Rocky Mountain Fever) is much lower, around 10 to 20 percent. What’s more, a recent study published by the Army Public Health Center indicates that lone stars can’t carry Lyme disease at all. Stromdahl, the Army entomologist, surveyed 54 studies from 35 different research groups involving 52,000 ticks and found that a chemical in lone star saliva kills Borrelia – the bacteria that causes Lyme.
Lisa Zins

“You never want to say never with ticks or insects and what they can carry,” she says. “But we presented a lot of evidence that they don’t.”

But the reality is that we’re living in a warming world, and one of the consequences of that is a tick expansion. And while a group of scientists is working on a vaccine for alpha-gal, others are devising ways to attack the issue at its root — by eliminating the ticks from highly populated areas.

Gaff at Old Dominion conducts studies using a robot called a tickbot, which moves around dragging a rag soaked with permethrin (a common treatment for lice that also kills ticks). The bot, which has a little piece of dry ice embedded in its center, breathes out CO2 and attracts ticks to the toxic rag.

Richard Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Upstate, New York, is conducting tick experiments on entire neighborhoods, which he calls “tick towns.” Twenty-four communities volunteered for the experiment, and some are outfitted with a naturally occurring fungus that sucks the life force out of ticks. Others have little contraptions called “bait boxes” that dab rodents with a small dose of Frontline, the flea and tick medicine for cats and dogs. According to Ostfeld, these preventive measures are “probably our best hope at clobbering ticks.”

Tickbots and tick towns aren’t much comfort to people already living with Lyme or alpha-gal, but they’re our best shot at keeping people who are still unaffected safe. For the alpha-gal allergic among us, the spread of lone stars means the end of traditions that once seemed reassuringly permanent — like eating hamburgers at a dock party on the Lake of Ozarks. Those get-togethers aren’t what they once were for John Beckett. But he’s playing the long game.

“I’m trying my best not to get bitten a second time,” he says, adding he reckons his blood levels will have evened out in a few decades. “By the time I’m 80 I might be able to eat meat again.”

https://grist.org/science/lone-star-ticks-are-a-carnivores-nightmare-and-theyre-just-waking-up/

Lyme Epidemic Spreads Worse Than Ever

ecowatch.com
Natural Resources Defense Council
By Clara Chaisson

In the summer of 2013, I was changing into pajamas when an irritated blotch of skin caught my eye. My rib cage looked like a miniature advertisement for Target: There was a near-perfect circle of red, a smaller, concentric ring of clear skin, and then a red dot right in the middle. Bull’s-eye.

In medical jargon this distinctive rash is called erythema migrans, and it’s the calling card of Lyme disease. Fittingly enough, I was spending this particular peak tick season in Old Lyme, Connecticut—where it was first discovered in 1975. Luckily, I knew to be on the lookout for this exact symptom, and a course of antibiotics knocked it out of my system. I experienced no further problems.

But cases of Lyme disease aren’t always so straightforward. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), somewhere around a quarter of infected people never get the bull’s-eye rash, and other early signs, like headache and fatigue, can be easy to misinterpret. If Lyme progresses untreated, it can spread to the joints, heart and nervous system, sometimes triggering problems like meningitis, arrhythmias, or Bell’s palsy. Later stages of the disease can cause symptoms that are more difficult to treat, like arthritis and memory loss.

Worryingly, more and more people are experiencing Lyme’s ravages as environmental conditions help Borrelia burgdorferi, the disease-causing bacterium carried by ticks, spread into new areas.

“It’s a huge problem, it’s growing, and we really are concerned about the lack of prevention tools that are available,” said C. Ben Beard, deputy director of the CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases.

Unlike the tiny ticks that carry the troublesome bacteria, Lyme’s rise is easy to spot in the CDC’s incidence maps from the past couple of decades. Since the early 1990s, the annual number of officially reported cases of Lyme has tripled to 30,000, but studies suggest the actual number is 10 times higher than that. Climate change, suburban land development, and habitat change are creating conditions that not only allow the ticks to thrive, but also put more people into contact with them and their harpoon-like mouthparts.

Black-legged ticks (also known as deer ticks) feed exclusively on blood and need three meals over a two-year period to complete the four stages of their life cycle; otherwise, they starve to death (good riddance). As winters warm, milder seasons are giving the bloodsuckers a larger window of opportunity to find hosts to dine on, allowing them to survive in greater numbers. Meanwhile, higher temperatures are enabling the ticks to spread to parts of the map that have historically been too cold to sustain them. (These arachnids also depend on a high baseline of relative humidity, which explains why residents of drier regions of the country don’t have to worry about the disease.)

