All-female auto shop empowers women by teaching everything there is to know about fixing cars

Patrice Banks at Girls Auto Clinic

mypositiveoutlooks.com

Buying a car and taking it to the auto shop for repairs and maintenance can be a nightmare for many women.

Sadly, many of them don’t get the same treatment as men, a situation that continues to frustrate females everywhere to no end. They feel misunderstood and taken advantage of, and there really isn’t much out there that they can rely on to ease their concerns.

Staff at Girls Auto Clinic

This unfortunate truth prompted materials engineer and mechanic Patrice Banks to open up a ladies-only auto shop in Philadelphia called “Girls Auto Clinic” or GAC, for short.Instagram

Banks wanted to change the conversation around women and their vehicles, so she founded GAC in 2015. The goal is to empower females and provide them with the know-how of managing their own cars, so they can become confident “sheCANics.”

“I was afraid I was going to be taken advantage of,” Banks said. “I was tired of feeling helpless and having to go talk to a guy.”

Banks also hopes to increase the presence of women in the male-dominated automotive industry.

At 31, Banks enrolled in night classes at a technical school. She was the only woman in the class and was older than the average student by about 12 years.Instagram

She eventually quit her job as a materials engineer and started her apprenticeships in garages around Philadelphia. Finally, she gained enough knowledge and experience to open up GAC in 2015.

GAC is fully owned and operated by women, meaning it has an all-female workforce. The business offers a place where women can take care of their cars without all the stress that typically comes with it.

Each GAC mechanic’s objective is to give women the auto experience they deserve and equip them with the information they need about their cars.Facebook

“People are coming in, especially women, with that guard up. In order to get them to trust you, you have to let that guard down,” Banks explained.

“Mechanics do a lot of diagnosing from hearing, seeing, feeling and smelling. So if we can hear, see, feel and smell it, so can you. So I’m going to show you what I’m looking for, what I’m feeling for, so you can feel comfortable and you know this is what’s going on with [your] car. … It’s just about transparency and communication.”

Banks admits that she was once an “auto airhead,” someone who doesn’t know a thing about cars. But when she realized that women spend billions of dollars every year on buying and maintaining cars, she recognized that females are the most influential vehicle customer segment. So, she built a business model that supports a need in the lives of many women drivers.Instagram

GAC became more than just an auto shop for women when Banks added a beauty salon to it. Here, women can pamper themselves while they wait for their cars to be serviced.

They have the option of availing of a manicure, pedicure, and even a blow-out! The “Clutch Beauty Bar” really elevates customer experience and provides them with the kind of service that is hard to find anywhere else.

GAC is focused on educating females about cars, a mission they fulfill by providing car care memberships, videos, workshops, and a friendly Shecanic Facebook community where members can ask car-related questions and have them answered by mechanics.Facebook

Banks also wrote a book called “The Glove Box Guide” to teach women how to take care of their cars.

Patrice Banks holding her book "The Glove Box Guide"

Kudos to Patrice Banks for shaking up the automotive industry and changing the game! Thank you for empowering women through their cars and serving as an inspiration to many.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/all-female-auto-shop-empowers-women/

The Masks They Wore During World War II

www.colorized.com

Linda Speckhals

In this colorized image from 1938, a mother is walking her baby in a gas-resistant baby buggy (or pram). The pram was designed by FW Mills and was an alternative to the baby gas mask. The lid had a glass panel; there was a gas filter on the top. On the back of the pram, a bulb from a car horn sucked in fresh air and expelled the stale. Thus, the buggy was properly ventilated. The woman herself is also wearing a gas mask.

Source: (Reddit/colorized).

In World War I, chlorine and mustard gas were used as a form of chemical warfare, resulting in 88,000 dead and 1,200,000 injured. This was only 20 years before the start of World War II, and so it was part of the collective memory. This, coupled with the bombing of Guernica, helped to induce terror in Great Britain.

The Fear Was Real

On April 26, 1937, the Nazi German Luftwaffe’s Condor Legion and the Fascist Italian Aviazione Legionaria bombed Guernica in Spain, and although the number of people who died is disputed and the number of casualties were not high, it did create fear in Britain of what could happen if Nazi bombers got through. The widespread fear in Britain was that the Nazis would drop poison gas bombs and the government started to plan for tens of thousands of deaths in London. Liddell Hart, one of the government advisors, told them to plan for 250,000 deaths in the first week of the war. Thus, every British civilian was issued a gas mask, or “general civilian respirator.” In total, they issued more than 35 million of them.

