The Smallest Feline in the World – A Rusty-Spotted Cat – Katzenworld

The Smallest Feline in the World – A Rusty Spotted Cat He may look like a kitten or even fit in the palm of your hand, but this little male is nearly fully grown. What he lacks in size he makes up for endearing. Young cats are born curious. It is how they learn about […]

Source: The Smallest Feline in the World – A Rusty-Spotted Cat – Katzenworld

Advertisements

The Dog Meat Industry: South Korea’s Dirty Little Secret amid the Winter Olympics – FIREPAW, Inc.

The Winter Olympics is shining a light on a common practice in South Korea that many people outside the country fine reprehensible. Horrific conditions for dogs followed by torturing killings, in order to meet the demands for dishes containing dog meat. The Humane Society International puts the figure at 2.5 million dogs bread and slaughter every year as food for South Koreans, who believe that dog meat has special medical properties. Reports from inside reveal that family pets also end up on dinner plates.

https://firepaw.org/2018/02/07/the-dog-meat-industry-south-koreas-dirty-little-secret-and-the-winter-olympics/

POV Footage Shows Polar Bears Struggling to Find Food | National Geographic

Rats exchange goods and services using human tit-for-tat rules – FIREPAW, Inc.

https://firepaw.org/2018/02/02/rats-exchange-goods-and-services-using-human-tit-for-tat-rules/

PLEASE SHARE THIS ALERT WITH EVERONE YOU KNOW!!!


Check out World Animal News (@WorldAnimalNews): https://twitter.com/WorldAnimalNews?s=09

A Lion and Tiger Attack Show Horse at a Chinese Circus

(warning graphic video) The horse survives this attack, but you can clearly see the horse was shook up….the handlers were totally unprepared for such an attack, it could have been much worse. There’s no excuse for this anywhere in the world!

(@WorldAnimalNews): https://twitter.com/WorldAnimalNews?s=09

Dogs lick their mouths in response to angry humans, say scientists – FIREPAW, Inc.

Fellow humans may look alarm or move away when you show anger, but your dog will likely lick his mouth. Researchers trying to determine whether dogs truly had an understanding of human emotion discovered that yes, indeed they do – and they are consistently demonstrate that understanding by licking their mouths when human express anger.

https://firepaw.org/2018/01/13/dogs-lick-their-mouths-in-response-to-angry-humans-say-scientists/

Brain Surgery Helps a Rescued Fur Seal | National Geographic – YouTube

“Rescued Bear With Amputated Paws Learns to Walk Again” National Geographic

Rudolph the Red Nosed Radiation Bioindicator: Radioactive Cesium, Radioactive Carbon, Radioactive Water and More Lethal “Gifts” Left by the Nuclear Industry | Mining Awareness +


https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2015/12/21/rudolph-the-red-nosed-radiation-bioindicator-radioactive-cesium-radioactive-carbon-radioactive-water-and-more-lethal-gifts-left-by-the-nuclear-industry/

Dogs Are Berainier Than Cats New Study Finds

Dogs Are Brainier Than Cats!
A new study has some ammunition for dog people everywhere.

The research, published in the journal Frontiers of Neuroanatomy, says dogs may be brainier than cats. That is, dogs have cerebral cortexes with twice as many neurons — the brain cells responsible for thought, planning and behavior – compared to cats. Scientists have associated neuron density with overall cognitive ability – i.e. intelligence.

For the study, a group of researchers led by Suzana Herculano-Houzel, an associate professor of psychology and biological sciences at Vanderbilt University, examined the neuronal density and brain sizes of various carnivorans, a class of mammals that includes many predators – along with some omnivores and and a few herbivores. These animals are of particular interest, according to the paper, because many must outsmart prey to survive, potentially pointing to a higher number of neurons, and thus higher intelligence.

