‘Can’t un-see it’: Dolphin activist reveals scene that still haunts him

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An 81-year-old dolphin activist has opened up about the toll years of campaigning has taken on his mental health.

Describing the last 50 years as like “one big bad movie”, Dolphin Project founder Ric O’Barry said he would prefer to be retired and sailing.

It’s hard to walk away from a lifetime of activism, while the “abuse” of dolphins continues around the world.

“Wherever I am you try and escape it,” Mr O’Barry told Yahoo News Australia.

“Those images don’t go away. Once you see it you can’t un-see it.”

Dolphin campaigner Ric O'Barry is haunted by scenes of dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan. Source: Dolphin Project
Dolphin campaigner Ric O’Barry is haunted by scenes of dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan. Source: Dolphin Project

He’s particularly haunted by the deaths of whales and dolphins in Taiji, Japan.

Vision captured by Dolphin Project gives insight into his experience: the ocean turning red with blood after dolphins and small whales are driven towards the rocky shore, then butchered.

“When you put your head on the pillow at night it doesn’t go away,” Mr O’Barry said of his time campaigning against the slaughter in Taiji.

“It’s like one long, bad dream, these last 15 years.”

‘It affects your family,’ O’Barry says of dolphin activist work

In his pursuit to free dolphins from captivity, Mr O’Barry has had his life threatened on many occasions, and lost count of how often he’s been imprisoned around the world.

Describing Japanese prison as torturous, he has avoided confrontation there, even when a hunter in the town of Taiji decapitated a dead baby dolphin in front of him.

“I think he wanted to shock me with a knife, that kind of stuff right in my face,” Mr O’Barry said.

“Blood splattered all over me”.

Mr O'Barry spoke to Yahoo News Australia from his home in Copenhagen. Source: Michael Dahlstrom
Mr O’Barry spoke to Yahoo News Australia from his home in Copenhagen. Source: Michael Dahlstrom

The work has taken a toll on him, but he believes it’s the people he loves have suffered most.

“It affects your family, it affects everybody around you,” he said.

“You miss your son’s graduation, I’m not sure I would recommend this to anybody.”

‘I wish I hadn’t taken that phone call’

Every time he leaves his home he’s walking into conflict, and that’s hard to leave at the door when he comes home.

Mr O’Barry’s work shot to prominence 10 years ago after his campaign to end dolphin slaughter in Japan was documented in the Oscar winning film The Cove.

Sometimes you have a split second to make a choice and it’ll literally change your life.Ric O’Barry

His work there began after receiving a call from another activist asking for assistance.

Mr O’Barry recalls he was told it was “dangerous” but they needed help.

Mr O'Barry (left), a skilled diver, said it is thrilling to set dolphins free. Source: Dolphin Project
Mr O’Barry (left), a skilled diver, said it is thrilling to set dolphins free. Source: Dolphin Project

“So, I bought an aeroplane ticket and I was there the next day,” he said.

“That was 20 years ago and I’ve been stuck (campaigning) there ever since.

“In some ways I wish I hadn’t taken that phone call.”

Dolphin Project’s work in the town of Taiji, has focused on not just the killing of dolphins for their meat, but also the hunters’ ties to the marine park industry.

Favoured species such as bottle-nose dolphins are captured and sold into captivity, particularly to Japanese and Chinese dolphinariums.

Dolphin parks linked to slaughter

With dolphin consumption not particularly popular in Japan, and known to be high in mercury, Mr O’Barry believes it is the lucrative sums earned from selling live dolphins which makes the slaughter financially viable.

While debate rages over whether dolphin killing is a tradition in Japan, the large scale culls and capture of these animals is a relatively new phenomenon.

Dead dolphins sell for as little as US $480, while a live animal can sell for 100 times that amount, according to Vice News.

Dolphin Project urges tourists to avoid dolphinariums. Source: Getty
Dolphin Project urges tourists to avoid dolphinariums. Source: Getty

The majority of those sold into entertainment are sent to China where there is an expanding middle class, with money to spend on dolphin shows, the Washington Post reported.

A growing number of Japanese nationals are protesting the hunt each year, and Mr O’Barry believes that ongoing education will see the practice phased out.

More

‘It’s all about showing up’: Key to dolphin activism

Despite describing himself as “always tired”, Mr O’Barry isn’t retiring any time soon, but he doesn’t know where his stamina comes from.

“I just keep doing it. It’s like breathing,” Mr O’Barry said.

“It’s kind of like asking me how do you keep breathing, I don’t think about that any more, I just breathe.”

In the world of computer activism, he believes change occurs by physically protesting, and resisting.

“I’m computer illiterate, I don’t even own a computer,” he said.

“It’s all about showing up. Real activists show up.

Progress being made as laws ban dolphin capture

Despite the depressing side of his work, Mr O’Barry said he can see progress being made.

He was particularly elated by news that the state of NSW would be banning the breeding and capture of dolphins, following similar legislation passed in France and Canada.

Mr O'Barry, pictured as a young man, transitioned from capturing dolphins to setting them free. Source: Dolphin Project
Mr O’Barry, pictured as a young man, transitioned from capturing dolphins to setting them free. Source: Dolphin Project

Paying penance for his time as a young man capturing dolphins for marine parks, and working on the 60’s television show Flipper, nothing now gives him greater joy than releasing dolphins back into the ocean.

His activism was directly sparked by the loss of Flipper who died in his arms. The very next day he flew to the Bahamas and was arrested after setting a dolphin free.