https://www.colorized.com/the-masks-they-war-during-world-war-ii/2

9/11 VICTIMS COMPENSATED LESS THAN THE TALIBAN, THANK YOU JOE! ARLIN REPORT THOUGHT(S) OF THE DAY

ARLIN REPORT...................walking this path together

The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was (by Congress) to pay out a maximum amount slightly over $ 7 Billion dollars. SEVEN BILLION DOLLARS! Joe Biden’s withdrawal from Afghanistan (a wreckless, incompetent procedure, a grade school student would know better) gave nearly $90 Billion dollars worth of military equipment to the TALIBAN! Think about that for just a moment! $7 billion went to American families who lost their loved ones by the same identical mold of people like the Taliban, and yet Joe Biden gives the Taliban a $90 Billion dollar gift, and strengthens their terrorist abilities.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_11th_Victim_Compensation_Fund#:~:text=Families%20unhappy%20with%20the%20offer,to%2097%25%20of%20the%20families.

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America’s History

The high price of freedom

What the hell are they teaching at school….what a bunch of idiots!

This is a little too creative for my taste… 😬

Have a sick and unhealthy house plant…there’s an app to help 🌱

Yellow Warbler

NAME: Setophaga petechia
POPULATION: 92 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Breeds in wet woods, thickets, and riparian areas; winters in open woodlands, on farms and gardens with scattered trees, and in mangrove forests

Yellow Warbler range map, NatureServe

Yellow Warbler range map by NatureServe

The Yellow Warbler is the most widespread American wood-warbler. It nests from Alaska to northern South America (including the Galapágos Islands), and in parts of the Caribbean as well, and winters as far south as Peru.

Tail tip to forehead, this is also the yellowest North American warbler, even more so than the Prothonotary or Blue-winged. Cinnamon breast streaks embellish the male’s gleaming plumage.

Seet: Cowbird Alert!

One of the Yellow Warbler’s calls, a repeated seet, serves specifically as a Brown-headed Cowbird alert. When a female hears another bird make this call, she rushes back to her nest to prevent the cowbird, a notorious nest parasite, from laying eggs there.

Other birds, including Red-winged Blackbirds, also seem to understand this warning; when they hear it, they also zip back to protect their own eggs. (Hear the seet call and learn more.)

The Yellow Warbler’s song is a sweet-sounding series of whistled notes often characterized as “sweet, sweet, sweet, I’m so sweet,” repeated as often as ten times in a minute.

“American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga aestiva)” Audio Player00:0700:38 1. “American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga aestiva)” 0:38

(Audio of Yellow Warbler song by Dominic Garcia-Hall, XC394040. Accessible at http://www.xeno-canto.org/394040.)

So Many Subspecies

Another superlative associated with the Yellow Warbler is the species’ incredible diversity: 37 subspecies are recognized, divided among four groups. Subspecies vary mostly in plumage color and pattern.

The Yellow Warbler nests throughout most of Canada, Alaska, and at least two-thirds of the area covered by the lower 48 U.S. states. Long-distance migrants, few if any of these birds remain north of the Mexican border in winter.

Several resident, or nonmigratory, groups are found in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. A resident subspecies even inhabits the Galápagos Islands off Ecuador’s Pacific coast. Males in nonmigratory populations have varying amounts of chestnut color on their heads, from just the cap to most of the bird’s head, as is the case with “Mangrove” Yellow Warblers.

For years, some ornithologists split the migratory and resident populations into two species, Setophaga aestiva and S. petechia. All now fall under the latter name.

Male Yellow Warbler feeding female on nest, Ivan Kuzmin, Shutterstock

Male Yellow Warbler feeding female on nest. Photo by Ivan Kuzmin, Shutterstock

Coffee Berry Protector

The Yellow Warbler feeds mainly on insects and spiders, gleaning them from shrubs and tree branches or sallying out from a perch to grab winged insects mid-air. This diminutive hunter sometimes hovers while seeking prey that might be hiding on the undersides of leaves. Like many other migratory songbirds, the Yellow Warbler adds fruit to its diet in winter.

Winter or summer, this warbler provides valuable pest control: One study, conducted on Costa Rican wintering grounds, showed that the Yellow Warbler and other insectivorous birds ate large quantities of invasive coffee berry borer beetles, helping reduce infestations on coffee plantations in that country by 50 percent.

A Clutch Performance

A male Yellow Warbler quickly claims a territory on the breeding grounds, chasing off intruding males. He courts prospective mates through incessant singing. In fact, one Yellow Warbler may sing more than 3,000 times in a day to attract a female! Once paired, the male attends his mate closely as she builds her nest, wary for other males, which often invade established territories and attempt to mate with resident females.