To learn more, the researchers examined the brains of eight mammals: cats, dogs, bears, lions, hyenas, ferrets, mongoose and raccoons. They found that the animals with larger brains also tended to have more neurons, just like non-carnivorans — a similarity that suggest carnivorans aren’t so different from the rest of the animal kingdom, after all.

The results were marked. In addition to dogs’ cortical neurons outnumbering cats’ — to the tune of 530 million to 250 million — they discovered that brown bears had only as many neurons as cats, despite the obvious size difference. Raccoons, on the other hand, had far more neurons than their small brain size would suggest.
A golden retriever that was studied had the most cortical neurons of all, with 627 million.
However, even the researchers admit that their findings shouldn’t resolve the old dogs-versus-cats debate over intelligence.

“While our finding of larger numbers of cortical neurons in dogs than in cats may
 confirm anecdotal perceptions of dog owners and animal trainers as well as unpublished reports that dogs are easier to train and therefore ‘more intelligent,’ cat owners would probably protest, and rightly so,” they write.
“Any argument about their cognitive capabilities at this point will be largely a matter of opinion until direct, systematic comparisons of cognitive capacity are performed across these and other species.”

http://people.com/pets/dogs-smarter-cats/#ampshare=http://people.com/pets/dogs-smarter-cats/

© 2017 Time Inc. All Rights Reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy (Your California Privacy Rights).

Thanksgiving Day In America – 2017

Shepherding All God's Creatures

It’s that time of year again when America celebrates the Thanksgiving Day Holiday. Wherever you are celebrating this day, make it a humane celebration especially when it comes to what we put on our plates!

We are reposting an article we published in 2015.  Enjoy!


During this Thanksgiving Holiday, what are you thankful for?  Even if you are not from America, celebrate this day with us!  Let’s all give pause to stop – and think about what is really important in life.  The answers will vary greatly, depending on many factors, including where we happen to live on the planet.   Let’s also, as we are pausing, think about life itself – the gift that it is.

“…whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things.”  Philippians 4:8

View original post 693 more words

A.G. Schneiderman And Suffolk Police Commissioner Timothy Sini Announce Takedown Of Major Dogfighting Ring | New York State Attorney General

A.G. Schneiderman And Suffolk Police Commissioner Timothy Sini Announce Takedown Of Major Dogfighting Ring
“Operation Bloodline” Results In Rescue Of 36 American Pit Bull Terriers, Three Felony Arrests For Breeding And Training For Profit

SUFFOLK COUNTY – Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman and Suffolk County Police Commissioner Timothy Sini today announced the takedown of a major dogfighting ring in which the defendants are alleged to have actively engaged in breeding and training American Pit Bull Terriers (“Pit Bulls”) for profit. The investigation, dubbed “Operation Bloodline,” resulted in the rescue of 36 pit bulls and three felony arrests.

“Dogfighting is an obscenely vicious and cruel form of animal abuse that tortures animals and endangers the safety of the public. It’s barbaric, despicable, and illegal,” said Attorney General Schneiderman. “No animal should be forced to fight to the death for human entertainment and profit, or bred and trained for that purpose. We’re committed to ending this vicious blood sport, and will continue to hold abusers accountable.”

“The Suffolk County Police Department will continue to seek out such depraved individuals who have the mistaken belief they have the right to beat, maim and murder innocent animals,” Suffolk County Police Commissioner Timothy D. Sini said. “There is no place in our county or society for such inhumane acts of abuse towards any animal and especially for profit. Our department is committed to seek out perpetrators involved in dog-fighting and animal cruelty and to work with our state and local law enforcement partners to bring charges to the fullest extent the law allows. And I especially thank Attorney General Schneiderman for his leadership on this important issue.”

The Attorney General’s Organized Crime Task Force and the Suffolk County Police Department were assisted in their investigation by the New York City Police Department’s Animal Cruelty Investigation Squad (“ACIS”), as well as the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), which offered their expertise in evidence collection and the removal and sheltering of the rescued animals, and the Town of Babylon Department of Environmental Animal Control (DEAC), which also provided shelter for some of the rescued animals.

