Captive Elephant Apparently Tortured With Bullhooks and Ridden by Humans at Roadside Zoo Must be Freed – ForceChange

Photo credit: Natural Bridge Zoo

forcechange.com

Target: Karl Mogensen, owner of Natural Bridge Zoo
Goal: Release Asha (aka “Beautiful”) the elephant to an accredited sanctuary.

Barney Mitchell

Asha the elephant has been imprisoned under torturous conditions her whole life. She is apparently forced to give rides to zoo visitors and is abused by painful bullhooks, all for the zoo’s profit. It is time to rescue this poor elderly elephant.

Recently, Asha was renamed “Beautiful” by the Natural Bridge Zoo, which is imprisoning her in Virginia. It is suspected that the name change was intended to hide the fact that Asha is still being inhumanely imprisoned after all these years of efforts to free her.

Reportedly, the Natural Bridge Zoo has faced numerous investigations regarding the neglect of Asha. She apparently lives in solitary confinement in a tiny enclosure, has received inadequate medical care, and has been forced to endure brutal Virginia winters, which is particularly cruel for an animal from Africa.

Furthermore, Natural Bridge Zoo was apparently fined for six violations of the Animal Welfare Act and was also cited for failing to have Asha under control while providing forced rides to humans.

All in all, Asha’s existence sounds tragic and must be remedied. It is long past time for Asha to be sent to an accredited sanctuary to live out her remaining years in peace.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Karl Mogensen,

Your roadside zoo has kept Asha the elephant long enough. She has made you a lot of money and generated tremendous publicity for your business. It is time to let her go. Please release her to an accredited sanctuary as soon as possible.

Asha has lived a long and hard life. She has apparently been forced to give rides to humans, to live in solitary confinement in a tiny enclosure, has received inadequate medical care, and has been forced to endure brutal Virginia winters, which is particularly cruel for an animal from Africa.

If these allegations are true, Asha’s continued imprisonment in your zoo is terribly inhumane and must be remedied. Please release Asha (aka “Beautiful”) to an accredited sanctuary where she can live out the rest of her life in peace.

https://forcechange.com/604245/captive-elephant-apparently-tortured-with-bullhooks-and-ridden-by-humans-at-roadside-zoo-must-be-freed/

Don’t Steal Safe and Healthy Animals for Display in Zoos – Animal Petitions

Photo credit: Andrew King

animalpetitions.org

Target: Kevin Shea, Administrator, U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)

Carey Jameson

Goal: Demand zoos use only rescued animals for human display.

Zoos can be a wonderful place to visit. They give us exposure to animals we may never see otherwise in real life. Through these experiences, people can learn more about all the creatures found on the planet and their habits and connections to one another. Zoos also offer opportunities for animals who are endangered or injured and will not survive in the wild. Not only does this give us a chance to fulfill curiosity about other creatures, it gives those animals a second chance at life.

Unfortunately, zoos do not operate so altruistically. Out of the estimated 800,000 animals in zoos, those that are bred in captivity also end up behind bars with generations after them never getting to run free. While it is understandable zoos have an invested interest in staying stocked with animals, they should not lose sight of their goal to operate in the best interest of wildlife under their supervision. Using all or mostly animals rescued from unsafe circumstances is the best way to improve zoo operations.

Rescued animals can include those that are injured or healthy animals close to extinction. Injured animals who may die in the wild can live safely in captivity given they have care sympathetic to the adjustment from their natural habitat. Those facing extinction can be protected, too, chiefly in the event any safely bred in zoos are correctly reintroduced to the wild. According to PETA, animals facing extinction only make up 18% of those in zoos, evidence there is much work to be done to make these establishments a place to sustain species the world may lose otherwise.

Sign the petition below to urge Administrator Shea towards an understanding for how important it is for zoos to be about animal conservation, not just human recreation.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Administrator Shea,

Every year, animal welfare is more important to people than in previous generations. U.S. zoos have always operated on a platform revolving around conservation, though not much has been done to improve animal welfare efforts at a reasonable pace. Their cages are stocked with wildlife that may not need human help whether from injury or endangerment. Those who do face extinction are bred more for entertainment rather than their survival. This is where APHIS needs to step in.

Because zoos will always be popular for children and interested adults alike, they still can survive with a shift in business model. Plenty of animals with permanent injury can be sourced from the wild and nurtured in captivity given fair and understanding care. In addition, with more animals facing endangerment and extinction every day, zoos have a fabulous chance to not only facilitate the survival of these poor creatures, but maintain a population for people to enjoy and learn about. Remember, zoos are first and foremost for the animals.

We urge you to reevaluate the guidelines governing zoos and to enforce a more animal-centric approach to their operation.

Sincerely,

Sign the Petition

https://animalpetitions.org/1177627/dont-steal-healthy-and-safe-animals-for-display-in-zoos/

Stop Imprisoning Wild Animals in Small, Filthy Cages at Roadside Zoos – Animal Petitions

Photo Credit: Animal People Forum 

Victoria Paige

Target: Roy Cooper, Governor of North Carolina

Goal: Stop rewarding abusive roadside zoos for confining wild animals.

Roadside zoos are disgusting institutions that capitalize on the suffering of sentient wild animals. Animals ranging from tigers and bears to lemurs and monkeys are kept in small, filthy cages that encompass a mere percentage of what their natural habitats in the wild would be. Often, these animals are kept alone, entirely isolated from the rest of their kin and denied access to mental stimulation and social inclinations. They are fed inadequate food, given dirty water, and receive little to no veterinary care, even when they are sick or injured.

Still, roadside zoos are somehow legal—and even encouraged—in much of the United States. Early in July of 2022, for example, North Carolina passed a bill that would exempt certain roadside zoo owners from having to pay sales tax on items for the zoo. This bill covers items used in the housing, raising, and feeding of animals for public display, in essence subsidizing the cruel confinement of these wild creatures.

Sign this petition to demand North Carolina stop rewarding the cruel capture, breeding, and display of wild animals at roadside zoos.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Governor Cooper,

Animals in roadside zoos endure extreme physical and psychological suffering. Tigers, monkeys, bears, and others are often stolen from their natural habitats and thrown in barren cages that are much too small. They are often kept alone, isolated from their friends and kin, and are fed inadequate food and water. Even so, North Carolina just signed a bill that would exempt certain roadside zoo owners from having to pay a sales tax on all required housing, raising, and feeding items, essentially subsidizing the cruel confinement of wildlife.

We are asking you, Mr. Cooper, to stop incentivizing abusive roadside zoos and, instead, focus legislative efforts on animal conservation.

Sincerely,

Sign the Petition

https://animalpetitions.org/1172182/stop-paying-roadside-zoos-to-abuse-wildlife/

Don’t Steal Healthy and Safe Animals for Display in Zoos – ForceChange

forcechange.com

Carey Jameson

Target: Kevin Shea, Administrator, U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)

Goal: Demand zoos use only rescued animals for human display.

Zoos can be a wonderful place to visit. They give us exposure to animals we may never see otherwise in real life. Through these experiences, people can learn more about all the creatures found on the planet and their habits and connections to one another. Zoos also offer opportunities for animals who are endangered or injured and will not survive in the wild. Not only does this give us a chance to fulfill curiosity about other creatures, it gives those animals a second chance at life.

Unfortunately, zoos do not operate so altruistically. Out of the estimated 800,000 animals in zoos, those that are bred in captivity also end up behind bars with generations after them never getting to run free. While it is understandable zoos have an invested interest in staying stocked with animals, they should not lose sight of their goal to operate in the best interest of wildlife under their supervision. Using all or mostly animals rescued from unsafe circumstances is the best way to improve zoo operations.

Rescued animals can include those that are injured or healthy animals close to extinction. Injured animals who may die in the wild can live safely in captivity given they have care sympathetic to the adjustment from their natural habitat. Those facing extinction can be protected, too, chiefly in the event any safely bred in zoos are correctly reintroduced to the wild. According to PETA, animals facing extinction only make up 18% of those in zoos, evidence there is much work to be done to make these establishments a place to sustain species the world may lose otherwise.

Sign the petition below to urge Administrator Shea towards an understanding for how important it is for zoos to be about animal conservation, not just human recreation.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Administrator Shea,

Every year, animal welfare is more important to people than in previous generations. U.S. zoos have always operated on a platform revolving around conservation, though not much has been done to improve animal welfare efforts at a reasonable pace. Their cages are stocked with wildlife that may not need human help whether from injury or endangerment. Those who do face extinction are bred more for entertainment rather than their survival. This is where APHIS needs to step in.