Like many other birds such as the Kirtland’s Warbler and Wood Thrush, the Yellow Warbler is frequently parasitized by Brown-headed Cowbirds. This problem is especially common in fragmented habitats, which provide easier access for female cowbirds to lay their eggs in host birds’ nests. But the Yellow Warbler fights back. It seems to recognize the foreign eggs, and often builds a new nest, covering over a cowbird-parasitized clutch with new nesting material. If the cowbird returns and re-lays, the warbler covers them again — sometimes resulting in nests with up to six tiers!

Females build and maintain the cup-shaped nests, incubate the eggs, and brood the hatchlings. Meanwhile, male Yellow Warblers aggressively guard nest sites and bring food to females sitting on eggs or young. Both sexes share chick-rearing duties: After the nestlings fledge, some may follow the mother, while the rest remain with the father.

Warblers on the Landscape

Although still numerous, Yellow Warblers are threatened by habitat loss, chiefly destruction of riparian habitats, and the overuse of pesticides. One subspecies, the Barbados Yellow Warbler, has been listed under the Endangered Species Act since 1970.

ABC’s work helps to conserve the Yellow Warbler and other migratory birds across their full annual life-cycle through its BirdScapes approach to conservation. Several BirdScapes in the southwestern United States protect riparian areas for the Endangered western subspecies of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo that also shelter the Yellow Warbler and other birds.

Copyright 2021 © American Bird Conservancy. All Rights Reserved. American Bird Conservancy is a 501(c)(3) organization. EIN: 52-1501259

https://c.sharethis.mgr.consensu.org/portal-v2.html

https://abcbirds.org/bird/yellow-warbler/

Learn more about these amazing hummingbirds

Love puzzles… get them before they’re gone…

Types of Finches: All Finch Species in the United States and Canada

abcbirds.org

There are 17 North American finch species. These include crossbills, Evening and Pine Grosbeaks, redpolls, and siskins. Birds in the Fringillidae family all have compact bodies, conical bills, and short necks with large jaw muscles. They also have relatively pointed wings, notched tails, and distinctive flight calls.

These small to medium-sized birds seem unassuming at first. However, when looked at more closely, their true beauty emerges. From the striking plumages of the three goldfinch species to the unusual and spectacular bills of crossbills and grosbeaks, finches really do have it all.

While these social birds are relatively conspicuous, they should not be taken for granted: More than half of North America’s finch species are in decline. New Hampshire, for example, is at risk of losing its state bird, the Purple Finch, as rising temperatures are expected to lead to a loss of 99 percent of this bird’s summer range in the state. Brown-capped and Black Rosy-Finches are also in danger and are on Partners in Flight’s (PIF’s) Red Watch List, and only an estimated 6,000 Cassia Crossbills remain.

Hazards like window collisions, outdoor cats, and pesticide use pose a threat to finches. Habitat loss from deforestation and other forms of land conversion are also major threats. But the effects of climate change seem to have taken the largest toll on finch populations.

To help these birds and many others, American Bird Conservancy and other organizations are taking a multipronged approach by promoting bringing cats indoors, working to decrease glass collisions, and educating the public about sustainable habitat managementand protecting birds from pesticides.

Our List

For the purposes of this U.S.-based list, we’ve used PIF population and conservation data exclusive to the United States and Canada. In many cases, these population estimates do not reflect global numbers. Cassia Crossbill information comes from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Our list is organized taxonomically and includes all regularly occurring finch species in  the continental United States and Canada.

Evening Grosbeak
Evening Grosbeak

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 3.4 Million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat: Northern and montane forests
Threats: Deforestation, disease, loss of food sources due to pesticides 
Conservation Status: PIF Yellow Watch List
Note: The Evening Grosbeak does not have a complex song, but rather draws from a repertoire of simple calls, including sweet, piercing notes and burry chirps.

Pine Grosbeak
Pine Grosbeak

U.S./Canada Population Estimate:  4.4 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:
Open boreal forest
Threats: Possibly climate change
Note: 
The Pine Grosbeak can be so tame and slow-moving that locals in Newfoundland affectionately call them “mopes.” Pine Grosbeaks declined by 2.4 percent per year between 1966 and 2015, resulting in a cumulative decline of 70 percent.

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 200,000
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat: Alpine tundra
Threats: Climate change
Note: 
The Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch has little fear of humans and will allow people to closely approach.

Black Rosy-Finch
Black Rosy-Finch

U.S. Population Estimate: 20,000
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat: Alpine tundra
Threats: Climate change 
Conservation Status: PIF Red Watch List
Note: The Black Rosy-Finch nests in crevices along cliffs in alpine areas that are rarely visited by people.

