Ice Cream Recall 2021: Weis Markets Recalls Over 11,000 Ice Cream Containers

Be sure to check the freezer if you might have Weis ice cream.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has shared a recall from Weis Markets, recalling more than 11,000 containers of ice cream. The frozen treats may be contaminated with “extraneous material, specifically metal filling equipment parts,” which is not a traditional ice cream topping.

The company has recalled 10,869 containers of Weis Quality Cookies and Cream Ice Cream in 48-ounce containers, as well as 502 bulk units of Klein’s Vanilla Dairy Ice Cream in three-gallon containers. The ice cream may be contaminated with foreign matter which is, obviously, a choking hazard. 

MORE: A Dog & Cat Food Recall Has Expanded After More Than 70 Dogs Die

The recall notice says there has been one report of someone finding an “intact piece of metal equipment” in their ice cream. There is concern that more containers may have been contaminated as well. 

The ice cream was sold at 197 Weis Markets stores in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, New York, Delaware, and West Virginia. The vanilla bulk ice cream packages are not available for retail sale, so you probably don’t have that sitting in your fridge. For the average shopper, there’s just the single product that you want to look out for. The Cookies and Cream ice cream has a sell-by date of October 28, 2021, which can be found near the bottom of the container. 

MORE: Blueberry Yogurts Are Being Recalled Over Potential Mold Contamination

Two other types of ice cream were packaged on the same date, but the announcement says all units were stored in a warehouse and never distributed. Be sure to return that package for a refund if you’ve got it in the freezer. You can also call Weis Markets’ customer service line with questions.

https://www-thrillist-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.thrillist.com/amphtml/news/nation/ice-cream-recall-2021-weis-markets?amp_js_v=a6&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQFKAGwASA=#ampshare=https://www.thrillist.com/news/nation/ice-cream-recall-2021-weis-markets

Albright’s Raw Dog Food Recall

Pin

Albrights Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe Recall

November 13, 2020 — Albright’s Raw Dog Food of Fort Wayne, Indiana, is voluntarily recalling 67 cases of Chicken Recipe for Dogs because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.

What’s Being Recalled?

The product is labeled Albright’s Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe for Dogs and is packaged in 2-pound chubs/rolls (see image above).

Each chub/roll is printed with:

  • Lot number C000185
  • Best By 19 May 2021

Product was sold frozen, and was distributed from the company to distributors from 7/8/20 to 8/27/20.

One animal illness has been reported. No human illnesses have been reported to date.

Where Was It Sold?

Albright’s Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe for Dogs was distributed in CA, FL, IL, IN, NH, NJ, NV, NY, PA, and TN.

The affected product was also distributed through retail stores, mail order, and direct delivery.

What Caused the Recall?

The problem bacteria was revealed after testing conducted by the FDA.

The problem was confined to this batch and the company has ceased the distribution of the batch as FDA and the company continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

About Salmonella in Humans

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

About Salmonella in Pets

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

What to Do?

Due to the frozen condition of the product, it is possible that retailers and end users may still have the product in their freezers.

Consumers who have purchased Albright’s Raw Dog Food Chicken Recipe for Dogs are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 260-422-9440 Monday through Friday, 8 AM to 4 PM ET.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to the FDA’s “Report a Pet Food Complaint” page.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/albrights-raw/

15K Pounds Of Canned Soup Recalled

Faribault Foods Inc., a Faribault, Minn. establishment, is recalling approximately 15,134 pounds of canned PROGRESSO  soup product due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The product contains milk and soy, known allergens, as well as beef and pork, which are not declared on the product label.

The cans labeled as chicken noodle soup actually contain a meatball and pasta product. The canned soup items were produced on May 26, 2020. The following products are subject to recall:

14-oz. cans of “PROGRESSO ORGANIC CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP” with a best by date of “BestByMAY262022” printed on the bottom of the can and a best by date of “09JUN2022” printed on the product case.
The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST18826A” printed on the bottom of the can under the best by date. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered when the firm’s distributor notified FSIS of consumer complaints that the soup contained meatballs and pasta instead of chicken and noodles.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ pantries. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

https://breaking911.com/15k-pounds-of-canned-soup-recalled/

Love Shellfish? New Study Suggests Oysters Might Contain Bacteria, Plastics and Baby Formula : MEDICINE & HEALTH : Science Times

 

 

Scientists from the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with the University of Queensland and Environmental Defense Fund, Cornell University, yield an alarming discovery after conducting the first landmark study using high technology to examine the contaminants of oysters.

Love Shellfish? New Study Suggests Oysters Might Contain Bacteria, Plastics and Baby Formula

Their study reveals that oysters are contaminated with human bacterial pathogens and micro debris like plastics, kerosene, talc, paint, and baby formula.

The study was conducted in the eastern part of the Andaman Sea, with the help of local researchers in Myanmar in the rural Tanintharyi region. The researchers found that coastal urbanization and lack of sewage treatment contaminates seafood and, in turn, poses health risks for humans.

love-shellfish-new-study-suggests-oysters-might-contain-bacteria-plastics-and-baby-formula(2)

(PHOTO:Pixabay)

The findings of their research were published in Science of the Total Environment.

Read: Marine Plastic Pollution Harms Bacteria That Help Us Breathe

What’s Inside the Shellfish?

The study covered nine coral reefs off the Mergui Archipelago of Myanmar situated roughly 40 miles from the city of Myeik that has over 250,000 residents.

The researchers used the next-generation DNA sequencing technology to reveal 5,459 potential human pathogens of 87 species of bacteria. More than 50% of these bacteria are harmful to human health.

Additionally, they used infrared spectroscopy to examine human-derived micro debris found in oysters and found 78 different contaminants.

Study senior author Joleah Lamb, an assistant professor of ecology & evolutionary biology at UCI, said that 48% of the contaminants they found in oysters were microplastics. However, many other particles were also present and not just plastics.

They were surprised to find constituents of fuel, paint, cosmetics, and three different brands of powdered milk that comprise 14% of the micro debris.

The pathogens and microparticles reflect the pervasive presence of sewage and other human-derived micro debris, which implies that coastal urbanization has led to the contamination of vital marine species globally.

Read Also: Happy As A Clam: Boracay Beach Front Covered in Clams Has Caught the Attention of Netizens in Social Media

Implications for Human Health

The study’s implications for human health are very important. Oysters in the study area and anywhere that is part of the local diet consume the shellfish raw and whole. The contaminants found suggest that even areas such as rural Myanmar, far from the urban cities, have significant pollution from agricultural and human waste.

Today, more than 50% of seafood exports come from developing countries, which raises concerns about food safety and security worldwide.

But aside from pathogens present in shellfish, experts are very much concerned about the predominance of microplastics and its other types that are present in seafood that could adversely affect the environment and human health.

Microplastics such as persistent organic pollutants, or POPs carry toxins that enter the seafood and eventually transferred to people through food. That means, microplastics in the marine environment could be an emerging health risk to the people worldwide.

The authors are also concerned that over 50% of the micro debris detected in the Myanmar oyster tissues are polymer materials that are harmful to human health. These are kerosene, saponin, and talc.

Furthermore, the presence of milk supplement reveals that there is a direct fecal-oral link between sewage and human waste that is making its way back to the food chain. Therefore, it elevates further the risk of contamination or, worse, disease transmission.

https://www.sciencetimes.com/amp/articles/26690/20200730/love-shellfish-new-study-suggests-oysters-contain-bacteria-plastics-baby.htm?__twitter_impression=true

CDC: Cases of Salmonella from onions reported in Tennessee and Virginia

Bianca Marais 22 hours ago

(WJHL) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning people not to eat, serve, or sell onions from Thomson International, Inc., or food made with them after 396 illnesses were reported in 34 states. This includes red, white, yellow, and sweet onions.

Those states include Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina and Kentucky. https://d-170205462774592454.ampproject.net/2007172306003/frame.html

One case of salmonella was reported in Kentucky, Three cases were reported in North Carolina, five in Tennessee, and four in Virginia. A full list of cases in affected states can be found by clicking HERE. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0

According to a report by the CDC, 59 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

For a full list of symptoms for the Salmonella infection, click HERE.

At home, the CDC recommends that you check your refrigerator and kitchen for any of these onions or fresh foods made with them:

  • Check the package or look for a sticker on an onion to see if it is from Thomson International, Inc. If it is, don’t eat it. Throw it away.
  • If you can’t tell where your onions are from, don’t eat them. Throw them away.
  • If you made any foods with onions and you don’t know where they are from, do not eat them. Throw them away, even if no one got sick.
  • Wash and sanitize any surfaces that may have come in contact with onions or their packaging, such as countertops, refrigerator drawers, knives, and cutting boards.

When you eat out or shop for food, the CDC recommends that you check with restaurants and grocery stores to make sure they are not serving or selling onions from Thomson International Inc., or fresh foods prepared with them:

  • If they don’t know where their onions are from, don’t buy the product.
  • People sickened in this outbreak reported eating raw onions in freshly prepared foods, including salads, sandwiches, wraps, salsas, and dips.