Beginning in March 2017, the Attorney General’s Organized Crime Task Force (OCTF) and the Suffolk County Police Department (SCPD) launched “Operation Bloodline” following reports of dogfighting on Long Island. 

Beginning on September 28th and continuing through yesterday evening, investigators executed search warrants at two Suffolk County locations: 38 Birch Street and 135 Irving Avenue, both in Wyandanch, seizing evidence and rescuing the 36 pit bulls (ranging in age from one week to seven years). Prosecutors allege that the dogfighting ring had been operating at those locations and elsewhere in Suffolk County since at least March, when they first began the investigation.
Richard Davis, 34, of 38 Birch Street, Martin Newkirk, 49, of 135 Irving Avenue, and Taikeem Wheeler, 26, of 165 N. 26th Street, in Wyandanch were arrested yesterday and arraigned today on complaints charging each of them with multiple felony offenses of Prohibition of Animal Fighting in violation of New York State Agriculture and Markets Law §351(2)(b), Conspiracy in the Fifth Degree, and other Animal Cruelty crimes. The defendants are alleged to have each operated a so-called kennel that actually served as staging ground for the dogfighting ring: Davis operated the Roll Right Kennel on Birch Street; Newkirk operated the Rise ‘n’ Shine Kennel on Irving Avenue; and Wheeler operated the Across the line Kennel on North 26th Street. 

“Dog fighting is a barbaric act that exploits the trusting nature of innocent animals and condemns them to a life of violence and suffering for human profit,” said Matt Bershadker, president and CEO of the ASPCA. “We are thankful for our partners in prosecution and law enforcement for continuously increasing their commitment to eradicating this inhumane blood sport, which tragically persists in the dark corners of our society.”
As a result of this investigation, 14 pit bulls were rescued from Davis’ 38 Birch Street home; over 20 pit bulls were rescued from Newkirk’s 135 Irving Avenue home; and two pit bulls were rescued from Wheeler’s 165 N. 26th Street home. Over half of the dogs rescued are puppies.

All 36 of the pit bulls were found virtually imprisoned in deplorable conditions, often tethered to heavy chains and segregated from one another, with no visible food or drinkable water, and with injuries consistent with earlier fights. One had an untreated broken front leg and another was significantly underweight. Virtually all of the adult pit bulls had fleas, dirty coats, and long claws, evidence of their solitary life on hard ground and indications of rarely having ever been walked. The majority of the pit bulls were found with numerous bite wounds that left scars; none appear to have been treated by a veterinarian. 

While veterinary medical supplies were seized at each of those premises, no veterinary records were located at either location, as dogfighters themselves usually treat their dogs’ injuries as not to arouse suspicion of their illicit dogfighting activities. Almost all of the pit bulls seized pursuant to the search warrants had been isolated from one another; they were tethered to heavy chains, were singularly crated, and/or were segregated in their own kennel. These past injuries and conditions are indicative of training pit bulls to engage in dogfighting, in part, by severely limiting their ability to socialize with other pit bulls unless they are engaged in a fight or breeding. Additionally, prior to the actual fight, owners often engage pit bulls in a ten-minute “bump” or “roll” in order to test a younger dog to see if it is a “game dog.”
Police recovered numerous items of dogfighting paraphernalia at 38 Birch Street and 135 Irving Avenue that demonstrate the sophistication of the alleged training and breeding of these dogs by Wheeler, Davis, and Newkirk. Those items include bloody breaking sticks (which are designed to separate pit bulls when one’s jaw becomes latched in a grip on its opponent while engaged in dogfighting), as well as numerous heavy chains, double-thick dog collars, weighted dog vests, treadmills, and performance-enhancing dietary supplements. These items are often used to build strength in a pit bull’s neck and shoulders, to control its weight, and to increase its endurance and stamina, as a dogfight to the death can last longer than an hour.