Brown-capped Rosy-Finch
Brown-capped Rosy-Finch

U.S. Population Estimate: 45,000
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat: Alpine tundra
Threats: Climate change
Conservation Status:
PIF Red Watch List
Note:
This is the most sedentary rosy-finch.Unlike the Black Rosy-Finch, this species is known to sometimes nest in abandoned buildings.

House Finch
House Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 31 million
Population Trend:
Increasing
Habitat:
Generalist
Threats: 
House Finch conjunctivitis (mycoplasmal conjunctivitis)
Note: 
House Finches are native to the western United States and Mexico but were introduced in the eastern United States when illegal cagebirds were released in New York in 1939. This one of the most well-studied bird species.

Purple Finch
Purple Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 5.9 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Mixed northern, montane, and boreal forests
Threats: 
Competition with the House Finch over food and breeding grounds, possibly climate change
Note: 
Purple finches sometimes imitate other birds in their songs, including Barn Swallows, American Goldfinches, Eastern Towhees, and Brown-headed Cowbirds. Populations decreased by almost 1.5 percent per year between 1966 and 2014.

Cassin’s Finch
Cassin's Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 3 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Western forests
Threats:
Additional studies are needed to determine the factors causing declines in populations.
Conservation Status:
PIF Yellow Watch List
Note:
Both sexes tend to show more of a peaked head and longer, straighter bill than the House and Purple Finch. Cassin’s Finch populations have declined 69 percent since 1970.

Common Redpoll
Common Redpoll

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 38 million
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat: Sub-Arctic forests and tundra 
Threats: Vehicle collisions, salmonella infections from bird feeders, possibly climate change
Note: During winter, Common Redpolls are known to tunnel into the snow to stay warm during the night. To keep redpolls and other birds safe at feeders, it is recommended that you clean your feeders with a diluted bleach solution several times a week, and make sure feeders are dry before filling them with seed. This helps prevent salmonella and other infections.

Hoary Redpoll
Hoary Redpoll

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 10 million
Population Trend:
Unknown
Habitat: 
Arctic tundra
Threats: 
Possibly climate change
Note: 
Many Hoary Redpolls overwinter in areas that are entirely dark, or nearly so, during the winter.

Red Crossbill
Red Crossbill

U.S./Canada Population Estimate:  7.8 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Coniferous forests
Threats: 
Deforestation, vehicle collisions, possible chemical poisoning
Note: 
The crossbill’s odd bill shape helps it get into tightly closed cones. The crossed tips of the bill push up scales, exposing the seeds inside.

Cassia Crossbill
Cassia Crossbill

U.S. Population Estimate: 6,000
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Lodgepole Pine forests, other coniferous forests
Threats:
Forestfires, infestations of Mountain Pine Bark Beetle, possibly climate change
Note: 
Prior to 2017, the Cassia Crossbill was considered one of ten types of the Red Crossbill. However, researchers discovered that it doesn’t breed with other crossbills, has a thicker bill, and isn’t nomadic. Its name comes from Cassia County, Idaho.

White-winged Crossbill
White-winged Crossbill

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 35 million
Population Trend: 
Increasing
Habitat: 
Boreal forest
Threats:
 Habitat loss and fragmentation, possible chemical poisoning
Note: 
White-winged Crossbills with lower mandibles crossing to the right are approximately three times more common than those with lower mandibles crossing to the left.

Pine Siskin
Pine Siskin

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 35 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat:
Northern and montane forests
Threats: 
Domestic cats and other predators, salmonella infections from feeders, pesticide poisoning
Conservation Status:
Common Bird in Steep Decline
Note: 
Pine Siskins can speed up their metabolic rate roughly 40 percent higher than a “normal” songbird their size to stay warm. Pine Siskin populations have declined by 80 percent since 1970.

Lesser Goldfinch
Lesser Goldfinch

U.S. Population Estimate: 4.7 million
Population Trend:
Increasing
Habitat:
Brushy areas, forest edges, gardens
Threats: 
Loss of riparian habitat
Note:
The Lesser Goldfinch is most common in California and Texas, with pockets of local populations throughout the rest of its U.S. range. It also occurs widely from Mexico to northern South America. This species’ range is increasing with urbanization.

Lawrence’s Goldfinch
Lawrence's Goldfinch

U.S. Population Estimate: 240,000
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Chaparral, dry areas near water
Threats: 
Habitat loss, introduction of invasive species
Note: 
The Lawrence’s Goldfinch is nomadic, present in large numbers in a locality one year and absent the next.

