Sign Petition: The Silent Extinction of Giraffes Just Got Even Worse

thepetitionsite.com

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Government leaders of Nigeria, Malawi, and Senegal

48,660 SUPPORTERS – 50,000 GOAL

Giraffes haven’t been having a good few months. First, last November, a newborn calf died just weeks after it had been born. Then, at the same zoo, another giraffe gave birth resulting in the death of both the cow, a beloved giraffe named Cami and her calf.

But as if that wasn’t bad enough, the news for Giraffes has just gotten worse: they have just been added to the endangered species list.

Many people are unaware that the Giraffe is in danger. According to a 2016 survey, there are less than 100,000 of them in the wild. In fact there are are more elephants on Earth than giraffes. Since over the last generation, almost 40% of the species has been lost, their slow disappearance, has been called the “silent extinction.”

Giraffes are in this dire situation because of two main reasons; human encroachment into their habitat and poaching. Construction and other industries have pushed the giraffe off their principal grazing lands and locals in some areas rely on giraffe meat for food or sell it for profit. According to the Rothschild’s Giraffe Project, “freshly severed heads and giraffe bones” can bring in nearly $150. Considering that over half the people in Africa live on less than a $1.25 day. Giraffe poaching is a lucrative business.

While some giraffe species are holding stable, others are so close to disappearing that they have been designated “critically endangered”. The next classification is “extinct in the wild,” meaning the animal can no longer sustain its population naturally.

Giraffes are some of the most famous animals in Africa, but now, like elephants, rhinos and cheetahs they too are in trouble. The countries in which the giraffe roam must do more to protect these iconic African beasts. Nigeria, Malawi, and Senegal, for example, all have declining giraffe populations. They must take action.

Please sign the petition and ask government leaders of Nigeria, Malawi, and Senegal to implement programs to save their giraffes from poaching and habitat loss.

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/827/824/560/the-silent-extinction-giraffes-have-just-been-given-some-really-bad-news/

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Petition: Save 6M acres of Florida wetlands from destruction

by: Ellen Fishel
recipient: Rick Scott DEP Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

35,827 SUPPORTERS – 40,000 GOAL

It was just published today in the paper that the Trump Administration is looking into developing 6 million acres of Florida wetlands for commercial development. This came about after a huge rollback in environmental regulations, which will cause half of Florida wetlands to lose federal protection.

This will destroy not only the delicate environment of the Everglades, but also the precious water supply that is so desperately needed here.

The Everglades are already in danger because of development 30 years ago!!! Scientists are trying to restore the Everglades! It can never go back to its original state. We seem to always overlook our precious environment, our beautiful planet as $$$ always seem to be at the forefront!!

I am saddened to think our government would even think of destroying such a delicate ecosystem and all the animals and wildlife who live there. What are we leaving for future generations? We already have red tide here in part due to contaminated water that is feeding this bloom. What happens when the Everglades are turned upside down???

I would like to see this stopped and legislation passed that cannot be turned over by ANYONE to save the Wetlands. Please sign the petition to demand that the Trump administration and the Environmental Protection Agency REVERSE this rule change, and to demand that Congress pass laws to protect this precious land, once and for all!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/910/168/211/?z00m=31189648&redirectID=2798991659

 

MALAWI REMAINS FREE FROM TROPHY HUNTING! – Lilongwe Wildlife Trust

lilongwewildlife.org
December 21, 2018 5:49 am

Great news…the Government have confirmed that they have rejected the hunting proposal!

Following debate on the introduction of trophy hunting inside Malawi’s protected areas, we collected over 3,500 petition signatures in the first 48 hours – thank you so much to all who signed and shared it. Read the statement here.

Special thanks go to the Malawi Parliamentary Conservation Caucus for their strong stance. Hon Commodius Nyirenda, MP and MPCC Spokesperson, said, “Public opinion reflects that of the Malawi Parliamentary Conservation Caucus: that trophy hunting is not welcome in Malawi. We value our reputation as a tourism destination too highly. And – where legal hunting can be used as a cover for illegal wildlife trade and undermine community sensitisation efforts – we believe that the questionable revenue is not worth the associated risks that could ultimately undermine conservation efforts.”

Thanks also to PASA, the Born Free Foundation, Olsen Animal Trust, Love Support Unite and Green Paw for their extra support.

Merry Christmas everyone!

https://www.lilongwewildlife.org/2018/12/21/malawi-free-from-trophy-hunting/

Breaking! Fin Whales & Mountain Gorillas Gain Improved Status On Updated IUCN Red List; Conservation Efforts Must Continue – World Animal News

By WAN –
November 14, 2018
Photos from IUCN
The Fin Whale and the Mountain Gorilla are among the species with improved status, according to today’s update of The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
The IUCN Red List now includes 96,951 species of which 26,840 are threatened by extinction.
The Fin Whale has gone from Endangered to Vulnerable following bans on whaling, while the Mountain Gorilla subspecies has moved from Critically Endangered to Endangered as a result of collaborative conservation efforts.
“Today’s update to The IUCN Red List illustrates the power of conservation action, with the recoveries we are seeing of the Fin Whale and the Mountain Gorilla,” Inger Andersen, IUCN Director General said in a statement. “These conservation successes are proof that the ambitious, collaborative efforts of governments, business and civil society could turn back the tide of species loss.”
“Unfortunately, the latest update also underlines how threats to biodiversity continue to undermine some of society’s most important goals, including food security,” continued Andersen. “We urgently need to see effective conservation action strengthened and sustained.”
Previously listed as Endangered, the Fin Whale is now listed as Vulnerable, as the global population of species has roughly doubled since the 1970s. The recovery follows international bans on commercial whaling in the North Pacific and in the Southern Hemisphere which has been in place since 1976, there has been a significant reduction in catches in the North Atlantic since 1990. The status of the western subpopulation of the Gray Whale has also improved, moving from Critically Endangered to Endangered. Both of these whale species were historically threatened by overexploitation for their blubber, oil and meat.