He’s particularly proud of the work they have done rehoming three dolphins in Bali, which had been kept inside a hotel swimming pool to entertain tourists.

“There are some days where we actually rehabilitate and release dolphins back into the wild,” he said.

“Words fail when I try to explain how I feel about that — you’re literally giving them their lives back.

“Most dolphins that are captured lose their lives, they don’t get their lives back.”

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Help set them free!

The Dolphin Project

Ariel and Turbo Release Case Dolphin Project

In May of 2001, two bottlenose dolphins were languishing in a crude holding pit in the mountains of Santa Lucia Milpas Atlas, Guatemala. Both dolphins – a male named Turbo and a female named Ariel, had been captured from the wild and brought to the mountains by truck fourteen months earlier. Their captors were in the process of training them to perform in shows in the infamous traveling dolphin circus known as Water Land/Mundo Marino, when the Guatemalan environmental organization, MadreSelva, discovered the primitive operation. MadreSelva immediately alerted the authorities and asked them to look into the legality of Water Land´s captive dolphin training camp.

Water Land operates out of Margarita Island in Venezuela. Ruben Roca, the owner of the same traveling dolphin show that had illegally held Cheryl the Russian navy dolphin until her death, abandoned Ariel and Turbo when Guatemalan authorities instigated proceedings against him for their illegal capture.

Roca had left the dolphins in a shallow, stagnant pit, which had been dug with a backhoe. The hole was inserted with a white plastic liner, and a three foot high cement wall topped it off. The dolphin trainers had taken the fish freezer and parts of the filtration system with them when they fled the country in the middle of the night. As a result, the filtration system was not working, and the dolphins were literally living in a cesspool. According to eye witnesses, the pit had originally contained four dolphins. It is presumed that the two missing dolphins, named Sammy and Pinky, were transported to Water Land´s base in Margarita Island.

Ric O’Barry checking on the condition of Ariel and Turbo.

Dolphin Project, which at the time was working with the World Society of the Protection of Animals (WSPA) was initially contacted by Ms. Magali Rey Rosa of MadreSelva. When Ric and Helene O’Barry showed up in the remote mountain location to inspect Water Land´s dolphin training camp on June 1st, they found Ariel and Turbo floating listlessly on the surface of the foul-smelling water.

The dolphins were malnourished and dehydrated, and their skin was discolored from the contaminated water. Rocca’s rented house and the pit he had dug for the dolphins was located at an elevation of more than 6,000 feet. The altitude had played havoc with the dolphins’ health, and they had not eaten in several days.

Ric and Helene set up camp next to the pit and implemented first-aid. The filthy water was pumped out, and the bacteria-ridden liner was scrubbed clean. The pit was refilled with 25 tanker-trucks of fresh city water as well as 2400 pounds of salt. A new heavy duty swimming pool filtration system was installed. They fed the dolphins freshly-caught fish injected with water and electrolytes in order to re-hydrate them.

IMG_0005

While Helene and Dr. Juan Carlos Murillo, a WSPA veterinarian, nursed the two dolphins back to health with fresh fish, vitamins and antibiotics, Ric flew to the edge of the Guatemalan jungle by helicopter provided by the Guatemalan Army to search for a site to build a sea pen. An ideal site was chosen when pods of resident bottlenose dolphins were spotted from the air. With the help of the Guatemalan army, a huge sea pen was erected in record time in Graciosa Bay, on the bayside of the Manabique Peninsula.

It took more than five weeks of negotiations between the Guatemalan government, MasdreSelva and WSPA to secure the dolphins´ release. While the negotiations went on, members of the dolphin captivity industry tried to roadblock our efforts. For the dolphins, this was a do-or-die situation: They could not survive in the holding pit much longer.

The authorities finally awarded custody to WSPA, and on July 12th Ariel and Turbo were transported out of the mountains and back to the sea.

The Guatemalan navy provided a truck that would transport the dolphins from Santa Lucia Milpas Altas to the airport in Guatemala City. The dolphin rescue team had received death threats a few days earlier, and police and army personnel escorted the truck the entire way.

From Guatemala City, the dolphins were transported by plane to the naval base in Puerto Barrios. From there, it was just a 20-minute helicopter ride to the awaiting sea pen in Graciosa Bay where, for the first time in over a year, Ariel and Turbo once again experienced real sea water and a spacious environment. Never again would they have to perform tricks in order to be fed. The healing process could begin.

Airlifting Ariel and Turbo to their readaption and release facility.

Airlifting Ariel and Turbo to their readaption and release facility ~ with Helene Hesselager O’Barry.

While the remote site at the edge of the Guatemalan jungle was ideal for rehabilitating dolphins, it posed many challenges for the dolphin rescue team. Ric and Helene were dropped off in the jungle with very few supplies, and as they saw the helicopter take off and disappear, they had no idea where they were going to spend the night. Just before dark, they found a small platform that could be used as a camp site. Here, they were safe from panthers, crocodiles, poisonous snakes and the large pack of wild dogs that lived in the area.

A freeze brand is used to create a logo on the dorsal fin for tracking after release.

A freeze brand is used to create a logo on the dorsal fin for tracking after release.

Ariel and Turbo had only spent a short time in captivity and were perfect candidates for release. They had spent enough time in the wild prior to their capture to know how to survive, which fish to catch and how to avoid predators. Once introduced to the large sea pen, they showed no interest in humans whatsoever, and they had not forgotten how to hunt live prey. They spent most of their time leaping, diving and catching fish in the deep end of the sea pen. A pod of resident bottlenose dolphins entered Graciosa Bay twice a day to hunt for fish and each time visited the sea pen.