A black-legged tick’s four stages lifePamela Freeman

Climate change isn’t the only thing humans are causing to make the environment more hospitable to these parasites. Forest fragmentation is giving a boost to populations of white-footed mice, the primary carriers of B. burgdorferi, and suburbanization puts humans into closer contact with these and other tick-hosting wildlife like chipmunks and deer.

Almost half of all U.S. counties reported the presence of black-legged ticks as of 2015, up 45 percent from 1996. Still, Lyme is mostly a regional threat—95 percent of confirmed cases occur in just 14 states in the Northeast and upper Midwest. And within those states, Lyme is sickening more and more people. The upsurge is especially pronounced in the Northeast, where the number of counties with high incidence of the disease increased 320 percent between 1993 and 2012.

As Lyme moves into new communities, residents often don’t know how to protect themselves, and local doctors aren’t always familiar with the symptoms and best treatment practices. On top of that, bad advice on how to treat Lyme is swirling around on the Internet. According to one study, more than 30 untested alternative therapies are marketed to Lyme sufferers online, including drinking urine, sleeping on a bed of 70 magnets, and blowing gaseous ozone into the rectum. Yup. (Just to be crystal clear: Do not try any of this at home … or anywhere else.)

“The misinformation persists at almost all levels of the Lyme epidemic,” said Richard Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

Richard Ostfeld tags a white-footed mouse as part of field research on the ecology of Lyme disease.Pamela Freeman

Combine inadequate prevention with serious—but sometimes enigmatic—symptoms, widespread misinformation, and a steady creep into new areas, and you’ve got a recipe for a population increasingly vulnerable to a Lyme epidemic. “I would characterize our preparedness as very poor,” said Ostfeld. “And that needs to be rectified.”

So, what can be done? A lot, actually. Beard said the CDC is working to educate health care providers in Lyme-prone areas on how to recognize the symptoms. The National Institutes of Health is also supporting research into more rapid diagnostic tests. The current approach detects antibodies that the immune system produces in response to the bacteria, but the antibodies can take a few weeks to show up.

Ostfeld thinks diagnosing Lyme will remain difficult for some time, and avoiding infections in the first place through tick checks, proper clothing, and potential vaccines may still be the best strategy. “What if we lived in a world in which [diagnosis] was less important because we were preventing so many potential cases of tick-borne disease?” he asked.

Last summer, the FDA fast-tracked the approval process for VLA15, a potentially safe and effective Lyme disease vaccine. (A pharmaceutical company discontinued an earlier vaccine, introduced in 1998, after some recipients claimed it gave them arthritis. Clinical data did not support these claims; the same vaccine is now used to protect dogs from the disease.)

Ostfeld, along with his research partner and wife, Bard College ecologist Felicia Keesing, is leading the Tick Project, a five-year study to see if environmental interventions can protect communities from Lyme disease. A thousand households (and their pets) in 24 neighborhoods in Dutchess County, New York, have signed up to participate. The researchers began deploying two tick control methods last summer: bait boxes that apply a small dose of fipronil—the main ingredient in Frontline—to small animals like chipmunks and mice, and a fungal spray that kills ticks. Over the next few years, they hope to find out whether these methods can effectively lessen a neighborhood’s exposure to Lyme.

On a larger scale, it will be critical to curb climate change and the other forces that drive Lyme disease and other vector-borne illnesses, like the Zika virus and malaria, into new areas.

“We absolutely need to be pushing our leaders at all levels of government to cut carbon pollution,” said Juanita Constible, senior advocate for climate and health for NRDC’s Climate and Clear Energy program. “We’re setting up the backdrop for ticks to take over parts of the country where they never were before.”

Constible speaks from the heart. She lives in Loudoun County, Virginia, a Lyme hot spot, and has had the disease three times in the past six years. And though she has made a full recovery after each bout with Lyme, the experiences have left their mark on her work. “It makes it a lot more deeply personal for me, and it heightens the urgency to do something about climate change,” she said. “I certainly don’t want my friends and family and coworkers to face this.”

https://www.ecowatch.com/lyme-disease-climate-change-2558718285.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=a32277fb5e-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-a32277fb5e-86074753

Keep Mosquitoes Away This Summer With DIY Bug-Repelling Mason Jars

healthspiritbody.com

MOSQUITOS!

Nearly everyone loves summer, but few appreciate the influx of insects that come with seasonally warm temperatures – especially the pesky mosquitoes. Not only are they a nuisance, but their bites can result in itching, swelling, redness, and in extremely rare cases, diseases as serious as the Zika virus.