Because zoos will always be popular for children and interested adults alike, they still can survive with a shift in business model. Plenty of animals with permanent injury can be sourced from the wild and nurtured in captivity given fair and understanding care. In addition, with more animals facing endangerment and extinction every day, zoos have a fabulous chance to not only facilitate the survival of these poor creatures, but maintain a population for people to enjoy and learn about. Remember, zoos are first and foremost for the animals.

We urge you to reevaluate the guidelines governing zoos and to enforce a more animal-centric approach to their operation.

Sincerely,

Photo credit: Andrew King

https://forcechange.com/610670/dont-steal-healthy-and-safe-animals-for-display-in-zoos/

SIGN: Stop UK Advertisements of Cruel Elephant Tourist Attractions

ladyfreethinker.org

Image via Lady Freethinker

Sign This Petition

PETITION TARGET: Boris Johnson, Prime Minister of the UK

Elephants abused and exploited in the tourism industry are denied everything that is natural and important to them. They’re controlled and hit with sharp metal bullhooks and often are forced to give tourists rides and kept chained when they’re not working.

These gentle giants always suffer in captivity. That’s why the non-profit campaign group Save the Asian Elephants (STAE) is working to get a law passed in the United Kingdom to prohibit the advertising and promotion of unethical elephant-related tourist attractions.

In the wild, elephants can travel up to 50 miles a day with their families and can live well into their 70s. They are loving mothers, too— female elephants remain with their daughters from birth until they are separated by death. But in captivity, they spend much of their lives chained, typically die before they reach 40 years old, and are separated from their families. 

STAE has discovered more than 1,000 UK firms that are promoting nearly 300 venues overseas that exploit and abuse elephants for entertainment and profits.  Not only is this cruel, but it’s also incredibly dangerous.

In July 2022, a woman was killed in Thailand after a captive elephant charged at her during a demonstration in the park. Her family is now calling for an advertising ban, with the victim’s sister saying, “A ban on the advertising of these tourist sites would go a long way to preventing visitors from learning about these places and preventing humans from profiting from animal abuse.”

As long as cruel elephant attractions are advertised and promoted, elephants will continue to suffer for profits and more people could be killed.

Sign our petition today urging the UK Government to ban advertising tourist attractions overseas where elephants are abused and exploited!

https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-stop-the-uk-from-advertising-cruel-elephant-tourist-attractions/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Petition · Help free Shankar from decades of solitary confinement in the Delhi Zoo · Change.org

Nikita Nandika – YFA started this petition to Director, National Zoological Park (NZP) Shri Dharam Deo Rai and

Petition in other languages: Hindi , Italian, French

Who is Shankar?

In 1998, a 26 month-old male African elephant was presented as a diplomatic gift by Zimbabwe to India. He was named ‘Shankar’ after India’s 9th President Dr. Shankar Dayal Sharma. Shankar, now over 26 years old, has lived his entire life in the Delhi zoo (National Zoological Park, NZP). Since 2001 when his sole companion Vambai passed away, Shankar has lived in solitary confinement. 

Shankar’s Physical and Mental Condition

Shankar is chained for 17 hours of the day and does not have adequate space to move around when he is let out. Much like humans, elephants are social beings and suffer neurological distress when put in solitary confinement. Shankar constantly demonstrates stereotypical behaviour like swaying and head-bobbing, a key sign of distress (see video link). In fact, Shankar’s aggressive behaviour has necessitated the zoo authorities to permanently close the viewing pathway since he could be a danger to visitors. In a response to our RTI in July 2021, the Delhi Zoo confirmed that not only has it made NO effort in the past, it has NO FUTURE PLANS to release Shankar to a sanctuary or any other location where he can have the companionship of other African elephants. This just fills us with sadness and despair for Shankar who is clearly in duress. If Shankar’s solitary captivity does not end immediately, he will meet the same fate as Vambai who died in the zoo.

Our Demand

We need the Delhi Zoo (NZP) to transfer Shankar to be released to a wildlife refuge or sanctuary where there are ample African elephants. The NZP director  has a unique opportunity to set an example to every other zoo in India and to the world so that not only Shankar but all other captive elephants can have a better future.

Steps undertaken by YFA

  1. Letter sent to Delhi Zoo on October 4, 2021. Read here
  2. Letter sent to Prime Minister’s Office on November 16, 2021. Read here
  3. Having received no response, we filed a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) in the Delhi High Court that was heard on January 3, 2022. The Hon’ble High Court admitted our case and also directed the Respondents to consider our representation. The next court hearing is scheduled for July 6, 2022.

We really hope you will join hands with us to help Shankar earn his freedom and have a chance to live a normal elephant life with his own kind. Please sign our petition and share it widely.

Thanks and regards

Nikita Dhawan and Nandika Karunakaram

(On Behalf of Youth For Animals)

FOLLOW OUR SHANKAR CAMPAIGN PAGE HERE

Reach us via-

Website II Email 

Follow us on social media to help amplify our voice

Twitter II Facebook II Instagram II Linkedin II YouTube

Hashtags for our campaign

Main- #FreeShankarDelhiZoo

Others- #FreeShankar #ShankarforSanctuary #Shankar #HaathiMereSaathi

Sign this petition

Updates

https://www.change.org/p/freeshankardelhizoo-help-free-shankar-26-year-old-male-african-elephant-from-his-solitary-confinement-at-the-delhi-zoo-follow-our-campaign-page-for-updates-bit-ly-freeshankar

Petition · End Happy The Elephant’s 10 Years of Solitary Confinement · Change.org

www.change.org

The Bronx Zoo has been given the shameful title of the 5th worst zoo for elephants in the country. The New York Times calls Happy the Bronx Zoo’s loneliest elephant. That’s because this highly intelligent and social being is one of the only zoo elephants in the entire United States who is being held alone. And it looks like her living conditions won’t change anytime soon unless we do something about it.

I am asking you, my fellow animal lovers, to encourage the Bronx Zoo Director James J. Breheny to release Happy to a sanctuary where she can be in a more natural setting and live the rest of her life in peace.

New standards regarding the keeping of elephants were recently passed by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the accrediting organization for American wildlife institutions. Among their recommendations was that elephants be held in groups of three or more, as they are highly social creatures. Now, zoos around the country  are scrambling to comply with the regulations by AZA’s 2016 deadline. Yet, the Bronx Zoo seems steadfast in its opinion that Happy is “happy” with her solitary life. This goes against all scientific data about elephant behavior.

Happy and 6 other elephant calves were captured in the wild from Thailand and brought to the States in 1977. For 25 years, she and her companion, Grumpy, were kept as a pair in the Bronx Zoo. When Grumpy passed away, she was paired with Sammy, who sadly died in 2006. It was then that the zoo decided to end its elephant program, but it didn’t relocate the elephants it currently had.

For 10 years, Happy has been in a sort of solitary confinement, unable to truly interact with the other elephants held at the zoo. This is a social being like a monkey or a dolphin. Elephants thrive in the company of their own kind, where they form multi-generational family groups that remain loyal to one another for life, and the elders pass wisdom down to the younger ones to help them navigate their world.

Happy is likely not at all happy. She has endured a decade of loneliness and deserves the chance to be with others of her kind in a sanctuary. Please join me in telling the Bronx Zoo to release Happy to a sanctuary and let her really have a chance at happiness.

https://www.change.org/p/end-happy-the-elephant-s-10-years-of-solitary-confinement

Missing wallaby is found hiding in bush near zoo exhibit

This undated photo provided by the Memphis Zoo shows Honey Bunch, the wallaby.  The  wallaby who went missing at the Memphis Zoo after storms passed through Tennessee this week, has been found hiding in plain sight. “It was an area right behind the exhibit that was a service area that had been searched multiple times in the past 36 hours, but he was camouflaged really well and hidden very well under a bush,” said Jessica Faulk, the zoo's spokesperson, Friday, April 15, 2022. (Memphis Zoo via AP)

local21news.com

BETH CAMPBELL | Associated Press

This undated photo provided by the Memphis Zoo shows Honey Bunch, the wallaby. The wallaby who went missing at the Memphis Zoo after storms passed through Tennessee this week, has been found hiding in plain sight. “It was an area right behind the exhibit that was a service area that had been searched multiple times in the past 36 hours, but he was camouflaged really well and hidden very well under a bush,” said Jessica Faulk, the zoo’s spokesperson, Friday, April 15, 2022. (Memphis Zoo via AP)

UNDATED (AP) — Honey Bunch, the wallaby who went missing at the Memphis Zoo after storms passed through Tennessee this week, has been found hiding — nearly in plain sight.