Dolphin Rehabilitation Sea Pen

Dolphin Rehabilitation Sea Pen

Ariel and Turbo were rehabilitated using the Dolphin Project protocol. On the day of their release back into the wild, they were quickly adopted by the resident pod of bottlenose dolphins. Both Ariel and Turbo were seen together by local fishermen one year later. Turbo was spotted again on January 2003 in the Sarstoon River, which form a portion of the border between Belize and Guatemala. He was swimming with a group of wild dolphins.

Join the Pod, Dolphin Project
Take the Pledge to NOT Visit a Dolphin Show

DONATE

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and all donations are tax-deductible as authorized by law.

© 2021 Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project. All Rights Reserved.

171 Pier Ave. #234
Santa Monica, CA 90405

https://www.dolphinproject.com/campaigns/dolphin-sanctuary-project/readaption-vs-release/release-case-ariel-and-turbo/

Freedom

Sanctuaries for Dolphins

The Cove

End The Senseless Slaughter In Taiji 🐬 Dolphin Project 🐬

Bottlenose Dolphin Capture Taiji The Cove Captive Selection Captivity

TAKE ACTION

Learn more about our Taiji campaign

The dolphin drive hunts that take place each year in Taiji, Japan, have garnered international attention as the world has learned about the mass slaughter of dolphins and the ruthless captive selection process. These brutal hunts are documented by our team of Cove Monitors each season, and shared with the international public so that attention may be drawn to this outdated and unnecessarily cruel practice.

Please help today by taking the following action steps:

1. TAKE THE PLEDGE NOT TO BUY A TICKET TO A CAPTIVE DOLPHIN SHOW

Share your pledge on social media and encourage others to join you!

2. SIGN THE PETITION TO JAPAN’S GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS TO END THE HUNTS

3. URGE BROOME, AUSTRALIA TO SUSPEND “SISTER CITY” TIES WITH TAIJI, JAPAN

4. JOIN DOLPHIN PROJECT ON THE FRONT LINES IN TAIJI

Were you inspired by Ric O’Barry in “The Cove”? Learn more about becoming a volunteer Dolphin Project Cove Monitor.

Ric O’Barry The Cove Photo: DolphinProject.com

5.  MAKE A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION TO SUPPORT OUR INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGNS

Your support is critical to our mission. If your employer has a matching gifts program, your donation could be doubled or even tripled!

6.  HAVE A COVE OR BLACKFISH PARTY AND HELP EDUCATE OTHERS

Host a movie night at your house and watch “The Cove” or “Blackfish”to educate others about dolphin captivity issues.

7. GET CREATIVE

Have a personal goal you’ve always wanted to accomplish? Want to help protect dolphins? Learn how by creating your very own fundraiser.

Think of unique ways to raise awareness in your community. Visit our VOLUNTEER PAGE for ideas.

8. SHARE

Let your voice be heard for dolphins! Education and spreading the word are key, so follow our social media accounts and share our posts with your friends. 

9. WEAR your support for dolphins! SHOP authentic Dolphin Project gear.

All proceeds support our international campaigns, and it’s a great way to start a conversation.

10. CONTACT THE AUTHORITIES

Help us get the word out! Please contact these authorities and let’s end this senseless slaughter once and for all.

WAZA: The World Association of Zoos and Aquariums
secretariat@waza.org

AZA: The American Association of Zoos and Aquariums
Media Contact: Rob Vernon (301)244-3352 | Email: rvernon@aza.org

IMATA: The International Marine Mammal Trainers’ Association
info@imata.org

PRIME MINISTER OF JAPAN
Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga
Cabinet Public Relations Office, Cabinet Secretariat,
1-6-1 Nagata-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100 – 8968, Japan

Website: http://japan.kantei.go.jp/index.html
Online comment form #1: https://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/forms/comment_ssl.html

Japanese Embassies Worldwide:
Websites of Japanese Embassies, Consulates and Permanent Missions

List of Embassies and Consulates-General in Japan:
List of Embassies and Consulates-General in Japan

US Embassy in Japan:
William Hagerty IV – Ambassador of the United States to Japan
Telephone: 011-81-3-3224-5000
Fax: 011-81-3-3505-1862
Send E-mail to the U.S. Embassy in Japan

Japan Cabinet Office
Comment/Question for Cabinet Office

Wakayama Prefecture Office, Fishery Division:
E0717001@pref.wakayama.lg.jp
Telephone: +81-73-441-3010
Fax: +81-73-432-4124

Dolphin Base:
Telephone: +81-0735-59-3514
Fax: +81-0735-59-2810

International Whaling Commission (IWC)
The Red House,
135 Station Road,
Impington,
Cambridge,
Cambridgeshire CB24 9NP, UK.
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 233 971
Fax: +44 (0) 1223 232 87
Email: secretariat@iwc.int

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) / Convention on Migratory Species (CMP)
UNEP/CMS Secretariat
Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1
53113 Bonn, Germany
Tel: (+49 228) 815 2401
Fax: (+49 228) 815 2449
Email: secretariat@cms.int

Japan Fisheries Public Content Form:
Contact the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries

US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations:
US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and all donations are tax-deductible as authorized by law.

© 2020 Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project. All Rights Reserved.