American Goldfinch
American Goldfinch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 43 million
Population Trend:
Increasing
Habitat: 
Open habitats, fields, forest edges, open woodlands
Threats: 
Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
 Goldfinches have an almost entirely plant-based diet, only swallowing the occasional insect.

How Can I Help?

We all can do our part to protect North America’s finches.

American Bird Conservancy and our Joint Venture partners have improved conservation management on 6.4 million acres of U.S. bird habitat — an area larger than the state of Maryland — over the last ten years. This is a monumental undertaking, requiring the support of many, and you can help by making a gift today.

Policies enacted by Congress and federal agencies, such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have a huge impact on America’s birds. You can help shape these rules for the better by telling lawmakers to prioritize birds, bird habitat, and bird-friendly measures. To get started, visit ABC’s Action Center.

https://abcbirds.org/blog21/finch-species-united-states/

Pigs can play video games with their snouts, scientists find

A pig uses its snout to play a simple video game on a tiny arcade-cabinet-style setup at ground level
image captionHamlet – or perhaps Omelette – hits the arcade, hoping to win big

Pigs can play video games, scientists have found, after putting four fun-loving swine to the test.

Four pigs – Hamlet, Omelette, Ebony and Ivory – were trained to use an arcade-style joystick to steer an on-screen cursor into walls.

Researchers said the fact that the pigs understood the connection between the stick and the game “is no small feat”.

And the pigs even continued playing when the food reward dispenser broke – apparently for the social contact.

Usually, the pigs would be given a food pellet for “winning” the game level. But during testing, it broke – and they kept clearing the game levels when encouraged by some of the researchers’ kind words.

“This sort of study is important because, as with any sentient beings, how we interact with pigs and what we do to them impacts and matters to them,” lead author Dr Candace Croney said.

Ebony pig
image captionEbony the pig operates a joystick

The research team also thought that the fact the pigs could play video games at all – since they are far-sighted animals with no hands or thumbs – was “remarkable”.ADVERTISEMENTnullnull

But it was not easy for them.

Out of the two Yorkshire pigs, Hamlet, was better at the game than Omelette, but both struggled when it got harder – hitting the single target just under half the time.

The Panepinto micro pigs had a bigger gamer skill gap – while Ivory was able to hit one-wall targets 76% of the time, Ebony could only do it 34% of the time.

A composite shows one of the Yorkshire pigs using the apparatus, left, and a close-up of the food dispenser on the right
image captionThe pigs were first trained on a non-functioning joystick to get them used to the idea

But the researchers were still satisfied that the attempts were deliberate and focused, rather than random – what they called “above chance”.

That means that “to some extent, all acquired the association between the joystick and cursor movement”.

Kate Daniels, from Willow Farm in Worcestershire, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that while the scientists might have been impressed, “I don’t think this will come as a surprise to anyone that works with pigs”.

She added: “They’re not playing Minecraft – but that they can manipulate a situation to get a reward is no surprise at all.”

Dr Candace Croney and one of the pigs
image captionLead author Dr Croney said the pigs’ achievements were remarkable

She paraphrased a quote often attributed to Winston Churchill: “Dogs look up to you, cats look down on you, and pigs look you right in the eye.”

She added: “When you look a pig right in the eye, you can tell there’s intelligence there.”

Still, pigs are no match for humans when playing games – or even less intelligent primates.

The same kind of experiment has been tried with chimpanzees and monkeys, who have the advantage of opposable thumbs, and were able to meet much higher requirements from researchers.

The research paper was published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-56023720?fbclid=IwAR0L5FADpk1GL7KPAW_qkqnSWWc0KUZVRs_xZwDWaLHZKTzPQaqxL9OzCYY

Can you help with this research

Checkout shark week on the Discovery channel

You Know those Virtual House Tours? Here’s One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kings «TwistedSifter

null Jul 9, 2020

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 1 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kings

Ramesses VI Nebmaatre-Meryamun was the fifth pharaoh of the Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt. He was buried in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, in a tomb now known as KV9.

Earlier this year, the Egyptian Tourism Authority released an incredible 3D virtual tour of the tomb and the detail and artistry is astounding. Below you will find some screen shots from the virtual tour but be sure to explore it for yourself here.

