Richa blueberry muffin overnight oats

Vegan Mediterranean-Inspired Shakshuka With Potatoes and Beans

livekindly.co

The Plant Based School

Shakshuka is a dish of eggs poached in a rich tomato sauce that has existed in Mediterranean cultures for centuries. This vegan shakshuka recipe uses potatoes and beans instead of eggs for a healthy and delicious breakfast, brunch, or dinner.

When Louise and I were working in Dublin—Ireland, shakshuka was one of our favourite dishes for our Sunday brunch. We would go to this tiny little place on Bath Ave called Juniors, and we would eat ourselves into an afternoon-long food coma. We weren’t vegan at the time, and so the shakshuka was with two large eggs in it.

Fast-forward a few years and we are both vegans. Sadly, we realized that it is not easy to find a good vegan shakshuka around. And so, a couple of weeks ago we made our own. The result was so delicious that we decided to make another one, but this time with potatoes and Italian spices instead. And it was a success!

For the ingredients, you’ll need tomatoes and small, yellow potatoes. If you live in a country with good tomatoes, then go for fresh, red, extra-ripe tomatoes. On the other hand, if you don’t have access to good tomatoes, then get some Italian canned whole peeled tomatoes. Add some tomato paste to give the sauce extra richness.

You’ll need fresh or canned white or cannellini beans. You can sub these with most other legumes such as chickpea, black-eyed beans, other beans, etc. Onion, celery, carrot, and garlic form the base for many Italian-inspired dishes. Chop them up and gently fry them in some olive oil to give max flavour to your dish (soffritto). Since this is an Italian version of shakshuka we use bay leaves, rosemary, thyme, and chili flakes. You can sub these with the traditional shakshuka spices (cumin, paprika, cayenne pepper, nutmeg).

Lastly, you’ll need extra virgin olive oil, a must in most Mediterranean recipes, flat-leaf parsley, and fresh spinach to add on top. Enjoy!

Vegan Mediterranean-Inspired Shakshuka With Potatoes and Beans

Vegan Mediterranean-Inspired Shakshuka With Potatoes and Beans

Ingredients

  • 28 oz whole peeled tomatoes, canned (800 grams)
  • 8 small potatoes (300 grams)
  • 1 cup white beans (150 grams)
  • 1 handful flat-leaf parsley (20 grams)
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 1 small carrot
  • 1 white onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 2 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp chili flakes

Instructions

  1. Finely chop onion, celery, carrot and garlic
  2. Peel the potatoes and set aside in bowl with cold water
  3. In a cast iron pan or stainless steel pan, fry carrot, celery, onion and garlic in olive oil on medium heat for three minutes.
  4. Add one cup of water, tomato paste, salt and chili flakes. Stir continuously to create a curry-like paste. Let cook this paste for two mins.
  5. Turn the heat to medium-low and add the pelati tomatoes, crush the tomatoes gently with a wooden spatula and stir well.
  6. Once tomatoes are crushed, add thyme, rosemary and bay leaves.
  7. Add the peeled potatoes and three cups of water, let simmer for 30 minutes on low-medium heat.
  8. Add the white beans and stir well, let simmer for another 15 minutes, or until potatoes are cooked and can be pierced with a fork.
  9. Let cool ten minutes before serving, this will increase intensity of flavour.
  10. Serve with a slice of thick sourdough bread or your favourite grain (rice, couscous, and buckwheat all go amazingly well with this dish).

If you enjoyed my vegan Shakshuka dish, try making this vegan Mediterranean risotto with chickpeas and a creamy cashew sauce. According to the recipe’s author, “this vegan risotto’s creaminess is accomplished using cashews, marinated artichokes, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, salt, and garlic cloves.”

This recipe was republished with permission from The Plant-Based School.

https://www.livekindly.co/vegan-mediterranean-shakshuka-potatoes-beans/?goal=0_8051ea5750-41b2aeb1d2-136082747&mc_cid=41b2aeb1d2&mc_eid=5db4ddecf5

10 Signs You Could Have a Protein Deficiency

man-641691_1920-1536x10241874459003.jpghttps://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/signs-you-have-a-protein-deficiency/

