Sign Petition: Ban the Use of Asbestos in Cosmetics!

thepetitionsite.com

by: Care2 Team recipient: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Update: Yet another U.S. cosmetics manufacturer, Beauty Plus Global (BPG), has had to recall its products bcause they were contaminated with toxic asbestos. In fact, this is actually the second time in five months that BPG has had to recall its products due to lethal contaminants. It’s time the U.S. FDA gets its act together, takes health seriously, and ban the use of asbestos in cosmetics now! Recently, jewelry and makeup retailer Claire’s Accessories recalled several cosmetic products after a customer raised concerns that they may contain asbestos. Thankfully, Claire’s Accessories was committed to taking the allegations seriously and having an independent lab test the products for asbestos, but how would asbestos get into the cosmetics in the first place? Well, it turns out that, despite its many known health risks, asbestos is not banned from use in cosmetic products. Please sign this petition to change that now. While it is against the law to use any ingredient in a cosmetic that makes the product harmful to consumers when used as directed, asbestos is not specifically included in the list of ingredients prohibited from use in cosmetics. But it absolutely should be. Once asbestos fibers enter the body, they never dissolve and can cause inflammation and permanent changes to the body’s cells. Prolonged exposure to asbestos can cause life-threatening diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and mesothelioma. The U.S. is far behind when it comes to restricting the use of harmful chemicals in personal care products. Whereas the E.U. has banned 1,400 chemicals and Canada has banned 600, the U.S. has banned just 30 harmful chemicals. We need to catch up.

Is Procter & Gamble Cruelty-Free in {2020}?

simpleveganmom.com

Is Procter & Gamble Cruelty-Free in {2020}?


P & G owns many of the household items you use every day. But is
Procter & Gamble cruelty-free or do they test on animals?

Keep reading to learn more.

Is P&G Cruelty Free or Do They Test on Animals?

*This post may contain affiliate links. You can read our dry and boring disclaimer for more info.

Procter & Gamble Animal Testing Policy

Procter & Gamble’s animal testing policy can be found in the policies and practices section of their website. Here is what it says:

“At
P&G, we believe that eliminating animal testing is the right thing
to do. We do not test our products or ingredients on animals anywhere in
the world unless required by law. We are working hard to make it
obsolete. Therefore, we’ve invested more than $410 million in developing
alternative, non-animal testing methods and then getting them accepted
by regulators around the world. Today, we use more than 50 non-animal
alternatives, half of which were invented or co-invented by P&G. We
will continue working with the world’s top independent experts and
partnering with leading animal protection groups such as the Humane
Society of the U.S. to promote new alternatives research and regulatory
acceptance of existing alternatives. This is the only way to eliminate
all animal testing, globally.”

P&G animal testing policy

Does Procter & Gamble Test on Animals?

Yes,
Procter & Gamble does test on animals. They state they don’t test
their products on animals but make the exception to satisfy a country’s
health authorities.

Is Procter & Gamble Certified Cruelty-Free?

No, Procter & Gamble is not certified cruelty-free by Leaping Bunny, PETA, or Choose Cruelty-Free.

In fact, Procter & Gamble is listed on PETA’s list of brands to avoid.

P&G Peta

Is Procter & Gamble Sold in China?

Yes, Procter & Gamble is sold in China. Here is a picture of their Chinese website.

P&G China Website

What Companies Does Procter & Gamble Own?

Below
is a list of brands that are owned by Procter & Gamble. I’ve
indicated the ones that are sold in China and any certified cruelty-free
brands.

The choice is yours on whether to boycott some or
all of Procter & Gamble’s brands. But I would err on the side of
caution for the brands that have no information.

