Nevada Passes Bill Banning Animal Testing For Cosmetics

plantbasednews.org
By Liam Gilliver

‘Exciting progress’ (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

Nevada has become the latest state in the US to ban the sale of animal-tested cosmetics but will exempt products imported from China, which by law have to be tested on animals.

The Nevada Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act (SB 197), which was first introduced to state legislators in February, will take effect from January 1, 2020.
‘No longer necessary or acceptable’

Senator Melanie Scheibel, who authored the bill, told Cruelty-Free International: “For more than 50 years animals have been used in painful tests for cosmetics. But science and public opinion have evolved and today it is no longer necessary or acceptable to harm animals for new cosmetics.

“The time has come to make cruel cosmetics a thing of the past and I am proud that Nevada is leading the way.”
Not a ‘total victory for animals’

Animal-rights organization PETA said: “While the new law is certainly exciting progress, we’re not quite ready to call this one a total victory for animals,” while pointing out the exemption of countries such as China.

Nevada follows in the footsteps of California, who passed a similar law against animal-testing earlier this years, that will also come into effect from January 2020.

Click here to check which companies ‘never’ test their products on animals

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https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/nevada-animal-tested-cosmetics-china?utm_source=sumome&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=sumome_shares

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China Approves New Non-Animal Cosmetics Tests After PETA Push

https://features.peta.org/cruelty-free-company-search/index.aspxpeta.org
Published April 3, 2019 by . Last Updated April 4, 2019.

After years of pushing from PETA, the Chinese government has approved two more non-animal methods for testing cosmetics products in China.

The two newly approved tests, the direct peptide reaction assay for skin sensitization and the short time exposure assay for eye irritation, will spare countless animals the agony of having substances dripped into their eyes and rubbed onto their skin.

© iStock.com/Viorel Sims

This major progress is thanks to the groundbreaking work of the expert scientists and regulatory specialists at the Institute for In Vitro Sciences (IIVS), with whom PETA provided initial funding to train Chinese scientists and educate officials in modern non-animal methods.
No animal should be poisoned or blinded for a consumer product—or any other reason.

In 2012, PETA exposed the fact that some formerly cruelty-free companies had quietly started paying the Chinese government to test their products on animals in order to sell them in that country. At the time, animal tests were required for any cosmetics sold in China. PETA immediately contacted the leading experts in the field of non-animal test methods at IIVS and provided them with the initial grant to launch their work in China.

IIVS scientists successfully worked with Chinese officials to approve the first non-animal test method, the 3T3 neutral red uptake phototoxicity assay, which is used to test cosmetics for their potential toxicity when they come into contact with sunlight.

Institute for In Vitro Sciences, China

In 2014, the Chinese government announced that it would accept the results from non-animal test methods but only for non–special use cosmetics manufactured in China. Tests on animals are still required for all imported cosmetics and all special-use cosmetics, regardless of where they were manufactured.
Support Companies that Never Test on Animals

By purchasing only cruelty-free products, you can spare sensitive rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, rats, and other animals from excruciating tests, a lifetime of suffering, and death. Need help finding out which products are cruelty-free? We’ve got you covered: PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies database currently lists more than 3,800 compassionate companies that don’t test on animals anywhere in the world.

http://features.peta.org/cruelty-free-company-search/index.aspx

Breaking! Procter & Gamble Partners With HSI To End Animal Testing For Cosmetics In All Global Beauty Markets By 2023 – World Animal News