“It was an area right behind the exhibit … that had been searched multiple times in the past 36 hours, but he was camouflaged really well and hidden very well under a bush,” said Jessica Faulk, the zoo’s spokesperson.

A curator happened to see some tracks Friday morning and followed them to Honey Bunch, Faulk said.

“We suspect he was there the whole time,” she said.

Honey Bunch was taken to the zoo’s hospital and was being evaluated by a veterinarian, who gave him a clean bill of health, Faulk said.

A creek in the KangaZoo exhibit overflowed during storms Wednesday night, and the exhibit was evacuated, with the animals moved to the hospital. Honey Bunch and three other wallabies will move back to the exhibit together in a day or so probably, Faulk said.

Honey Bunch is 21 months old and one of the largest of the four, she said.

Faulk said no one knows how he was able to get out of the exhibit’s fencing but that zoo officials are looking into it so they can prevent it from happening again.

Memphis police had assisted in the search for the missing animal, a smaller relative of the kangaroo.

https://local21news.com/news/offbeat/missing-wallaby-found-hiding-in-bush-near-zoo-exhibit-tennessee-honey-bunch-jessica-faulk-memphis-zoo-spokesperson-21-months-old

Smithsonian’s National Zoo celebrates 50th ‘Pandaversary’

local21news.com

ALEXANDRA RODRIGUEZ | WJLA Staff

The Smithsonian National Zoo celebrates its 50th Anniversary of their Giant Panda conservation. (WJLA)

WASHINGTON (WJLA) — The Smithsonian’s National Zoo is celebrating the golden anniversary of its achievement in the care, conservation, breeding, and study of giant pandas.

The Smithsonian National Zoo celebrates its 50th Anniversary of their Giant Panda conservation. (Video: WJLA)

Zookeepers rolled out a special fruitsicle cake for the in-residence panda family to honor the special achievement.

Over the past five decades, the Zoo’s bears have become international icons, beloved both for their adorable antics and their ability to bring colleagues from the United States and China together to collaborate for a common goal of saving the species from extinction.

Ever since their arrival, giant pandas have symbolized cross-cultural collaboration between the United States and China. In 1972, Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai gifted two giant pandas to the American people as a gesture of goodwill following former President Richard M. Nixon’s groundbreaking state visit.

The President and First Lady Pat Nixon selected the Smithsonian’s National Zoo as female Ling-Ling and male Hsing-Hsing’s home in the United States. Then-Zoo director Theodore Reed personally escorted the bears from China, and they arrived in Washington, D.C., on April 16, 1972.

The Smithsonian National Zoo celebrates its 50th Anniversary of their Giant Panda conservation. (Photo: WJLA)

Zoo visitors will get to enjoy lion dance performances, panda-shaped bao buns, and calligraphy demonstrations and see the pandas receive special enrichment treats. The world premiere of the Smithsonian Channel’s documentary on the Zoo’s giant panda program, “The Miracle Panda,” will be screened for a limited time at the Zoo’s Visitor Center Theater at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/gallery-smithsonians-national-zoo-celebrates-50th-pandaversary-fruitsicle-cake-past-five-decages-bring-united-states-and-china-together-to-collaborate-for-common-goal-saving-species-from-extinction

In Remarkable Rescue Op, Man Evacuates Lion And Wolf From Ukraine In Bus

Sanya Jain

A four-day mission to rescue a lion and a wolf from war-torn Ukraine had a happy ending with the two zoo animals “settling in well” in Romania, Tim Locks – the British war veteran who spearheaded the rescue op – has said. According to Daily Mail, Mr Locks, a 45-year-old Iraq veteran, had been delivering aid in Ukraine when he heard about the plight of the animals from a conservationist at his hotel. 

He embarked on a mission to save the two animals, driving from Lviv to Zaporizhzhia Oblast, where the lion and the wolf were kept in a zoo, along with two companions. 

In the remarkable rescue operation, which Mr Locks documented on Facebook, the animals were transported to neighbouring Romania in the back of a minibus. The lion, Simba, and the wolf, Akela, were driven almost non-stop until they reached the Romanian border. Then, as the final leg of their journey, the animals were taken to a zoo in the north-eastern city of Radauti in Romania on Sunday. 

Mr Locks shared an update on the animals on Wednesday. “We’ve just heard back from the zoo in Romania and it’s amazing to hear that both Simba and Akela are settling in well. Both are eating and drinking plenty and enjoying some chill time after the long journey,” he wrote.

He had earlier shared photos from the rescue mission on Facebook, describing how a crane was used to lift the lion and the wolf into the minibus. “It took 3 hours to load both animals into the back of a Ford transit minibus with the seats removed using a crane and a JCB,” he had revealed.

“We kept reminding each other that we’d got a lion and a wolf in the back of the van as we were driving and looking back to see there they were, just over our shoulders,” Mr Locks told Metro News.

He said guards at checkpoints were less than amused when he declared a lion and a wolf as their cargo. “One guard told us there was a war on and it was no time to joke around,” Mr Locks said. “I took him to the side of the van, opened the door, and showed him this proper big lion, like Aslan out Narnia.”

After dropping the animals off in Romania, the trio drove back to Ukraine to assist in humanitarian missions as the country continues its fight against Russian forces.  

https://www.ndtv.com/offbeat/in-remarkable-rescue-op-man-evacuates-lion-and-wolf-from-ukraine-in-bus-2842272

2 young Asian elephants die days apart at US zoo

local21news.com

LEE BULLEN | Zenger News

An elephant virus is responsible for the deaths of two calves at a New Mexico zoo since Christmas Day, according to the Albuquerque BioPark.

A statement from the park said that Jazmine, 8, died from the effects of her infection on Jan. 2, and her brother, Thorn, 3 died from the same virus on Dec. 25.

2 young Asian elephants die days apart at US zoo. Jazmine and Thorn are seen playing and feeding in this video prior to their deaths. (Albuquerque BioPark)

The calves died after being diagnosed with elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus, known as EEHV, the zoo said. The virus also killed a 5-year-old Asian elephant calf named Daizy in 2015.

“While not much is known about EEHV, the disease can progress rapidly, and early detection is critical,” the zoo said.

The zoo shared video of Thorn, and said that since he was a baby, “Thorn was trained to be active in his health care and voluntarily participate in medical exams, including presenting his ears to allow for a weekly blood draw. This behavior, along with weekly testing, allowed the biopark’s animal care team to discover the virus in Thorn’s blood at a very low level. The BioPark staff immediately began working around the clock to treat the illness. Treatments started with antiviral medications and fluids. As Thorn’s disease continued to progress, the team shifted to twice-daily sedated treatments to ensure he was getting everything he needed, in addition to the non-sedated fluid and antiviral treatments. He also received regular infusions of plasma, whole blood and stem cells.”

The National Elephant Herpesvirus Lab at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C., provided bloodwork services and EEHV expertise, the zoo said, and additional assistance came from other accredited zoos.

“Thorn’s short life had a great impact on the lives of other elephants,” the zoo said. “His birth was significant because he was born in the presence of his sister, Jazmine, and grandmother, Alice. This natural herd birth was a huge advancement in the care and socialization of elephants in human care.

“He was also raised in a multi-age herd that includes his sister, grandmother, mother Rozie, adult male Albert and adult female Irene. The zoo’s practices that allowed Thorn and the rest of the herd to use their natural behaviors are leading the way for elephant care across the United States and the world.”

In the case of Jazmine, “the zoo’s elephant experts and veterinary teams did everything in their power — and then some” to help her, said the park’s director, Stephanie Stowell. “Jazmine matched their efforts every step along the way. True to her strong-willed nature, Jazmine fought valiantly against the disease.

“Adding to the anguish of losing a beloved animal, Jazmine’s death marks a considerable loss to the future of Asian elephants. Jazmine was on a carefully planned path to become an elephant matriarch.

Had Jazmine survived, the zoo said, “her skills and experiences would have enabled her to raise her own calves and lead elephants in her own multigenerational herd.

“Jazmine’s short life will have a long-term impact on other elephants in human care as well as in the wild.”

Stowell said all elephants can carry EEHV in a latent state throughout their entire lives without negative effects.

It is not known why the virus sometimes comes out of latency, she said.

“Elephants are most susceptible to EEHV from 18 months to 8 years of age. EEHV causes hemorrhagic disease that can be fatal for young elephants. It is the leading cause of death for Asian elephant calves and can strike elephants in the wild and in human care.