  • Ace
  • Always
  • Ambi Pur
  • Ariel
  • Aussie – PETA CERTIFIED
  • Bounce
  • Braun – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Cascade
  • Cheer
  • Comet
  • Crest – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Dawn
  • Downy
  • Dreft
  • Era
  • Febreze
  • Fixodent
  • Gain
  • Gillette – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Hair Food – PETA CERTIFIED
  • Head & Shoulders – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Herbal Essences
  • Ivory
  • Joy
  • Mr. Clean
  • Native
  • Olay – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Old Spice
  • Oral-B – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Pantene – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Rindex 3en1
  • Safeguard – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Salvo
  • Scope
  • Secret
  • SK-II – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Snowberry
  • Tampax
  • The Art of Shaving
  • Tide – SOLD IN CHINA
  • Venus

Wrap Up: Is Procter & Gamble Cruelty-Free?

No,
Procter & Gamble is not a cruelty-free brand. In their animal
testing policy, they state they do not test on animals. However, Procter
& Gamble chooses to sell in China, a country that requires imported
cosmetics to be tested on animals.

Therefore, Procter & Gamble is not considered to be cruelty-free and will be added to my list of brands that test on animals.

Now
I’d like to hear from you. What are your thoughts about Procter &
Gamble? Will you boycott them completely or use some of their
cruelty-free brands? Please leave your comments below!

📌 PIN IT FOR LATER 📌

Is P&G Cruelty Free or Do They Test on Animals?

Aborted Fetal Cells in Your Coffee Creamer and Wrinkle Cream?

Absolute Truth from the Word of God

Yesterday I read that the scalps of aborted babies are being sold to companies to help find out what causes male pattern baldness. Needless to say, this made me physically sick.  I think that selling the bodies and parts of aborted babies has to be the most wicked and evil thing humans can do.

Do these people have no consciences?

I originally wrote this article in 2016.  I will update information as I am able.

I have been tracking companies for years who have been using the cells of aborted babies in their products. I know this is horrifying and sounds more like something out of a Sci-Fi movie, but I’m sorry to have to tell you that it’s true.

I have been able to get an updated list as of June 2016. Some of the companies have ceased this monstrous practice (I have listed those); although I’m sure it…

View original post 660 more words

How to remove gel nail polish at home without ruining your nails

businessinsider.com
Lilah Nicolaidis
remove gel nail polish Shutterstock A gel manicure is a popular, time-saving procedure that gives you long-lasting, freshly lacquered nails for about two weeks.
But removing gel polish is not as simple as removing regular polish.
It can be damaging to your nails if you don’t take it off properly.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to remove gel nail polish safely and the things you need to do it at home.

Many people love gel manicures. Gel polish’s glossy finish is practically indestructible and that just-left-the-salon look can last for two weeks or more. But eventually, you will notice a tiny chip, and then another and another until you’ve got to remove the polish.

As anyone who’s ever had a gel manicure can confirm, that’s easier said than done. Gel polish is not like regular nail polish. Its ingredients are stronger than your traditional lacquer, which is part of why it’s so resistant to the normal wear-and-tear that destroys your average manicure in a matter of days. Gel polish is also cured under a UV or LED lamp, whereas regular polish sets under less extreme conditions.

Another reality of the gel manicure is that it can weaken your nails. Removing gel polish is not like removing regular polish, either. It takes a few steps whether you choose to go back to the salon or do it at home, and the process can be especially damaging to your nail bed if you try to peel or pick it off yourself. With that in mind (and because we’re trying to save you a few bucks), we’re going to explain how to remove a gel manicure at home.

Here’s what you need to remove a gel manicure:

Nail file: ClassyLady Professional Glass Nail File

Cuticle cream: Deborah Lippman Nail Cuticle Repair Cream

Cotton balls: Jumbo Cotton Balls

Acetone nail polish remover: OPI Nail Polish Remover

Aluminum foil: Standard Aluminum Foil

Wooden nail sticks: Adecco Nail Art Orange Wood Sticks

There are also removal kits available, like this Red Carpet Manicure version and these nail polish remover soak off foils, but these options can be pricier than having your gel polish removed at the salon.