Dolphin Project

171 Pier Ave. #234
Santa Monica, CA 90405

https://www.dolphinproject.com/take-action/save-japan-dolphins/

Shopping Amazon this holiday… every purchase you make they will make a donation to the dolphin project

Dolphins learn how to use tools from peers, just like great apes

api.nationalgeographic.com

By Liz Langley 7-9 minutes

PUBLISHED June 25, 2020

Bottlenose dolphins hunt in French Polynesia’s Rangiroa Channel. The marine mammals use two types of tools to find food, a rare behavior in nature.Photograph by Greg Lecoeur, Nat Geo Image Collection

In Shark Bay, Australia, bottlenose dolphinsthat aren’t related have been observed teaching each other a new way to use a tool, a behavior that until now scientists have found only in humans and other great apes.

It’s also the first known example of dolphins transmitting such knowledge within the same generation, rather than between generations. That’s significant, the authors say, because such social learning between peers is rare in nature.

In a practice called shelling, dolphins will chase fish into abandoned giant snail shells on the seafloor, then bring the shells to the surface shake them with their noses, draining the water and catching the fish that fall out.

Dolphin mothers generally teach their young how to hunt: Shark Bay dolphin moms, for instance, teach their offspring sponging, another form of tool use in which dolphins put sponges on their beaks to protect them while foraging among rocks. (Explore our interactive of the tools animals use.).

A Shark Bay dolphin practices shelling, one of only two known examples of tool use in the cetaceans.Photograph by Sonja Wild, Dolphin Innovation Project

“The fact that shelling is socially transmitted among dolphin peers rather than between mother and offspring sets an important milestone, and highlights similarities with certain primates, who also rely on both vertical and horizontal learning of foraging behavior,” senior study author Michael Krützen, an anthropologist at the University of Zurich, said in a press statement.

Though dolphins and great apes have very different evolutionary histories and habitats, they’re both long-lived, large-brained mammals with tremendous capacity for innovation and culture, Krützen says.

Maggie Stanton, a psychologist at Franklin & Marshall College in Pennsylvania, who has studied Shark Bay dolphins and chimpanzees at Tanzania’s Gombe Stream National Park, agrees. One chimp family in Gombe, she notes, may have learned how to use tools to extract ants from a female chimp that joined the community.

Cracking a mystery

In 2007, Krützen launched a study of Shark Bay’s dolphins, identifying more than a thousand individual dolphins over 11 years. During this time, scientists observed shelling 42 times among 19 dolphins. Half of these events occurred after a marine heatwave in 2011, which may have caused a die-off among giant sea snails, leading to more discarded shells on the seafloor. (Read about a new species of dolphin discovered in Australia.)

https://api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/animals/2020/06/dolphins-use-tools-peers-similar-great-apes?__twitter_impression=true

🐬🐬Dolphins by the Dozens 🐬🐬

These dolphins are stolen from the wild and sold to aquariums around the world! Please do not support this cruel to tradition!!

Stolen from the wild

Nearly Extinct Pink Dolphin Gives Birth To Pink Calf

 

lifeinsider.me

Uncommon pink dolphin mother gave birth to a charming infant dolphin. She was named Pinky, and the baby dolphin has been seen in the Calcasieu River in Louisiana. The pink calf was there, as well.

This warm-blooded animal became famous 12 years back. Chief Erik Rue was the first to recognize her. The video of Pinky and her child was posted on Pinky’s Facebook page. The dolphins were swimming before a huge boat in the Calcasieu Ship Channel.

As indicated by specialists, Pinky is a Rare River Dolphin who got the pink shading from an uncommon hereditary change. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) recorded stream dolphins as jeopardized. Its populace is diminishing.

The birth of the calf gives us trust that calves have acquired their mom’s hereditary change which would help in the exertion of expanding the number of inhabitants in uncommon species.

Skipper Rue clarified that the dolphin is pink from its tail to the tip and has red eyes. Its skin is smooth and lustrous.

Pinky isn’t influenced by the earth or daylight however beyond any doubt likes to stay underneath the surface more than other animals.

She’s a fantastic mammal that conveys delight to local people, and visitors love seeing such a superb well-evolved creature.

Bridget Boudreaux spotted Pinky and her calf in the river some a time ago. She saw them swimming and bouncing around. Recognizing the mother and her child was a great encounter for her, and she even requested that the commander stop the vessel so she can see it better.

https://lifeinsider.me/nearly-extinct-pink-dolphin-gives-birth-to-pink-calf/

R.I.P Amity – A Sea World Icon

Black Cove

On Sunday February 10, the news was shared on a cetacean-interest Facebook page that Amity, Sea World Gold Coast’s oldest dolphin had died.  The comments that followed were mostly from people who had known and worked with Amity during their careers, and it was clear that there was a genuine fondness for this captive dolphin.

Amity received her name from the area where she was collected – Amity Banks in Moreton Bay, Queensland.  Estimated to be around 3 or 4 years of age, Amity was  captured sometime in the mid to late 60’s when wild dolphin capture was still legal in Australia.

It is likely that Amity belonged to the resident population in that area, and as a juvenile Australian Humpback dolphin (Sousa sahulensis), she would either have been taken from her mother or would have recently become independent, as calves of this species usually stay with Mums for around…

View original post 235 more words

Dolphin Project 🐬 Protest🐬

IMG_20190202_103444

Come on out and create a noise like no other!

Event information location Scottsdale Arizona…

buff.ly/2WmXqXe#DolphinProject #ThanksButNoTanks

 

Warning Graphic Images: Police Searching For Person Who Carved Name Into Dolphin While At Sea In Spain – Sea Voice News

seavoicenews.com
by Alex Larson

Heartbreaking images show a female dolphins dead body with the name ‘JUAN’ carved into the side of the mammal.