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 4 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kings

See the Virtual Tour

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 6 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kingspharaoh-ramesses-vi-tomb-virtual-tour-egypt-valley-of-kings-7

See the Virtual Tour

pharaoh-ramesses-vi-tomb-virtual-tour-egypt-valley-of-kings-8pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 5 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kings

See the Virtual Tour

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 7 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kingspharaoh-ramesses-vi-tomb-virtual-tour-egypt-valley-of-kings-9

See the Virtual Tour

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 8 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kingspharaoh-ramesses-vi-tomb-virtual-tour-egypt-valley-of-kings-11

See the Virtual Tour

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 9 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kingspharaoh-ramesses-vi-tomb-virtual-tour-egypt-valley-of-kings-10

See the Virtual Tour

pharaoh ramesses vi tomb virtual tour egypt valley of kings 11 You Know those Virtual House Tours? Heres One for the Tomb of Ramesses VI in the Valley of Kings
 

Categories: ARCHITECTURE, BEST OF, HISTORY, TRAVEL
Tags: · archaeology, egypt, tomb, virtual tour 1SHARESShare to PinterestPinterest Around The Web

https://twistedsifter.com/2020/07/virtual-tour-tomb-of-ramesses-vi-valley-of-king-egypt/#like-133947

Premieres June 30th on National Geographic

Black Police Officer Discusses Defunding The Police, White Privilege Successful Black Americans. You need to listen to this very powerful video and what it takes to succeed.

Black Police Officer Explains Why Tasers Are Lethal, Homicide, DWI and Body Cam – Atlanta Police

‘THEY AIN’T NOTHING BUT DEVILS’: Muhammad Ali’s son says father would have HATED ‘racist’ BLM movement | RT – Daily news

Muhammad Ali was a wonderful man and father!

Truth2Freedom's Blog

‘THEY AIN’T NOTHING BUT DEVILS’: Muhammad Ali's son says father would have HATED ‘racist’ BLM movement

Muhammad Ali’s only biological son says his father would have despised the “racist” Black Lives Matter movement and endorsed all races, never singling “anyone out.”

‘‘My father would have said, ‘They ain’t nothing but devils.’ My father said, ‘all lives matter,’” Muhammad Ali Jr. told the New York Post.  

The 47-year-old son of the legendary boxer, who is often noted as a cultural trailblazer for black Americans, did not stop at connecting his father to the “all lives matter” position. He also said Ali would have supported President Donald Trump — the late athlete endorsed both Democrat Jimmy Carter and Republican Ronald Reagan when they were running for the presidency.

Ali Jr. himself blasted the Black Lives Matter movement as “racist.”

Also on rt.com

‘Disgrace to our country!’ Trump calls for arrests as activists topple…

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” Juneteenth” A Celebration of Overcoming tonight at 8 p.m.

This frog’s babies erupt out of its back—and other surprising ways animals give birth

api.nationalgeographic.com

By Jake Buehler 9-12 minutes

PUBLISHED June 8, 2020

A Suriname toad, Pipa pipa, at the Saint Louis Zoo. Females of this species birth their young from holes in their backs.Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark

Of the many ways to be born, live birth may be the most familiar to humans. We mammals deliver live, squirming babies, and we think of many other animals as laying eggs—but in reality, animals have found a variety of ways to bring their young into the world.

Live birth, also known as viviparity, is common throughout the animal world, and not just among mammals. It has emerged in fish, amphibians, insects, and arachnids, to name a few.

In fact, viviparity has evolved independently about 150 times in various animal species, including at least 115 times in living reptiles, a number three times higher than in all other vertebrates combined, says Henrique Braz, a herpetologist at the Butantan Institute in São Paulo, Brazil.

There are benefits—and drawbacks—to laying eggs and live-bearing, but these modes of reproduction aren’t an either/or proposition. Egg-laying and live-bearing are two points on a continuum, with many species straddling the middle. (Read about a lizard evolving from egg-laying to live birth.)

Halfway there

All mothers need to do one thing for their offspring: provide nourishment. That’s either as yolk in an egg or, for live-bearing animals, often directly from the mother’s body. (In the unique case of seahorses, it’s the father’s body that feeds the young.)

This frog’s babies erupt out of its back

Some species manage to give birth to live young, yet the mother contributes little to no food in utero. They do this by retaining the babies in eggs inside the mothers’ bodies, letting the young grow and develop using the yolk as a food source. Then, when the young are fully formed and ready to get out into the world, they hatch inside their mother as they’re being born.

This kind of reproduction, called ovoviviparity, is common among venomous snakescalled vipers, though not in most other snakes which lay clutches of eggs. There are also a number of fish—such as mollies and guppies—that reproduce this way. (Read more about how various animal groups give birth.)

One of the more surreal examples is the Suriname toad (Pipa pipa), an exceptionally flat, leaf-like amphibian from South American rainforests. During mating, the male deposits dozens of fertilized eggs onto the female’s back, and then her skin grows around the eggs, creating a surface like inverted bubble wrap. The offspring develop in these small wombs for months. Eventually they erupt from mom’s backand head into the water as little froglets, skipping the tadpole stage entirely.