“Fin Whales and Western Gray Whales were severely depleted by hunting and it is a relief to finally see their populations on the rise. These whales are recovering largely thanks to bans on commercial hunting, international agreements, and various protection measures,” stated Randall Reeves, Chair of the IUCN SSC Cetacean Specialist Group. “Conservation efforts must continue until the populations are no longer threatened.”
The nearly complete protection of Fin Whales throughout their range, has allowed the global population to reach around 100,000 mature individuals.
This update of The IUCN Red List also brings hope for the Mountain Gorilla, which has improved in status from Critically Endangered to Endangered, thanks to collaborative conservation efforts across country boundaries and positive engagement from communities living around the Mountain Gorilla habitat. The Mountain Gorilla is one of two subspecies of the Eastern Gorilla; the Eastern Gorilla species remains Critically Endangered.
Intensive conservation action, including anti-poaching patrols and in-situ veterinary interventions, such as the removal of snares, has contributed to the growth of Mountain Gorilla populations since the previous IUCN Red List assessment, published in 2008.
The 2008 Mountain Gorilla population was estimated to be around 680 individuals, but 2018 estimates show that it has increased to over 1,000 individuals, the highest figure ever recorded for the subspecies. The population growth has been confirmed through coordinated and improved survey methods.
Mountain Gorilla habitat is restricted to protected areas in two locations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda – The Virunga Massif and Bwindi-Sarambwe. Both locations are bordered by land intensively cultivated for agriculture by a growing human population. Threats to this subspecies remain high, including poaching, recurring civil unrest, and human-introduced diseases ranging from respiratory infections to Ebola.
“While it is fantastic news that Mountain Gorillas are increasing in numbers, this subspecies is still Endangered and therefore conservation action must continue,” said Dr. Liz Williamson of the IUCN SSC Primate Specialist Group. “Coordinated efforts through a regional action plan and fully implementing IUCN Best Practice guidelines for great ape tourism and disease prevention, which recommend limiting numbers of tourists and preventing any close contact with humans, are critical to ensuring a future for the Mountain Gorilla.”
Sadly, the largest North American tortoise species, the Bolson Tortoise, is one of the species that had its status change from Vulnerable to Critically Endangered on The IUCN Red List due to exploitation for subsistence consumption, as well as widespread habitat loss.
The population of the tortoise, found in isolated areas in the Bolsón de Mapimí basin in Mexico, has plummeted by over 64% in the past 30 years. The species is endangered under Mexican federal wildlife laws and captive breeding programs aiming to reintroduce the species to New Mexico and Texas in the United States.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-fin-whales-conservation-efforts-must-continue/

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,endangered species,fin whales,IUCN Red List,Mountian Gorillas

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Sign Petition: The Koala Is Heading Towards Extinction

thepetitionsite.com
by: Care2 Team
recipient: Premier Gladys Berejiklian

Count to sixty. In that one minute period, 19 animals perished in the Southern Australian state of New South Wales (NSW). They are dying because of tree clearing that has become rampant in the state under the government of Gladys Berejiklian, who has written off the environment as a concern for her administration.

19 animals a minute equals a whopping 10 million animal deaths a year in NSW. According to conservative figures, the government estimates that nearly 2000 square miles of forest have been felled between 1998 and 2015, toppling a forest and woodland area that equals twice the size of Luxembourg. In that time 10.7 million birds, 67.1 million reptiles and 9.1 million mammals have disappeared.

One of those mammals is the koala. It might seem unbelievable, but one of Australia’s most iconic animals is now under threat of disappearing.

In fact, if things don’t change, researchers say that the animals could go extinct within our lifetime. This previously unthinkable headline is mainly because states like NSW have been far too lenient when it comes to clear-cutting in the koala’s last remaining ranges. Their survival depends on having enough habitat where they are able to thrive. But without a sound policy that protects vegetation and wildlife, the famous marsupial and many other animals are likely to disappear in short order.

Is this how the Berejiklian government wants to be known? As the administration that let the last remaining koalas in NSW go extinct? We certainly hope not, but we must make sure.

Speak up and tell Premier Berejiklian’s government that they have a duty to protect New South Wales’ koala populations.

Sign and ask them to demand tree-clearing restrictions today.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/268/366/574/the-koala-is-heading-towards-extinction-and-new-south-wales-is-doing-nothing-to-save-it./

 

Petition: Humanity has a new cousin

secure.avaaz.org
Humanity has a new cousin
3-4 minutes
To President Joko Widodo, the Indonesian legislature, and all members of the Indonesian government:

We call on you to ban the North Sumatera Hydro Energy’s 510MW Batang Toru Hydroelectric Power Plant and any and all industrial development in the Batang Toru forest. These types of projects put some of the world’s last remaining orangutans at risk. Orangutans are critically endangered and this project would put this precious species further at risk of extinction.

Already an Avaaz member?
Enter your email address and hit “Send”.

First time here? Please fill out the form below.

This is wild! Scientists just announced there’s a new species of orangutan that we never knew existed before… and they need our help.

They’re called Tapanuli orangutans and they have their own distinct genes and features.
But there’s only 800 of them left — and a new dam project is about to rip through their forest in Indonesia.

But there’s still hope: the scientific announcement has made headlines, and investors are backing away from the project. Let’s end it once and for all by getting the Indonesian government to stop all industrial projects in the Tapanuli’s home land!