Dog fighters often make their money by selling dogs from strong “bloodlines,” descended from other successful fighters. Many of the pit bulls rescued in this case were of the RedBoy, Jeep, and Beast bloodlines, which are well-known bloodlines that dogfighters attempt to pass on through breeding, for the sole purpose of developing future pit bulls that are aggressive and willing to engage in dogfighting. Several were infected with a red blood cell parasite known as Babesia gibsonii, which is substantially more prevalent in fighting pit bulls.

Unfortunately, two of the dogs had to be euthanized because they had been attacked by their mother. A third dog, named Sophie, had been so abused and tortured that the ASPCA determined that she had become a threat to humans and had to be euthanized as well. Wheeler allegedly touted Sophie’s prowess as a dogfighter, citing her bloodline as the daughter of one of his other pit bulls who had won multiple fights.

The rest of the dogs are currently being sheltered by the ASPCA in order to allow them to heal and hopefully be retrained and adopted.
Dogfighting is a crime in all 50 states. In New York, dogfighting and the breeding and training of dogs for that purpose are felonies, and each charge carries a maximum penalty of four years in jail and a fine of $25,000. Breeders of pit bulls sell the offspring of fighting pit bulls for upwards of $1,600 per puppy. The fights themselves are often to the death, with owners and spectators placing bets on the outcomes.

In May 2013, the Attorney General announced his Animal Protection Initiative, which included the goal of shutting down underground animal fighting rings across the state. New Yorkers can provide anonymous tips about potential animal fighting rings or report animal abuse by calling 1-866-697-3444. For more information on Attorney General Schneiderman’s Animal Protection Initiative, visit http://www.ag.ny.gov/animals. 

The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.
This case was investigated by OAG OCTF Investigator Derek Stevens, under the supervision of Supervising investigator Paul Grzegorski and Deputy Chief Christopher Vasta and Chief Dominick Zarrella, as well as SCPD Detective Philip Alvarez, under the direction of Police Commissioner Timothy Sini. The case is being prosecuted by OCTF Assistant Deputy Attorney General Thomas Luzio, under the direct supervision of OCTF Deputy Diego Hernandez. Deputy Attorney General-In Charge Peri Alyse Kadanoff runs the Organized Crime Task Force.
Attorney General’s Press Office: (212) 416-8060

nyag.pressoffice@ag.ny.gov

© 2017 NEW YORK STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL. All rights reserved.

Fur free Friday New York City November 24th

CAAF
Group

Caring Activists Against Fur works with the aim of creating awareness of a very sensitive, yet often unacknowledged, issue: the fur trade industry disregards everything but profit.

Innocent furry animals are slaughtered senselessly, often by people who showcase complete disregard and lack of respect for an animal’s life. Unfortunately, these creatures do not have a voice of their own and cannot speak to defend their right. This is why Caring Activists Against Fur works to educate, engage and spread the word about the horrors of the fur trade.

The battle against the fur industry still rages on!

Find out more about CAAF’s activities as well as info on the protest schedule and other media!

Donate to our billboard campaign! https://www.gofundme.com/lets-get-more-fur-billboards-up

NY/NJ 2017-18 Fur Protest Schedule!

http://www.caafgroup.com
You MUST check http://www.caafgroup.com for weather-related changes and confirm everything is set & join facebook group: Caring Activists Against Fur or “NYC Animal Rights” or “FAUN” on http://www.meetup.com

WHERE: Steven Corn Furs, 358 NJ Route 17 North, Paramus, NJ, 07652-2906.
WHEN: Saturday, November 11th, 2017.
TIME: 1:00 ~ 2:30pm. https://www.facebook.com/events/1926941320890355/?active_tab=about

Sundays, Nov. 12 & 19th – The Fur Source – 3 West 57TH NYC – Sponsor: The Animals Battalion – “NYC Animal Rights” on http://www.meetup.com for information.