onegreenplanet.org

10 Signs You Could Have a Protein Deficiency By Chelsea Debretchecklist-2077020_1920-1536x9662123720440.jpg

Protein is an essential building block of life and plays important roles in many bodily functions, organs, building muscle mass, and even boosting energy. Simply put, you have to get that proper amount of protein in order to feel good from the inside out. The term protein deficiency actually refers to a range of protein intake — from a slight deficiency to a mild deficiency called hypoproteinemia to a severe protein deficiency referred to as kwashiorkor. While kwashiorkor is a “multifactorial syndrome” caused by severe protein deficiency and is generally seen in many “Central Africa and South Asia, where up to 30 [percent] of children get too little protein from their diet,” a mild protein deficiency “indicates a lack of body protein or a relative deficiency of one of several essential amino acids” and is “synonymous with a negative nitrogen balance.” This mild deficiency referred to as hypoproteinemia is “a condition in which a person has very low levels of protein in the blood.” As the human body “cannot store protein long term for future use” we need to “consume enough protein every day to ensure the body gets enough to work correctly.” Even though kwashiorkor is very rare in the Western world, mild protein deficiencies are commonly seen, especially with the rise of primarily plant-based eating. The plant-based world is rife with sources of protein, but for those transitioning between animal-based protein and plant-based protein, it’s important to know your sources and supplement appropriately. Protein deficiency may not be common, yet it can “affect almost all aspects of body function … [and] as a result, it is associated with many symptoms.” 10 Signs of Protein Deficiency TeroVesalainen/Pixabay While it may be easy to understand what protein deficiency is, it’s a bit harder to identify whether our bodies suffer from this deficiency or not. It’s always a good idea to take a look at your daily diet and make sure you’re consuming protein-rich foods. With that said, there are a handful of physical signs and symptoms that can also alert you to a protein deficiency.

1. Skin Issues

In severe cases of protein deficiency — such as kwashiorkor — the skin will exhibit signs of edema “characterized by swollen and puffy skin.” More moderate protein deficiencies can also be seen via skin issues including “flaky or splitting skin, [or] redness and patches of depigmented skin.”

2. Brittle Hair and Nails

When it comes to some of the physical signs of protein deficiency, pay close attention to your hair and nails! Protein is an “essential part of your hair and nails,” therefore if you protein deficient your nails may become brittle and your “hair can lose some of its luster, and may not be quite as thick as it used to be,” plus it may split much easier. On top of that, if these warning signs don’t trigger your spidey-senses, possible hair loss may do the trick. In order to “preserve protein stores” the human body “shuts down hair growth.”

3. Mood Changes

Amino acids aren’t simply “building blocks of protein,” but they are also “necessary for healthy brain function.” When you suffer a deficiency in protein, you also suffer from an amino acid deficiency, which has been “linked to depression, brain fog, sluggishness, and lack of focus.” This may manifest itself in severe irritability or increased depression.

4. Loss of Muscle Mass

It’s not too difficult to jump to the conclusion that protein deficiency — the building blocks of muscle mass — will lead to a loss of said muscle mass. This is because “muscles are your body’s largest reservoir of protein” and when you’re suffering a deficiency “the body tends to take protein from skeletal muscles to preserve more important tissues and body functions.” If protein deficiency is ignored it will lead to “muscle wasting over time.”

5. Increased Risk of Bone Fractures

A symptom that you don’t necessarily see, but definitely feel are bone fractures. If protein deficiency is left untended to for long enough, “our bodies borrow from other areas, including the storage in our skeletal muscle tissue” in order to transfer the protein to more essential organs and our brain. On top of the weakened skeletal structure, if you’ve also lost muscle mass, your bones will be “more susceptible to injuries like fractures and breaks.”

6. Trouble Fighting Infections and Healing

While the immune system is essential for fighting foreign invaders, it’s also a key player in healing infections. This means if you suffer from a protein deficiency, it can also knock down your immune system a couple of pegs. An impaired immune system “may increase the risk of severity of infections, a common symptom of severe protein deficiency.” This may also lead to recurring viral or bacterial infections. Plus, when it comes to protein and your immune system, it turns out “even a marginally low protein intake may impair” its function. Therefore, this may be one of the first symptoms you experience.

7. Increased Appetite

Milder forms of protein deficiency cause an increase in appetite, while a severe deficiency — such as kwashiorkors — has the opposite effect. As your body struggles to find sources of protein, it will attempt “to restore your protein status by increasing your appetite, encouraging you to find something to eat.” With that said, you may find that you’re craving “savory, high-calorie foods” rather than sugary treats.

8. Weight Gain

As a side effect of the increased appetite, you may find a slight or not so slight fluctuation in your weight. Unfortunately, “modern society offers unlimited access to savory, high-calorie foods,” therefore instead of recognizing the protein deficiency for what it is, we simply satisfy those cravings with the boundless food options available. On top of that, many of these foods have low amounts of proteins, so you’re still not fixing the deficiency and only increasing caloric intake.

9. Immune System Disruption

As we learned in the protein 101 section, protein is an essential component of a healthy immune system. Your immune system protects the body and helps “fight off foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses.” A protein deficiency can cause your immune system to be slightly compromised, which means a lot more sniffly noses and sore throats that just don’t go away.

10. Feeling Fatigued and Weak Claudio

You may think these issues are linked to the loss of muscle mass and it definitely is related, but there’s more to it. Protein is a macronutrient meaning it provides energy for the body. What happens when you don’t have enough protein? Weakness and fatigue. How does it work? Turns out protein is a “component of hemoglobin, which is present in our red blood cells and transports oxygen throughout the body” and when these oxygen levels drop it “could cause weakness or shortness of breath.”