Sign now
, then share everywhere – when we reach a million signers we’ll take our call directly to the Indonesian authorities!

https://secure.avaaz.org/campaign/en/a_world_without_orangutans_23/

Breaking! New Report Reveals 99.9% Of 108,124 People Surveyed In North Carolina Want Federal Protection For Red Wolves – World Animal News

By WAN –
November 1, 2018

Photo from the Center for Biological Diversity
The controversial plan by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to drastically reduce protection for the nation’s only wild population of endangered red wolves, has met nearly unanimous opposition from more than 100,000 members of the public.
Out of 108,124 comments submitted to the Fish and Wildlife Service on the proposal, 99.9% spoke out in favor of the red wolves and their need for strong federal protections.
In June, the service solicited public comments on its management plan for the red wolf, which survives only in Eastern North Carolina with only as few as 30 individuals remaining.
The service suggested reducing the recovery area where the wolves can safely roam by more than 90%. The revised recovery area would only be expected to provide sufficient space for 10-15 red wolves.
The proposal would eliminate protections for any red wolves that wander off Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge and Dare County Bombing Range.
The plan would shockingly allow anyone to kill red wolves on private lands for any reason.
“People overwhelmingly oppose the Trump administration’s dangerous plan to slash the red wolf recovery area,” Perrin de Jong, a Center for Biological Diversity staff attorney based in North Carolina, said in a statement. “This reckless proposal would put these unique animals in immediate jeopardy of being lost from the wild forever. Citizens from the recovery area, across the state, and around the country, clearly want the feds to do more, not less, to protect the world’s most endangered wolf.”
“Every voice raised in support of wildlife can make a difference, and Americans overwhelmingly support the Red Wolf Recovery Program,” said Maggie Howell, executive director of the Wolf Conservation Center. “We’re counting on the service to take notice and follow the best available science to ensure that the world’s most endangered wolves remain a living, breathing part of the landscape in Eastern North Carolina.”
People living in the areas most directly affected by red wolves also expressed strong support for their conservation. Out of 2,923 comments submitted by the people of North Carolina, 2,898 comments, or 99.1%, spoke out in favor of red wolves. From the current five-county recovery area in Eastern North Carolina where the wolves live, 75 out of 95 comments submitted were also pro-wolf.
North Carolina’s governor also spoke out against the service’s proposal and expressed support for red wolf recovery.
“There is a viable path forward for North Carolina’s red wolves living in the wild, and I have directed relevant departments in my administration to work with USFWS to continue the recovery program and build upon its success to date,” Governor Roy Cooper said in a comment submitted to the Service on July 30th.
Only 19 comments specifically supported the agency’s plan to eliminate red wolf protections and shrink the recovery area. Of 30 additional comments opposing red wolf recovery, 13 came from a single real estate developer.
Volunteers from the Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, Wildlands Network, and the Wolf Conservation Center reviewed each of the thousands of comments submitted to produce this analysis.
In the past, the service released inaccurate tallies of wolf public comments it had received. In 2017, during the initial scoping period for the current plan, the agency reported only 12,000 out of 55,000 red wolf comments, ignoring extensive compilations of comments submitted by conservation organizations.
“Wildlife, including red wolves, are managed by the USFWS in trust for the American people,” noted D.J. Schubert, Wildlife Biologist at the Animal Welfare Institute. “The people have now spoken loud and clear of their support for the protection and recovery of the red wolf in the wild, it is time that the government starts to listen and comply with the public’s clear message. Less than 20 years ago, there were more than 130 red wolves in the wild. These numbers can be achieved again if the USFWS complies with federal law.”

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-new-report-reveals-99-9-of-108124-people-surveyed-in-north-carolina-want-federal-protection-for-red-wolves/

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© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Avaaz Petition – Stop Trump’s elephant slaughter

secure.avaaz.org
Avaaz – Stop Trump’s elephant slaughter
3-4 minutes
Sign the petition to President Trump, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and conservation authorities around the world:

Elephants are facing extinction and this is no time to strip them of protection. Trophy hunting drives the slaughter of elephants, increases demand for their body parts, and projects a double standard that makes it harder to tackle ivory poaching. We call on you to do all you can to reverse the US decision to allow the import of elephant trophies, before it is too late.

2,672,438 have signed. Let’s get to 3,000,000

Sign the petition to President Trump, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and conservation authorities around the world:

“Elephants are facing extinction and this is no time to strip them of protection. Trophy hunting drives the slaughter of elephants, increases demand for their body parts, and projects a double standard that makes it harder to tackle ivory poaching. We call on you to do all you can to reverse the US decision to allow the import of elephant trophies, before it is too late.”

More information:

Trump just gave a sickening gift to his son, changing the law to let bloodthirsty American hunters murder elephants in Africa and bring their heads home as trophies.

Trump Jr. shot and mutilated an elephant — and now his dad is rewarding him by making it so anyone can join the slaughter and bring home elephant body parts as souvenirs, even as ivory poaching threatens to wipe these amazing creatures out.

Let’s build a massive global outcry to shame the US into dropping this disgusting plan, and when it’s huge, Avaaz will work with key African countries to deliver it at a major wildlife protection meeting days away.

https://secure.avaaz.org/campaign/en/trump_vs_elephants/?bFAfecb&v=100017&cl=13505251035&_checksum=6621df59855e203035dcd3cacfc7eb29227c4a83a4c8a213e2100116e36a5710

Petition:Conserving Ontario’s Mountain Lions · Change.org

Carina Lai started this petition to Ian Arthur and 2 others

5-6 minutes

We, the undersigned, hereby urge the Legislative Assembly of Ontario to publicly release a recovery strategy for the mountain lion (Puma concolor) by December 31, 2019.

Background:

In 2007, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of Ontario was established with the intent of protecting over 200 species at risk. Under the ESA, the government of Ontario is required to play an active role in conserving native species. However, a decade after its enactment, the ESA has unfortunately not been effectively implemented, leaving species at risk in a vulnerable position.

One of the defining features of the ESA is the mandatory formation and implementation of recovery strategies by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) for all endangered and threatened species in Ontario. Recovery strategies are based on scientific findings and provide a framework of recommended measures to ensure the survival and recovery of a species. However, the MNRF may delay the release of a recovery strategy for a number of reasons.