For more information about the outbreak, click HERE. Categories: Consumer, News, Regional https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0 Loading … https://d-170205462774592454.ampproject.net/2007172306003/frame.html

WJHL | Tri-Cities News & Weather

https://www-wjhl-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.wjhl.com/news/consumer/cdc-cases-of-salmonella-from-onions-reported-in-tennessee-and-virginia/amp/?usqp=mq331AQFKAGwASA%3D&amp_js_v=0.1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s&ampshare=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wjhl.com%2Fnews%2Fconsumer%2Fcdc-cases-of-salmonella-from-onions-reported-in-tennessee-and-virginia%2F

Salad Recalled In Several States

breaking911.com

Fresh Express is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity of Fresh Express 11.5-ounce Southwest Chopped Kit with production codes G163B10A and G163B10B, UPC code 071279306025 and use-by date of June 29 due to the presence of undeclared wheat, soy, cashews, and coconut. In some individuals the consumption of undisclosed allergens could cause allergic reactions that in some cases could be life-threatening.

The recall was necessitated when Fresh Express learned that, during a single production run, incorrect condiment packets were placed into Southwest Chopped Kit bags and, as a result, the allergens wheat, soy, cashews, and coconut are not properly declared.

Only the Southwest Chopped Kit displaying the identified product codes, UPC code and use-by date are subject to the recall. All other Fresh Express Southwest Chopped Kits are properly labeled, and no other Fresh Express products are included in the recall. No illnesses are reported to date.

The recalled product was distributed between June 12 and June 18 in the states of Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. Fresh Express representatives are coordinating with retail stores, instructing them to remove the recalled product from store shelves and inventories.

Fresh Express takes all matters of food safety very seriously, including the issue of allergens. Company procedures and programs stringently follow all mandated regulations and focus on preventive measures designed to minimize potential risks. Express is coordinating with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is conducting a full investigation into this isolated incident.

Consumers in possession of the recalled product should discard it. A refund is available where purchased or by contacting the Fresh Express Consumer Response Center toll-free at (800) 242-5472 Monday through Friday during the hours of 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time.

Information regarding Fresh Express products sold at Publix affected by this recall:

Product Name: Fresh Express Southwest Chopped Kit
GTIN: 071279306025
Lot/Exp. Date: Lot G163B10A/use by June 29, Lot G163B10B/use by June 29

https://breaking911.com/salad-recalled-in-several-states/

Nearly 43,000 pounds of ground beef recalled for possible E. coli contamination

The beef products were sold in stores across the country.

Something went wrong. Author: Megan Yoder (TEGNA) Published: 12:05 PM EDT June 14, 2020 Updated: 1:26 PM EDT June 14, 2020

A meat producer is recalling 42,922 pounds of ground beef products because they may be contaminated with E. coli. 

The products were produced on June 1 and were shipped to retail locations nationwide, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. 

  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing “MARKETSIDE BUTCHER ORGANIC GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF” and a use or freeze by date of 07/01/20 and lot code P-53298-82.
  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing four ¼ lb. pieces of “MARKETSIDE BUTCHER ORGANIC GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES” and a use or freeze by date of June 27, 2020 and lot code P-53934-28.
  • 3-lb. vacuum packages containing three 1 lb. pieces of “MARKETSIDE BUTCHER ORGANIC GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF 93% LEAN / 7% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 07/01/20 and lot code P53929-70.
  • 1-lb. tray packages containing four ¼ lb. pieces of “THOMAS FARMS GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES 85% LEAN / 15% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 06/25/20 and lot code P53944-10.
  • 4-lb. tray packages containing 10 ¼ lb. pieces of “THOMAS FARMS GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES 80% LEAN / 20% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 06/25/20 and lot code P53937-45.
  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing four ¼ lb. pieces of “THOMAS FARMS GRASS-FED GROUND BEEF PATTIES 85% LEAN / 15% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 06/27/20 and lot code P53935-25.
  • 1-lb. vacuum packages containing “VALUE PACK FRESH GROUND BEEF 76% LEAN / 24% FAT” and a use or freeze by date of 07/01/20 and lot code P53930-18.

The following products are affected by the recall: 

There have been no confirmed cases of E. coli connected to this recall, FSIS said. 

Credit: FSIS

You can see photos of the labels here. 

Consumers can contact the Lakeside Processing Center Call Center at (856) 832-3881 with questions.

© 2020 WPMT-TV. All Rights Reserved.

https://www.fox43.com/article/news/nation-world/ground-beef-recall-e-coli-lakeside-refrigerated-services/507-b6a720d8-6da3-418a-8086-0202ccb272dc

Unending Quarantine: We Are Not the Only Ones

unnamed

freefromharm.org

Ashley Capps 10-12 minutes


In addition to the logistical and financial crises so many continue to endure as a result of COVID-19, extended social distancing has plunged much of the world into a full-blown existential crisis as well. Shelter-in-place mandates, shuttered businesses and community spaces, and the loss of important social and familial rituals has found us confronting an unprecedented moment of alienation. We are profoundly disoriented by the sense of being estranged from our own lives.

While this feeling of separation is emotionally harrowing, I believe it can also provide an opportunity to consider the abjectly alienated existences we routinely inflict on so many of our fellow beings; the nonhuman animals we breed or capture for the purposes of exploitation. For us, this estrangement from the lives we belong to is temporary. For the animals languishing on farms, in zoos, vivisection laboratories, aquariums, circuses, pet stores, breeding mills, kill shelters, and anywhere else humans have imprisoned our fellow creatures, alienation is the very essence of their existence, and a permanent condition.

A “beef” cow at a “livestock” show. Photo by Unparalleled Suffering Photography.

And while the plights of all of these creatures is urgent and worthy of closer examination, in the interest of time I will limit this reflection to animals who are farmed; not only because they comprise the bulk of my research and advocacy, but because our consumption of animals, and our obsession with meat, is now unavoidably implicated in the current pandemic on multiple levels.

Our Fatal Flesh Obsession

While it is widely believed that COVID-19 jumped to humans via the animal flesh trade, this has led to a disproportionately critical focus on wildlife and “wet” markets. In reality, the “livestock” sector is the single largest source of human zoonotic disease pandemics globally. A 2012 global study mapping human diseases that come from animals found that “While zoonoses can be transmitted to people by either wild or domesticated animals, most human infections are acquired from the world’s 24 billion livestock, including pigs, poultry, cattle, goats, sheep and camels.”

Indeed, the World Health Organization states that “the greatest risk for zoonotic disease transmission occurs at the human-animal interface through direct or indirect human exposure to animals, their products (e.g. meat, milk, eggs…) and/or their environments,” while the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations notes that “Seventy percent of the new diseases that have emerged in humans over recent decades are of animal origin and, in part, directly related to the human quest for more animal-sourced food.”

Just a decade ago, swine flu, an H1N1 influenza virus, jumped from farmed pigs to humans and infected nearly 61 million people in the U.S. alone, where it resulted in 12,469 deaths, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, as many as 284,500 people were killed by the swine flu pandemic.

The infamous 1918 influenza pandemic known as the Spanish Flu was also caused by an H1N1 virus. Attributed to having developed from either a swine flu or avian flu virus on a pig or poultry farm (pre-dating so-called factory farms, it should be noted), the pandemic killed an estimated 50 million people globally.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

The Bigger Sickness

While these pandemics are tragic, they are not inevitable. In the grand scheme of things, they are symptoms of a much deeper sickness, one of our own making, with which we have infected not only ourselves, but whose toxic consequences can now be seen across the globe: in the burning of the Amazon rainforest to make room for ever more cattle ranching; in Australia where the ceaseless bulldozing of koala habitat, and the deliberate mass killing of kangaroos, both on behalf of the beef industry, kill far more of each species every year than the recent wildfires that drew a collective gasp of horror; in the unprecedented rates of wildlife species extinction resulting from habitat loss, whose number one driver is animal agriculture; in the climate crisis to which meat and dairy production contribute more greenhouse gas emissions than all global transport combined, leading to more and increasingly devastating droughts, floods, fires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events, while inching global temperatures inexorably toward the point of no return.

A koala mother and joey on a bulldozed log pile in Queensland. Photograph: WWF

Killing animals is killing us.

And the sickness is not in the scale of our killing; this is not an argument about the evils of industrial animal farming and a need to simply shift to more so-called humane, bucolic forms of exploitation and slaughter. The sickness is the mentality that designates sentient beings as something to be farmed at all. These animals, from whom we have stolen so many dignities; the dignities of self-determination, of bodily and reproductive autonomy, of family, of wildness, and of inherent existential worth, live suspended in a Frankensteinian netherworld of separation, entirely outside the natural order their ancient instincts once belonged to.

A mother goat at a “livestock” show. Unparalleled Suffering Photography

As author Joanna Lucas has written:

“Isolated from the natural world to which they belonged for millennia, farmed animals are forced to live their short lives in severely degraded physical and psychological environments that are far different from the ecosystems and cultures from which they historically derive. Severed from the intricate social structures that governed and guided their free-living communities, and confined, without the possibility of escape, to a human world where they have no place in the present, no link to the past, and no possibility of a future, domesticated animals have no power whatsoever over the most important aspects of their lives.