Why such a strange system? Like other ovoviviparous species, the Suriname toad can give her eggs some protection by carrying them around—useful in a world full of hungry egg predators.

Dining in

Most live-bearing animals provide their babies with some form of sustenance directly.

In mammals, this is common. But West Africa’s critically endangered Nimba toad (Nimbaphrynoides occidentalis) is the only frog fed entirely from its mother’s resources in utero. Female Nimba toads have a nine-month pregnancy, feeding fetal toadlets with a nutritious “uterine milk.”

There are even some viviparous moms that get creative with feeding their young during pregnancy. African tsetse flies (Glossina morsitans) carry a single larva around in their uterus, and it’s fed with a kind of “milk” secreted from a special gland. The Pacific beetle cockroach (Diploptera punctata) gives birth to fully formed, miniaturized young, after fueling them with a similar uterine elixir.

The phenomenon of fetuses dining within the womb can get even stranger. Some live-bearing caecilians—worm-like amphibians that live almost entirely underground or in stream bottoms—actually feed on their mother from the inside. There, they scrape and eat the thickened lining of her oviduct, the passageway that carries eggs from her ovary.

And it can get even more gruesome. A number of shark species host an embryonic battle in the womb, with the babies killing and consuming their siblings for sustenance.

A deeper bond

Some animals take live-bearing even further, interlacing their own circulatory system with that of their developing young, nourishing them and eliminating waste through this linkage. This can take the form of a specialized, temporary organ, like a placenta. Though placentas are typically associated with “placental” mammals such as humans, cats, dogs, and whales, these groups don’t have a monopoly on the organ.

“The organ is not actually just composed of mom’s tissues or baby’s tissues,” says Camilla Whittington, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Sydney. Technically, any organ comprised of both maternal and fetal tissues which exchanges nutrients counts as a placenta. Even marsupials, mammals that carry their young in pouches, have rudimentary placentas. And placentas also have evolved in some unexpected groups.

For example, that sharpnose sharks (Rhizoprionodon) nourish fetuses with an organ that looks precisely like a scaled-down version of a human placenta, Whittington says. There are also some lizard species that develop a placental link with their young, though the African skink Trachylepis ivensi is the only reptile species whose embryos can actually burrow into the wall of the oviduct, approaching the degree of implantation seen in mammal pregnancy.

Worth the effort

Viviparity is clearly not all-or-nothing, but a condition in which there’s flexibility. For example some lizards and snakes are egg-laying in one part of their geographic range, but live-bearers in another. Scientists even observed one lizard lay eggs and give birth to live young in the same clutch.

But why evolve live birth in the first place? There are definitely some drawbacks.

“If you ask any pregnant woman when she’s about two weeks away from giving birth, it’s pretty hard to locomote,” says Whittington. “And you can imagine if you’re a pregnant lizard and you’re very large, it might be hard to escape predators.” (These animals spawn the most offspring in one go.)

Carrying developing young internally also raises the stakes if a mother does get eaten. At least if you’ve deposited your eggs elsewhere, there’s a chance your genetic line may survive even if you perish.

Keeping young inside longer can help protect them, though, and it allows more direct control over their developmental conditions such as temperature. That may be why cold regions host a higher proportion of viviparous species than warmer locations.

“If you live in a cold or variable climate and you just leave your eggs in the nest and walk away, there might be a risk that it’s too cold,” says Whittington.

Whatever advantages viviparous mothers gain from going through pregnancy and live birth, the ability has evolved scores of times throughout the animal kingdom—and that suggests that it must be worth the extra effort.

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5 ways to mark the 75th anniversary of World War II’s end

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WWII 75 Years Later

From a Jewish resistance leader’s compass in Israel to a fortified island off France, artifacts and places recall a planet in conflict.

By Maryellen Kennedy Duckett PUBLISHED May 6, 2020

The Collings Foundation restores and exhibits historic aircraft, such as Lockheed’s P-38 Lightning, used by the U.S. in aerial combat and reconnaissance missions during World War II.Photograph by SCOTT SLOCUM, AERO MEDIA GROUP

A version of this story appears in the June 2020 issue of National Geographic magazine.

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The planet’s deadliest conflict officially came to a close 75 years ago, on September 2, 1945, when Japan formally surrendered during a solemn ceremony in Tokyo Bay aboard the U.S.S. Missouri. Germany had signed an unconditional surrender document on May 7 of that year. Here are five ways to commemorate the end of World War II—while at home and on future travels.