“Each case of EEHV hemorrhagic disease, while tragic, does provide us with more information on its causes, transmission, and treatment. The elephant community rallied around Albuquerque BioPark to provide support with husbandry, treatment, and testing.

“We are devastated by these latest two deaths, and we hope that the incredible cooperation amongst our colleagues will continue to provide answers on how best to prevent these deaths,” said Erin Latimer, a spokesperson for the EEHV Advisory Group that dedicated their time to administering the EEHV treatment regime.

https://local21news.com/news/nation-world/video-2-young-asian-elephants-die-days-apart-at-us-zoo

Petition · Free Rakesh the elephant from Kapilash Zoo, Odisha. · Change.org

www.change.org

Dear all,
This is regarding Rakesh the elephant who is kept in pathetic conditions in a zoo in Orissa. I was informed that that elephant has been rescued, but that is false.
After speaking with Maneka Gandhi, I have come to know that the elephant is kept in a Kraal or trench and can’t even turn. She has managed to get the chains removed and his wounds have healed kind of, but he is still imprisoned and is in a bad state. The animal needs to be rescued and freed. We need minimum 2,000 emails written to the Chief Secretary of Odisha.
Please write, ‘Free Rakesh, his shackles have been removed. He is living in a trench and has suffered enough. We need to get him out of there. Once again, the shackles have been removed but his living conditions are pathetic. He needs to be freed.’ I am attaching the email. Please, please write an email asking him to free Rakesh the elephant so he can enjoy the rest of his years. Please, please don’t ignore this message and please share widely. The email id is
asittripathy@gmail.com, Csori@ori.nic.in
Regards,
Cookkie Khanna 

https://www.change.org/p/orissa-government-free-rakesh-the-elephant-from-kapilash-zoo?recruiter=1051393456&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_initial&utm_term=psf_combo_share_message&recruited_by_id=187a4710-66d7-11ea-9a12-417c2b8f4e6d

Petition · Justice For Eko · Change.org

www.change.org

Please Sign the Petition

On Wednesday, December 29, 2021 a man who was unauthorized to be in or near the Malayan Tiger Eko’s enclosure at Naples Zoo At  Caribbean Gardens, in Naples, FL stuck his hand/arm in, enticing or antagonizing the animal. Eko, part of a “Critically Endangered” species took hold of his arm by mouth. Police could not get the tiger to release the man, and had to shoot the animal, who later died. Malayan tigers are classed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Fewer than 200 of the animals remain in the wild, according to the World Wildlife Fund. There is now 1 less beautiful creature on the planet, thanks to the irresponsible and ignorant actions of this man. Eko’s death is 100% the result of this man’s actions. He worked for a 3rd party cleaning company and was not authorized to be in that area. Charges of criminal nature MUST be filed, and while the man has suffered medical consequences he must be held accountable for the loss. Please add your support and demand Collier County press charges against him, and the cleaning company. Negligence, Animal Abuse, and Criminal Trespassing Resulting In Loss Of Protected Animal Life. Remember Harambe, We owe these animals true protection!

https://www.change.org/p/collier-county-justice-for-eko

Sign Petition: A French Zoo Caused The Death of Four Wolves. It’s Time It Gets Shut Down For Good.

www.thepetitionsite.com

  • by: Care2 Team
  • recipient: Barbara Pompili, France’s Minister of the Ecological Transition

39,655 SUPPORTERS

40,000 GOAL

In December of 2021, nine wolves tried to escape their small enclosures at Trois Vallées zoo. They didn’t pose any immediate threat to humans nearby, but simply destroyed safety hatches and climbed a fence. In fact, they never even left the zoo. But four were almost immediately shot dead for “dangerous behavior” by park workers. This is what happens when you run a zoo without animal welfare or safety concerns in mind — innocent animals end up dead.

Sign now to demand Barbara Pompili permanently shut down the Trois Vallées zoo!

This isn’t the first time Trois Vallées zoo has come under public scrutiny. In fact, just over a year ago, the zoo was ordered to close over animal, staff, and visitor safety concerns due to “security breaches,” but a court order allowed it to reopen. There is little evidence the zoo has taken any steps to improve the safety or wellbeing of the animals living at the zoo. Four dead wolves is the final straw. 

Following the incident, the zoo is temporarily closed, but supposed to reopen in less than a month, according to its social media page. Now is the time for the Minister of the Ecological Transition to step up and shut down this dangerous zoo — which repeatedly shows a lack of concern for animal life and wellbeing – for good. 

The blood of four dead wolves is on the hands of the zoo, and ultimately, Barbara Pompili if she does not act to stop this murderous institution from reopening. Sign now if you agree!

 

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/377/165/264/?z00m=32933849&redirectID=3174457787

Tiger killed after grabbing man’s hand at Florida zoo

By Nancy Posted in Zoos Tagged

Lions Now Gorillas Test Positive COVID-19

Taliban fighter ‘points gun at miserable bear at Kabul Zoo’ amid care concerns

A Taliban fighter appears to point a weapon at a bear

www.mirror.co.uk

By William Walker00:42, 2 Sep 2021

In the photo a group of fighters from the regime can be seen stood looking down towards a lone bear who is penned in inside an enclosure as a gun is pointed in its direction

The image has prompted concerns about the animal’s treatment

A chilling image has emerged appearing to show armed Taliban militants aiming a gun at a bear at Kabul Zoo.

In the photo a group of fighters from the regime can be seen stood looking down towards a lone bear who is penned in inside an enclosure.

As the animal looks up towards the group one of the militants can be seen appearing to point his weapon in its direction.

While an international animal coalition has said the animals at the zoo were being cared for the image has raised concerns over mistreatment of the animals that happened in the 1990s.

According to reports from the time there were a number of incidents at the zoo involving Afghan fighters beating animals, with one chucking a grenade at a bear.

Taliban fighters on patrol

The Taliban seized control of the country after the US pulled out(AFP via Getty Images)

The new image, published by The Sun, is sad to have sparked concerns over how the animals left at the zoo will now be treated.

The publication reports that a source said: “It’s game over for the animals in the zoo.

“They can’t even run. I cant even begin to imagine the horror.”

It is claimed that zoo staff continue to service the animals but it is not known if the animals will continue to be maintained by the Taliban.

Asia for Animals said it was monitoring the situation but that the animals were so far being fed and cared for as normal.

They said in a statement: “We have had more confirmation from our contacts on the ground that whilst the situation on the ground is unstable the zoo is still in operation.

“There have been Taliban soldiers at the zoo, liaising with the staff and visiting the animals.

“As the zoo comes under Kabul Municipality the zoo will ultimately be the responsibility of the Taliban.

“Currently the animals are still being fed and cared for as normal.

“There was a fire near by the zoo last week but the zoo was unaffected.”

The group later confirmed on social media that the animal in the image was not shot nor had it been shot at.

One media report published two decades ago claimed that in the 1990s one man threw a grenade at a lion in the zoo after it killed his friend, with the blast leaving the animal blind in one eye.

The zoo was also said to have been a favourite among bored soldiers on leave from the frontline and saw bears being beaten, and other animals struck with sticks, snowballs and stones.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/taliban-fighter-points-gun-miserable-24890274.amp?__twitter_impression=true

The sad life of Marjan

Even A Snow Leopard At The San Diego Zoo Has COVID Now

www.yahoo.com

Maggie Clancy


Who gave the snow leopard at the zoo COVID?!

Just when you thought you knew everything there is to know about COVID-19, the new Delta variant, and ways to keep yourself and your loved ones safe (vaccinate!), this happens. An unvaccinated snow leopard at the San Diego Zoo tested positive for COVID-19. Yes, a snow leopard.

A male snow leopard at the San Diego Zoo is suspected to have contracted SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Wildlife care specialists noticed the snow leopard was coughing and had nasal discharge, prompting the team to test for the virus. Results are pending at this time pic.twitter.com/GWLc6mygmw

— San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance (@sandiegozoo) July 24, 2021

Ramil, a nine-year-old male snow leopard, had caretakers concerned when they noticed he had a cough and a runny nose on Thursday, July 22.

Zookeepers took two separate tests of Ramil’s stool and confirmed the presence of COVID-19, according to a statement made by the zoo the following day.

The snow leopard is being monitored closely and does not appear to have any major signs of illness other than the aforementioned symptoms. The origin of the possible exposure is still being investigated as we continue our contact tracing efforts. pic.twitter.com/pMNJcOfrJp

— San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance (@sandiegozoo) July 24, 2021

Fortunately, Ramil and his habitat-mates — a female snow leopard and two Amur leopards — seem to be doing okay. Ramil’s symptoms haven’t worsened, and so far, the other three animals have remained safe in quarantine. The exhibit is closed as Ramil recovers and the rest of the animals stay in isolation from the rest of the zoo.