Humans decide where they will live; if they will ever know their mother; if, and how long, they will nurse their babies; when, and if, they will be permitted to see or be with their families and friends; when, where, or if they will be allowed to socialize with members of their own species; when, how, and if, they are going to reproduce; what, when, and how much they will eat; how much space they will have, if any; if, and how far, they will be allowed to roam; what mutilations they will be subjected to; what, if any, veterinary care they will receive; and when, where, and how they are going to die.”

Photo by Toronto Cow Save.

What can it mean that in a society obsessed with personal identity and freedom, we have erased the very concepts of identity, liberty, autonomy, and consent from entire populations of sentient individuals without so much as blinking at the moral implications of the indignity and debasement we needlessly inflict on them in the name of profit and palate pleasure?

To degrade any individual, much less entire species, to the lifelong status of property, captive, and commodity, is the grossest devaluing of life, and the ultimate alienation.

A dead hen on the egg conveyor. Jo-Anne McArthur/WeAnimals Media

Quoting author Linda Clark:

“When we use other individuals, they have not a thing to call their own; not their bodies, not their children, not even their very lives. Nothing. Reduced to commodities and resources, every moment of their existence is governed by human economics of the service that can be taken from them, the cash value of such substances as milk, eggs and body fibres that can be stripped from their living bodies, and ultimately the value per kilo of their pitiful corpses hacked and sawed to pieces. Our use of them is thorough and utterly pitiless.

These are the innocent victims of our deluded species. They do not ‘live’ as we know and value the word. They endure an existence. They are powerless, brought into the world by violation on an industrial scale for the sole purpose of gratifying human indulgence.

It doesn’t have to be this way. We can thrive without causing this devastating harm.”

blank

And here’s author Will Tuttle:

“Harboring the idea of owning another living being is in itself an act of violence, and our outer violence toward nonhuman animals, which is so devastating to us all, springs from this idea… [W]e are never owners of others. We can be their guardians, companions, friends, protectors, admirers, and appreciators, and this blesses us far more than we might think. The move from “owner” to “guardian” frees both the “owners” and the “owned,” and establishes the foundation for peace, freedom, and justice. We are all harmed by the culturally mandated ownership mentality that reduces beings to mere commodities, whether for food, clothing, entertainment, or the myriad of other uses. It is long past time for us to awaken from the cultural trance of owning our fellow beings…”

blank


It is no coincidence that our systematic destruction of animal lives, which is in large part facilitated by our refusal of their subjectivity, is also destroying the earth. As I write this, U.S. slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have been identified as the largest hotspot for coronavirus infection in the country, but are being forced to stay open by executive order of Donald Trump in order to supply the flesh fetish. Meanwhile, headlines continue to report “mass meat shortage” fears alongside images of people in full medical masks browsing empty meat refrigerators.

Our culture is in a state of addiction. It is pathological. And it is wrecking our planet, which ought to be incidental to the immorality of needlessly breeding billions of sentient individuals into captivity, reproductive subjugation, and slaughter. Bodies are not commodities. Body parts are not barcodes. Beings are not property.

Until we divest from this poisonous sense of entitlement, this stupor of violence, exploitation, and consumption, our species is doomed.

May it be otherwise. 

blank
  •  

13 Of The Best Grocery Delivery Services

If you’re practicing social distancing and at a high risk of contracting the coronavirus, or just don’t feel comfortable going to the market right now, there are a handful of awesome delivery services that will deliver a meal kits and groceries right to your door.

Please read tips and related information in the comments at the end of the article.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/hannahloewentheil/best-grocery-delivery-services?origin=tastynl&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Tasty%20Bumble%20Sponsored%203%2F30&utm_term=Tasty%20confirmed

The Coronavirus Could Force Mass Slaughterhouse Closures | LIVEKINDLY

 

https://www.livekindly.co/coronavirus-could-force-mass-slaughterhouse-closures/

Enoki Mushrooms Recalled Over Deadly Listeria Outbreak in 17 States

ecowatch.com

Olivia Rosane

A listeria outbreak linked to enoki mushrooms has killed four people in 17 states and sent 30 to the hospital. Amarita / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The new coronavirus isn’t the only public health threat facing the U.S. right now.

A listeria outbreak linked to enoki mushrooms has killed four people in 17 states and sent 30 to the hospital, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced Tuesday.

“Until we learn more about the source and distribution of the enoki mushrooms, CDC advises that people at higher risk for Listeria infections – pregnant women, adults ages 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems, such as people with cancer or on dialysis – avoid eating any enoki mushrooms labeled as ‘Product of Korea,'” the agency advised.

The CDC warning came a day after California-based Sun Hong Foods recalled all cases of its enoki mushrooms labeled “Product of Korea” after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) alerted the company that samples of its product had tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes in Michigan.

“Enoki mushrooms are white, with long stems and small caps,” the FDA explained. “They’re usually sold in clusters.”

The mushrooms are popular in East Asian cooking and are also called enokitake, golden needle, futu or lily mushrooms, according to USA Today.

The affected mushrooms were packaged in a white cardboard box, and then in clear plastic bags with green labels, according to the FDA. They have a Universal Product Code of 7 426852 625810 and were distributed in Washington, California, Florida, Illinois, Oregon and Texas. They are carried by J&L Supermarket, Jusgo Supermarket, ZTao Market, New Sang Supermarket and Galleria Market.

The outbreak so far has sickened a total of 36 people in Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Tennessee and Virginia, according to the CDC. Cases began to emerge between Nov. 23, 2016 and Dec. 13, 2019. The four deaths occurred in California, Hawaii and New Jersey.

People infected with listeriosis usually begin to have symptoms one to four weeks after eating contaminated food, though infections can begin as late as 70 days after exposure.

Pregnant people usually come down with flu-like symptoms such as fever and muscle ache, but it can have dangerous consequences for their children. Six of the people to fall ill in the current outbreak were pregnant, and two of these cases resulted in the loss of the infant.

In non-pregnant people, symptoms include flu-like symptoms as well as headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions. While otherwise healthy people will likely only experience symptoms for a short amount of time, the disease can have deadly consequences for children, elderly people or those with weakened immune systems, according to the FDA.

https://www.ecowatch.com/enoki-mushrooms-listeria-2645456832.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=f6f26032d7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-f6f26032d7-86074753

Check your fridge: 88 egg products under recall after deadly listeria outbreak – WPMT FOX43

Multiple brands of products that include hard-boiled eggs are under nationwide recall following an alert last week by the ‘Center for Disease Control and Prevention’ about a deadly outbreak of listeria. At least seven people in five states I’ve gotten sick including one who died in Texas.

The eggs from Almark Foods in Gainesville, Georgia were sent to foodservice operators nationwide.

Continue reading here for more information and links about this recall…

https://fox43.com/2019/12/24/check-your-fridge-88-egg-products-under-recall-after-deadly-listeria-outbreak/amp/?taid=5e02def13a83d00001f181c9&utm_campaign=trueAnthem%3A%20Trending%20Content&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter&__twitter_impression=true

Nearly 16,000 pounds of frozen beef patties have been recalled because they may contain plastic

 

fox43.com
CNN Wire

About 15,739 pounds of frozen beef patties are being recalled because they “may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically small, green, soft plastic,” the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service said.

The ready-to-eat products from Cincinnati-based AdvancePierre Foods were not sold in retail stories, the FSIS said Friday in a news release, but distributed from a warehouse in Iowa to institutions, including schools.

The frozen products were not sent to schools as part of the National School Lunch Program but were part of a commercial sale, the FSIS added. The schools that got the patties were not named.

The products in question were packed in 15.09-pound cases that contained “CN FULLY COOKED FLAMEBROILED BEEF PATTIES,” with product code 69097, the FSIS said. The recall was categorized as having a low health risk.

“FSIS is concerned that some product may be in institutional freezers,” the statement said. “Institutions that have purchased these products are urged not to serve them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.”

The recall was issued after a food-service establishment complained to AdvancePierre Foods that it found soft, green plastic in a patty. There aren’t any confirmed reports of “adverse reactions” to the patties, the FSIS said Friday.

Advance Pierre Foods, which is owned by Tyson Foods, said in a statement that it was recalling the patties “out of an abundance of caution.” According to the company, 15,000 pounds is about “half of one truckload of product.”

AdvancePierre Foods reiterated that the affected products were not available in stores. It had received no reports of injuries or illness.

“No other AdvancePierre Foods products are affected,” the company said.

The company recalled more than 20,000 pounds of beef patties in April after it got two reports of soft, purple plastic in the patties.

https://fox43.com/2019/12/21/nearly-16000-pounds-of-frozen-beef-patties-have-been-recalled-because-they-may-contain-plastic/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

The CDC Says Not To Eat Romaine Lettuce From A California Region After 40 Reported Cases Of E. Coli

delish.com

Kristin Salaky

US-HEALTH-FOOD

ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDSGetty Images

The CDC issued a food safety alert on Friday advising people not to consume romaine lettuce from the Salinas, CA, region following 40 reported cases of E. coli.