Once you’ve gathered your ingredients, carve out about 30 minutes for the whole process, since you’ll need to soak and file your nails. Find a well-ventilated place, either near an open window or a fan so you don’t breath in too much acetone. Finally, settle in with your favorite podcast and get started.

How to remove gel nail polish at home

File your nails: The point of this step is to gently penetrate the surface of the gel polish so the acetone can soak in more easily. You don’t need to do more than gently sand the surface to remove the shine. We recommend the ClassyLady Professional Glass Nail File.
Protect your skin and cuticles: Acetone is extremely drying, so take the extra time to coat the area around your nails with a thick cream or oil to protect your skin. You don’t need to go overboard, just a drop will do. We like the Deborah Lippman Nail Cuticle Repair Cream.
Soak the cotton balls: Fill a small bowl with OPI’s Nail Polish Remover and soak 10 cotton balls in it.
Wrap your nails in aluminum foil: Tear 10 3-inch squares of aluminum foil, one for each finger. Then take a soaked cotton ball and wrap your fingertips. This can be tricky, so we suggest wrapping your non-dominant hand first to make it easier. Now, sit back and relax for about 15 minutes.
Check your progress: Peek inside one of the foil wrappers. If the gel looks loosened and falling off the nail you’re ready to move on to the next step. If not, wrap the foil back up and wait another 5 to 10 minutes.
Removal: Remove the foil and apply slight pressure to the nail. The gel should slide off easily with the cotton ball, and any residue can be removed with a wooden nail stick. We recommend Adecco’s Nail Art Orange Wood Sticks.
Hydrate your nails: Don’t skip this important step! Your nails will be dry after the gel polish comes off, so wash them, and then either soak them for a few minutes in a hydrating oil or reapply the cuticle cream over your nail beds. The only reason not to do this is if you’re polishing again immediately, but experts suggest giving your nails some time to recover between manicures.

Buy the ClassyLady Professional Glass Nail File on Amazon for $9.96

Buy the Deborah Lippman Nail Cuticle Repair Cream at Sephora for $24

Buy Jumbo Cotton Balls at target for $1.89

Buy OPI Nail Polish Remover on Amazon for $5.65

Buy Standard Aluminum Foil at Target for $2.59

Buy Adecco Nail Art Orange Wood Sticks on Amazon for $5.99

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Find all the best offers at our Coupons page.

https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-remove-gel-nail-polish-at-home?utm_content=buffer08698&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer-insider-twitter

Disclosure: This post is brought to you by the Insider Picks team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com.

Nevada Passes Bill Banning Animal Testing For Cosmetics

plantbasednews.org
By Liam Gilliver

‘Exciting progress’ (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

Nevada has become the latest state in the US to ban the sale of animal-tested cosmetics but will exempt products imported from China, which by law have to be tested on animals.

The Nevada Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act (SB 197), which was first introduced to state legislators in February, will take effect from January 1, 2020.
‘No longer necessary or acceptable’

Senator Melanie Scheibel, who authored the bill, told Cruelty-Free International: “For more than 50 years animals have been used in painful tests for cosmetics. But science and public opinion have evolved and today it is no longer necessary or acceptable to harm animals for new cosmetics.

“The time has come to make cruel cosmetics a thing of the past and I am proud that Nevada is leading the way.”
Not a ‘total victory for animals’

Animal-rights organization PETA said: “While the new law is certainly exciting progress, we’re not quite ready to call this one a total victory for animals,” while pointing out the exemption of countries such as China.

Nevada follows in the footsteps of California, who passed a similar law against animal-testing earlier this years, that will also come into effect from January 2020.

Click here to check which companies ‘never’ test their products on animals

Sign up for our newsletter to get the best of Plant Based News delivered to your inbox weekly.

PBN Academy launches with a selection of simple courses on health and wellness, how to rise a child vegan, reversing type-2 diabetes with diet and more.

https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/nevada-animal-tested-cosmetics-china?utm_source=sumome&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=sumome_shares

China Approves New Non-Animal Cosmetics Tests After PETA Push

https://features.peta.org/cruelty-free-company-search/index.aspxpeta.org
Published April 3, 2019 by . Last Updated April 4, 2019.