The animal was found washed up on a beach and authorities are now hunting for the individual whom committed the atrocious act.

Credit: Central European News

The carvings as well as several other injuries appear to be have done at sea where the animal perished and later washed ashore in the south-eastern Spanish province of Almeria.

According to Equinac coordinator Eva Maria Moron, “The injuries and the cuts were not done at the beach, it must have happened at sea and the storm has pulled it out of the water.’

Spanish Civil Guard sources told reporters that the Department of Marine Service has been investigating the appearance of other dolphins found dead on the beach for months and that the latest case will be added to the investigation.

Credit: Central European News

Representatives of Equinac added that if anyone does find a dead dolphin on the coastline of Spain, they should immediately notify the authorities and that fishermen whom catch dolphins as a product should be notifying the authorities as well.

They added: “We want to make people aware of the importance of taking care of protected animals, such as marine turtles or dolphins, some people in the fishing industry are against these animals as for example they say that dolphins are eating their fish or breaking their nets and we should be aware of that.”

http://seavoicenews.com/2018/12/18/warning-graphic-images-police-searching-for-person-who-carved-name-into-dolphin-while-at-sea-in-spain/

WAN Exclusive With Marine Animal Rescue Regarding Case of Dolphin Shot In California; $10,000 Reward Offered To Find The Sick Subhuman Who Did It – World Animal News

img_20181204_1423181734627668.jpg

WAN Exclusive With Marine Animal Rescue Regarding Case of Dolphin Shot In California; $10,000 Reward Offered To Find The Sick Subhuman Who Did It

By Lauren Lewis –
November 19, 2018

The heartbreaking discovery of a dead dolphin that washed up on shore off the coast of Manhattan Beach, California, earlier this month continues to raise questions and demand answers.
Most importantly, who is the pathetic individual responsible for killing the innocent dolphin, and what possesses someone to commit such a horrible act of violence.
WAN talked with Peter Wallerstein of Marine Animal Rescue about the “senseless brutality” of the killing, and a $10,000 reward fund that the nonprofit organization has established to help authorities identify and locate the perpetrator, as well as ensure that justice is served.
“There is no reason for anyone to kill a dolphin, especially this way,” Wallerstein, who discovered the bullet wound, told WAN, further noting that the dolphin otherwise appeared to be in good shape.
A 33-year veteran of rescuing marine animals in and around Los Angeles County, Wallerstein explained that his theory of how the dolphin died was confirmed when Dr. Palmer with the Marine Mammal Care Center in Los Angeles found the bullet inside of the deceased marine mammal.
Wallerstein told WAN that he reported the incident to the National Marine Fisheries law enforcement division, the unit that should be investigating the crime, as dolphins are among the ocean mammals protected under federal law.
Jim Milbury of the National Marine Fisheries West Coast office advised WAN this afternoon that the law enforcement division was aware of the situation, he stated that it is the organization’s policy to not comment on the status of investigations.
Don’t let the tragic death of this sentient being be in vein, other dolphins need our help to ensure that justice is served, and to send a strong message that this type of senseless animal cruelty will not be tolerated or treated lightly.
It is imperative that anyone with information about this case contact the National Marine Fisheries Law Enforcement’s Hotline at (800) 853-1964.
Anyone with a tip should also contact Peter Wallerstein of Marine Animal Rescue at (310) 455-2729.
Marine Animal Rescue, which is offering the reward, will forward relevant information received to the National Marine Fisheries Law Enforcement Division to ensure an investigation into this heinous crime.
Donations to help Marine Animal Rescue save the lives of sick, injured or orphaned marine animals including: whales, seals, sea lions and seabirds, can be made Here!

https://worldanimalnews.com/wan-exclusive-with-marine-animal-rescue-reguarding-case-of-dolphin-shot-in-california-10000-reward-offered/

 

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Petition: Stop the dolphin slaughter in Norway before it starts! · Change.org

change.org
Stop the dolphin slaughter in Norway before it starts! · Change.org
Ørjan Jacobsen Fjeldstad started this petition to The Norwegian government and 4 others
2 minutes

The elected officials of the indigenous northern Sami people of Norway has voted unanimously yes to introduce dolphin slaughter to the northern beaches of Norway. Similar to The Cove in Taiji Japan, or the Grindadrap in the Faroe Islands. They start working on how to legalize and implement this practice. With the ultimate goal of getting the Norwegian government on board.

Dolphins live in groups, and the catch of some, leads to damage in the social structure. Inflicting trauma and suffering, and limiting the ability to reproduce. Not to mention the brutality and suffering inflicted over the period of time it takes to kill the dolphins with various tools. The Sami claim dolphin hunt is a tradition worthy of reinstating.

If this were to happen, it would be a tremendous setback to animal welfare and conservation in Norway. It would color the beaches red. The dolphin population would not be safe anymore. And Norway would have dealt another smack in the face to international solidarity. I’m referring to the whaling ban Norway refuses to uphold, despite being a member of the IWC, and losing a vote that ended the legitimacy of commercial whaling in 1982.