By WAN –
February 21, 2019

Today, Procter & Gamble joins the Humane Society International #BeCrueltyFree Campaign, to ban animal testing for cosmetics in all major global beauty markets by 2023.
“We are pleased to partner with the Humane Society International in the quest to end cosmetic animal testing. I’m proud of the passion and expertise our researchers have contributed already to this goal,” Kathy Fish, Chief Research, Development and Innovation Officer of Procter & Gamble said in a statement. “I know they will continue to be a force for good, providing leadership and advocacy to help achieve our shared vision.”
The company also noted that it has “invested more than $420 million over forty years in developing non-animal testing methods.”
The #BeCrueltyFree campaign was launched in 2012 with the aim of extending the European Union’s legal precedent – banning cosmetic animal testing and the sale of newly animal tested cosmetics – to countries where this practice is still allowed or even mandated by law.
P&G’s support for #BeCrueltyFree will include joint education and capacity-building programs for non-animal alternatives, continued development of new animal-free approaches to safety assessment, and advocating for the legislative end of cosmetic animal testing in key global beauty markets.
For over two decades, P&G, HSI, HSUS, and the Humane Society Legislative Fund have collaborated on the development and regulatory uptake of animal-free testing methods. The organizations expect that by bringing their complementary strengths together, they will reach the end goal more quickly. A key focus will be gaining acceptance of new methods by regulators and enrolling many companies and governments globally to adopt cruelty-free public policies and practices.
Dr. Harald Schlatter, P&G Corporate Communications and Animal Welfare Advocacy added: “We’ve invested more than $420 million over forty years in developing non-animal testing methods. Our researchers have led or co-designed at least twenty-five cruelty-free methods that have replaced animal testing of cosmetic products. HSI and the HSUS have been powerful partners in advancing these methods globally.“
“Animal testing of cosmetics not only causes unnecessary animal suffering, but it also represents outdated science. For more than 20 years, we have collaborated with Procter & Gamble to advance the development and regulatory acceptance of non-animal testing approaches, but in order to finally move proposed cosmetics animal testing bans into law in the United States, Canada, Brazil, Chile, South Africa and other influential markets, we need the active support of major industry leaders such as P&G.,” stated Troy Seidle, HSI Vice President for Research & Toxicology. “With the power of P&G’s household brands, I’m confident we can achieve a legislative end to cosmetic animal testing globally within five years.”
P&G’s brands include: Always, Bounty, Charmin, Crest, Dawn, Downy, Febreze, Gain, Gillette, Head & Shoulders, Olay, Oral-B, Pampers, Pantene, Tide, Vicks, and more.
Each move to ban animal testing for cosmetics is an important step forward to ending the cruel and unnecessary practice, everywhere!
In 2018, Social Compassion In Legislation and Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine co-sponsored Senate Bill 1249, the California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act, with the support of Peace 4 Animals and World Animal News.
The historic legislation signed into law last October will make it unlawful for cosmetic manufacturers to sell any cosmetic in California if the final product or any component of the product was tested on animals after January 1, 2020, with some exceptions for regulatory requirements.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-procter-gamble-turns-cruelty-free-for-cosmetics-partners-with-hsi-to-end-animal-testing-for-vanity/

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Coty’s COVERGIRL becomes largest Leaping Bunny certified makeup brand ever | Cruelty Free International

4th November 2018
Coty’s COVERGIRL becomes largest Leaping Bunny certified makeup brand ever

Coty to support a global end to animal testing for cosmetics

Today we are delighted to announce an exciting new partnership with Coty, one of the world’s leading beauty companies, that aims to end animal testing for cosmetics globally.

As a first step in the partnership, Coty has been awarded the Leaping Bunny certification for beauty range COVERGIRL.

COVERGIRL becomes the largest makeup brand to achieve the Leaping Bunny certification. The Leaping Bunny logo will feature on all COVERGIRL products, the best visible and independent assurance for consumers of a company’s commitment to no animal testing.

Michelle Thew, CEO of Cruelty Free International, said: “We’re delighted to partner with Coty to end cruel and unnecessary animal testing for cosmetics worldwide and have been impressed with the company’s passionate commitment. The Leaping Bunny certification of COVERGIRL marks a new milestone in this area as the largest makeup brand to be certified cruelty free after having met our rigorous criteria. It demonstrates how it’s possible to be an accessible and innovative brand without inflicting suffering on animals. We hope today’s announcement encourages more cosmetics companies to do the right thing.”

Ukonwa Ojo, Chief Marketing Officer, Coty Consumer Beauty, said: “Consumers expect brands to be leaders for positive change so today COVERGIRL is taking a stand about making cruelty free cosmetics a mainstream reality. We know we are not alone in wanting a beauty industry that is free from animal cruelty and, working with Cruelty Free International, invite others to join us in turning these conversations into action.”

Coty has already committed to at least one more of its brands being certified with the Leaping Bunny by 2020. Watch this space to find out which brand will be next!

https://crueltyfreeinternational.org/what-we-do/breaking-news/coty%E2%80%99s-covergirl-becomes-largest-leaping-bunny-certified-makeup-brand-ever

© Cruelty Free International

Chemicals in Personal Care Products may Soon Start to be Regulated – Chemical Free Life


https://chemical-free-life.org/2017/05/15/chemicals-in-personal-care-products-may-soon-start-to-be-regulated/

Everything you need to know about eco-friendly toothbrushes | Grist

The moment of tooth
Everything you need to know about eco-friendly toothbrushes
By Ask Umbra® on Oct 31, 2016 5:43 am

Q. Dear Umbra,

Do any 100-percent compostable or recyclable toothbrushes exist outside of boar bristle brushes? I’m trying to eliminate all landfill waste from my bath and cosmetic products, but sticking a pig-tasting brush in my mouth is less than appealing.

Elizabeth L.
St. Paul, Minnesota

A. Dearest Elizabeth,

If I were to write a book about going zero-waste in the bathroom — and from soap to TP to lip balm, there’s certainly enough fodder for one — I’d have to devote an entire chapter to dental hygiene alone. We’d need to cover floss, of course, plus toothpaste, tongue scrapers, and the greenest way to keep one’s grill sparkling-clean. So I’m a bit relieved that you’re asking only about toothbrushes. Those, at least, we can handle in one column.