After years of pushing from PETA, the Chinese government has approved two more non-animal methods for testing cosmetics products in China.

The two newly approved tests, the direct peptide reaction assay for skin sensitization and the short time exposure assay for eye irritation, will spare countless animals the agony of having substances dripped into their eyes and rubbed onto their skin.

© iStock.com/Viorel Sims

This major progress is thanks to the groundbreaking work of the expert scientists and regulatory specialists at the Institute for In Vitro Sciences (IIVS), with whom PETA provided initial funding to train Chinese scientists and educate officials in modern non-animal methods.
No animal should be poisoned or blinded for a consumer product—or any other reason.

In 2012, PETA exposed the fact that some formerly cruelty-free companies had quietly started paying the Chinese government to test their products on animals in order to sell them in that country. At the time, animal tests were required for any cosmetics sold in China. PETA immediately contacted the leading experts in the field of non-animal test methods at IIVS and provided them with the initial grant to launch their work in China.

IIVS scientists successfully worked with Chinese officials to approve the first non-animal test method, the 3T3 neutral red uptake phototoxicity assay, which is used to test cosmetics for their potential toxicity when they come into contact with sunlight.

Institute for In Vitro Sciences, China

In 2014, the Chinese government announced that it would accept the results from non-animal test methods but only for non–special use cosmetics manufactured in China. Tests on animals are still required for all imported cosmetics and all special-use cosmetics, regardless of where they were manufactured.
Support Companies that Never Test on Animals

By purchasing only cruelty-free products, you can spare sensitive rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, rats, and other animals from excruciating tests, a lifetime of suffering, and death. Need help finding out which products are cruelty-free? We’ve got you covered: PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies database currently lists more than 3,800 compassionate companies that don’t test on animals anywhere in the world.

http://features.peta.org/cruelty-free-company-search/index.aspx

15 Cruelty-Free Lipsticks to Add to Your Makeup Bag! – One Green PlanetOne Green Planet

A good shade of lipstick has the power to brighten your attire look and give you that extra bit of confidence to walk around like the boss you are! to feel good about the lipstick you’re using as well as yourself, it’s best to use cruelty-free products. This way you know that no animals were harmed in order for you to achieve your gorgeous look.💄

To help you out, we put together 15 beautiful cruelty-free lipsticks available on Amazon that you should check out. Some of them might just become your go-to and permanent additions to your makeup bag!🐇

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/lifestyle/15-cruelty-free-lipsticks-to-add-to-your-makeup-bag/

Toxins Aren’t Pretty: Demand Safe Cosmetics | Take Action @ The Breast Cancer Site

thebreastcancersite.greatergood.com
Toxins Aren’t Pretty: Demand Safe Cosmetics | Take Action @ The Breast Cancer Site
2 minutes

I am writing to applaud your championing of the Safe Cosmetics Act, a long-overdue piece of legislation critical to protecting all of us from the dangerous and insidious chemicals we are exposed to every day.

The Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act of 1938 is woefully out-of-date; loopholes in U.S. federal law allow manufacturers to use unlimited amounts of chemicals in their products without requiring testing, monitoring of health effects, or adequate labeling. This is unacceptable, and I am grateful that you recognize the urgent need to regulate an industry with such a far-ranging impact.

The Safe Cosmetics Act (H.R. 2359) you have co-sponsored with your colleagues Rep. Ed Markey and Rep. Tammy Baldwin will give the FDA authority to ensure that personal care products are free of harmful ingredients by phasing out ingredients linked to cancer, birth defects, and developmental harm. It will also create a health-based safety standard system that will protect both consumers and workers in the cosmetic industry, while providing the funding to the FDA it needs to provide effective oversight of a $50 billion industry that is currently self-regulated. Furthermore, not only is this legislation good for consumers and industry workers, it will level the playing field for businesses that are striving to make the safest products.