Although the MNRF may sometimes be justified in deferring the release of a recovery strategy, we are concerned that this clause may serve as an excuse for the government to indefinitely postpone action towards the recovery of a species. According to the David Suzuki Foundation, as of June 13, 2017, the MNRF has failed to make available recovery strategies for over 40 species, with some recovery strategies being more than seven years late (1). One such species is Canada’s largest wildcat, the mountain lion, Puma concolor.

As a top predator, mountain lions play an essential role in the ecosystem, and severe declines in population numbers can have drastic implications on the food web (2, 3). The mountain lion was classified as endangered in 2008 and its recovery strategy is at least eight years late (4). The MNRF justifies this delay by claiming that it is giving “priority to other species” (4). However, as conservation initiatives for the species have been delayed for almost a decade, this reasoning is no longer acceptable. Because of the mountain lion’s potentially crucial role in Ontario’s ecosystems and its acute sensitivity to human activity (5, 6), we believe that every effort should be taken to conserve the species. In other words, a recovery strategy is long overdue.

As concerned citizens, we, Carina Lai and Mary Kathleen Hickox, intend to write a formal letter to three members of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario: Ian Arthur, the MPP of Kingston and the Islands, the Hon. Rod Phillips, Minister of Environment, Conservation, and Parks, and the Hon. Jeff Yurek, Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry. In this letter, we will urge the government to release a recovery strategy for the mountain lion.

But there is something YOU can do. By signing this petition and giving us your support, you can show public servants that this issue matters to you. We hope to garner enough public support so that, combined with our letter, we will be successful in pressuring the provincial government to take action on the mountain lion’s dwindling numbers by the end of next year. Help us make a difference to stop the provincial government’s continued neglect of one of Canada’s most iconic species.

https://www.change.org/p/ian-arthur-conserving-ontario-s-mountain-lions?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=13598647&grid_position=4&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAFcJ0AAAAAAAW8pHj5yEwfQzOGNlNGI1NA%3D%3D

Check out this website to learn more!

https://mary14kathleen.wixsite.com/mountainlions

References

David Suzuki Foundation. (2017). Without a trace? Reflecting on the 10th anniversary of Ontario’s Endangered Species Act, 2007. Retrieved from https://davidsuzuki.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/without-trace-10th-anniversary-ontario-endangered-species-act.pdf
Ripple, W. J., & Beschta, R. L. (2006). Linking a cougar decline, trophic cascade, and catastrophic regime shift in Zion National Park. Biological Conservation, 133(4), 397-408. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2006.07.002
Ripple, W. J., & Beschta, R. L. (2008). Trophic cascades involving cougar, mule deer, and black oaks in Yosemite National Park. Biological Conservation, 141(5), 1249-1256. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2008.02.028
Government of Ontario. (2018). Progress Updates and Forecasts for Selected Species at Risk in Ontario. Retrieved from https://files.ontario.ca/rs_progress_tracking_table_pdf_19april2018.pdf
Dickson, B. G., Jenness, J. S., & Beier, P. (2005). Influence of vegetation, topography, and roads on cougar movement in southern California. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 69(8), 264-276. doi:10.2193/0022-541X(2005)069<0264:IOVTAR>2.0.CO;2
Dyke, F. G. V., Brocke, R. H., Shaw, H. G., Ackerman, B. B., Hemker, T. P., & Lindzey, F. G. (1986). Reactions of mountain lions to logging and human activity. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 50(1), 95-102. doi:10.2307/3801496

Photo Credit:

Graham, D. (Photographer). (n.d.). Cougar, Puma concolor. [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://www.nature.ca/notebooks//english/cougar_p6.htm

Petition · Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board: Stop the Sport Killing of Foxes & Help Combat Lyme! · Change.org

Lindzey P started this petition to Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board and 1 othe

4 minutes

I am petitioning the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board to stop the trapping and hunting of foxes for sport, for recreation, or for commercial purposes.

Currently, VT is listed as the #1 state in the U.S for confirmed Lyme Disease cases according to the CDC. New research regarding the increase of mice population in connection to the decrease of key rodent predators, such as foxes, has prompted me to request that the Fish & Wildlife Board halt the recreational and commercial trapping and hunting of foxes. This moratorium will likely help reduce human exposure to the diseases contracted by ticks who feed heavily on mice, a major host. Mice are key hosts for ticks and they infect up to 95% of ticks that feed on them. Increasing mice populations means a higher likelihood to contract tick borne illnesses. Predators, such as foxes will help reduce mice becoming hosts and break the cycle of further spreading tick borne diseases.

Foxes not only kill what they’ll immediately eat, but they kill and cache large quantities of mice for future consumption. A recent study revealed that the very presence of foxes on the landscape may impede mice mobility – a greater presence of foxes cause mice to spend more time hiding (refuging), which means less time roaming and becoming key hosts for ticks. Disease ecologist at the Cary Institute, Dr. Richard Ostfeld, and Dr. Holt, ecologist with University of Florida, reason that predators can reduce disease transmission by lowering the density of reservoir-competent hosts, such as mice and other rodents. “The takeaway is, we shouldn’t underestimate the role predators can play in reducing Lyme disease risk,” said Ostfeld who originally speculated on the importance of small mammal predators in a 2004 paper. “Let’s not discount these cryptic interactions that we don’t see very often unless we put camera traps in the woods.” (1)

Recreational and commercial killing of foxes must not take priority over the health and the interests of the general public. Per the North American Fur Auction’s 2017 fur sale, red fox prices are down, with 100% of the offering selling for averages of $13-17. Very few grey fox sold at all. Also, foxes are not killed for food, so why are they killed at all when they offer the potential of helping Vermont fight its Lyme epidemic?