We call on the Norwegian government, and relevant ministers to ban delfinfangst aka dolphin slaughter, and make it illegal permanently. And to refuse any future requests of allowing such an unnecessary and barbarically outdated practice to resurface from the depths of the past. Where progress in animal welfare, and human ethics in treatment of animals has made its slow march.

https://www.change.org/p/the-norwegian-government-stop-the-dolphin-slaughter-in-norway-before-it-starts

Breaking! Myanmar Expands Protected Area For 76 Critically Endangered Irrawaddy Dolphins Living In The Ayeyawady River – World Animal News

dnnimagehandler

By WAN –
October 16, 2018

Irrawaddy Dolphins in Myanmar. CREDIT: WCS
Working in collaboration with Myanmar’s Department of Fisheries (DoF), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has announced the creation of a new protected area for a population of critically endangered Irrawaddy dolphins living in the Ayeyawady River of central Myanmar.
Sadly, earlier this year, conservationists counted a total of 76 Irrawaddy dolphins living in the Ayeyawady River between the river towns of Mandalay and Bhamo.
The new 100-kilometer (62 mile) zone will serve as an extension to an existing protected area established in 2005 between the towns of Mingun and Kyauk Myaung in collaboration between DoF and WCS.
“Establishment of the new Ayeyawady Dolphin Protected Area demonstrates the significant commitment of the Myanmar Government to conserve this charismatic species of the Ayeyawady River,” Saw Htun, Deputy Country Program Director, WCS Myanmar Program said in a statement. “WCS will collaborate with all stakeholders on coordinated efforts to save the threatened Irrawaddy dolphins in existing and new protected areas.”
To establish the new protected area, DoF and WCS consulted with over 50 villages along the river. Based on those meetings the protected area status was agreed for a 100 kilometer stretch of the river from Male to Shwegu, with a further 100 kilometers designated as a less restrictive buffer area.
Within the new protected area, use and size of gillnets are restricted to prevent dolphins from getting entangled, sometimes drowning. In addition, other methods like electric fishing and the use of dynamite and gold mining are strictly prohibited along with damage of habitat such as sandbars, grasslands, and vegetation.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-myanmar-expands-protected-area-for-76-critically-endangered-irrawaddy-dolphins-living-in-the-ayeyawady-river/

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Petition: Why Is Peru Illegally Slaughtering 15,000 Dolphins Each Year?

by: Kevin Mathews
recipient: Vice Minister Javier Fernando Miguel Atkins Lerggios

46,140 SUPPORTERS – 50,000 GOAL

A new report by the Animal Welfare Institute finds that over 100,000 cetaceans (dolphins, porpoises and small whales) are intentionally killed each year by fishers so they can be chopped up for bait. This inhumane practice is most common off the coast of Peru, where fishers catch up to an estimated 15,000 dolphins.

These dolphins aren’t just being killed, they’re being brutalized. Once they’re pulled on to the boat, they’re stabbed with harpoons and knives and left to slowly die in agony.

Hunting dolphins is already against the law in Peru, but the lack of enforcement isn’t preventing the fishing industry from carrying on with killing dolphins and the like anyway. Though there have been some initial efforts to fix this problem, it’s going to take a serious commitment from Peru to scare this thriving black market out of existence.

That’s why we’re calling on Vice Minister Javier Fernando Miguel Atkins Lerggios, the man in charge of fisheries and aquaculture in Peru, to commit himself to aggressively

If undercover investigations by conservation groups can discover how prevelant this practice is, surely some government stings can catch the fishing industry in the act, too.

Protect the dolphins, Peru!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/103/306/410/

 

“Dolphins Come Together to Greet Newborn | BBC Earth”

Petition: Someone Shot and Killed a Dolphin and Her Unborn Calf

by: Care2 Team
recipient: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

109,846 SUPPORTERS – 110,000 GOAL
When most people see a dolphin their hearts fill with joy. But not some thug in Mississippi. Instead, according to officials, he pulled out a gun and shot it.

If that wasn’t bad enough, when authorities performed a necropsy on the dead cetaecian, they found that it was pregnant. Neither the mother or unborn calf had a chance of surviving. Now animal welfare organizations are offering a combined reward of up to $11,000 for information that leads to the killer’s arrest.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) — one of the organizations charged with implementing the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) — if caught, the culprit could face up to one year in prison and $100,000 in fines.

Since 2002 — in the Northern Gulf region which includes Mississippi — 24 dolphins have been found dead from human-inflicted injuries including guns, arrows or being impaled.

For some reason, more and more people are finding it “fun” to abuse our protected marine life.

This killer must be caught and brought to justice so our government can make an example out of them. We must make sure animal abusers are held responsible for their crimes.

Sign the petition and tell NOAA support them in their search for the killer of the Mississippi dolphin.
https://www.thepetitionsite.com/481/471/271/someone-shot-and-killed-a-dolphin-and-her-unborn-calf/

 

Petition: Protect Dolphins from Oil Spills

act.oceana.org

Opening the floodgates to dirty and dangerous offshore drilling is a catastrophe waiting to happen, made all the worse by President Trump’s proposal to gut a key safety rule.

The BP oil spill was the most devastating oil spill in our nation’s history and the Well Control Rule was one of the only safety regulations implemented in the aftermath.

We cannot allow the Trump Administration to eliminate this key safety rule right when they are pushing to radically expand offshore drilling in nearly all federal waters. We need more safety, not less.

Tell the Trump Administration and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement: Do not dismantle the Well Control Rule and risk another oil spilling catastrophe.

We need 30,000 people to speak up before the Aug. 6 deadline to stop offshore drilling – make yourself heard.

https://act.oceana.org/page/27224/action/1?locale=en-US

In male dolphin alliances, ‘everybody knows your name’ — ScienceDaily

sciencedaily.com
In male dolphin alliances, ‘everybody knows your name’ — ScienceDaily
Jonathon Goodman,
3-4 minutes

It’s not uncommon in dolphin society for males to form long-lasting alliances with other males, sometimes for decades. Now, after studying bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 7 find that these males retain individual vocal labels rather than sharing a common call with their cooperative partners.