FUR FREE FRIDAY 2017 (Nov. 24th)
Macys 151 West 34th St. NYC
​1:00 – 3:00pm (with march around Herald Square at 2:00)

https://www.facebook.com/events/719180241601303/

Thank you to all activists who are speaking up for fur bearing animals! The battle against the fur industry still rages on….

Email:
information@caafgroup.com

Telephone:
1-201-927-3617

Other Animal Rights Groups to Reference:

NYC Animal Rights:

NYC Animal Rights

New York, NY
2,947 Animal Voices

Next Meetup

The Animals’ Battalion vs The Fur Source of New York

Sunday, Nov 19, 2017, 1:00 PM
6 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

FAUNNJ:

Friends Of Animals United NJ/NY (FAUN)

Pennington, NJ
386 Friends Of Animals

FAUN is a coalition of New Jersey and New York-based animal/earth liberation activists who are bound by the twin objectives of exposing and working against the perpetrators of…

Next Meetup

Fur Free Friday – NYC (Day After Thanksgiving)

Friday, Nov 24, 2017, 1:00 PM
3 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

Copyright © 2014 CARING ACTIVISTS AGAINST FUR (CAAF) Power by IPOWER
Version: Mobile | Web

Why do Cats Knead? 7 Interesting Reasons You Should Aware Of – Katzenworld


https://katzenworld.co.uk/2017/11/08/cats-knead-7-interesting-reasons-aware/#comments

Puppy Almost Dies After Ingesting Opioid On Walk ~ News video | Care2 Causes


http://www.care2.com/causes/puppy-almost-dies-after-ingesting-opioid-on-walk.html

Is a Dog’s and Cat’s Mouth Cleaner Than a Human’s? Get the Facts. National Geographic


https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/10/dogs-cats-clean-licking-bacteria-health-science/?google_editors_picks=true

Dolphins’, Whales’ Cultures and Societies are Human-like

A new scientific study has demonstrated what many have suspected for decades: dolphins and whales have complex cultural and societal communities that mimic those of humans, including working togeth…

Source: Dolphins’, Whales’ Cultures and Societies are Human-like

Predictably, Las Vegas Shooter Had a History of Violence to Animals | PETA

Predictably, Las Vegas Shooter Had a History of Violence to Animals
Written by PETA | October 4, 2017

As our nation recoils from the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, familiar new details are emerging about the shooter, Stephen Paddock.

The man suspected of killing 59 people and injuring more than 500 at a country music festival in Las Vegas reportedly had a history of verbally abusing his girlfriend and killing animals. Employees at a Starbucks in Mesquite, Nevada, that Paddock frequented with his girlfriend, Marilou Danley, told authorities that he regularly berated her in front of them and was “mean” and “rude” to her. According to news reports, he was also a “hunting enthusiast” and held licenses both to hunt and to fish.

Study after study has confirmed the link between killing animals and committing violent acts against humans. According to statistics compiled by a researcher at Yale University, 80 percent of convicted violent criminals have a history of hurting or killing animals. One study found that people who abuse animals are five times more likely to commit violent crimes against humans. And according to a New South Wales newspaper, a police study in Australia revealed that “100 percent of sexual homicide offenders examined had a history of animal cruelty.”

The majority of inmates on death row at the San Quentin State Prison, according to the warden, first “practiced” on animals. The American Psychiatric Association identifies such crimes as one of the diagnostic criteria for conduct disorders, and the FBI uses reports of cruelty to animals when gauging the threat potential of suspected and known criminals.

Perhaps noted theologian, missionary, and philosopher Albert Schweitzer summed it up best: “Anyone who has accustomed himself to regard the life of any living creature as worthless is in danger of arriving also at the idea of worthless human lives.”

In gory photos and social media posts, hunters glorify domination, violence, and bloodshed. If they feel a rush of power the first time they kill a rabbit, bird, or other small animal, they often develop a craving to pursue bigger and bigger “prey” in order to achieve the same psychological effect.