Foxes face a host of dangers from predators, such as fishers and eagles, to human-caused mortality, including cars and landowners killing in defense of property. Fox’s populations are managed based on available food and habitat; their presence on our landscapes is much more valuable alive than dead. Vermont Fish & Wildlife has little to no data on the number of foxes who are hunted or trapped each year, including those foxes who are killed under the nuisance wildlife provision.

In conclusion, the human health benefits of this proposal far outweigh any recreational benefits that a small number of Vermonters may experience. We have nothing to lose with this moratorium and so much to gain. For further reading on research as to the importance of predators in managing the spread of Lyme visit: Cascading effects of predator activity on tick-borne disease risk.

This moratorium will not impact a landowner’s right to kill foxes in defense of property under V.S.A. 10, §4828

1: New York Times | Lyme Disease’s Worst Enemy? It Might Be Foxes | 8.2.2017

https://www.change.org/p/vermont-fish-wildlife-board-stop-the-sport-killing-of-foxes-help-combat-lyme?source_location=petition_footer&amp;algorithm=promoted&amp;original_footer_petition_id=13271964&amp;grid_position=2&amp;pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAGS5vgAAAAAAW8pGBrIM3bIyZTJhZTI1Mw%3D%3D

Last Chance: Fight This Vicious Attack on Wildlife Petition

Bald eagle

Sept. 24 is the last day to let the Trump administration know that you firmly oppose its disastrous plan to gut protections for threatened wildlife at the bidding of industry.

Bald eagles, blue whales and alligators wouldn’t exist today without the Endangered Species Act. It’s our nation’s most successful environmental law and has prevented the extinction of 99 percent of the animals and plants in its care. But now the law itself is in danger.

If we’re going to stop President Trump and Secretary Zinke from destroying the Act’s key provisions, we all need to speak up with one voice.

Using the form on this page, tell Zinke and Trump to immediately withdraw their vicious proposal.

The Trump administration’s proposed changes would dismantle protections for polar bears, jaguars and hundreds of other endangered species, as well as the places they live.

It would also mean that hundreds of at-risk species waiting to be granted protection under the Act — like the monarch butterfly — would face delays or be denied help. We can’t let it happen.

Act now to help save the law that has saved bald eagles and scores of other iconic wildlife from disappearing. Let’s make sure this fierce and vital law remains so well into the future.

https://act.biologicaldiversity.org/onlineactions/TkeADTm-40qUeAp1iTfj1A2?sourceid=1004296&amp;utm_source=action&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;emci=4bc40129-6bb8-e811-bce7-000d3a12b7e6&amp;emdi=d9c7b3a2-e0bf-e811-af11-28187847c89e&amp;ceid=111331&amp;smartlinkdata=JmZuPU5hbmN5JmxuPUtlaXRlciZlbT1uYWNrcGV0cyU0MGdtYWlsLmNvbSZhZGQxPTIyNStIZWF0aGVyK0RyKyZjaT1IYXJyaXNidXJnJnN0PVBBJnBjPTE3MTEyJnA9TXJzLg%3d%3d

Center for Biological Diversity | Saving Life on Earth

Photo of bald eagle by Jerry McFarland/Flickr.

Petition: 95% of Lemur Species Could Disappear From This Earth if Madagascar Doesn’t Take Action to Save Them

by: Care2 Team
recipient: President of Madagascar, Hery Rajaonarimampianina

45,478 SUPPORTERS – 50,000 GOAL
Madagascar is one of the world’s richest nations in biodiversity but they may not be able to carry that title for much longer. One of their most famous animals, the lemur — a primate found only on the east African island, is under threat. And without immediate action, nearly every species of lemur could be lost.

According to a new study, of the planet’s more than 110 species and subspecies of lemur 105, a full 95% of them, qualify as critically endangered, endangered, or vulnerable to extinction in the wild; making them the most at risk mammal on the planet.

Imagine if 95% of all humans ceased to exist on Earth.

Lemurs are under attack from all sides. The island nation has lost nearly 80% of its forests since the 1950s. One study suggests that between 2005 and 2013, 2.47 million acres of forest were cut down. That’s an area only slightly larger than the island of Puerto Rico. With so much deforestation, the lemurs are losing habitat at an exacerbated rate.

What’s more depressing is that while they are losing habitat due to logging, mining, and agriculture, they are also being hunted for food. They are killed for bushmeat by villagers but are also sold in some of the country’s nicer restaurants in urban areas. Restaurant-goers can use special code words to order the dish that is technically illegal albeit all too abundant.

While laws are on the books to stop deforestation in protected forests and penalize killing lemurs rampant corruption, bribe-taking and other factors mean that many culprits get off scot-free, or if they go to court they are rarely penalized.

It’s time for Madagascar to ask itself, do they want to be the nation that let their own, unique natural heritage disappear from the Earth when they had a chance to stop it? Are they willing to take conservation seriously in order to save this unique species and ensure that it can live on for centuries?

The country must take serious action and change policy to bring lemurs back from the brink. That means punishing those responsible for illegal mining, clear cutting and poaching to the fullest extent of the law.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/543/353/808/

 

Breaking! 95% of The World’s Lemur Population Is At Risk of Extinction, Making It The Most Endangered Mammal On The Planet! – World Animal News