I commend you for displaying the leadership to sponsor the Safe Cosmetics Act and strongly encourage you to continue efforts to pass this important legislation.

https://thebreastcancersite.greatergood.com/clicktogive/bcs/petition/SafeCosmetics?utm_source=bcs-ta-health&utm_medium=email&utm_term=02242019&utm_content=takeaction-f&utm_campaign=SafeCosmetics&oidp=0x4a568a63ec7cab2cc0a82937

Coty’s COVERGIRL becomes largest Leaping Bunny certified makeup brand ever | Cruelty Free International

4th November 2018
Coty’s COVERGIRL becomes largest Leaping Bunny certified makeup brand ever

Coty to support a global end to animal testing for cosmetics

Today we are delighted to announce an exciting new partnership with Coty, one of the world’s leading beauty companies, that aims to end animal testing for cosmetics globally.

As a first step in the partnership, Coty has been awarded the Leaping Bunny certification for beauty range COVERGIRL.

COVERGIRL becomes the largest makeup brand to achieve the Leaping Bunny certification. The Leaping Bunny logo will feature on all COVERGIRL products, the best visible and independent assurance for consumers of a company’s commitment to no animal testing.

Michelle Thew, CEO of Cruelty Free International, said: “We’re delighted to partner with Coty to end cruel and unnecessary animal testing for cosmetics worldwide and have been impressed with the company’s passionate commitment. The Leaping Bunny certification of COVERGIRL marks a new milestone in this area as the largest makeup brand to be certified cruelty free after having met our rigorous criteria. It demonstrates how it’s possible to be an accessible and innovative brand without inflicting suffering on animals. We hope today’s announcement encourages more cosmetics companies to do the right thing.”

Ukonwa Ojo, Chief Marketing Officer, Coty Consumer Beauty, said: “Consumers expect brands to be leaders for positive change so today COVERGIRL is taking a stand about making cruelty free cosmetics a mainstream reality. We know we are not alone in wanting a beauty industry that is free from animal cruelty and, working with Cruelty Free International, invite others to join us in turning these conversations into action.”

Coty has already committed to at least one more of its brands being certified with the Leaping Bunny by 2020. Watch this space to find out which brand will be next!

https://crueltyfreeinternational.org/what-we-do/breaking-news/coty%E2%80%99s-covergirl-becomes-largest-leaping-bunny-certified-makeup-brand-ever

© Cruelty Free International

PETITION: PETA Asia Exposes Extreme Cruelty in Badger-Brush Industry

You can help stop this…there’s no reason to use animal-hair brushes, especially when there are so many high-quality alternatives available. For the sake of badgers suffering on these farms, please, only buy synthetic brushes. Please continue reading here and sign petition…

https://investigations.peta.org/badger-brush-industry/?utm_source=PETA::E-Mail&utm_medium=E-News&utm_campaign=1018::skn::PETA::E-Mail::Owls%20Skulls%20Cut%20Open%20at%20Johns%20Hopkins::::peta%20e-news&ea.url.id=145586&forwarded=true

Victory! While Virginia Becomes The 4th U.S. State To Pass Anti-Animal Testing Legislation For Cosmetics; Help Us Ensure That California Is Next! – World Animal News

Victory! While Virginia Becomes The 4th U.S. State To Pass Anti-Animal Testing Legislation For Cosmetics; Help Us Ensure That California Is Next!By Lauren Lewis – May 28, 2018

WAN is thrilled that Virginia passed legislation to require that cosmetics and personal care product manufacturers or contract testing facilities use alternative methods to testing on animals.
Virginia became the fourth state in the country to enact this important legislation when Governor Ralph Northam signed HB 1087, which was introduced by Delegate Jennifer Boysko into law.
California, New Jersey, and New York also have such laws in place.
The California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act, SB 1249, was introduced in the California State Legislature by Senator Cathleen Galgiani earlier this year. This important bill would prohibit the sale of animal-tested cosmetics in the state, it is sponsored by Social Compassion in Legislation (SCIL) and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), and supported by Cruelty Free International and Lush Cosmetics.