In the alert, the CDC advised that people not eat and businesses not sell any romaine products that have been labeled as created in (or partly in) Salinas. This includes all types of whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and packages of precut lettuce and salad mixes which contain romaine. If your romaine does not include a region or you aren’t sure if it’s romaine, the CDC advises throwing it away.

The CDC also reported 40 confirmed cases of E. coli from 16 states associated with the recall, 28 of which have been hospitalizations. There have been no deaths. You can find a map of reported cases here.

The alert listed the recent salad recall from Missa Bay, LLC which saw thousands of pounds of pre-packaged salad recalled over E. coli fears.

“We are concerned about the potential for contaminated lettuce on store shelves and in people’s refrigerators,” Director of the CDC’s Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases Dr. Robert Tauxe told USA Today in a statement: “Heading into the Thanksgiving holiday, it is critically important to avoid buying or eating romaine lettuce from the Salinas growing area so you can protect yourself and your family.”

If you have any of the romaine lettuce in question in your home, you should dispose of it and wash any surfaces it may have touched.

Romaine lettuce has been linked to several outbreaks in recent years and this most recent health alert said that this outbreak was caused by the same strain of E. coli that caused outbreaks linked to lettuce in 2017 and 2018.

News Editor Kristin Salaky is the news editor at Delish.com covering viral foods, product launches, and food trends.

https://www.delish.com/food-news/a29895348/romaine-lettuce-outbreak-november-2019/?source=nl&utm_source=nl_del&utm_medium=email&date=112319&src=nl&utm_campaign=18679623&utm_term=AAA%20–%20High%20Minus%20Dormant%20and%2090%20Day%20Non%20Openers

Smoked Salmon Sold in 23 States Recalled Over Botulism Fears

Olivia Rosane

Salmon lovers in more than 20 states had better check their refrigerators.

“Consumers are warned not to use the product even if it does not look or smell spoiled,” the recall notice said.

The Maine-based company is recalling the salmon because it could become contaminated with Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that causes botulism. Botulism occurs because the bacteria make spores that help them survive, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explained.

“The spores usually do not cause people to become sick, even when they’re eaten. But under certain conditions, these spores can grow and make one of the most lethal toxins known,” the CDC said.

Those conditions include low oxygen, low acid, low sugar, a certain temperature range, a certain amount of water and low salt. It seems like a combination of the last three is what caused the potential problem with the salmon, as the recall notice explained:

The recall was initiated because the product’s water phase salt (WPS) tested below 3.5%. This was discovered upon re-review of laboratory certificates, which were found to have incorrectly reported WPS levels. Labeling instructions state to keep refrigerated at or below 38ºF and that the product may be frozen. Because the WPS is under 3.5% the product must remain frozen until ready to consume. Product stored in the refrigerator after thawing has the potential to be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum.

Water phase salt (WPS) measures the amount of salt relative to moisture in the fish, according to the BC Centre for Disease Control. Salt helps to keep moisture out of the fish, which reduces bacteria growth.

“The combination of refrigeration temperatures and prescribed salt levels offer a high degree of assurance that bacterial growth will be retarded,” the centre explained.

Mill Stream Corp. said it froze the salmon before distribution, but retailers may have thawed it before selling it.

“Consumers who purchased the product frozen are advised to keep it frozen until ready to use and thaw under refrigeration immediately before use,” the recall notice advised. “If a consumer has refrigerated product subject to the recall, they should dispose of it immediately even if it does not look or smell spoiled.”

The recalled salmon was sold between March 6 and Sept. 17, 2019 in whole salmon side, two pound, one pound, eight ounce and four ounce vacuum-sealed packages. The packages had the following lot numbers on the back: 7049, 7050, 7051, 7052, 7054, 7056, 7058, 7060, 7062 and 7066.

It was sold and distributed wholesale, online and to retail stores in Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, Rhode Island, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, Utah, Iowa, Tennessee, Minnesota, Colorado, Florida, Arizona, Wisconsin, Washington, Georgia, Illinois, Virginia, Michigan and Texas, Newsweek reported.

The symptoms of botulism include weakness, dizziness, double vision and difficulty speaking or swallowing, the FDA said. According to the CDC, botulism can ultimately cause difficulty breathing, paralysis and even death. No one has been sickened by the salmon to date, but anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical attention.

Around 200 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with botulism every year, Newsweek reported. Most have to be hospitalized, but, if they receive proper medical attention, fewer than five in 100 patients die from the disease.

Go Raw, LLC Recalls One Lot of Quest Beef Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

Company Announcement Date:
November 14, 2019
FDA Publish Date:
November 14, 2019
Product Type:
Animal & Veterinary
Pet Food
Beef/Beef Product
Reason for Announcement:

Recall Reason Description

May be contaminated with Salmonella
Company Name:
Go Raw, LLC
Brand Name:
Product Description:

Company Announcement

Go Raw, LLC, of Cottonwood Utah is recalling its 2lb. frozen bags of “Quest Beef Cat Food” because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

The affected products were nationally distributed through retail stores and are identified with the following UPC 6-91730-17101-8, Lot N128.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

This recall is being initiated after the firm was notified by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture when sample was collected and tested positive for Salmonella. The firm did conduct their own test which resulted in a negative result. Salmonella is not evenly distributed throughout a lot which is why it could have been found on a small sample that the Minnesota department of agriculture took.

However, because of their commitment to overall safety and quality, Go Raw, LLC is conducting a voluntary recall of this product. Consumers should also follow the safe handling tips published on the packaging, when disposing of the affected product.

Consumers who have purchased 2lb. bags of Quest Beef Cat Food are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions should contact the company at 801-432-7478, Monday-Friday, 9:00am to 4pm MST.
Company Contact Information

Consumers:
Nicole Lindsley, Go Raw, LLC
801-432-7478

https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/go-raw-llc-recalls-one-lot-quest-beef-because-possible-salmonella-health-risk

“More than 2 million pounds of chicken recalled in eight states | USA TODAY”

 

Potent Neurotoxin Added to Popular Spice

Chemical Free Life

So it turns out there is something you can add to the popular spice turmeric to make it bright yellow–something that consumers seem to be big on. The problem is, the ‘something’ you add is lead–a potent neurotoxin that is dangerous at any level due to its link with brain and heart disease and cognitive damage.

Results from a new study reveal that turmeric — a commonly used spice for food and celebratory body paints and often sold as a healing agent and health booster– is sometimes adulterated with a lead-laced chemical compound in Bangladesh, one of the world’s predominant turmeric-growing regions.

Are you ingesting adulterated turmeric?

If you live in Bangladesh there is an increased likelihood you are ingesting turmeric that is adulterated with lead. (At last testing, 30 percent of pregnant women in the area had elevated lead levels in their blood.)

If you live outside Bangladesh…

View original post 133 more words

Pillsbury Flour Recalled Due to Salmonella Risk

ecowatch.com
Olivia Rosane

More than 12,000 cases of Pillsbury brand flour have been recalled due to a potential Salmonella contamination, Food Safety News reported Sunday.

The recall was first announced Friday night on the websites of Publix and Winn-Dixie, two grocery stores that carried the product. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) then tweeted out a recall notice Monday.

The recall was issued voluntarily by Pillsbury owner Hometown Food Company and affects around 12,185 cases of Pillsbury Unbleached All Purpose Flour with lot codes of 8 292 and a best-by date of April 19, 2020 or 8 293 and a best-by date of April 20, 2020, CNN reported.

“Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase for a refund,” Publix wrote in a recall notice reported by Food Safety News.

Neither grocery store’s recall notice mentioned how or when the flour became contaminated. The Winn-Dixie announcement said that there had been no reports of illness associated with the product so far.

Hometown Food Company bought Pillsbury’s baking and desserts product in September, 2018, USA Today reported.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) used the recall as a teachable moment on the dangers of eating uncooked flour.

It retweeted the recall with a link to an article on the dangers of raw dough. Most customers think that eating dough is dangerous because of the presence of uncooked eggs, but the FDA explained that flour itself can be contaminated.

“Flour is derived from a grain that comes directly from the field and typically is not treated to kill bacteria,” senior advisor in FDA’s Office of Food Safety Leslie Smoot, Ph.D. said. If animals relieve themselves in a field, for example, nothing has been done to the flour between harvesting and purchase to kill those bacteria.

In 2016, dozens of people learned this the hard way when they came down with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O121. The FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local authorities investigated the outbreak and identified the bacterium making people sick in flour that had been used in dough eaten raw by some of the patients. In the end, ten million pounds of flour were recalled, the FDA said.

If you love cookie-dough ice cream, don’t worry; the FDA says that commercial brands should be made with treated flour and pasteurized eggs.
https://www.ecowatch.com/pillsbury-flour-recall-salmonella-2631377462.amp.html?__twitter_impression=true

Toxic Forever Chemicals Lurking in Eco-Friendly Food Packaging?

Chemical Free Life

Some health- and environment-conscious consumers and food retailers are starting to think they are damned if they do and damned if they don’t.   Even when they opt for the newer, “healthier and more eco-friendly” food packaging over plastic or Styrofoam for takeout meals there seems to be problems.  In this case (as there was previously with Whole Foods food packaging for their deli offerings) there is evidence suggesting that the compost-based, eco-friendly food packaging used by some carryout restaurants and delis contain toxic PFAS chemicals which have been demonstrated to leach into the food–and therefore into the consumer’s body.