“We found that male bottlenose dolphins that form long-term cooperative partnerships or alliances with one another retain individual vocal labels, or ‘names,’ which allows them to recognize many different friends and rivals in their social network,” says Stephanie King (@_StephanieLKing) from the University of Western Australia. “Our work shows that these ‘names’ help males keep track of their many different relationships: who are their friends, who are their friend’s friends, and who are their competitors.”

In the new study, King and colleagues set out to better understand what role vocal communication plays in coordinating complex social behaviors, including cooperation, in bottlenose dolphins. The researchers knew from years of study that male bottlenose dolphins form long-term cooperative alliances with one another. However, they did not know how these males used vocal signals to form and maintain these relationships.

To explore the role of vocal signals, they recorded the dolphins’ vocalizations using underwater microphones and determined the individual vocal label used by each of the males. They then measured the similarity of those identity signals within and between alliances to find out whether males with stronger social relationships used vocal labels that were more similar.

“We wanted to understand if allied male dolphins converged onto similar calls as a way of advertising their alliance membership, or whether they retained individual vocal labels,” King explains.

The analysis showed that males in an alliance retain vocal labels that are quite distinct from one another, suggesting that those calls serve a purpose similar to an individual name. That’s in contrast to findings in many other species where individuals with close relationships converge on shared vocalizations as a way of advertising their membership to that partnership or group.

“With male bottlenose dolphins, it’s the opposite — each male retains a unique call, even though they develop incredibly strong bonds with one another,” King says. “Therefore, retaining individual ‘names’ is more important than sharing calls for male dolphins, allowing them to keep track of or maintain a fascinating social network of cooperative relationships.”

King says they will now study the males’ relationships with one another more closely. They’ll play the “names” of individual males back to each other and explore how males respond to members of their alliances in different contexts.

“It will be interesting to reveal whether all cooperative relationships within alliances are equal or not,” she says.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180607112756.htm

Story Source:

Materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Petition: Tourist Steals Dying Dolphin From Beach

by: Care2 Team
target: Yangjiang City Police

37,309 SUPPORTERS
40,000 GOAL

As the small dolphin lay suffering on the shore, a man approached. But he didn’t help the beached animal — instead he did something far worse.

The male tourist, dressed only in black swimming trucks, was filmed by shocked beachgoers picking up and throwing the dying dolphin over his shoulder. The man even seems to smile at the horrified onlookers as he walks off with the dolphin slung over his shoulder. He is then seen taking the dolphin to his car and speeding off.

Sign and share this petition to demand that local authorities find this man and charge him to fullest extent of the law for this cruel and illegal act!

The video was taken at Hailing Island off the coast of Yangjiang City in southern China and the unidentified man is still at large. The poor dolphin’s fate is unknown.

In the wild, dolphins are very social and emotionally sensitive animals. Their intelligence has been described by scientists to be on par with great apes and human toddlers. It’s unconscionable that this man would treat this helpless dolphin so cruelly — committing it to a painful death while he callously collects the animal like a souvenir.

Join the global call for Yangjiang City Police to treat this case as seriously as possible. This tourist needs to be found, investigated, and charged for this horrific act of abuse!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/221/043/938/tourist-steals-dying-dolphin-from-beach/

Copyright © 2018 Care2.com, inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved

Justice Must Be Served After Man Heartlessly Carries Stranded Dolphin Off Of A Beach In South China – World Animal News

Justice Must Be Served After Man Heartlessly Carries Stranded Dolphin Off Of A Beach In South China
By WAN – May 4, 2018

Police are looking for a man who was filmed callously carrying a stranded dolphin off of a beach in southern China.
The horrifying footage, taken at popular tourist destination Hailing Island in Guangdong province, was reportedly filmed during China’s three-day labor holiday on May 1st.
According to Channel News Asia, the man picked up the dolphin, which appeared to be lifeless, and swung it over his shoulder before driving away with it in a car.
As per China’s Law of Wildlife Protection, dolphins are one of the species that citizens are not allowed to hunt, kill, sell, or keep, even if the mammals are found dead.
“Dolphins are protected animals in China,” an official stated after the local fisheries bureau launched an investigation. “Whether it is dead or alive, it is wrong to take it away. He should have called the authorities to deal with the matter.”
“Is he going to boil the dolphin,” questioned one person, “This is simply disgusting.”
Local officials have confirmed that the man could face criminal charges for his action.
Could? He absolutely Should!
WAN will continue to update this story as it develops.

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http://worldanimalnews.com/justice-must-be-served-after-man-heartlessly-carries-stranded-dolphin-off-of-a-beach-in-south-china/

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What to Expect From North America’s First Dolphin Sanctuary

azula.com
What to Expect From North America’s First Dolphin Sanctuary
Martha Sorren
4-5 minutes

As more people come around to the idea that cetaceans are animals that deserve freedom and not to be stuffed into tanks for entertainment purposes, a real shift is occurring.
Soon, North America will see its first-ever dolphin sanctuary built — designed to rehabilitate aquarium dolphins in their natural habitat.

According to the Associated Press, the National Aquarium has begun a three-year program designed to get its seven dolphins ready for release into this sanctuary. Fortunately, they just received a major boost from tour company Virgin Holidays, which pledged $300,000 to make this sanctuary a reality.