By WAN –
August 7, 2018

A shocking report has come to light after 50 global experts in primate conservation evaluated the status of Lemurs.
Of the planet’s 111 known lemur species and subspecies, the disheartening results indicated that 105 might qualify as critically endangered, endangered, or vulnerable to extinction in the wild; making them the most endangered mammal on the planet.
As per the report, the primates that are unique to the island of Madagascar have been threatened due to habitat loss from agriculture, illegal logging, charcoal production and mining. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, besides habitat loss, hunting the animals for food, and capturing them as pets, has emerged as a new threat as well.
“This is, without a doubt, the highest percentage of threat for any large group of mammals and for any large group of vertebrates,” said Russ Mittermeier, Chief Conservation Officer for Global Wildlife Conservation and chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) Primate Specialist Group (PSG) said in a statement. “This assessment not only highlights the very high extinction risk Madagascar’s unique lemurs face, but it is indicative of the grave threats to Madagascar’s biodiversity as a whole. Madagascar’s unique and wonderful species are its greatest asset, its most distinctive brand and the basis for a major ecotourism industry.”
The updated assessments resulting from the recent PSG-led workshop will require further validation through a review process, but provisionally find that primate experts consider a staggering 38 lemur species to be critically endangered, 44 endangered and 23 vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. This represents an increase of 12 threatened species from the last workshop conducted back in 2012.
Among the most spectacular species of lemurs up-listed from endangered to critically endangered in the assessment is the Indri, the largest of the living lemurs and a species of symbolic value comparable to that of China’s giant panda.
Another striking lemur is the critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur, one of the few primate species other than humans that has blue eyes. Probably the rarest lemur is the northern sportive lemur, also critically endangered, of which there are only about 50 known individuals left. All nine species of the sifakas subspecies have also now been listed as critically endangered.
The IUCN SSC Lemur Red List and Conservation Planning Workshop included more than 50 experts from the United States, UK, Canada, Germany, Italy, France, Portugal and Madagascar.
All of these experts are working together to implement a major action plan for lemur conservation to update a very successful plan published in 2013 using information from the July workshop. That plan succeeded in raising more than $8 million for lemur conservation, which is now being disbursed to dozens of conservation projects around the world.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-95-of-the-worlds-lemur-population-is-at-risk-of-extinction-making-it-the-most-endangered-mammal-on-the-planet/

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TAGS Animal News,Animal Welfare,,Breaking News,Critically Endangered,Endangered Wildlife,
extinction,Lemurs,Madagascar,

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Petition: Tasmania, Do Something to Save the Beautiful Swift Parrot From Extinction

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Tasmanian Environment Minister, Elise Archer

41,121 SUPPORTERS – 45,000 GOAL
The swift parrot isn’t as famous as some of its Australian relatives. Part of the reason could be because it’s so rare. In fact, it’s one of Australia’s most endangered birds, listed as — critically endangered in the IUCN Red List of endangered species. According to a study conducted in 2014, the species may face extinction by 2031 due to predation and loss of habitat.

Yet despite that warning more than four years ago, the government of Tasmania has yet to implement measures that would halt the destructive logging that is devouring this beautiful bird’s home.

Now conservationists are fighting back. Armed with a new study, they allege that the government is sitting on its hands while the old growth trees the birds rely on for breeding are slowly disappearing. Tasmania has had common sense management plans on the books for years. One that would ensure enough breeding habitat, for example, has been around for a decade. Yet, it hasn’t been put into action.

This is inexcusable, Australia has recently won the undesirable title of the country with the highest rate of extinction worldwide. If that title is only met with inaction, then the chances of survival for dozens of endangered species struggling to survive Down Under looks dire.

These parrots must be saved and the Tasmanian government must take action now to avoid disaster.

Please sign the petition and tell Tasmania that they have a duty to save the swift parrot. Your signature can make a difference.

Photo Credit: Jade Craven

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/794/736/717/

 

Petition · BLM & Nevada Federal Legislators: Save the Pine Nut Wild Horse Herd · Change.org

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Save the Pine Nut Fish Springs Wild Horses from Capture!
American Wild Horse Campaign started this petition to BLM Deputy Director Brian Steed and 4 others

We the undersigned citizens are calling on the Bureau of Land Management to leave the Pine Nut Fish Springs wild horses in their home on our public lands near Gardnerville, Nevada. These iconic Nevada mustangs have an international following and are an important tourism resource for the local area. The local community embraces their presence and the livestock grazing permitee in the area supports their protection.

The Fish Springs wild horses are managed through a community partnership that utilizes the PZP birth control vaccine to humanely reduce population growth in the herd. It makes no sense to round up and remove horses that are being successfully managed at no cost to taxpayers…. especially given that the round up, removal and storage of 45 horses in holding pens could cost taxpayers $1 million or more! Worse, given the BLM’s push for lethal management solutions, every horse removed from the range will be in grave danger of being killed or slaughtered.

This Administration has stated a commitment to honoring the wishes of local communities. In the interest of fiscal responsibility and humane treatment of these cherished horses, we urge you to honor the citizens and businesses of this area and the interests of horse lovers throughout the world by leaving the Fish Springs horses on our public lands. At minimum, any removals that do take place must be incremental and must not exceed the local community’s capacity to train and adopt the horses out to quality and long-term homes.

https://www.change.org/p/blm-nevada-federal-legislators-save-the-pine-nut-wild-horse-herd

 

Petition: It’s Time to Ban Trophy Hunting in South Africa

by: Care2 Team
target: Government of South Africa 41,872 SUPPORTERS – 45,000 GOAL

Last year Tess Thompson Talley flew to South Africa for a hunting safari where she took the life of what she called a “rare” black giraffe. But it wasn’t until recently that people noticed her sick trophy hunting photos on Facebook.

Now animal lovers, conservationist and environmentalists alike are outraged. People want to know how anyone can get enjoyment from taking such a majestic creature. In the photos, Tess proudly poses in front of the giraffes barely dead body. It’s a truly disgusting sight.

Giraffes are currently considered a vulnerable species. In fact, according to a 2016 survey, there are less than 100,000 of the animals in the wild and over the last generation, almost 40% of the species has been lost. But because few people have sounded the alarm, many have called their slow disappearance, the “silent extinction.”

These animals, like elephants, rhinos, and lions, despite their vulnerable or endangered status, are legally hunted in South Africa. Trophy hunters argue that their activities and the money they pay to take big African game actually creates an incentive for locals to protect these vulnerable species. But according to a recent study by the the International Union for Conservation of Nature “trophy hunting, contrary to the common view, not only is having negative impacts on wild populations but that there is also an extremely close link between legal hunting and poaching.”