Not all hunters go on to gun down humans, but stalking defenseless victims and violently killing them for “sport” is so egregious and the suffering inflicted is so extreme that we have to wonder whether exposing emotionally disturbed people—as Paddock obviously was—to such cruelty has the potential to destroy their capacity for empathy.

We may not be able to stop all violence, but we can object to the senseless slaughter of living beings for “fun” and “entertainment” in an effort to save more members of all species.
https://www.peta.org/blog/predictably-las-vegas-shooter-had-a-history-of-violence-to-animals/
PETA.org

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
501 Front St., Norfolk, VA 23510
757-622-PETA (7382)
757-622-0457 (fax)
PETA is a nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) corporation (tax ID number 52-1218336).

Hopefully they Won’t Breed and Produce MORE Psychopaths


Check out @Protect_Wldlife’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/Protect_Wldlife/status/914040603381567493?s=09

“Be Their Voice”


Check out @worldanimalday’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/worldanimalday/status/915592892256849921?s=09

  “God Bless All Our Animals”


Check out @crawfords15’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/crawfords15/status/915548639954599936?s=09

  “Today is World Animal Day”


Check out @medez77’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/medez77/status/915513193375682560?s=09

“Today Is World Animal Day” 


Check out @Protect_Wldlife’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/Protect_Wldlife/status/915494541003755520?s=09

‘Where’s the tranquilizer gun?’ Outrage as young bomb-detector dog shot dead at airport — RT Viral

The killing of a young trainee bomb-detector dog that caused flight delays at Auckland Airport in New Zealand has sparked outrage on social media. People are questioning why the animal wasn’t simply tranquilized.

Source: ‘Where’s the tranquilizer gun?’ Outrage as young bomb-detector dog shot dead at airport — RT Viral

The Winds of Change Bring Peril for Bats – Defenders of Wildlife Blog


Defenders of Wildlife Blog
14 September 2017
The Winds of Change Bring Peril for Bats
Posted by: Pasha Feinberg

Wind power is on the rise and with it is an uptick in bat deaths.

Developing renewable energy is critical to minimizing greenhouse gas emissions and reducing climate change. Wind energy is an important source of American renewable energy and the success of this industry is crucial to our green energy future. However, like all energy types, wind energy is not without its challenges. In the early 2000s, researchers realized that wind turbines were killing bats at record rates.
A Fatal Attraction

Findings from the last decade reveal that wind turbines kill more than half a million bats each year in the United States. The overwhelming majority of the bats killed are migratory bats that are not affected by white-nose syndrome, the pathogenic fungus causing precipitous declines in hibernating bat species.

Wind turbine blades disproportionately strike these migratory bats as they pass through wind farms to forage or migrate. It’s unclear why there are so many collisions, but bats are well-known to be curious creatures and have been documented to change course to check out turbines. Although there’s no scientific consensus on why bats are attracted to turbines—theories range from mistaking turbines as trees for roosting, to seeking out insect prey that congregate near turbines—this behavior puts them at increased risk for collision with the spinning blades.
Bat Numbers Give Us Cause for Pause

As more information becomes available about the interaction of bats and wind energy production, scientists are growing increasingly concerned. Bats are long-lived mammals (many bats live more than a decade, and at least one Brandt’s bat lived for 41 years!) that reproduce slowly, meaning that bat populations are very sensitive to losses of breeding-age adults.

A recent study led by UC Santa Cruz professor Winnifred Frick, whose findings were published in Biological Conservation earlier this year, set out to identify whether mortality from wind turbines could cause bat populations to decline. Professor Frick and her colleagues focused on the bat species most commonly killed by wind turbines: the hoary bat.