In an abundance of caution, the leopard habitat will be closed to Zoo visitors until further notice. We ask that you keep our snow leopard and the incredible team of dedicated wildlife care professionals and veterinarians who serve him in your thoughts during this time. pic.twitter.com/FDDOnZBbpy

— San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance (@sandiegozoo) July 24, 2021

San Diego Zoo is unsure of how the snow leopard contracted the virus in the first place, as staff members are required to wear masks and use other PPE and sanitation precautions. Vaccination, however, is not required for the San Diego Zoo staff.

Ramil isn’t the first animal to contract COVID-19 at the San Diego Zoo. In January, eight gorillas at the zoo’s interactive Safari Park contracted the virus from an asymptomatic zookeeper.

The gorillas’ infection, in conjunction with Ramil’s COVID-19 case, had the zoo again requesting experimental COVID-19 vaccinations for animals most prone to catching the virus — large cats and primates — for emergency use.

A win for science: our partners at @Zoetis, a veterinary pharmaceutical company, developed a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) that we used to vaccinate great apes at the Zoo. The vaccine was created specifically for animals. @NatGeo https://t.co/ZpM5QVD4pl

— San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance (@sandiegozoo) March 5, 2021

Again, the animals made a full recovery, but like humans, we still don’t know all of the long-term effects of contracting COVID-19. Some people who have had the virus have experienced elevated heart rates for months after infection, chronic lung issues, and other ailments associated with what people are calling “Long COVID,” or Post Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC). Long COVID can affect nearly any organ in the body, have a wide and varying range of symptoms, and testing long after the initial infection doesn’t always link the lasting symptoms to COVID-19.

Great news! Our gorilla troop has made a full recovery from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans. Starting today, our guests can once again connect with these primates and learn ways they can help save this important species. https://t.co/phlrubBPhr pic.twitter.com/Gpjdxy8UAY

— San Diego Zoo Safari Park (@sdzsafaripark) February 13, 2021

Vaccinating can also help keep you and your pets safe from contracting the virus, though Dr. Anthony Fauci explained in a town hall for kids that they shouldn’t be afraid to go near their pets and can still “give your pet a big hug” and not worry about being dangerous to them.

In the meantime, make sure to be wearing a mask in public, whether you are interacting with wild animals or not, because just like Ramil, the people around you can catch COVID-19 from anyone unvaccinated, even if they aren’t showing symptoms. Let’s keep everyone safe, people and animals alike.

See the original article on ScaryMommy.com

Zoos and other prisons – not vegan, not ‘conservation’, not ‘education’

Zoos and aquariums are just two types of place where members of nonhuman species face lifelong incarceration for the ‘entertainment’ of our species. Many with vested interests are quick to claim that the ‘entertainment’ aspect is only part of the story; that the main reason for imprisoning other species has something to do with ‘education’ or about ‘conservation’, and there’s no doubt that both these words frequently allow a free pass from criticism or even critical thinking for these widespread and lucrative businesses. 

Zoos , ‘wild life parks’, and sea world equivalents crop up frequently on social media and one doesn’t have far to look to discover that the folk myths about ‘education’ and ‘conservation’ are alive and well, and have been since long before the days of TV and film.

We may arguably live in at a time when the use of other animals is increasingly frowned upon as unethical in circuses, but meanwhile every family heading to look at imprisoned creatures for a day’s ‘entertainment’ is doing their bit – to the sound of cash registers and burger stalls – to reinforce the continuing message that humans are superior creatures and that other species exist for our entertainment.

I decided that it’s important to start to compile the best information and links into a single resource to be added to as more comes to hand, providing something to share when the subject is raised by those whose self interest blinds them to the facts. I start with a piece that I recently came across by the great Tom Regan. The other articles are in date order.

Are Zoos Morally Defensible?

1995  In this piece comprising a chapter of a larger work authored by others, Tom Regan (1938-1917) examines and discusses the ethics of zoos from the Animal Rights position, by providing valuable insights into how the sharply contrasting ‘utilitarian’ or ‘holistic’ stances affect the subject. He writes,

‘As will become clear as we proceed, my own moral position is not that of a neutral observer. Of the three tendencies to be considered, I favor one (what I call the “rights view”) and disagree rather strongly with the other two.’ https://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog/mc00236_2596514_20201001_7045#

The Case Against Zoos

June 11 2021 ‘I find one statistic particularly telling about their priorities: A 2018 analysis of the scientific papers produced by association members between 1993 and 2013 showed that just about 7 percent of them annually were classified as being about “biodiversity conservation.”
People don’t go to zoos to learn about the biodiversity crisis or how they can help. They go to get out of the house, to get their children some fresh air, to see interesting animals. They go for the same reason people went to zoos in the 19th century: to be entertained.
A fine day out with the family might itself be justification enough for the existence of zoos if the zoo animals are all happy to be there. Alas, there’s plenty of heartbreaking evidence that many are not.’
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/11/opinion/zoos-animal-cruelty.html

The neural cruelty of captivity: Keeping large mammals in zoos and aquariums damages their brains

September 24 2020 ‘Some people defend keeping animals in captivity, arguing that it helps conserve endangered species or offers educational benefits for visitors to zoos and aquariums. These justifications are questionable, particularly for large mammals. As my own research and work by many other scientists shows, caging large mammals and putting them on display is undeniably cruel from a neural perspective. It causes brain damage.’https://theconversation.com/the-neural-cruelty-of-captivity-keeping-large-mammals-in-zoos-and-aquariums-damages-their-brains-142240

It’s Time to Stop Pretending Zoos Are Good for Animals

March 9, 2020 ‘We imagine the zoo as Noah’s Ark, preserving the last remnants of endangered species. And yet, 83% of species in zoos are not endangered, or even threatened. Why are these animals kept, if the zoo is all about conservation? Of the few zoo animals that are endangered, almost none of them will be released into the wild — they’ve been bred and raised for the entertainment of humans, and would not survive in nature. But even if zoos were successfully preparing their animals for release on a grand scale, it would be an inefficient use of resources: Conservation in the wild is far more effective than captive breeding, in almost all cases.

Going to the zoo to support conservation is like buying an extra load of groceries so you can donate $3 to St. Jude at checkout. https://tenderly.medium.com/its-time-to-stop-pretending-zoos-are-good-for-animals-ca72fd4599e5

Zoos are outdated and cruel – it’s time to make them a thing of the past

August 14 2019 ‘If zoos are so abysmal, why do they still exist on such a large scale? The answer is simple. Zooreaucracies and zoo-rocrats have a stamp collector’s mentality and an appetite and preference to please the public with iconic and non-threatened species, leading to their needless captivity and “consumption” for entertainment.

In other words, the public come first and not the animals. Is that conservation? Zoos don’t want you to know these facts because it would expose the fundamental flaws in the arguments they put out for their existence, and as a consequence merely prove that they’re in the conservation of business and not in the business of conservation.’

~ Damian Aspinall, Conservationist  https://www.independent.co.uk/climate-change/news/zoos-cruel-wildlife-conservation-species-a9056701.html

Zooicide: Seeing Cruelty, Demanding Abolition

November 16 2018 

  • ‘Zoos do not protect endangered species.
  • By making them objects of entertainment, they may serve the opposite function.
  • On average, zoos spend about 2-3 percent of their budgets on research. That’s it.
  • Zoos educate nobody. The didactics at most zoos are rudimentary at best.
  • Zoos are unhappy places for animals. Like people, they want to be free and among their kind.
  • The biggest threat to animals is habitat loss. So, what do zoos do? They sell McDonald’s hamburgers, KFC, and every other kind of fast food grown on lands that could have been used to sustain wild populations of animals.’ https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/animal-emotions/201811/zooicide-seeing-cruelty-demanding-abolition

Are zoo animals happy? There’s a simple empathy test we can apply

April 16. 2017 ‘If we are to continue keeping animals in confinement … Making animals happier must be a top priority, and written into the budgets of zoo managers. Nevertheless, we need to remember that enrichment is just a Band-Aid solution. It serves, like the Valium given to SeaWorld’s whales, to manage the symptoms. But it can’t treat the underlying disease. Only freedom from captivity can really resolve the illness.’ https://www.salon.com/2017/04/16/are-zoo-animals-happy-theres-a-simple-empathy-test-we-can-apply/

Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? A
Critical Evaluation of the American Zoo and Aquarium Study

2010 ‘Modern-day zoos and aquariums market themselves as places of education and conservation. A recent study conducted by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) (Falk et al., 2007) is being widely heralded as the first direct evidence that visits to zoos and aquariums produce long-term positive effects on people’s attitudes toward other animals. In this paper, we address whether this conclusion is warranted by analyzing the study’s methodological soundness. We conclude that Falk et al. (2007) contains at least six major threats to methodological validity that undermine the authors’ conclusions.
There remains no compelling evidence for the claim that zoos and aquariums promote attitude change, education, or interest in conservation in visitors ‘https://www.wellbeingintlstudiesrepository.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1007&context=acwp_zoae

https://theresanelephantintheroomblog.wordpress.com/2021/06/16/zoos-and-other-prisons-not-vegan-not-conservation-not-education/

theresanelephantintheroomblog.wordpress.com

Gigi the giraffe dies two weeks after being moved to Sydney Zoo

 

By 9News Staff – 8 hours ago

https://players.brightcove.net/664969388001/H190EXsjW_default/index.html?videoId=6166288078001&adUnit=9news%2Fweb&playsinline=true

A giraffe at Sydney Zoo has died unexpectedly two weeks after being transported from Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland.