If that is the case, then why do countries like South Africa continue to allow these animals to be killed?

It’s time South Africa put an end to this horrible practice and create policies that actually protect their unique animal species. Please sign the petition and ask South Africa to ban trophy hunting once and for all.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/200/628/320/its-time-to-ban-trophy-hunting-in-south-africa/

 

Watch “Elephants Hit by Trains in India Poses Challenge for Conservationists | National Geographic”

Petition: Gray Wolves Could Soon Lose Their Protected Status, Thanks to Trump

by: Judy Molland
target: Greg Sheehan, Principal Deputy Director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

23,841 SUPPORTERS – 25,000 GOAL

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has announced that it has begun reviewing the status of the gray wolf in the lower 48 states under the Endangered Species Act and will publish a proposal revising the wolf’s status “by the end of the calendar year.”

Translation: gray wolves, by far the most populous wolves in the U.S., will probably lose their protected status and be at the mercy of hunters and trappers.

This is terrible news for the environment. Wolves need further recovery before their protections can be removed, but the Trump administration would prefer to let their cronies kill these wonderful animals.

Please sign my petition, asking the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service not to remove protections from gray wolves.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/204/196/689/

 

Coyotes get a bad rap

Exposing the Big Game

expert tells Parry Sound Nature Club Coyote Watch Canada hopes to change perception through education COMMUNITY Apr 02, 2018 by Cathy Novak Parry Sound North Star

Coyote watch <https://dynamicmedia.zuza.com/zz/m/original_/1/5/15d75dc9-737c-48e1-9c55-d12c72068e26/EDT_PS_Nature_club_Super_Portrait.jpg>

Coyotes get a bad reputation according to an official from Coyote Watch Canada. April 2, 2018. – Coyote Watch Canada

PARRY SOUND — The Parry Sound Nature Club was privileged to host a presentation by Lesley Sampson of Coyote Watch Canada at their meeting on March 21 at the West Parry Sound District Museum.

The meeting room was filled to capacity — seems coyotes and the chance to learn about coexisting peacefully with them is something many are interested in. Sampson opened her presentation with a beautiful photo of a coyote and the quote, “How you see me is but a mere reflection of you.” Coyotes have caught a bad rap in the past, and one of Lesley’s missions…

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Four Animal Welfare Groups Sue Trump Administration After Approving Elephant & Lion Trophy Imports Behind Closed Doors – World Animal News

http://worldanimalnews.com/four-animal-welfare-groups-sue-trump-administration-approving-elephant-lion-trophy-imports-behind-closed-doors/

By Lauren Lewis –
March 23, 2018

Four conservation and animal-protection groups sued the Trump administration earlier this week over its secretive new policy of approving elephant and lion trophy imports behind closed doors.
The new lawsuit targets a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision, outlined in a March 1st memo, to shut the public and scientists out of the process for evaluating the impacts of trophy hunting of elephants, lions and other threatened and endangered species in Africa.
The Center for Biological Diversity, the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society International, Ian Michler and Born Free USA filed the suit in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.
A federal court ruled in December that the administration needed to involve the public in trophy import decisions. Instead of complying, Interior Department officials adopted a case-by-case permitting approach that fails to comprehensively consider trophy hunting impacts and severely decreases transparency. The day after quietly finalizing its new approach, the administration announced the first meeting of a pro-trophy hunting council convened to advise Fish and Wildlife on increasing trophy hunting of foreign species.
“Despite ample scientific and economic concerns and tremendous public outcry over trophy hunting, this administration seems determined to allow Safari Club International and other special interests to unduly influence federal wildlife policy decisions,” said Anna Frostic, managing wildlife attorney with The Humane Society of the United States.
The memo rescinds numerous prior rules on trophy imports, wiping the slate clean of longstanding decisions pertaining to imports of trophies from elephants, lions, and bontebok, a type of antelope. However, the service has signaled that it still intends to rely on the bad science contained in its prior authorizations to import wild animal trophies.
“Elephants shouldn’t be killed for cheap thrills, and the Trump administration shouldn’t make crucial trophy hunting decisions behind closed doors,” said Tanya Sanerib, international program legal director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Federal wildlife officials seem to be thumbing their nose at President Trump after he called for an end to the horror show of trophy hunting.”
This challenging the March 1st memo is being added to a pending court case contesting the administration’s decision last November to lift an import ban on Zimbabwe elephant trophy imports, as well as a decision allowing imports of lion trophies from Zimbabwe to the United States.
Polls show that a vast majority of Americans have already expressed their opposition to killing elephants and lions for fun and importing their body parts, but continued public pressure is needed to keep this issue in the spotlight, and to stop a small special interest group from being allowed to perpetuate the threats against these species.

Help us continue to bring you the latest breaking animal news from around the world and consider making a Donation Here! http://www.peace4animals.net/donate

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,Animal Welfare Organizations
Elephants,Trophy hunting,Trump Administration

© Copyright 2016 – WorldAnimalNews.com

WORLD WILDLIFE DAY TODAY!

huggers.ca

Today, March 3, is World Wildlife Day. Since 2013, the United Nations has set this day aside to celebrate Earth’s incredible biodiversity – and to call attention to the ongoing mass extinction (Ceballos, Ehrlich, & Dirzo, 2017). This year’s World Wildlife Day is all about big cats. As such, I have prepared a special post […]

via World Wildlife Day Spotlight: The Mountain Lion Foundation — The Jaguar

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A Federal Court Could Save Yellowstone’s Grizzlies From the Trump Administration

Exposing the Big Game

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/43181-a-federal-court-could-save-yellowstone-s-grizzlies-from-the-trump-administration

Wednesday, January 10, 2018    By Mike Ludwig

A grizzly bear and cubs play in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, on June 3, 2017. (Photo: Wolverine 9 5)A grizzly bear and cubs play in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, on June 3, 2017. (Photo: Wolverine 9 5)

The Northern Cheyenne Tribe and a coalition of environmental groups are asking a federal court in Montana to throw out the Trump administration’s decision to remove grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park from the endangered species list — a move that has paved the way for trophy hunts of the iconic animals.