This ground-breaking legislation would make it unlawful for any cosmetic manufacturer to knowingly import or sell any cosmetic, including personal hygiene products such as deodorant, shampoo, or conditioner, in the state of California if the final product or any component of the product was tested on animals after Jan. 1, 2020. A violation would result in a fine of up to $500 for the first violation and up to $1,000 for each subsequent violation.
WAN and Peace 4 Animals have joined forces with our partner Social Compassion In Legislation, one of the main sponsors of the bill, to help push this important legislation forward and make it the first law of its kind for cruelty-free cosmetics in the state of California.
Twenty-first-century science is rapidly moving away from outdated animal tests and these new cruelty-free cosmetics laws being proposed requires the use of available methods that avoid animal testing or reduce the number of animals used for the testing of products.
Many effective alternatives to animal testing now exist, including 3-D printing, construction of artificial human tissue, and the generation of sophisticated computer programs that can make accurate predictions about chemical safety.
With these sophisticated technologies comes improved and more predictive information on the safety of chemicals and other products.
The new law in Virginia does not apply to testing done for medical research, including testing of drugs or medical devices, nor does it prohibit the use of animal tests to comply with requirements of state or federal agencies.
The new legislation authorizes the Attorney General to bring a civil action to enforce such provision. Any person who violates the law may be subject to a civil penalty of up to $5,000, as well as court costs and attorneys fees.

http://worldanimalnews.com/victory-while-virginia-becomes-the-4th-u-s-state-to-pass-anti-animal-testing-legislation-for-cosmetics-help-us-ensure-that-california-is-next/

You can help support the Cruelty-Free Cosmetic Act and learn more about what you can do to help California become the next state to pass this important legislation by clicking here http://worldanimalnews.com/victory-while-virginia-becomes-the-4th-u-s-state-to-pass-anti-animal-testing-legislation-for-cosmetics-help-us-ensure-that-california-is-next/!

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Chemicals in Personal Care Products may Soon Start to be Regulated – Chemical Free Life


https://chemical-free-life.org/2017/05/15/chemicals-in-personal-care-products-may-soon-start-to-be-regulated/

Petition · Tell Neutrogena to stop all animal testing · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/tell-neutrogena-to-stop-all-animal-testing

Petition · Avon Products: Tell Avon Stop Animal Testing Overseas · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/avon-products-tell-avon-stop-animal-testing-overseas?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=1&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uADgUZwAAAAAAWIgHEj3fxfUwNmZlOTk0Nw%3D%3D

FOUR MILLION Donkeys are Slaughtered Every Year to Make Chinese ‘Miracle’ Youth Serum  | Daily Mail Online

There is no medical evidence to support the belief in its effectiveness.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3930644/Decimation-donkeys-4MILLION-animals-slaughtered-year-make-Chinese-miracle-youth-serum.html#top

Everything you need to know about eco-friendly toothbrushes | Grist

The moment of tooth
Everything you need to know about eco-friendly toothbrushes
By Ask Umbra® on Oct 31, 2016 5:43 am

Q. Dear Umbra,

Do any 100-percent compostable or recyclable toothbrushes exist outside of boar bristle brushes? I’m trying to eliminate all landfill waste from my bath and cosmetic products, but sticking a pig-tasting brush in my mouth is less than appealing.

Elizabeth L.
St. Paul, Minnesota

A. Dearest Elizabeth,

If I were to write a book about going zero-waste in the bathroom — and from soap to TP to lip balm, there’s certainly enough fodder for one — I’d have to devote an entire chapter to dental hygiene alone. We’d need to cover floss, of course, plus toothpaste, tongue scrapers, and the greenest way to keep one’s grill sparkling-clean. So I’m a bit relieved that you’re asking only about toothbrushes. Those, at least, we can handle in one column.