Toxic PFAS chemicals may be in your eco-friendly takeout food containers

A recent report released by the New Food Economy, a non-profit newsroom that investigates food-related issues, reported the “cancer-linked” presence of PFAS, also called “forever chemicals,” in the fiber bowls used at fast casual dining spots and other…

View original post 669 more words

Texas Tripe Recalls Pet Food Due to Salmonella and Listeria | Dog Food Advisor

dogfoodadvisor.com

August 14, 2019 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning dog owners not to feed certain lots of Texas Tripe raw pet food after samples tested positive for Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes.

The FDA is issuing this alert because these lots of Texas Tripe Inc. raw pet food represent a serious threat to human and animal health.

Because these products are sold and stored frozen, FDA is concerned that people may still have them in their possession.

What’s Being Recalled?

The recalled products are sold frozen in 20-pound and 40-pound cases.

Each case contains multiple plastic pouches.

Lot codes to help identify recalled product are printed on the outside of the cases. But the lot codes are not printed on the individual sealed plastic pouches, also known as chubs.

So, if the case has been discarded, there are no unique identification numbers on the individual chubs that allow customers to determine that they possess the recalled products.

These products are manufactured by Texas Tripe Inc. and were sold direct to consumers online and by phone.

The chart below lists the recalled products and lot numbers provided by the firm to FDA on 8/6/2019. These include 35 lots for each of the following 23 product varieties.

Texas Tripe Dog Food Recall of August 2019

The FDA-sampled products below tested positive for Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes (as of 8/13/19) but have not been recalled.

Texas Tripe Chicken Blend: Lot 19196-6
Texas Tripe Pork Blend: Lot 19190-09
Texas Tripe Beef Blend: Lot 19191-05

Where Were the Products Sold?

According to the company, recalled products have been sold directly to consumers in the following states:

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia

What Caused the Recall?

The Office of the Texas State Chemist (OTSC) collected 23 finished product samples at Texas Tripe Inc. Of the 23 samples, 16 tested positive for Listeria and/or Salmonella.

The FDA followed up these findings with an inspection and collected and analyzed samples of unopened finished product, after the firm performed corrective actions, from additional lots of some of the same products tested by OTSC.

FDA testing showed some of the samples contained Salmonella and/or L. mono.

FDA and OSTC shared their test results with Texas Tripe Inc. The firm initiated a recall on July 3, 2019 by directly notifying some of its customers via email.

Why FDA Is Concerned

Pet foods and treats contaminated with Salmonella and L. mono are of particular public health importance because they can affect both human and animal health.

Pets can get sick from these pathogens and may also be carriers of the bacteria and pass it on to their human companions without appearing to be ill.

People can get sick from handling contaminated pet foods and treats or touching surfaces that have had contact with the contaminated pet foods and treats.

Additionally, if a person gets Salmonella or L. mono on their hands, they can spread the bacteria to other people, objects, and surfaces.

The FDA is aware of recent cases in which humans and/or animals have gotten sick from exposure to Salmonella-contaminated pet foods (Salmonella-human cases, Salmonella-kitten, Salmonella-kitten and dog).

Although FDA is not aware of a documented case of a person acquiring L. mono infection from a pet food, once Salmonella or L. mono get established in the pet’s gastrointestinal tract, the animal can shed the bacteria in the feces when it has a bowel movement, and the contamination may continue to spread.

Because animals can shed the bacteria in the feces when they have bowel movements, it’s particularly important to clean up the animal’s feces in yards or parks where people or other animals may become exposed, in addition to cleaning items in the home.

The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act requires that all animal food, like human food, be safe to eat, produced under sanitary conditions, contain no harmful substances, and be truthfully labeled.

Without an effective control for pathogens, such as cooking, animal food is more likely to contain pathogens such as Salmonella and L. mono.

Refrigeration or freezing does not kill the bacteria.

About Salmonella

Salmonella is a bacterium that can cause illness and death in humans and animals, especially those who are very young, very old, or have weak immune systems.

According to the CDC, people infected with Salmonella can develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps.

Most people recover without treatment, but in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized.

In some patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream and then to other body sites unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.

Consult your health care provider if you have symptoms of Salmonella infection.

Pets do not always display symptoms when infected with Salmonella, but signs can include vomiting, diarrhea (which may be bloody), fever, loss of appetite and/or decreased activity level.

If your pet has these symptoms, consult a veterinarian promptly.

You should also be aware that infected pets can shed the bacteria in their feces and saliva without showing signs of being sick, further contaminating the household environment.

About Listeria

Listeria monocytogenes (L. mono) is a bacterium that can cause illness and death in humans and animals, especially those who are pregnant, very young, very old, or have weak immune systems.

According to CDC, listeriosis in humans can cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the person and the part of the body affected.

Symptoms can include headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, and convulsions in addition to fever and muscle aches.

Pregnant women typically experience only fever and other flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and muscle aches.

However, infections during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery, or life-threatening infection of the newborn.

Pregnant women and their newborns, adults age 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to get sick with listeriosis.

Anyone with symptoms of listeriosis should contact a health care provider.

L. mono infections are uncommon in pets, but they are possible.

Symptoms may include mild to severe diarrhea, anorexia, fever, nervousness, muscular and respiratory signs, abortion, depression, shock and death.

Pets do not need to display symptoms to be able to pass L. mono on to their human companions.

Once L. mono gets established in the pet’s gastrointestinal tract, the animal can shed the bacteria in the feces when it has a bowel movement…

And the contamination may continue to spread, further contaminating the household environment.

What to Do?

If you have any recalled product, stop feeding it to your pets and throw it away in a secure container where other animals, including wildlife, cannot access it.

Consumers who have had this product in their homes should clean refrigerators/freezers where the product was stored and clean and disinfect all bowls, utensils, food prep surfaces, pet bedding, toys, floors, and any other surfaces that the food or pet may have had contact with.

Clean up the pet’s feces in yards or parks where people or other animals may become exposed.

Consumers should thoroughly wash their hands after handling the recalled product or cleaning up potentially contaminated items and surfaces.

If you believe you have symptoms of Salmonella and L. mono, consult your health care provider.

People who think their pets have become ill after consuming contaminated pet food should first contact their veterinarians.

Veterinarians who wish to have pets tested for Salmonella may do so through the Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN Network) if the pet is from a household with a person infected with Salmonella.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to https://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.
Get Dog Food Recall Alerts by Email

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Dog Food Advisor’s emergency recall notification system.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/texas-tripe-recall-salmonella-listeria/

Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Pig Ear Dog Treats | Dog Food Advisor

CDC Pig Ears Dog Treats Salmonella Outbreak Map

July 17, 2019 — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced its investigation into an outbreak of Salmonella infections due to contaminated pig ears dog treats is expanding to 27 states.

Related Recall

In a related story posted July 3, 2019, by The Dog Food Advisor, Pet Supplies Plus recalled bulk pig ears stocked in open bins because they might be contaminated with Salmonella.
Link to Dog Treats Confirmed

The CDC has uncovered scientific evidence to indicate that contact with pig ear dog treats is the likely source of the outbreak.

Pig Ears Dog Treats Sold in Bulk

DNA “fingerprinting” conducted by the CDC has linked the bacteria found on pig ears dog treats with the following 3 genetic strains:

Salmonella infantis
Salmonella newport
Salmonella london

About the Outbreak

As of July 16, 2019, a total of 93 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from 27 states.

Twenty ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

What States?

Affected states include Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin.

About the Investigation

During the investigation, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development gathered pig ear dog treats at retail locations where ill people reported buying the products.

A common supplier of pig ear dog treats has not been identified. Pet owners can take steps to keep their families healthy while feeding pets.

This investigation is ongoing and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.
About Salmonella

Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria.

The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.

In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.

Children younger than 5 years, adults 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

What to Do?

Consumers should not feed suspected pig ears to their dog. Throw them away in a secure container so that your pets and other animals can’t eat them.

Even if some of the recalled pig ears were fed to dogs and no one got sick, do not continue to feed them to pets.

Wash containers, shelves, and areas that held the recalled pig ear dog treats with hot, soapy water.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to https://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.
https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/salmonella-outbreak-linked-pig-ear-dog-treats/

FDA: Grain Free Dog Food & Heart Disease | Dog Food Advisor

dogfoodadvisor.com
This Report Has Been Updated

June 27, 2019 — The FDA has published its third status report regarding a potential connection between grain-free diets and a type of heart disease in dogs known as dilated cardiomyopathy… or DCM.

The Dog Food Advisor initially alerted readers about this issue on July 12, 2018, the day it was first announced by the FDA… and continues to update this report on an ongoing basis.
About DCM

DCM is a disease of a dog’s heart muscle that results in weakened contractions and poor pumping ability…

Which can lead to an enlarged heart and congestive heart failure.

Even death.

Which Breeds Are Affected?

Although the root cause of DCM remains unknown…

And even though initially the condition appeared to be more common in certain breeds…

The FDA has received reports of DCM in a wide range of breeds, including many not genetically prone to the disease.