Delisting the Yellowstone bears opened the door for Montana, Idaho and Wyoming to allow grizzly bear hunting on vast areas of land.

Grizzly bears in the lower 48 states are endangered and qualify for special federal protection. However…

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Save Starving Polar Bears

Polar bears are starving to death and heading towards extinction more rapidly than scientists originally expected. Sign this petition to urge the United States to combat climate change and protect these magnificent animals.

Source: Save Starving Polar Bears

“Adorable Lemurs Roam Free on This Ancient Island”  Short Film Showcase National Geographic

Petition: Defend Starving Polar Bears – Save the Arctic Refuge

To defend polar bears like the one seen in this tragic viral video, we need to immediately move away from dirty energy sources and embraced a clean energy future. Drilling in the Arctic Refuge would be a huge step in the wrong direction. Tell your members of Congress to protect polar bears in the Arctic and opposed drilling today.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/184/484/307/defend-starving-polar-bears-%E2%80%93-save-the-arctic-refuge/

Petition · Ryan Zinke: Ban elephant ivory and tusks from being imported into the U.S. · Change.org

The faith of African elephants will be decided next week. In response to mass opposition the Trump Administration has temporarily halted the policy changed to lift the ban on elephant hunting trophies Ivory and body parts, until conservation facts can be “reviewed.”

https://www.change.org/p/ryan-zinke-ban-elephant-ivory-and-tusks-from-being-imported-into-the-u-s?j=191158&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=35726509&mid=7233053&jb=8401&utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=191158&sfmc_tk=QO1jHMcMNgJVzKVuN3Ni56edc4O04QU3qq4Wb82Xn8iz3kVth2FjJh2papn9ouUX&j=191158&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=35726509&mid=7233053&jb=8401

November 3rd is National Bison Day! – Defenders of Wildlife Blog

  

03 November 2017

It’s National Bison Day!
Posted by: Caitlin Cattelino

National Bison Day has been observed annually on the first Saturday in November since 2012. In 2016, President Barack Obama signed the National Bison Legacy Act, making the North American bison the national mammal of the United States.

The American bison has a long and varied history in the United States. About 150 years ago, millions of bison roamed the Great Plains until a mass slaughter began in the early 1800s. By the late 1880s, fewer than 1,000 bison remained. However, wild bison are making a comeback throughout the West, thanks to the work of Native American tribes, government agencies and conservation groups such as Defenders of Wildlife.

Bison, a keystone species, help create habitat on the Great Plains for a number of different wildlife species, including grassland birds and even many plant species. As bison forage, they aerate the soil with their hooves, which aids in plant growth, and disperse native seeds, helping to maintain a healthy and balanced ecosystem.

Northern Colorado is one location that added wild bison to the landscape, joining other grassland species like prairie dogs and endangered black-footed ferrets. In November 2015, 10 bison, descendants of wild Yellowstone National Park bison, were reintroduced to Soapstone Prairie Natural Area, a city-owned property just north of Fort Collins, Colorado. Earlier that year, in June 2015, Defenders of Wildlife volunteers joined the City of Fort Collins and Larimer County to help ready the range for the bison’s return by pulling up old fence posts and removing dangerous barbed-wire fencing that once crisscrossed a section of Soapstone prairie. 

By August 2017, nearly two years after the reintroduction, the Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd tripled in size and were in need of more space. Again, Defenders of Wildlife volunteers teamed up with volunteers from the City of Fort Collins to help. Volunteers worked in teams to remove 3 miles of interior barbed-wire fencing, fence posts and debris from an area that will soon become the bison’s expanded range. This newly opened area will give the bison herd, which is now over 35 animals, much more room to roam! 

Over the last decade, the conservation community has contributed significantly to bison conservation, helping to bring back America’s national mammal. While bison are no longer threatened by extinction, substantial work remains to fully restore the species to its ecological and cultural role throughout the Great Plains.
Connective landscapes and wildlife corridors are key to bison recovery. We are engaged in land and natural resource planning efforts with state federal agencies, as well as advocating for better consideration of bison as a species of concern on forest lands. Our partnerships with parks and natural resource agencies as well as with private landowners make a difference with connecting landscapes so bison can access suitable forage for grazing. Defenders’ collaborations with tribes have resulted in sustaining several cultural herds in Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota and Montana. Defenders and our partners are also paving the way for Yellowstone bison – the first wild herd recovered – to be available for conservation, with animals that can be translocated from the park to supplement other herds.

Caitlin Cattelino, Colorado Outreach Representative
Caitlin works across the state with diverse grassroots organizations and media outlets to increase public support and awareness for wildlife conservation and to mobilize citizen advocates.
Categories: American bison, Bison, bison, Fort Collins, Great Plains, Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd, Wildlife, Yellowstone National Park bison

http://www.defendersblog.org/2017/11/national-bison-day/

A Path Forward for Wolves – Defenders of Wildlife Blog

 http://www.defendersblog.org/2017/10/path-forward-wolves/

Wild Jaguar in Arizona captured on remote sensor camera – Katzenworld

New Video Shows Wild Jaguar in Arizona TUCSON, Ariz.— The Center for Biological Diversity released a new video this week of a wild jaguar currently living in the United States, named “Sombra” by students of the Paolo… More

Source: Wild Jaguar in Arizona captured on remote sensor camera – Katzenworld

Petition: Endangered Cheetahs Don’t Belong On A Leash. Ban The Cheetah Trade Today.


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/517/579/348/?TAP=1732