Hoary-Bat-Jens-Rydell

The  hoary bat, named for its silver-tipped fur that resembles hoar frost, is a wide-ranging, migratory bat found throughout the United States, into Mexico and Canada. Hoary bats are solitary animals, spending their days roosting in trees until sunset. As it gets dark, these charismatic critters emerge to feed, foraging over great distances as they search for moths and other insects.

Unfortunately, hoary bats seem particularly susceptible to wind turbines, representing over a third (38 percent) of all bats killed at wind energy facilities. Professor Frick and her colleagues sought to determine whether the high mortality rate for hoary bats at wind facilities was sustainable.

Their results were alarming. According to the best available estimates for population size and growth rate, they projected hoary bat populations would decline by 90 percent in the next 50 years due to mortality at wind turbines. If wind energy development continues at expected rates and nothing is done to decrease bat mortality, the fate of the hoary bat will only become more dire.

Unfortunately, the hoary bat is not alone in facing such a bleak future – other migratory bat species may also be at risk. While hoary bats are the hardest hit bat species, other species of migratory bats are also frequently killed by wind turbines. Hoary bats, eastern red bats, and silver-haired bats collectively account for almost 80 percent of all bats killed at turbines. Future research is needed to determine whether there are population-level impacts to eastern red bats and silver-haired bats from wind energy.
What Can Be Done?

Fortunately, there are techniques that the wind industry can adopt so that we do not have to choose between wind energy and these important bat species. Wind industry leaders have stepped up and are proactively working with researchers and government agency staff to create technological solutions to overcome these bats’ fatal attraction to turbines. Technologies to deter bats from approaching turbines, such as playing high frequency noises, lighting the blades with ultraviolet light, using textured turbine coatings, are in development and being tested at pilot sites. We are optimistic that these technologies will be commercially available within the next five years or so, but continued funding and research are needed.

Until these technologies are available, operational changes, such as “feathering” turbine blades so that they don’t spin at low wind speeds (when bats are most active) during important migration periods, can drastically reduce bat deaths. These operational changes can be adopted immediately, but they come with a catch: they reduce the amount energy being produced from each turbine.

It’s not that wind facility operators don’t want to do the right thing–most are aware of the problem and want to minimize bat kills. However, until there is industry-wide adoption, any wind facility that does implement operational curtailment (by strategically feathering turbine blades) is at a competitive disadvantage because it would be producing less energy than a comparably-sized facility that’s not endeavoring to protect bats. In addition, some facilities are contractually obligated to produce a certain amount of energy that leaves little room for seasonal curtailment to protect bats.

If wind facilities trying to protect bats go out of business, that’s a losing scenario for both wildlife and the climate. Thus, saving these bats can’t solely rest on industry – energy consumers need to value wind operators who take measures to protect bats.

It’s a rare opportunity to be able to protect a species before it’s on the verge of extinction, but in order to do any good, we must act swiftly. Allowing hoary bat numbers to continue to decline at a precipitous rate isn’t just bad for bats, it’s bad for industry, too. Protecting bats through preventative solutions available to us now will help keep these species off the Endangered Species List, at which point options may be limited to more expensive conservation measures.
Unlike Vampires, Bats Don’t Live Forever (Plus Vampires are Fake)

Time is of the essence and we cannot afford to delay action. The wind industry, conservation organizations, academia, government, and energy users need to work together to find solutions. Defenders of Wildlife is fully committed to a strong wind energy future while conserving bats. We are working to educate corporate buyers about the importance of purchasing wind energy from responsible operators, while simultaneously advocating for federal, state, and private investment to advance and commercialize technical solutions to reduce the industry’s impacts on wildlife. Tackling this issue now is critical to securing a strong future for the wind energy industry and bats.