Likely Linked to Diet

Since announcing its investigation in July 2018…

FDA researchers have observed that most of these DCM cases were associated with animals eating dry dog foods.

However…

Dogs eating raw, semi-moist, and wet diets were also affected.

FDA Distribution of Dog Food Formats

What Types of Dog Food?

Researchers found that over 90 percent of the reported recipes were grain-free.

And that…

Most of these animals ate diets that appeared to contain high concentrations of peas, chickpeas, lentils… or various types of potatoes.

Yet some dogs consumed diets that contained grain, too.

FDA Chart Showing Most Common Ingredients Associated with DCM Cases

Which Brands?

Brands named most frequently in these reports are depicted in the following FDA graphic…

FDA Chart of Most Frequently Reported Brands in DCM Cases

The FDA reminds readers…

“It’s important to note that the reports include dogs that have eaten grain-free and grain containing foods and also include vegetarian or vegan formulations. They also include all forms of diets: kibble, canned, raw and home-cooked.

“Therefore, we do not think these cases can be explained simply by whether or not they contain grains, or by brand or manufacturer.

The Agency goes on to assure dog owners…

“To put this issue into proper context, the American Veterinary Medical Association estimates that there are 77 million pet dogs in the United States.

“As of April 30, 2019, the FDA has received reports about 560 dogs diagnosed with DCM suspected to be linked to diet. Tens of millions of dogs have been eating dog food without developing DCM.”

The FDA also makes the following logical observation…

The prevalence of reports in dogs eating a grain-free diet might correlate also to market share: these products have become exceedingly popular over the last several years.

Which would certainly explain the higher number of DCM cases associated with these same brands.
What’s the Cause?

Based on its latest update…

The FDA has still not discovered why certain dog foods may be associated with the development of DCM. In fact, the Agency now believes the connection between diet and DCM is a complex scientific issue involving multiple factors.

Still…

Even though it’s not clear exactly what it is about these diets that may be connected to DCM in dogs, there are a number of possible causes.

For example…

Taurine deficiency is a well-documented, potential cause of some cases of DCM. Yet it’s not likely to be the only cause.

In fact…

According to Dr. Lisa Freeman, a veterinary nutritionist at Tufts University, “most dogs being diagnosed with DCM do not have low taurine levels”.

Which means…

It’s not reasonable to assume a taurine deficiency is the definitive cause of DCM.
The One Common Thread

According to the FDA, researchers have uncovered one dietary feature common to a large number of DCM cases…

“The common thread appears to be legumes, pulses (seeds of legumes), and/or potatoes as main ingredients in the food. This also includes protein, starch and fiber derivatives of these ingredients…

“Some reports… indicate that the pets were not eating any other foods for several months to years prior to exhibiting signs of DCM.

Editor’s comment: As previously noted, most of these animals appeared to eat diets that contain high concentrations of plant-based protein “boosters”. These include items like pea protein, dried peas, and potato protein. Or a number of legumes (ingredient splitting) located near the top of the ingredients list.
8 Things You Can Do Right Now
to Lower Your Dog’s Risk

Until the FDA completes its study and releases its final report…

The Dog Food Advisor believes it makes good sense to apply science and logic to all your feeding decisions.

So, consider these commonsense tips…

Since vegetable protein tends to be incomplete (deficient in certain essential amino acids needed by a dog to sustain life), avoid brands that derive most of their protein from legumes and other plant-based protein boosters
Don’t avoid any brand just because it contains peas, legumes or potatoes. In reasonable amounts, studies have not found these ingredients to be toxic
Avoid brands that list pea protein, potato protein, or other plant-based protein concentrates among their first few ingredients
Avoid brands that use the deceptive practice of ingredient splitting to hide the fact their recipes are dominated by non-meat components… like corn, rice or legumes
Consider switching your dog to a quality grain-inclusive product
Focus on the recipe. Not the brand. To satisfy consumer demand, companies sometimes replace the meat in certain products with cheaper plant-based alternatives. Yet they still offer other recipes with superior, meat-rich designs
Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Diversify. Since no dog food can ever be perfect, consider using diet rotation to lower the risk of endlessly feeding your pet the same imperfect product
Need help? Consider switching your dog’s current diet to one of the many found on our best dog foods lists

What We’re Doing to Help

Since the FDA’s latest status report was published on June 27, 2019, The Dog Food Advisor research team has been working on 3 important projects…

We’re updating all our Best Dog Foods lists to reflect the FDA’s latest findings. This process is tedious and time-consuming. So, please allow up to 3 weeks
We’re revisiting all our grain-free dog food reviews and making changes (when appropriate). You can expect most recipes to retain their current ratings while others will be lowered by up to 1-star
We’re creating a list of “Best Dog Foods with Grain” to help pet parents find a sensible alternative to grain-free diets

There are hundreds of painstakingly prepared reviews and lists that need to be manually edited. You should expect this total project to take months to complete.
The Bottom Line

Final results are still not available.

And there’s no way to know how long the FDA’s investigation will take. Yet the Agency is hopeful that as more data becomes known, its scientists will gain a better understanding of the possible connection between diet and DCM.

Until we know the answer…

Be patient.

Don’t overreact.

And don’t be frightened by all the well-meaning yet misguided advice you’ll surely encounter on the Internet.

Even from uninformed professionals.

Base your feeding decisions on facts and science.

Including accurate label analysis.

Keep in mind…

The Dog Food Advisor has never favored any recipe just because it’s grain free.

Nor should you.

Instead…

Our ratings are heavily weighted in favor of our estimate of each recipe’s apparent meat content.

In fact…

Ratings are automatically reduced anytime we find excessive amounts plant-based protein “boosters” (like peas, legumes or non-meat protein concentrates) too close to the top of any ingredients list.

Finally…

Many of the very best dog foods on the market are grain free…

And they’re made by some of the most respected companies in the USA and Canada.

We’re confident the industry will quickly adapt its recipes to any decisive conclusions reached by the FDA’s future findings.

And of course, we’ll make any relevant adjustments to our content as needed to reflect these scientific findings (once they become available).

In the meantime…
Our Very Best Advice

Since there’s no such thing as a perfect dog food…

And because built-in flaws tend to be magnified when the same food is fed endlessly… day after day for a lifetime.

You may wish to consider diet rotation when feeding your pet.

Most importantly…

Stay informed.

Keep in mind…

We can update you the moment the FDA releases its findings.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-news/fda-investigating-potential-link-between-diet-and-heart-disease-in-dogs/

50+ items that you actually shouldn’t put in the refrigerator

Do you ever feel like your fridge seems to be getting smaller and smaller? Well, it’s probably because you’re putting things in there that you shouldn’t. Many Americans make the mistake of putting everything they get from the grocery store into the fridge, not knowing that it will actually kill the flavor of many foods. By removing these items from your fridge, you’re not only free up space, but you also improve but taste and quality of the items that should be stored at room temperature.

Here’s a handy list of things that really don’t need to be refrigerated.

https://homehacks.co/53-items-dont-need-refrigeration/?utm_source=twitter_ads&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=6b719901-6d93-af27-a55a-306176976dc0

Thogersen Family Farm Pet Food Recall | Dog Food Advisor

dogfoodadvisor.com

April 7, 2019 — Thogersen Family Farm of Stanwood, WA is voluntarily recalling raw frozen ground pet food because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.
What’s Recalled?

The following 2-pound packaged varieties are included in this recall:

Coarse ground rabbit frozen raw pet food
Coarse ground mallard duck frozen raw pet food
Ground llama frozen raw pet food
Ground pork frozen raw pet food

Recalled product labels did not contain any lot identification, batch codes, or expiration dates.

Products were packaged in 2-pound flattened, rectangular clear plastic packages and stored frozen.

The front of each package contains one large white square label with the company name, product type and weight.

About Listeria

Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Listeria monocytogenes infections can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Anyone experiencing these symptoms should immediately contact a health care provider.

Pets with Listeria monocytogenes infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Recalled product labels did not contain any lot identification, batch codes, or expiration dates. Products were packaged in two pound flattened, rectangular clear plastic packages and stored frozen.
The front of the package contains one large white square label with the company name, product type and weight.

Where Was It Sold?

Thogersen Family Farm stated the affected products were either sold to individual customers or two retail establishments that have been notified.

Some of the product has not been distributed and held at the manufacturing location.

What Caused the Recall?

The recall is the result of samples collected by the Washington State Department of Agriculture and revealed the finished products contained the bacteria.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

What to Do?

Consumers who have purchased affected product should discontinue use.

For questions, consumers may contact the company at 360-929-9808.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to https://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.
Get Dog Food Recall Alerts by Email

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/thogersen-family-farm-pet-food/

Hunt’s tomato paste recalled over possible mold contamination

fox43.com

Conagra Brands, Inc. has recalled some of its Hunt’s Tomato Paste No Salt Added six ounce cans.

According to the FDA, the final product could have been damaged during the canning process, creating the potential for mold.