A giraffe has died at the new Sydney Zoo just weeks after moving there from Australia Zoo.

Three-year-old Gigi only recently arrived in western Sydney after being transferred from Queensland’s Sunshine Coast.

But on Saturday night, the eve of World Giraffe Day, Gigi died.https://d-21731682141961717604.ampproject.net/2006050512000/frame.htmlGigi the giraffe died just weeks after being transferred to Sydney Zoo. (Sydney Zoo)

Sydney Zoo said her death was sudden and unexpected.

“It is with a heavy heart that we say a very sad goodbye to Gigi,” Sydney Zoo said in a statement.

“As we mourn this tragic loss, she will be remembered for her friendly and cheeky nature.”

A post-mortem is being carried out by an expert team from the University of Sydney. The results are expected to be released in a few weeks.

Gigi was moved to western Sydney as part of a nationwide breeding program.https://d-21731682141961717604.ampproject.net/2006050512000/frame.html

The zoo said she was fit, healthy and had settled in well.

But some experts are concerned.

Veterinary surgeon Dr Robert Zammit suggested moving from a hot to a cold climate could have placed stress on the animal.

A new companion will be sought for Sydney Zoo’s remaining giraffe, Eyelean.

 

https://amp.9news.com.au/article/379bf72c-50a6-42d0-bb44-4fc05df6f463?__twitter_impression=true

Court orders the release of Kaavan the ‘mentally tormented’ elephant

dailymail.co.uk

4-5 minutes


  • An online petition for Kaavan the elephant had gained over 280,000 signatures
  • He was brought to the Islamabad zoo from Sri Lanka in the mid-1980s 
  • Caretakers responded to his aggression by chaining his legs and beating him
  • Animal rights groups have launched petitions to cover the costs of moving him

A court has ordered the release of a ‘mentally ill’ bull elephant to a sanctuary after 35 years suffering in a Pakistani zoo. 

Local and international animal rights organizations launched a campaign to free Kaavan the elephant a year ago after reports that zookeepers were beating him and denying him food. 

The Islamabad High Court today ordered wildlife officials to consult with Sri Lanka, where the Asian elephant came from, to find him a ‘suitable sanctuary’ within 30 days. 

An online petition gained over 280,000 signatures and small protests were held outside Marghazar Zoo. 

The campaign also attracted international attention, with rights groups and celebrities, including the singer Cher, calling for the elephant to be moved to a more humane facility.

After hearing the news of his release today, Cher said: ‘This is one of the greatest moments of my life.’The plight of Kaavan, a mentally tormented bull elephant confined to a small pen in an Islamabad Zoo for nearly three decades, has galvanized a rare animal rights campaign in PakistanPakistani caretaker Mohammad Jalal sits next to Kaavan the elephant at Marghazar Zoo in Islamabad Animal rights groups called on Pakistan to relocate Kaavan to an animal sanctuary. But the Capital Development Authority, the local agency in charge of managing the zoo, had refused

‘The pain and suffering of Kaavan must come to an end by relocating him to an appropriate elephant sanctuary, in or outside the country,’ the court ordered, criticising the zoo for failing to meet the animal’s needs for the past three decades. 

The court has also ordered dozens of other animals – including brown bears, lions and birds – to be relocated temporarily while the zoo improves its standards. 

Elephants are gregarious by nature, and males can become aggressive when they are separated from the herd. 

Kaavan, who was brought to the zoo from Sri Lanka in the mid-1980s, grew even more unruly when the female elephant he was being kept with died in 2012.

Activists say caretakers responded to his aggression by chaining his legs, beating him and confining him to an enclosure that was far too small.

Sunny Jamil, an activist at the Help Welfare Organization – a local animal rights group – said the mangled ceiling fan in the roof of the enclosure testifies to its insufficient height. 

Jamil, who visits the zoo regularly, says the pen can reach 40 degrees Celsius (100 F) in the summer, and that the elephant is given little water to cool down. ‘It is cruel,’ he said.Kaavan, who was brought to the zoo from Sri Lanka in the mid-1980s, grew more unruly when the female elephant he was being kept with died in 2012 Activists say caretakers have responded to his aggression by chaining his legs, beating him, and confining him to an enclosure that is far too small 

Mohammad Jalal, the caretaker for the 36-year-old elephant, said: ‘I have hardly seen him happy.’ 

Kaavan swayed back and forth as Jalal spoke – a sign of mental torment – and at one point hurled a brick at onlookers.

Animal rights groups have launched petitions to cover the costs of the move to the sanctuary. 

The Capital Development Authority, the local agency in charge of managing the zoo, had originally refused the transfer – perhaps fearing it would lose visitors. 

Instead, it had worked on bringing in another female elephant, said Sanaullah Aman, an official with the agency. 

Aman denied the allegations of abuse and said ‘every possible step’ was being taken for Kaavan’s wellbeing, without elaborating.Mohammad Jalal, the caretaker for the 36-year-old elephant, said: ‘I have hardly seen him happy’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8348989/amp/Court-orders-release-Kaavan-mentally-tormented-bull-elephant.html?ico=amp_articleRelated

‘Britain’s worst zoo’ threatens to KILL animals because it’s running out of money during lockdown

 

  • Borth Wild Animal Kingdom fear it only has enough money left for a week of food
  • The West Wales zoo costs £3,000 a week to run and has more than 300 animals
  • Owners Tracy and Dean Tweedy may euthanise the animals ‘as a last resort’
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

A zoo dubbed the worst in Britain is threatening to put down its animals because it is running out of money to feed the exotic breeds amid the coronavirus lockdown. 

Tracy and Dean Tweedy, who own Borth Wild Animal Kingdom in West Wales, fear they only have enough money to feed more than 300 animals for a week. 

The married couple say their money is running out to care for their stock and are planning ‘as a last resort’ to euthanise ‘the animals that we care for’. Married couple Tracy, 49, and Dean Tweedy (pictured) say their money is running out to care for their stock and are planning ‘as a last resort, euthanising the animals that we care for’ The zoo is running out of money to care for its 300 animals and the married couple said they are planning ‘as a last resort’ to euthanise ‘the animals that we care for’

Council chiefs ‘lost confidence’ in the ability of the zoo to operate safely following the deaths of two lynx and other animals.

In January this year, the zoo was ordered to close because it did not have trained gunmen in case of an animal escape.

But it was allowed to reopen in February before having to close again in March due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Ms Tweedy, 49, said many staff are on furlough and the zoo’s business relief grant of £25,000 has nearly run out.

She said: ‘We were already only scraping by financially after the long, quiet winter season.

‘We need help now more than ever. Despite everything, we are as determined as ever to not give up.’  Council chiefs have ‘lost confidence’ in the ability of the zoo to operate safely following the deaths of two lynx. Pictured, the lynx in the zoo before it escaped and was shot https://secured.dailymail.co.uk/embed/gamp-video/8352217/video-1571188.html#amp=1Ms Tweedy, 49, said many staff are on furlough due to the coronavirus pandemic and the zoo’s business relief grant of £25,000 has nearly run out It costs £3,000 a week to run the zoo and if the animals cannot be fed or re-homed, a cull of the animals has been considered. She said it costs £3,000 a week to run the zoo and a cull of the animals has been considered if they cannot be fed.

After the money runs out, the couple will have to start looking at re-homing but are considering euthanasia as a last resort. 

Problems for the zoo began in late 2017 when Lilleth the Eurasian lynx escaped and was shot dead by a marksman after being found at a nearby caravan site.