Follow us on social media to stay up-to-date on the latest developments concerning wildlife from Capitol Hill and other news important our work. Don’t forget to sign up for our emails where you will get all the latest news and action alerts to support wildlife.
145
Pasha Feinberg, Renewable Energy & Wildlife Research Associate
Pasha Feinberg is a research associate for the Renewable Energy and Wildlife team, providing scientific research in support of the team’s efforts to ensure that renewable energy development does not occur at the expense of wildlife. Prior to joining Defenders, Pasha earned her B.S. and M.S. in environmental science from Stanford University and conducted ecology research in Mexico, Australia, Tanzania, Kenya, and the United States to better understand the relationships between biodiversity, human health, and other ecosystem functions and services.
Categories: Bats, bats, hoary bats, Living with Wildlife, Renewable Energy, renewable energy, wind power, wind turbines

http://www.defendersblog.org/2017/09/winds-change-bring-peril-bats/

Your weekly roundup of wildlife news from across the country.
1130 17th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036

1-800-385-9712

©2017 Defenders of Wildlife

The Animals of Natural Disasters – FI weREPAW, Inc.

animals-in-natural-disasters

The Animals of Natural Disasters
firepawincSeptember 16, 2017Uncategorized

Natural disasters like the recent hurricanes can take a terrible toll on animals–and their humans…’In 1999, Hurricane Floyd caused 2.9 million pet and livestock deaths, and thousands more owners lost their pets. The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina was particularly devastating. The Louisiana SPCA estimates that 15,500 animals required rescue, and that 80-85 percent of these animals were never reunited with their owners.’ The big question: What measures are in place to help prevent death, injury and separation of animals in natural disasters? And, what can we do to improve the odds?

What happens to Rex and Kitty after a natural disaster?

The ASPCA conducted the first ever nationwide assessment of emergency response capabilities for animals, the results of which were reported in Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in an article entitled, “The National Capabilities for Animal Response in Emergencies (NCARE) Study: An Assessment of US States and Counties.” This survey of officials who oversee emergency preparedness in US States and counties — led by Vic Spain, DVM, PhD, veterinary epidemiologist for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) — investigated which American communities are prepared to deal with the animal victims of an emergency and how and where emergency response planning can be improved.

The results of the study were mixed — much progress has been made, but there is still much to be done. Most states and about half of high-population cities and counties had organizational infrastructure for managing animals in a disaster, such as a State or County Animal Response Team. In contrast, only about one in four smaller population counties had such an organization, even in regions of the country prone to frequent natural disasters. People with pets are more likely than people without pets to refuse to evacuate in an emergency situation, putting their lives, as well as the lives of the people sent to rescue them, in danger. Only a little more than half of US counties, however, reported having plans for emergency shelters in which pets and people could be housed together.

A loss of animal life not only has an economic, but also a psychological impact. Studies show that pet loss after a disaster can be devastating for humans. Fifty-six percent of Americans now have pets. In the future, due to population growth, and the increase of not only the percentage of Americans living in disaster-prone areas, but also the number of natural disasters, the problem is going to get bigger.

Journal Reference: C. Victor Spain, R.C. Green, Lacie Davis, Gregory S. Miller, Susan Britt. The National Capabilities for Animal Response in Emergencies (NCARE) Study: An Assessment of US States and Counties. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, 2017; 0 (0) DOI: 10.1515/jhsem-2017-0014

 

source ; photo: @darkbluedaddy

animals death injury and separation from humans in natural disasters, animals in natural disasters

View all posts by firepawinc
Copyright FIREPAW, Inc., 1999-2017

 

Koala Survives Road Trip Trapped Inside Wheel Arch of Vehicle

Thankfully it was a ‘Wheel of Fortune’ for this little koala… A koala survived a 16-kilometre (10-mile) road trip in Australia clinging to the axle of a four wheel drive vehicle, …

Source: Koala Survives Road Trip Trapped Inside Wheel Arch of Vehicle

Stopping Animal Abuse

For news about legislation, programs and research concerning how animal abuse is linked with other forms of family and community violence,  Click here   To order your copy of the book, “Silent Victims”

Source: Stopping Animal Abuse

Ricky Gervais Wants a Worldwide Ban on Animal Testing