The products covered by this recall were distributed for retail sale in the U.S. The specific product information is listed below.
Item Description Case UPC Item UPC Case Batch/Lot Code Item Batch/Lot Code Best By Date
HNT PSTE TOM NSA 12/6Z 00-0-27000-38809-9 00-0-27000-38807-5 5291902510 2105902510

OCT 16 2020

Given the product may contain mold, consumers are advised not to use the tomato paste and to either throw it away or return it to the store where originally purchased.

No other Hunt’s products or Conagra Brands’ products are impacted by this recall.

Conagra Brands has informed the FDA of this recall and is working with customers to ensure the impacted product is removed from store shelves and is no longer distributed. Consumers with questions should call our Conagra Brands Consumer Care team at 1-888-280-0301, open 9 a.m. through 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday or visit https://www.hunts.com.

Source: FDA

https://fox43.com/2019/04/05/hunts-tomato-paste-recalled-over-possible-mold-contamination/

Why Do Governments Recommend This Toxic Food Today When They Didn’t A Decade Ago?

wakeup-world.com
February 26th, 2019

By Marco Torres

Guest writer for Wake Up World

If we analyze the food guide and government advice on nutrition over a decade ago and compare those advisements to what is recommended today, there is one big difference–one specific food crept up onto the radar of public health officials as if it had some kind of miraculous nutritional benefit for the public. The problem is, 80 percent of this food is genetically modified, contains toxic phytochemicals and is linked to digestive distress, immune system breakdown, allergies, ADD and ADHD, higher risk of heart disease and cancer, malnutrition, and loss of libido. Yet, governments seem to think that’s not a problem.

You’ve probably already figured out that the food is soy.

I’ll get to how deadly soy is shortly, but first let’s backtrack to the year 2000 and analyze the food guides of two countries, namely Canada and The United States.

The waybackmachine is a beautiful tool that can show us exactly what a website looked like in the past. So if we plug in both the USDA and Health Canada websites in the year 2000 at about the same period, we can see exactly how each publicly funded message translated to each respective food guide or pyramid.
In the Year 2000

On the Health Canada website, there was absolutely no mention of soy at all. Under milk products, the main message was to choose lower-fat milk products more often. Most people had no idea back then how toxic pasteurized milk was, so it was heavily consumed, much more than it is today. There are currently huge debates throughout the internet as to why humans are drinking milk at all.

On the USDA website on either the Milk, Yogurt & Cheese page or the main page illustrating the Food Guide Pyramid, there is again no mention of soy. The recommendation was also low dairy.

So what happened?
In the Year 2013

Today, Health Canada promotes fortified soy beverages on their website for those who don’t drink milk. So we go out of the frying pan and into the fire. We go from the recommendation of a dead liquid, namely pasteurized milk to a beverage that may be even more harmful to public health.

“Have milk or fortified soy beverages by the glass or use them in recipes.”

“Use milk or fortified soy beverages when preparing scrambled eggs, hot cereal, casseroles and soups.”

“Create smoothies by blending lower fat milk or fortified soy beverage with a combination of fresh or frozen fruits.”

“Try a latte made with low fat milk or fortified soy beverage.”

“Use milk or fortified soy beverages to replace some or all of the water when reconstituting canned tomato or cream soups.”

The USDA’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP), kicked their message into high gear in 2002 when they started heavily promoting soy across the United States. Their key message is still to switch to fat-free or low-fat milk, however consume calcium-fortified soy milk is a main heading.

“For those who are lactose intolerant… include lactose-reduced or lactose-free milk, yogurt, and cheese, and calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage).”

Under Tips For Vegetarians

“Sources of protein for vegetarians and vegans include beans, nuts, nut butters, peas, and soy products (tofu, tempeh, veggie burgers).”

“Sources of calcium for vegetarians and vegans include calcium-fortified soymilk”

“Calcium-fortified soymilk provides calcium in amounts similar to milk. It is usually low in fat and does not contain cholesterol.”

“For breakfast, try soy-based sausage patties or links.”

“try veggie burgers, soy hot dogs, marinated tofu or tempeh, and veggie kabobs.”

The site is littered with soy recommendations not only for vegetarians, but also in the promotion of protein foods.

How did this happen? When soy industry lobbyists get together and decide to change the framework of nutrition for the masses, it happens. It’s really that simple.

It’s not only soy. If you care to investigate further, you’ll also notice how three of the most toxic genetically modified oils in the world, canola, corn and soyabean oil are heavily promoted today on both the Health Canada website and the CNPP website (on behalf of the USDA), and neither agency had those recommendations in 2000.

The USDA had absolutely no mention of any of these oils in 2000.

Health Canada also has no mention of these oils in 2000.
How Deadly is Soy?

With Monsanto’s patented genes being inserted into roughly 95 percent of all soybeans and 80 percent of all corn grown in the U.S., the company used its wide reach to control the ability of new biotech firms to get wide distribution for their products, according to a review of several Monsanto licensing agreements and dozens of interviews with seed industry participants, agriculture and legal experts.

Soy protein is not an effective alternative to any other protein. It is high in allergens (some 28 different proteins present in soy have been found to bind to IgE antibodies). It’s also worth noting that the more soy protein you eat, the more likely you are to develop allergies to it — and the more severe those allergies are likely to become.

As Dr. Spreen has pointed out, phytates in unfermented soy products actually obstruct absorption of protein and four key minerals: calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc.

Even so, the public’s perception of soy as health food got a boost from the FDA with a rule that permits soy beverages, soy-based cheese substitutes, and soy-based butter substitutes to be fortified with vitamin D.

In their natural form, soybeans contain phytochemicals with toxic effects on the human body. The three major anti-nutrients are phytates, enzyme inhibitors and goitrogens.

These anti-nutrients are the way nature protects the soybean plant so that it can live long enough to effectively reproduce. They function as the immune system of the plant, offering protection from the radiation of the sun, and from invasion by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. They make the soybean plant unappetizing to foraging animals. All plants have some anti-nutrient properties, but the soybean plant is especially rich in these chemicals. If they are not removed by extensive preparation such as fermentation or soaking, soybeans are one of the worst foods a person can eat.

The most common soy (99%) sold at major grocery retailers in soy milks and processed foods is unfermented soy. It is deadly. Unfermented soy has been linked to digestive distress, immune system breakdown, PMS, endometriosis, reproductive problems for men and women, allergies, ADD and ADHD, higher risk of heart disease and cancer, malnutrition, and loss of libido.

The dangers of soy for men are a result of the high levels of the female hormone estrogen that soy and soy-based products contain. Primarily, soy affects the quality and concentration of a male’s sperm, especially if taken in large quantities or if the subject was exposed to high levels in the womb. A study at Harvard University showed that there was a definite correlation between men with low sperm counts and a high intake of soy foods. The study revealed that the average sperm concentration of 80 to 120 million per millimeter of an adult male was more than halved when soy formed part of the diet. The case is more compelling in the study of obese males whose sperm levels are even lower owing to the estrogen making properties of fat tissue.

When food is eaten, digestive enzymes such as amylase lipase and protease are secreted into the digestive tract to help break it down and free nutrients for assimilation into the body. The high content of enzyme inhibitors in unfermented soybeans interferes with this process and makes carbohydrates and proteins from soybeans impossible to completely digest. When foods are not completely digested because of enzyme inhibitors, bacteria in the large intestine try to do the job, and this can cause discomfort, bloating, and embarrassment. Anyone with naturally low levels of digestive enzymes such as elderly people would suffer the most from the enzyme inhibiting action of soy.

Groups most at risk of experiencing negative effects from the anti-nutrient properties of soy are infants taking soy baby formula, vegetarians eating a high soy diet, and mid-life women going heavy on the soy foods thinking they will help with symptoms of menopause.

Soybeans have a high content of goitrogens, substances that can block the production of thyroid hormone as well as cause goiter formation. Low thyroid activity plagues women in America, particularly middle-aged women. Thyroid hormone stokes the cellular furnaces, known as mitochondria. When thyroid production is low, energy levels as well as body heat are also low. Low thyroid level is what makes old people move so slowly and seem like every action is a huge chore. Low thyroid means the action of the heart is reduced, resulting in lack of oxygen to the cells, a prime condition for cancer.

Genistein, an isoflavone found in soybeans, can also block thyroid production. Phytate can accentuate these effects because it binds up zinc and copper, leaving little of these important minerals available to make thyroid hormone.

People filling up their shopping carts with raw or cooked soybeans, soy milk, and other non-fermented soybean products do not realize that the isoflavones they contain will not be available to their bodies. Most of the isoflavones in soy products are bound to carbohydrate molecules called glucosides. In this form genistein is actually called genistin. It is fermentation that transforms genistin into genistein. Many products in the U.S. do not distinguish between genistin and genistein on their labels.

Even with fermented soy foods, a little goes a long way. The nutrients found in miso, tempeh, and natto can be beneficial in the moderate amounts found in the typical Asian diet, but have the potential to do harm in higher amounts. In China and Japan, about an ounce of fermented soy food is eaten on a daily basis.

When fermented soy foods are used in small amounts they help build the inner ecosystem, providing a wealth of friendly microflora to the intestinal tract that can help with digestion and assimilation of nutrients, and boost immunity.