A second lynx, Nilly, also died in what was described as a ‘handling error’.

A report revealed one in five of the zoo’s animals died in just one year. It was discovered that monkeys, crocodiles and a leopard also died from its animal stock during 2018.

28762782-0-image-a-20_159031751901228762788-0-image-a-22_1590317533675

Tracy and Dean bought the zoo for £625,000 in 2016 to start a dream new life with their family, but it has turned into a nightmare A report revealed one in five of the zoo’s animals died in just one year. It was discovered that monkeys, crocodiles and a leopard also died during 2018.28762776-0-image-a-21_1590317526995Pictured, the police at the zoo when the Lynx escaped

28762772-0-image-a-23_1590317548668

Tracey said: ‘It would be tragic if mid Wales lost its only zoo. We work with so many local organisations on animal education and wildlife conservation that we see ourselves as a vital asset for the communit.

Tracy said many of the animals would be very hard to re-home due to licence requirements needed to look after the exotic animals. 

‘We also run as a sanctuary for animals that have been rescued from the exotic pet trade. For many of these animals, we are a last resort.ADVERTISEMENTnull

‘They came here because destruction was their only alternative.

‘They would be very difficult to re-home as the licence requirements to look after these animals and provide the proper care, can be very involved and expensive,’ she said.

The couple say Westminster has announced a fund to help zoos in England but there is no similar support in Wales.

The Welsh government said it had already provided all licensed zoos with details of existing support schemes. Ms Tweedy said many of the animals would be extremely difficult to re-home due to licence requirements to look after the exotic animals The couple say the Westminster government has announced a fund to help zoos in England but there is no similar support in Wales

‘If any zoo operators have concerns about their ability to meet the needs of their animals, they should contact their local authority’s animal health team for advice without delay as they are on hand to offer support,’ a spokeswoman said.

It said its £500m economic resilience fund provided more generous support than one specifically for zoos would have. 

A spokesman for Ceredigion County Council earlier said: ‘The local authority has lost confidence in the ability of the zoo to operate responsibly and safely.’ 

Zoos were forced to close at the end of March due to the coronavirus lockdown and many have warned their futures are in danger from the impact of the pandemic. 

Andrew RT Davies, Shadow Minister for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs in the Welsh Parliament, said: ‘This is a dire situation that the zoo finds itself in, but I’m afraid that zoos right across Wales are in the same precarious situation and desperately need support due to the profound impact of Covid-19.

‘It’s outrageous that whilst the UK Government has taken action and given £14 million to support zoos in England the Welsh Government has still not followed suit.

 

‘It is high time that the Welsh Labour Government listened to the plight of our zoos and introduce the much-needed fund.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8352217/amp/Britains-worst-zoo-threatens-KILL-animals-running-money-lockdown.html?__twitter_impression=true

Germany: Zoos plan emergency slaughter of inmates

Serbian Animals Voice (SAV)

The zoos and animal gardens in Germany are also suffering from the corona crisis. Due to the lack of income, they are under increasing pressure.

Bankruptcies are imminent – but what will become of the animals?

The animal park Neumünster has drawn up emergency plans for the slaughter of its animals because of the existential corona forced closure. It also says who will be the last to go to the slaughterhouse in the event of a fall: the 3.60 meter tall polar bear«Vitus», said Zoo Director Verena Caspari.

Vitus, the polar bear- Neumünster

The background is that the zoo currently has no income from visitors and is only kept alive by donations.

“We are an association,” said Caspari. “We do not receive any urban funds, and everything we have applied for so far has not yet been received by us. We currently only survive with donations.”

That’s enough.

“But…

View original post 577 more words

Online campaign grows to save sick and starving lions in Sudan park | Sudan

amp.theguardian.comOne of the malnourished lions sits in her cage at the Al-Qureshi park in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum. Photograph: Ashraf Shazly/AFP via Getty ImagesSudan

Park officials and vets say some of the five cats have lost almost two-thirds of their body weight

Agence France-Presse

Sun 19 Jan 2020 19.58 EST

Online calls to help save five “malnourished and sick” African lions at a park in Sudan’s capital grew on Sunday.

The lions are in cages at Khartoum’s Al-Qureshi park, which is in an upmarket area of the city, and have not had enough food and medicine for weeks.

Many people have demanded they be moved.

Osman Salih launched a Facebook campaign, Sudananimalrescue, and wrote: “I was shaken when I saw these lions at the park … Their bones are protruding from the skin.

“I urge interested people and institutions to help them.”

Park officials and vets said the lions’ conditions had deteriorated over the past few weeks. Some had lost almost two-thirds of their body weight.

“Food is not always available so often we buy it from our own money to feed them,” said Essamelddine Hajjar, a manager at the park, which is managed by the Khartoum municipality but is partly funded by private donors.

Sudan is in the middle of an economic crisis led by soaring food prices and a shortage of foreign currency.

On Sunday residents, volunteers and journalists visited the park to see the lions after their photographs went viral on social media networks.

One of the five cats was tied with a rope and was fed fluids through a drip as it recovered from dehydration, an AFP reporter who toured the park wrote.

Chunks of rotten meat covered in flies lay scattered near the cages.

The condition of the park was also affecting the animals’ health, another official at the park said.

“They are suffering from severe illnesses,” a caretaker, Moataz Mahmoud, said. “They are sick and appear to be malnourished.”

It is unclear how many lions are in Sudan but several are at the Dinder park along the border with Ethiopia.

African lions are classified as a “vulnerable” species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Their population dropped 43% between 1993 and 2014, with only about 20,000 alive today.

https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2020/jan/20/online-campaign-grows-to-save-sick-and-starving-lions-in-sudan-park?__twitter_impression=true

An Australian zookeeper took home animals in order to keep them safe from bushfires

mypositiveoutlooks.com
An Australian zookeeper took home animals in order to keep them safe from bushfires
4-5 minutes

Ongoing since September 2019, wildfires across Australia have ravaged more than 7.3 million hectares, obliterating entire towns and burning through habitats of the country’s wildlife. Those in the path of the wildfires do their best to save their properties, but one zookeeper went the extra mile – he took home most of the animals in his care to ensure their survival.

Mogo Wildlife Park is a popular tourist destination along the South Coast of New South Wales. It hosts about 200 endangered and exotic animals, including Sumatran tigers, southern white rhinos, zebras, and giraffes, as well as the largest collection of primates in Australia.

Lying directly in the path of wildfires, an evacuation order was sent out, but staff decided to stay behind to keep their wards from harm. All the animals were saved following the zoo’s established fire defense protocols.

Mogo Wildlife Park Director Chad Staples described the situation as “apocalyptic” and that it “felt like Armageddon.” The zoo was encircled by fire and smoke. “The scariest thing was how fast those winds were,” Staples said. “It got so dark it felt like it was midnight which was such a scary feeling.”

A precise plan for the safety of the animals was already in place, and as the fires moved in the zookeepers went into action. The first step was to remove all flammable materials from the area. The zoo staff had already collected thousands of liters of water, which were then placed in smaller tanks and loaded on vehicles so that staff can drive around and put out spot fires.

Mogo Wildlife Park

Then they turned their attention to the animals. Giraffes and zebras who had large enclosures where left there since there was room enough for the animals to move away from spot fires. Lions, tigers, orangutans, and other larger animals were placed in night enclosures to keep them calm and safe. The smaller ones, however, needed extra shelter.

So the chief zookeeper took some of them home! Most of the animals were kept on site, but Staples’ house provided temporary lodging for monkeys, pandas, and even a tiger. Staples said that these were mainly the animals that were highly stressed, not by the fires, but by the flurry of activity as zookeepers and vehicles moved quickly around the small zoo to battle the flames.

Mogo Wildlife Park

Mogo Wildlife Park staff Sara Ang said that “some of the smaller monkeys had to be moved to the house, the red panda is in the house and there’s a tiger in the back area of the house.”

Staples added, “Due to the amazing staff here and a well-executed plan, no one is hurt, not a single animal. Any species of animal that was small enough, or was in an area we couldn’t protect, we caught up. Right now in my house there’s animals of all descriptions in all the different rooms, that are there safe and protected… not a single animal lost.” Another staff member is keeping a tiger in their backyard.

Mogo Wildlife Park

Almost 30 people, including firefighters, have died due to the rampaging bush fires. Thousands have lost homes and properties and face an uncertain future. More than a billion animals, including thousands of koalas, are also believed to have perished in this devastating, and ongoing, fire season.