The gurus over at the American Dental Association recommend that we swap out toothbrushes every three to four months — so each one of us diligent brushers might be tearing through 320 or more of these bristly plastic sticks in our lifetimes. Picture everyone in St. Paul tossing that many brushes into the landfill, and those slim dental tools start to add up, don’t they? So it’s smart to do what we can do reduce such throwaways.

Luckily, Elizabeth, I don’t believe that requires resigning yourself to porcine mouth twice a day. True, boar bristle brushes are indeed an option, and they will biodegrade (unlike the nylon that makes up your standard bristles). I have never used one, but my research has uncovered both positive and negative reviews: It seems some people complain of a “funky” odor, but note that it fades fairly quickly. Perhaps more concerning is the fact that boar bristles are often stiffer than the average toothbrush’s, which can be rough on your enamel. Boar bristles are also usually sourced as a byproduct of the meat industry in China or India, which, depending on your views on animal products, might make this a no-go for you. And then there’s just the plain old gross factor, which sounds like it applies here (hey, I get it).

There is one more type of 100-percent compostable dental tool out there: the chew stick or neem stick. These are literally sticks from the neem tree that you nibble into a bristly tip, carefully use to brush your chompers, then trim before your next brushing session. They sound rather primitive, I know (and indeed, have been used for centuries), but I found one study reporting they’re on par with regular toothbrushes when it comes to removing plaque and other measures of dental health. I haven’t used one of these either, so I can’t endorse ‘em myself. But if you’re truly devoted to your zero-waste goals, they might be something to try. (Talk to your dentist first though, won’t you?)

And if these two totally compostable options are just too odd? That’s OK. We can still reduce our toothbrush-related waste without going that far. And while every little bit counts, I also believe in not sweating the small stuff — and the bristles on your toothbrush most definitely qualify as small stuff. So let’s brush up on a few not-entirely-biodegradable-but-still-eco-friendlier tools.

You can find several toothbrushes with biodegradable handles out there, even if not bristles: A few companies fashion theirs out of bamboo, that quick-growing, light-on-the-land woody grass we environmentalists also like for our sheets, flooring, and bike frames. This bamboo brand has further reduced its plastic content by making its bristles from 62 percent castor bean oil. This company makes its brushes from compostable bioplastic using “leftover plant material from American farms.” Some of these brushes have “binchotan charcoal” bristles, but know that these scrubbers are typically charcoal-infused nylon, which means the bristles are still not biodegradable. When it’s time for a new brush, these companies often suggest ripping out the nylon bristles with pliers before composting the handles — which actually sounds like a nice stress reliever to me.

Then there are the toothbrushes that are recycled and/or recyclable. These guys produce handles from recycled #5 plastic that can be recycled again in some curbside programs (but check with your local recyclers, as not everyone will accept them). This toothbrush is made from recycled yogurt containers, and you can give it new life when you’re done through the Gimme 5 drop-off/mail-in program. Similarly, TerraCycle accepts brushes from Colgate. As we’ve recently discussed, buying recycled stuff when we need to acquire new items helps to support the recycling market, so it’s a smart move.

One more option for you and your pearly whites, Elizabeth: toothbrushes with replaceable heads, which let you keep your handle basically ad infinitum. This one looks like your typical brush, while this one (made of recycled wood and paper) has a certain funky charm, and this recycled aluminum one is pure modernist chic. Bet you haven’t thought about your toothbrush as a style statement before, eh?

Best of luck on your zero-waste journey. It can be a twisty road with many challenges, but I bet you’ll find it worthwhile. In the meantime, I wish you fresh breath and zero cavities.

Oral-healthfully,
Umbra

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Cosmetics Industry and Animal Testing

Emilio Cogliani

2016-01-26-1453837513-9515143-_DSC0134_1643542.JPG

Photo by Meredith Lee/HSUS

The announcement that PETA UK has accused nine leading cosmetics brands of breaking European law by selling products tested on animals for the Chinese market is very disturbing, if not surprising.