Getting Rid Of Mosquitoes

If you’ve been optimistically hoping that your six-legged, bloodsucking friends will have succumbed to extinction over the winter, think again. Mosquitos have been around since the Jurassic period and will likely remain long after we’re gone.

Luckily, there are several options available to help us combat the pesky insects and keep them from ruining our outdoor summer activities. The most common being a wide range of over the counter repellents that can be sprayed directly on the skin or clothes. While the sprays are generally effective, most contain a chemical known as DEET which has been shown to cause health problems ranging in severity from mild skin irritations to nervous system interference.

mosquito spray

For this reason, it is recommended that when possible, you should avoid these products and opt for natural bug sprays.
Natural Insect Repellents
Citronella essential oil

This oil is extracted from lemongrass and repels mosquitoes and other flying insects with its potent scent.
Lemon eucalyptus essential oil

Numerous studies have shown that when extracted from the leaves of the lemon eucalyptus tree this oil acts as a highly effective mosquito repellent.
Citrus fruits

Similarly, studies have proven that the peels of citrus fruits are beneficial for repelling mosquitoes when placed around the perimeter of a space.

 

Natural-Bug-Repellent-mason-jar

natural-bug-repellent-mason-jar-768x4031442113708.jpg
Homemade Bug-Repelling Mason Jar Recipe

When combined together, essential oils and citrus fruits make a very effective mosquito repellent. Here’s what you will need:

2 mason jars

One lemon, sliced

One lime, sliced

10 drops of lemon eucalyptus essential oil

10 drops of citronella essential oil

4 rosemary sprigs

Floating disc candles

Instructions:

Add even amounts of lemon and lime slices to each jar.
Add 2 sprigs of rosemary to each.
Fill the jar with ¾ water and add 10 drops of the essential oils to a specific jar (do not mix).
Activate the recipe by lighting a candle.

These bug-repelling jars will make a great addition to your outdoor spaces this summer. Give this recipe a try and you’ll be amazed by the health conscious results!

https://www.healthspiritbody.com/bug-repelling-mason-jar/

Stevia Kills Lyme Disease Pathogen Better Than Antibiotics, Study Confirms

healthspiritbody.com

With summer upon us the risk of encountering ticks, the pesky critters responsible for the spread of Lyme disease is on the rise.

Lyme disease is an insidious and complicated disease to treat, both for the allopathic medical world and alternative medical practitioners, due to its rapid shape-shifting abilities.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), roughly 300,000 people have diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the United States alone. While ticks exist in half of all US counties, Lyme disease cases are concentrated in the Northeast and upper Midwest, with 14 states accounting for over 96% of cases reported to CDC.

The CDC says that while 80-90% of reported cases are considered resolved with the treatment of antibiotics, 10-20% of patients go on to develop the chronic form, which is a persistent and sometimes devastating illness that can harm any organ of the body, including the brain and the nervous system.

The culprit behind Lyme disease is Borrelia burgdorferi, a bacterial infection proven to respond most effectively to antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin.

However, Borrelia burgdorferi can exist in morphological forms, including spirochetes, spheroplast (or L-form), round bodies, and biofilms. When conditions are considered unfavourable for the bacteria, it has the ability to morph into the dormant round body, then hide in a biofilm form. When conditions are favourable, however, it can shift back to its spirochete form.

While conventional antibiotics can treat some forms of the disease, they’re not effective in treating ALL forms, often times failing to produce a long-term cure.

But, new research suggests a long-term treatment may be just around the corner.

A recent study published in the European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology revealed that stevia, a sweetener, and sugar substitute, has been found to terminate late state or chronic Lyme disease.

The study, conducted by researchers from the Department of Biology and Environmental Science at the University of New Haven in West Haven, Connecticut, found that stevia whole leaf extract, as an individual agent, was an effective treatment against all known morphological forms of B. burgdorferi.

For the study, researchers examined the antimicrobial effect of four stevia leaf extracts in comparison to individual antibiotics (doxycycline, cefoperazone, daptomycin), as well as a combination of the three.

Lab tests revealed that while one extract was more potent than the others, likely due to its growing conditions and the agricultural practices utilized, all extracts were effective in treating all forms of the bacteria.

In fact, the stevia extract was proven to work against even the most antibiotic-resistant of the bacteria, known as the biofilm. The individual antibiotics, on the other hand, actually increased the biofilm.