The gurus over at the American Dental Association recommend that we swap out toothbrushes every three to four months — so each one of us diligent brushers might be tearing through 320 or more of these bristly plastic sticks in our lifetimes. Picture everyone in St. Paul tossing that many brushes into the landfill, and those slim dental tools start to add up, don’t they? So it’s smart to do what we can do reduce such throwaways.

Luckily, Elizabeth, I don’t believe that requires resigning yourself to porcine mouth twice a day. True, boar bristle brushes are indeed an option, and they will biodegrade (unlike the nylon that makes up your standard bristles). I have never used one, but my research has uncovered both positive and negative reviews: It seems some people complain of a “funky” odor, but note that it fades fairly quickly. Perhaps more concerning is the fact that boar bristles are often stiffer than the average toothbrush’s, which can be rough on your enamel. Boar bristles are also usually sourced as a byproduct of the meat industry in China or India, which, depending on your views on animal products, might make this a no-go for you. And then there’s just the plain old gross factor, which sounds like it applies here (hey, I get it).

There is one more type of 100-percent compostable dental tool out there: the chew stick or neem stick. These are literally sticks from the neem tree that you nibble into a bristly tip, carefully use to brush your chompers, then trim before your next brushing session. They sound rather primitive, I know (and indeed, have been used for centuries), but I found one study reporting they’re on par with regular toothbrushes when it comes to removing plaque and other measures of dental health. I haven’t used one of these either, so I can’t endorse ‘em myself. But if you’re truly devoted to your zero-waste goals, they might be something to try. (Talk to your dentist first though, won’t you?)

And if these two totally compostable options are just too odd? That’s OK. We can still reduce our toothbrush-related waste without going that far. And while every little bit counts, I also believe in not sweating the small stuff — and the bristles on your toothbrush most definitely qualify as small stuff. So let’s brush up on a few not-entirely-biodegradable-but-still-eco-friendlier tools.

You can find several toothbrushes with biodegradable handles out there, even if not bristles: A few companies fashion theirs out of bamboo, that quick-growing, light-on-the-land woody grass we environmentalists also like for our sheets, flooring, and bike frames. This bamboo brand has further reduced its plastic content by making its bristles from 62 percent castor bean oil. This company makes its brushes from compostable bioplastic using “leftover plant material from American farms.” Some of these brushes have “binchotan charcoal” bristles, but know that these scrubbers are typically charcoal-infused nylon, which means the bristles are still not biodegradable. When it’s time for a new brush, these companies often suggest ripping out the nylon bristles with pliers before composting the handles — which actually sounds like a nice stress reliever to me.

Then there are the toothbrushes that are recycled and/or recyclable. These guys produce handles from recycled #5 plastic that can be recycled again in some curbside programs (but check with your local recyclers, as not everyone will accept them). This toothbrush is made from recycled yogurt containers, and you can give it new life when you’re done through the Gimme 5 drop-off/mail-in program. Similarly, TerraCycle accepts brushes from Colgate. As we’ve recently discussed, buying recycled stuff when we need to acquire new items helps to support the recycling market, so it’s a smart move.

One more option for you and your pearly whites, Elizabeth: toothbrushes with replaceable heads, which let you keep your handle basically ad infinitum. This one looks like your typical brush, while this one (made of recycled wood and paper) has a certain funky charm, and this recycled aluminum one is pure modernist chic. Bet you haven’t thought about your toothbrush as a style statement before, eh?

Best of luck on your zero-waste journey. It can be a twisty road with many challenges, but I bet you’ll find it worthwhile. In the meantime, I wish you fresh breath and zero cavities.

Oral-healthfully,
Umbra

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Good News! Switzerland Announces It Will End the Sale of Cosmetics Tested on Animals | PETA UK~PETITION

No bunny should suffer for beauty.

Source: Good News! Switzerland Announces It Will End the Sale of Cosmetics Tested on Animals | PETA UK

What Cruelty-Free Beauty Brands Can You Find at Sephora? | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

What Cruelty-Free Beauty Brands Can You Find at Sephora? | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA.

Using apple cider vinegar as a hair treatment

WPMT FOX43

[ooyala code=”03am91cDroMUFq-aHds9MuMEJzAqJA2t” player_id=”b4e1f6aa8f3147189a3fe75aa0a86854″]

There’s something sitting in your kitchen cabinet that has a use as a beauty treatment– apple cider vinegar!
Brandy Wiley from B Wiley Inc stopped by to talk about this interesting hair treatment.

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The Dirty Secrets of Your Nail Salon