European Union law bans the sale of any cosmetic product that has been tested on animals in finished form after 2004, as well as cosmetics containing ingredients subject to new animal testing after 2013.

According to PETA, cosmetics brands Benefit, Bliss, Caudalie, Clarins, Clinique, Dior, Estée Lauder and Gucci all sell their products in China, where the law requires pre-market animal testing for all imported cosmetics. There are also reports of Chinese authorities carrying out post-market animal testing on cosmetics already approved for sale, and also requiring companies to carry out additional animal testing for cosmetic ingredients that have not previously been approved for use in China.

There are many beauty companies, including my own

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WATCH: How To Have a Cruelty-Free Face in 30 Seconds | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

It’s easy to leave animal suffering out of your beauty regimen. Just look for these products!

Source: WATCH: How To Have a Cruelty-Free Face in 30 Seconds | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

17 Cruelty-Free, Vegan Dry Shampoos to Save Water, Time, and Energy | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

Have you been waiting for a roundup of vegan dry shampoos? Look no further!

Source: 17 Cruelty-Free, Vegan Dry Shampoos to Save Water, Time, and Energy | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

Best Cruelty-Free Drugstore Shampoos and Conditioners | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

Check out this all inclusive list of the best cruelty-free drugstore shampoos and conditioners.

Source: Best Cruelty-Free Drugstore Shampoos and Conditioners | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

Eva Mendes’ New CIRCA Beauty Line: Fun, Affordable, and Cruelty-Free | Blog | PETA Latino

Eva Mendes’ New CIRCA Beauty Line: Fun, Affordable, and Cruelty-Free | Blog | PETA Latino.

Cruelty-Free Beauty Brands at Walmart | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

Cruelty-Free Beauty Brands at Walmart | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA.

11 Cruelty-Free Vegan Hair Products From Target | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

11 Cruelty-Free Vegan Hair Products From Target | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA.

Target’s Top 12 Cruelty-Free Vegan Makeup Products | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

Target’s Top 12 Cruelty-Free Vegan Makeup Products | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA.

Search for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics: Makeup, Personal-Care Products, & More | Beauty | Living | PETA

Search for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics: Makeup, Personal-Care Products, & More | Beauty | Living | PETA.

#BeCrueltyFree Week: 10 Under $10 for Your Beauty Bag

The Friendly Fig

By now, you all know that the three of us are big supporters of the #BeCrueltyFree campaign. So… you can imagine how excited we were when we were asked to participate in this year’s #BlogForBunnies for #BeCrueltyFree Week!

#BeCrueltyFree Week is a global awareness raising week where everyone joins in to make some noise about cosmetics cruelty, promote fab cruelty-free brands, and tell people about how they can support the campaign to end cosmetics cruelty in our country or globally. I thought now would be a great time to go over some affordable cruelty-free options. It’s NOT hard to #BuyTheBunny!

What’s in your vegan beauty bag? For me, I carry the essentials: lip balm, lip color, blush, liner, concealer, and mascara. If I wanted to go all crazy-Mary-Poppins-style, I would carry nail color, powder, hand lotion, face wipes… the works!! But I like to keep it simple.

We’ve found…

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What Cruelty-Free Beauty Brands Can You Find at Sephora? | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA

What Cruelty-Free Beauty Brands Can You Find at Sephora? | Cruelty-Free Beauty & Cosmetics | Living | PETA.

Save Baby Wild Animals from Abuse

Save Baby Wild Animals from Abuse.

Boycott Birchbox Until They Go Cruelty-Free!

Vegan Lynx

Sign the petition here.

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Using apple cider vinegar as a hair treatment

WPMT FOX43

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There’s something sitting in your kitchen cabinet that has a use as a beauty treatment– apple cider vinegar!
Brandy Wiley from B Wiley Inc stopped by to talk about this interesting hair treatment.

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