Staples said that the team battled spot fires at the 65-acre park for several hours. He expressed his gratitude to all the passionate staff and volunteers who worked tirelessly to protect the animals because they “love them like their own family.”

Mogo Wildlife Park

Temporarily closed, the zoo, however, confirmed that every animal was “safe and in wonderful care.” The heroic efforts of the zookeepers of Mogo Wildlife Park is a bright spot in this long battle against wildfires and continuing measures to save precious wildlife.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/an-australian-zookeeper-took-home-animals-in-order-to-keep-them-safe-from-bushfires/

Sign Petition: Two of this Zoo’s Three Elephants Have Died in Less Than One Year.

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Commerford Zoo

If you type in RW Commerford & Sons in Google Maps, it will take you to a small zoo in Connecticut. The park has a horrific rating of 1.5 stars and once you do a little digging it isn’t hard to see why. The zoo has been cited by the USDA for several animal welfare violations over the years and has earned the ire of animal rights advocates for its treatment of three elephants in their custody – Karen, Beulah, and Minnie.

At least they did have three elephants. Several outlets reported that two of their three pachyderms have died in less than a year. Now the infamous traveling circus just has one. Karen, died earlier this year and Beulah, the famous 54-year-old female which had been held captive by the Commerford family for more than 40 years passed away in September.

Beulah, without even knowing it, had been at the forefront of the fight for rights for elephants in the state of Connecticut where lawyers were working to earn her and other elephants’ legal personhood.

The elderly elephant died as she lived, a prisoner and a tool for the Commerford Zoo to line their pockets of money made by making her suffer. She collapsed at the Big E Fair in neighboring Massachusetts. Now Minnie is the last elephant at the Commerford Zoo and it is only a matter of time until she too passes away without ever knowing freedom.

The owners of the Commerford Zoo should be ashamed of themselves. Elephants are intelligent, sentient beings that have no business in zoos. Nor do other animals for that matter because captivity is cruel.

It’s time to stand up and say enough is enough. Sign the petition and demand that R.W. Commerford & Sons give Minnie a fighting chance at a happy life. Tell them to give her to a reputable animal sanctuary where she can be free.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/553/363/364/?TAP=1732

Petition: Urge Police to Catch Drunk Guy Who Climbed Onto a Giraffe at a Zoo!

onegreenplanet.org

By Sharon Vega
Some giraffe subspecies are endangered due to habitat loss, poaching, human-wildlife conflict and more. These wild animals suffer enough. They don’t belong in zoos. Yet many are forced to live there in confinement. One giraffe recently went through a terrible ordeal when a drunk guy in the zoo climbed on top of a fence and got on top of him. It was all caught on video. How and why was this allowed to happen? These wild animals are not even supposed to be there, and to top it all off, they aren’t being protected or guarded?

People who are reluctant to recognize the truth about zoos are probably unaware that animals in zoos suffer more than just being in captivity. They are subject to the behaviors of the human spectators around them. For instance, some zoos host parties and play loud music right next to the animal enclosures. This is completely unfamiliar to them and is terrifying and can even be damaging to their hearing or health. What’s worse is that when alcohol is served at zoos, there are cases of belligerent people not just putting themselves in danger but terrifying the animals by climbing into their enclosures or throwing things at the animals.

In the case of this giraffe, the man appears to have arrived drunk at the zoo. He was filmed by someone as he climbed a fence and then got on top of a giraffe and proceeded to actually ride the poor animal. This happened at the Shymkent Zoo in the city Shymkent in Kazakhstan, Central Asia. The zoo has over 1500 animals, including a herd of giraffes. If animals are going to be kept in captivity this way (which they shouldn’t), there should at least be security measures that keep the animals safe.

How was the drunk guy not stopped while attempting to climb the fence. He should never have been able to get on top of the giraffe. It’s a prime example of why animals shouldn’t be kept in captivity this way. Giraffes, like all wild animals, belong in the wild.

Apparently police are searching for the drunk guy in the video. Sign this petition to put pressure on the police to catch him. People have to know this is unacceptable behavior.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/petition-drunk-guy-climbed-giraffe-zoo/

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Petition: End Happy The Elephant’s 10 Years of Solitary Confinement

change.org

Joann Burrows started this petition to Director of the Bronx Zoo James J. Breheny and 1 other

The Bronx Zoo has been given the shameful title of the 5th worst zoo for elephants in the country. The New York Times calls Happy the Bronx Zoo’s loneliest elephant. That’s because this highly intelligent and social being is one of the only zoo elephants in the entire United States who is being held alone. And it looks like her living conditions won’t change anytime soon unless we do something about it.

I am asking you, my fellow animal lovers, to encourage the Bronx Zoo Director James J. Breheny to release Happy to a sanctuary where she can be in a more natural setting and live the rest of her life in peace.

New standards regarding the keeping of elephants were recently passed by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the accrediting organization for American wildlife institutions. Among their recommendations was that elephants be held in groups of three or more, as they are highly social creatures. Now, zoos around the country are scrambling to comply with the regulations by AZA’s 2016 deadline. Yet, the Bronx Zoo seems steadfast in its opinion that Happy is “happy” with her solitary life. This goes against all scientific data about elephant behavior.

Happy and 6 other elephant calves were captured in the wild from Thailand and brought to the States in 1977. For 25 years, she and her companion, Grumpy, were kept as a pair in the Bronx Zoo. When Grumpy passed away, she was paired with Sammy, who sadly died in 2006. It was then that the zoo decided to end its elephant program, but it didn’t relocate the elephants it currently had.

For 10 years, Happy has been in a sort of solitary confinement, unable to truly interact with the other elephants held at the zoo. This is a social being like a monkey or a dolphin. Elephants thrive in the company of their own kind, where they form multi-generational family groups that remain loyal to one another for life, and the elders pass wisdom down to the younger ones to help them navigate their world.

Happy is likely not at all happy. She has endured a decade of loneliness and deserves the chance to be with others of her kind in a sanctuary. Please join me in telling the Bronx Zoo to release Happy to a sanctuary and let her really have a chance at happiness.

https://www.change.org/p/end-happy-the-elephant-s-10-years-of-solitary-confinement?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=13581677&grid_position=1&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAJx7OgAAAAAAXVF1MBq%2BT6A5MmJhZTgyZA%3D%3D

Petition · Johannesburg City Council: Free Lammie the Elephant at Jo’burg Zoo · Change.org

Free Lammie the Elephant at Jo’burg Zoo
Blue Summer started this petition to Johannesburg City Council and 1 other

Lammie the elephant has been in captivity at the Johannesburg Zoo for the past 32 years. A male elephant named Kinkel who was Lammie’s companion died recently due to “unconfirmed causes”.

This is not the first tragedy that captive-born Lammie (or the other animals at the Johannesburg Zoo) have endured. Both her parents, Jumbo and Dolly, who were captured from the wild in the 1970’s, died at the Zoo within a year of each other. Lammie’s brother, who was also born at the zoo, died shortly after being sold to a French zoo.

While Lammie languishes alone since the death of Kinkel, elephant experts are calling for her release from Johannesburg Zoo to a sanctuary, saying the captive elephant’s overall well-being is being compromised. Worse, the Johannesburg Zoo has confirmed that they plan to acquire another cow to keep Lammie company, but animal welfare and elephant experts have objected, saying that the lone elephant should be released into a wild reserve where she can roam free and bond with a herd.

As sentient beings reliant on family bonds, elephants in captivity display behavioral abnormalities, suffer from diseases, disabilities and have notably shorter life spans. Due to high infant mortality rates, no or minimal conservation value has been ascribed to captive elephant breeding programs.

In addition, South Africa’s Elephant Norms and Standards prohibit the capture of elephants in the wild for permanent captivity. According to Dr. Gay Bradshaw, a trans-species psychologist who researches the effects of violence on elephants and other animals, the death of an individual has a large impact on the family and within the community. Furthermore, repeated losses in the absence of the traditional healing structures of the elephant family and culture cause sustained psychological trauma.

For 32 years, Lammie has been confined in a restrictive and very limited space. For 32 long years, the Johannesburg Zoo has profited from Lammie and her family and it is about time for the Zoo to set him free to enjoy the freedom that all other elephants or wild animals enjoy!

https://www.change.org/p/johannesburg-city-council-free-lammie-the-elephant-at-jo-burg-zoo/sign?cs_tk=Akq0GroPAQ-jAmRLVV0AAXicyyvNyQEABF8BvP8hLeyq2ENtjvlpuQLNZjc%3D&utm_campaign=98eba481797b4742b9de61dc27206e45&utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_ask&utm_term=cs