The AP reported that the years-in-the-making project is in the early stages of shopping potential locations in Florida and, in the meantime, is painstakingly readying the dolphins for the habitat transition.

For example, the aquarium is raising the temperatures of the dolphins’ tanks so that algae will grow and start to emulate the real waters to which they’ll be relocated.

This donation by Virgin Holidays fits right in line with the company’s stance.
Virgin Group, founded by philanthropist Richard Branson, has long been interested in cetacean issues.

TV3, which is owned by Virgin Media, reported that in 2014 the company pledged to stop working with agencies that took captive cetaceans from the wild. In 2017, they ceased to work with hotels and entertainment attractions that housed captive dolphins and whales.

They also teamed up with the World Cetacean Alliance to forge new whale-watching rules that better respect the animals in their natural habitat.
In pledging money to help create a marine sanctuary for these dolphins, Virgin Holidays is propelling the company’s pro-cetacean policies forward to effect change.

The Independent reported that Virgin Holidays’ managing director, Joe Thompson, is hoping to re-shape how people interact with these wild ocean animals. He said the company aims to steer its clientele away from using animals in “theatrical shows” and places an emphasis on tourism that promotes animal welfare.

So helping build a sanctuary would allow tourists to view dolphins as they rehabilitate, rather than perform. Virgin Holidays hopes to have guests witness these animals beginning in 2020, according to the Independent.

But while tourism factors into Virgin Holidays’ hopes for the sanctuary, John Racanelli, CEO and president of the National Aquarium, told the Independent that the aquarium is thinking only about the dolphins at this point. “It’s the driving force behind the why, how and what’s next for this project,” he said.
“Put simply, we place the welfare of the dolphins above all else — science, the public, donors, whatever.”

Plans for the sanctuary are still in development, but TV3 reported that the $10 million to $15 million project is aiming for a site that is 100 times the size of the dolphins’ current tank — putting it at a cool 100 million gallons of water that will allow the dolphins to dive and swim freely.
Per the Independent, the sanctuary will also feature tides, temperature changes and other fish and plants that are native to the dolphins’ natural environment.

It’s a massive undertaking, and it’s not the only one in the works. According to Mother Nature Network, in 2016, a nonprofit called the Whale Sanctuary Project pledged to create a cold-water sanctuary for orcas and beluga whales to be retired to.
As of early 2018, that three- to five-year plan was still in the works.

These sanctuaries would be the first of their kind in North America and would drastically change the options for entertainment facilities’ captive cetaceans.

The tides have long been changing on how humans view sea animals in captivity, so it’s great that the industry is catching up with the times. Hopefully this all goes according to plan, and all seven dolphins can begin to get their lives back in just two short years with the hope of many more joining them in the future.
It’s the very least these magnificent animals deserve.

https://www.azula.com/dolphin-sanctuary-2562469814.amp.html?__twitter_impression=true

Giphy

Petition · Karmenu Vella: Stop the slaughter of common dolphins by the fishing industry in EU waters · Change.org

Thousands of short-beaked common dolphins are being killed by fishing vessels targeting pelagic fish species in EU Waters. This barbaric practice is referred to as ‘bycatch’by the fishing industry. We are calling on Karmenu Vella, the EU Commissioner for Environment Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, to take urgent action to end this cruel and unnecessary mess slaughter of these highly intelligent and much-loved animals.

https://www.change.org/p/karmenu-vella-stop-the-slaughter-of-common-dolphins-by-the-fishing-industry-in-eu-waters?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=10401740&grid_position=1&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAKeZxgAAAAAAWswF7swB7Ws4OTY1MjAxOA%3D%3D

Massive Oil Spill In Borneo, Indonesia, Claims The Lives Of 5 People & An Endangered Irrawaddy Dolphin – World Animal News

BREAKING NEWS
By Lauren Lewis –
April 4, 2018

A dead Irrawaddy dolphin was found washed up on the shore near the oil spill. Photo courtesy of the Rare Aquatic Species Indonesia (RASI).
The Indonesian government issued a state of emergency yesterday following a major oil spill that occurred over the weekend in Borneo, Indonesia.
Tragically, five fishermen and one endangered dolphin have been confirmed dead so far as a result of the spill that occurred on Saturday morning in the Balikpapan Bay, in East Kalimantan province.
This morning, as per an AFP report on Yahoo7, Indonesia’s national oil company Pertamina, which originally denied responsibility, declared that the spill was, in fact, caused by a ruptured pipe that was used for transporting crude oil approximately 25 meters below the sea surface.
The Irrawaddy dolphin, which is listed as endangered on the ICUN Red List, was discovered on the shore near the spill on Sunday evening.
Distributed across the coastal Indian Ocean from India to Indonesia, the Irrawaddy dolphin’s relatively small size, mobile ‘expressive’ head, and ability to spit water when instructed have contributed to the recent rise in their captivity.

u.s.whales.org, Dipani Sutaria
While the toxic spill is believed to be the cause of the dolphin’s death, according to Mongabay, Danielle Kreb, a marine biologist with the non-profit organization Rare Aquatic Species Indonesia (RASI) explained that it would take up to a week before they receive the results of the samples they took from the animal.
A protected species under Indonesian law, killing an Irrawaddy dolphin carries fines and a possible jail sentence.
WAN prays there are no more deaths of people or animals affected by this tragic oil spill.

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,animal welfare organizations,
Dolphin,Endangered Species,Indonesia

http://worldanimalnews.com/massive-oil-spill-in-borneo-indonesia-claims-the-lives-of-5-people-an-endangered-irrawaddy-dolphin/

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