Restored aircraft

The nonprofit Collings Foundation maintains a fleet of historic aircraft, such as the WWII-era Lockheed P-38 Lightning (shown above), that tours museums and air shows around the United States. For more than 30 years, its Wings of Freedom Tour has touched down at various airports to honor veterans and exhibit restored fliers. During these events, history buffs can even take the controls—along with an instructor—and soar into the skies aboard a P-51 Mustang fighter plane. null

Island outpost

Hundreds of bunkers, tunnels, and other eerie remnants of Hitler’s defensive Atlantic Wall dot the Channel Islands, an archipelago in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy, France. On Alderney, visitors can see the observation tower called the Odeon and hike the Bibette Head Trail to explore some of the best-preserved German strongholds. A memorial pays tribute to the slave laborers, from places such as Poland, Russia, and Spain, who helped build the fortifications and died on the island.

The Odeon observation tower is one of the many fortifications that were built on Alderney, part of the Channel Islands, during the German occupation.Photograph by ALDERNEYMAN/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Storied artifacts

At Jerusalem’s Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, learn about the Jewish partisans who carried out attacks on the Nazis in German-occupied Europe. Recent additions to the collection include a compass used by Jewish resistance leader Shlomo Brandt during covert operations run from a forest where he found refuge after fleeing the Vilna Ghetto, in what is now Lithuania. The center also houses a large online photo archive of Jewish life before, during, and after the war.

Yad Vashem, in Jerusalem, preserves compasses and whistles that belonged to Jewish partisan Shlomo Brandt.Photograph from YAD VASHEM ARTIFACTS COLLECTION, COURTESY IKA BRANDT, REUT, ISRAEL

New book

Follow military historian Ian W. Toll on a deep dive into the final year of World War II in Twilight of the Gods: War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945 (W.W. Norton & Company, July 2020). The last installment in Toll’s award-winning Pacific War trilogy uses firsthand accounts to detail the ferocious battles and high-stakes decisions leading to Japan’s surrender to the Allies.

Twilight of the Gods, covering the final year of World War II, publishes in July 2020.

Works of art

George Hoshida’s visual diary of drawings and watercolors captures a rare glimpse of life inside the U.S. internment camps where the Japanese-American artist was incarcerated during World War II. Hoshida’s family donated the roughly 260 original works and a separate Hoshida Papers collection containing correspondence, documents, and sketches to the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles. Because of its fragility, the artwork is exhibited only occasionally, but it can be seen online.

This George Hoshida drawing depicts New Mexico’s Lordsburg Internment Camp, one of several in which the artist was confined. Photograph from JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM (GIFT OF JUNE HOSHIDA HONMA, SANDRA HOSHIDA, AND CAROLE HOSHIDA KANADA, 97.106.1FO)

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Celebrating 50 years

Make Paper Straws

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Kids vs. Plastic

Paper Straws

Help keep the Earth healthy by ditching single-use plastic items. You can make a paper straw to use instead of a plastic one, which is one of the top items found at beach cleanups and can hurt ocean animals that mistake them for food.

By Allyson ShawPhotographs by Shannon Hibberd

SUPPLIES

  • Nat Geo Kids straw pattern or printer paper
  • Scissors
  • Non-toxic glue
  • Chopstick
  • Glass jar
  • Paraffin wax
  • Candle warmer or large cooking pot
  • Paper towel

STEP ONE

Print out the Nat Geo Kids straw pattern and cut it out, or use a piece of printer paper cut into 1.5-inch-wide strips.

STEP TWO

Add a long line of glue on the side without the pattern.

STEP THREE

Place a chopstick at an angle on the back of the paper. Then roll the paper around the chopstick until it’s completely covered. (Be careful to roll the paper on top of itself so you don’t get glue on the chopstick!)

STEP FOUR

Wait 10 minutes for the glue to dry, then wiggle the chopstick out from inside the paper tube.

STEP FIVE

Cut both ends of the tube to make them even.

STEP SIX

Grab a parent and put the wax in a glass jar. Melt the wax by either putting the jar on a candle warmer or in a pot of warm water on the stove.Kids vs. Plastic10 tips to reduce your plastic useMake pom-pom puffsPlastic Pollution

STEP SEVEN

Dip the paper tube into the melted wax one half at a time (this part might get a little messy!) Then gently wipe the tube with a paper towel to get off any extra wax. Let the straws dry about 10 minutes before using. PLANET PROTECTOR TIPThese paper straws will last only about a day. Ask your parents to purchase reusable straws made of bamboo, metal, glass, or silicone that you can use forever!

GET THE NAT GEO KIDS STRAW PATTERN!

 

10 tips to reduce your plastic useMake pom-pom puffsPlastic PollutionFight trash!Save the EarthQuizzesHabitatsU.S. states facts and photos

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