While researchers acknowledge that the results need more investigation and clinical trials to corroborate the finding, they’re hoping these results indicate we’re one step closer to finding an effective treatment for even the most persistent forms of Lyme disease.

https://www.healthspiritbody.com/lyme-disease-treatment/

Attention People Who Eat Dog Meat! Here are 3 Major Health Concerns You Should Know About – One Green Planet

Sara Farr
June 30, 2015

Although the concept of eating dog meat is completely unheard of in the U.S., in other parts of the world, it is regarded just the same as eating chicken or cow. In Vietnam, for example, approximately five million dogs are killed every year for meat, other places dog meat is eaten include Europe, Russia, Africa, Latin America, China, the Philippines, and South Korea.

The Yulin dog meat festival recently garnered international outrage as celebrities and animal activists joined together to raise awareness and call for an end to this faux “tradition.” Photos of dogs stuffed into cages and huddled in absolute fear before slaughter for the festival illustrate the cruelty involved in the dog meat trade. While the suffering of these animals is undeniable, there are also major human health concerns arising from the consumption of dog. The issues highlighted are critical concerns that could have a negative impact on human health if they are not addressed by ending the consumption of dog meat.
1. Rabies

One of the largest dangers of dog meat is the spread of rabies to both animals and people. In the Philippines, approximately 10,000 dogs and 300 people are killed by rabies each year. Despite efforts by the World Health Organization (WHO) to mass vaccinate dogs to prevent the spread of rabies through the processes of sourcing, slaughter, and sale of dogs, the dog meat trade moves tens of thousands of dogs across international borders making rabies prevention enormously difficult.

Workers can easily be infected with rabies during slaughter and spread the disease to other dogs and humans alike. In 2008, 20 percent of dogs in slaughterhouses in Hoai Duc, Vietnam were found to have rabies. The previous year, Vietnam suffered from a rabies outbreak with approximately 30 percent of the deaths attributable to the slaughter of dogs for meat. According to the Center for Disease Control’s records, only 10 people have ever survived this horrific disease. This is clearly a major concern when such a dangerous and deadly disease can be so easily spread.
2. Other Diseases

There are many other diseases and infections associated with dog meat that can endanger human health. The regional director of the Philippines National Meat Inspection Commission admitted that they do not inspect dog meat. Unfortunately, this is also the trend in China, according to Qin Xiaona, President of the Capital Animal Welfare Association.

Possible infections include parasites such as E. Coli 107 and salmonella. There is also a danger that bacterial infections like anthrax, brucellosis, hepatitis, and leptospirosis can be spread through the meat to people.

The bacteria associated with Cholera is also easily spread and propagated through the process of mass transporting and slaughtering dogs for consumption. Following a massive outbreak of Cholera in Vietnam, WHO’s representative Jean-Marc Olive, warned that eating dog meat, or other food from outlets that serve it, is linked to a 20-fold increase in the risk of becoming infected with the bacteria.

Trichinellosis is a zoonotic parasite that can be easily transmitted from dogs to humans through infected meat consumption. Once these parasites are in the human body, they can cause inflammation in blood vessels which leads to hemorrhaging in the nail beds and eyes, in addition to severe muscle weakness. If left untreated, trichinellosis can be fatal.
3. Antibiotic Resistance

There are many parallels to be found between dog meat farms and factory farms in America, unfortunately, antibiotic resistance is one of them. According to Change for Animals Foundation, “On dog farms, large numbers of dogs are living in close confinement, under stressful conditions, and are usually being fed insufficient, poor quality food. These factors result in increased levels of infectious disease and high mortality rates. In an effort to try to control the spread of disease and maximize productivity, there is evidence of farmers resorting to the indiscriminate overuse of antibiotics and vaccines.”

Dogs in these dirty farms are given large amounts of antibiotics and vaccines to fight the disease-ridden conditions on the farms. This influx of antibiotics is leading to a rise in superbugs. Superbugs present an enormous threat to global human health as a recent study conducted by the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance found that drug-resistant infections could kill an additional 10 million people a year by 2050 if steps aren’t taken to reduce the overuse of antibiotics. While the dog meat industry is not the only one contributing to this increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, its contribution should not be overlooked.
How to Stop the Dog Meat Trade

There are many options available if you want to help stop the cruel dog meat trade. First and foremost educating yourself and others of the dangers associated with eating dog meat is critical to bringing and end to this practice. Humane Society International has a wealth of information and resources to help and they also run large campaigns encouraging country leaders to take action to ban the trade altogether. Many people are not aware of the cruel practices and dangers or even the existence of the dog meat trade, so your best course of action is to educate yourself and others to expose the truth of this industry!

Image Source: amayaeguizaba/Pixabay

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/major-human-health-concerns-associated-with-the-dog-meat-trade/

Why this deer disease could change the way Americans hunt forever


https://amp.usatoday.com/amp/896235001