A study in an issue of Indian Journal of Medical Research suggests that eating soybean oil may boost cancer risk compared to eating a type of butter called cow ghee, a type of butter used in South Asian cuisine.

Soy Lecithin has been lingering around our food supply for over a century. It is an ingredient in literally hundreds of processed foods, and also sold as an over the counter health food supplement. Scientists claim it benefits our cardiovascular health, metabolism, memory, cognitive function, liver function, and even physical and athletic performance. However, most people don’t realize what soy lecithin actually is, and why the dangers of ingesting this additive far exceed its benefits.

Soybean lecithin comes from sludge left after crude soy oil goes through a “degumming” process. It is a waste product containing solvents and pesticides and has a consistency ranging from a gummy fluid to a plastic solid. Before being bleached to a more appealing light yellow, the color of lecithin ranges from a dirty tan to reddish brown. The hexane extraction process commonly used in soybean oil manufacture today yields less lecithin than the older ethanol-benzol process, but produces a more marketable lecithin with better color, reduced odor and less bitter flavor.

In theory, lecithin manufacture eliminates all soy proteins, making it hypoallergenic. In reality, minute amounts of soy protein always remain in lecithin as well as in soy oil. Three components of soy protein have been identified in soy lecithin, including the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, which has a track record of triggering severe allergic reactions even in the most minuscule quantities. The presence of lecithin in so many food and cosmetic products poses a special danger for people with soy allergies.

If you eat soy in any form, unless it’s fermented and organic, you are risking your immediate and long-term health. Check your labels, check your ingredients and most of all stay away from anything that is heavily advertised with soy as being a health food.

If you haven’t already figured it out, your government in not your ally when it comes to your health, so do as much research as possible, and cross reference every detail that comes out of public health education.

https://wakeup-world.com/2019/02/26/why-do-governments-recommend-this-toxic-food-today-when-they-didnt-a-decade-ago/

Sources:

metrofarm.com
mercola.com
preventdisease.com
biophile.co.za
wisegeek.com
ndmnutrition.com

Diet Soda May Be Hurting Your Diet

ecowatch.com
The Conversation

By Eunice Zhang

Artificial sweeteners are everywhere, but the jury is still out on whether these chemicals are harmless. Also called non-nutritive sweeteners, these can be synthetic—such as saccharin and aspartame—or naturally derived, such as steviol, which comes from the stevia plant. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved six types of artificial and two types of natural non-nutritive sweeteners for use in food.

That’s been great news for those working hard to curb their sugar consumption. Aspartame, for example, is found in more than 6,000 foods worldwide, and about 5,000-5,500 tons are consumed every year in the U.S. alone.

The American Diabetes Association—the most well-respected professional group focusing on diabetes—officially recommends diet soda as an alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages. To date, seven U.S. municipalities have imposed a sugary beverage tax to discourage consumption.

However, recent medical studies suggest that policymakers eager to implement a soda tax may also want to include diet drinks because these sweeteners may be contributing to chronic diabetes and cardiovascular diseases as well.

Why are These Sweeteners Calorie-Free?

The key to these virtually calorie-free sweeteners is that they are not broken down during digestion into natural sugars like glucose, fructose and galactose, which are then either used for energy or converted into fat.

Non-nutritive sweeteners have different byproducts that are not converted into calories. Aspartame, for example, undergoes a different metabolic process that doesn’t yield simple sugars. Others such as saccharin and sucralose are not broken down at all, but instead are absorbed directly into the bloodstream and excreted in the urine.

Theoretically, these sweeteners should be a “better” choice than sugar for diabetics. Glucose stimulates release of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body no longer responds as well to insulin as it should, leading to higher levels of glucose in the blood that damages the nerves, kidneys, blood vessels and heart. Since non-nutritive sweeteners aren’t actually sugar, they should sidestep this problem.

Artificial Sweeteners, Your Brain and Your Microbiome

However, there is growing evidence over the last decade that these sweeteners can alter healthy metabolic processes in other ways, specifically in the gut.

Long-term use of these sweeteners has been associated with a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. Sweeteners, such as saccharin, have been shown to change the type and function of the gut microbiome, the community of microorganisms that live in the intestine. Aspartame decreases the activity of a gut enzyme that is normally protective against Type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, this response may be exacerbated by the “mismatch” between the body perceiving something as tasting sweet and the expected associated calories. The greater the discrepancy between the sweetness and actual caloric content, the greater the metabolic dysregulation.

Chart: The Conversation, CC-BY-ND Source: FDA

Sweeteners have also been shown to change brain activity associated with eating sweet foods. A functional MRI exam, which studies brain activity by measuring blood flow, has shown that sucralose, compared to regular sugar, decreases activity in the amygdala, a part of the brain involved with taste perception and the experience of eating.

Another study revealed that longer-term and higher diet soda consumption are linked to lower activity in the brain’s “caudate head,” a region that mediates the reward pathway and is necessary for generating a feeling of satisfaction. Researchers have hypothesized that this decreased activity could lead a diet soda drinker to compensate for the lack of pleasure they now derive from the food by increasing their consumption of all foods, not just soda.

Together these cellular and brain studies may explain why people who consume sweeteners still have a higher risk of obesity than individuals who don’t consume these products.

As this debate on the pros and cons of these sugar substitutes rages on, we must view these behavioral studies with a grain of salt (or sugar) because many diet soda drinkers—or any health-conscious individual who consumes zero-calorie sweeteners—already has the risk factors for obesity, diabetes, hypertension or heart disease. Those who are already overweight or obese may turn toward low-calorie drinks, making it look as though the diet sodas are causing their weight gain.

This same group may also be less likely to moderate their consumption. For example, those people may think that having a diet soda multiple times a week is much healthier than drinking one case of soda with sugar.

Chart: The Conversation, CC-BY-ND Source: CDC

These findings signal that consumers and health practitioners all need to check our assumptions about the health benefits of these products. Sweeteners are everywhere, from beverages to salad dressing, from cookies to yogurt, and we must recognize that there is no guarantee that these chemicals won’t increase the burden of metabolic diseases in the future.

As a physician of internal medicine specializing in general prevention and public health, I would like to be able to tell my patients what the true risks and benefits are if they drink diet soda instead of water.

Legislators considering soda taxes to encourage better dietary habits perhaps should think about including foods with non-nutritive sweeteners. Of course, there is an argument to be made for being realistic and pursuing the lesser of two evils. But even if the negative consequences of sugar substitutes doesn’t sway our tax policy—for now—at least the medical community should be honest with the public about what they stand to lose or gain, consuming these foods.

Reposted with permission from our media associate The Conversation.

https://www.ecowatch.com/diet-soda-health-risks-2624805533.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=c669446345-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-c669446345-86074753

Columbia River Natural Pet Food Recall Expands

dogfoodadvisor.com

December 24, 2018 — Columbia River Natural Pet Foods of Vancouver, WA, is expanding its recent recall to include additional dog and cat foods due to their potential to be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

Columbia River Cow Pie Frozen Food for Dogs and Cats Recall

Columbia River Chicken and Vegetables Frozen Food for Dogs and Cats Recall

The following products are being recalled:

Columbia River Cow Pie Food for Dogs and Cats
Package Size: 2 pounds
Lot Number: 72618
Columbia River Chicken and Vegetables Food for Dogs and Cats
Package Size: 2 pounds
Lot Number: 111518

The recall includes 261 packages of Cow Pie Lot # 72618 and 82 packages of Chicken & Vegetables Lot# 111518 fresh frozen meats for dogs and cats, produced in July 2018 and November 2018.

Cow Pie and Chicken and Vegetables are fresh frozen meat products intended to be fed raw to dogs and cats.

Both were distributed in Alaska, Oregon, and Washington through retail stores and direct delivery.

The Cow Pie product comes in frozen 2-pound purple and white plastic bags with Lot# 72618 found on an orange sticker.

The Chicken and Vegetables product comes in frozen 2-pound turquoise and white plastic bags with Lot # 111518 found on an orange sticker.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

About Salmonella and Listeria

Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

What Caused the Recall?

The potential for contamination was noted after testing by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella in one package of Cow Pie and Salmonella in one package of Chicken & Vegetables.
What to Do?

Consumers who purchased the product should discontinue use of the product and return for a full refund or exchange by returning the product in its original packaging to place of purchase.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 360-834-6854 Monday to Friday from 8 AM to 4 PM PT.

This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/columbia-river-natural-pet-food-recall-expands/

Processed meats linked to increased cancer risk

Chemical Free Life

This is not new information from us, of course; we have been reporting on the scientific research on this topic for many years now.  It is more like a shot in the arm or important reminder as you make your rounds to all those holiday parties with trays and trays of processed meats–and other highly processed foods, for that matter. Here are some takeaways from a new piece in the mainstream media:

.

  • Eating red meat and processed meat has been linked to higher cancer rates.
  • Research is increasingly finding that processed meats are much worse for you than other kinds.
  • The average consumer may be eating more processed meat than is healthy.

The reason processed meats and highly processed foods in general are risky* to eat on a regular basis is thought by a growing number of researchers to be a function of myriad of synthetic and industrialized…

View original post 257 more words