Protein-Rich Plant-Based Recipes Maple Glazed Brussels Sprouts With Quinoa Risotto/One Green Planet The best way to make sure you steer clear of a protein deficiency is to simply add lots of plant-based protein sources to your weekly regimen. And, there’s a slew of options to choose from including almonds and peanuts, oats, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, quinoa, beans, lentils, tofu, and pumpkin seeds, just to mention a few of my favorites. Get your daily dose of protein starting with one of these delightful, protein-filled recipes!

Rice and Beans Rice and Beans/One Green Planet The most important part of plant-based protein is variety! This helps ensure that you’re getting complete proteins — a protein source that has all nine essential amino acids. This Rice and Beans recipe by Nita Ragoonanan combines two sources of protein — rice and beans — offering a healthy daily dose of protein. Plus, you’ll get healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, and lots of dietary fiber!

Almond Butter Tofu Stew Almond Butter Tofu Stew/One Green Planet Tofu is one of the best plant-based sources of protein available. A half a cup of firm tofu has over 19 grams of protein! This Almond Butter Tofu Stew recipe by Jackie Sobon not only provides that much-needed source of tofu-based protein, but it’s also rich in a slew of colorful vegetables meaning loads of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

Chickpea & Lentil Salad Chickpea & Lentil Salad/One Green Planet Aside from tofu, lentils are an excellent source of protein. One cup of cooked lentils has over 17 grams of protein! Chickpeas are also a wonderful protein-rich food with one cup offering over 14 grams of protein. Therefore, this Chickpea & Lentil Salad recipe by Stephanie Davies is a slam dunk of plant-based protein that is easily incorporated into the day either as a small snack, a filling lunch, or a side dish at dinner!

 

 

 

no yolk, vegan deviled egg filling

Diet Tips You Can Actually Use

vegan deviled egg yolksI love deviled eggs, but all the calories, fat and cholesterol from the yolk and mayonnaise (I use coconut oil mayo), makes it one of those snacks that should be eaten only every now and then. Here is a vegan version of deviled egg filling, that’s not only creamy, cholesterol free, low calorie, low fat, delicious (sometimes I just eat it on a spoon), but is also high in protein. You can use the filling just as you would on deviled eggs, but it’s also scrumptious on seedy crackers and celery sticks.

vegan, no yolk, deviled egg filling

Here’s the easy-to-make Deviled Egg Filling recipe:

  • 1 box medium-firm tofu, drained, and patted dry
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • ½ tsp mustard powder
  • ¼ tsp granulated garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp onion powder
  • 2 T whole grain mustard
  • ¼ cup sweet pickle relish
  • 2 T capers, drained
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Crumble the tofu with your hands into a large…

View original post 75 more words

What Every Vegan Should Know About Vitamin B12

bowl-of-fortified-granola-or-muesli-cereal-with-strawberries-and-blueberries-with-soya-plant-milk-being-poured-on-top

 

vegansociety.com
15-19 minutes

Below is an Open Letter containing detailed information on vitamin B12 from the health professionals and organisations listed at the end. If you simply want to know what to do, read ‘Vitamin B12 : your key facts’.


The information below was prepared by Stephen Walsh, a Vegan Society trustee, and other members of the International Vegetarian Union Science Group (IVU-SCI), in October 2001. This information may be freely reproduced but only in its entirety.
Recommendations

Very low B12 intakes can cause anemia and nervous system damage. The only reliable vegan sources of B12 are foods fortified with B12 (including some plant milks, some soy products and some breakfast cereals) and B12 supplements. Vitamin B12, whether in supplements, fortified foods, or animal products, comes from micro-organisms. Most vegans consume enough B12 to avoid anemia and nervous system damage, but many do not get enough to minimize potential risk of heart disease or pregnancy complications.

To get the full benefit of a vegan diet, vegans should do one of the following:

Eat fortified foods two or three times a day to get at least three micrograms (mcg or µg) of B12 a day
OR Take one B12 supplement daily providing at least 10 micrograms
OR Take a weekly B12 supplement providing at least 2000 micrograms.

If relying on fortified foods, check the labels carefully to make sure you are getting enough B12. For example, if a fortified plant milk contains 1 microgram of B12 per serving then consuming three servings a day will provide adequate vitamin B12. Others may find the use of B12 supplements more convenient and economical.

The less frequently you obtain B12 the more B12 you need to take, as B12 is best absorbed in small amounts. The recommendations above take full account of this. There is no harm in exceeding the recommended amounts or combining more than one option.

Good information supports vegan health, pass it around.

If you don’t read another word about B12, you already know all you need to know. If you want to know more, read on.
Vitamin B12 and vegan diets – Lessons from history

B12 is an exceptional vitamin. It is required in smaller amounts than any other known vitamin. Ten micrograms of B12 spread over a day appears to supply as much as the body can use. In the absence of any apparent dietary supply, deficiency symptoms usually take five years or more to develop in adults, though some people experience problems within a year. A very small number of individuals with no obvious reliable source appear to avoid clinical deficiency symptoms for twenty years or more. B12 is the only vitamin that is not recognised as being reliably supplied from a varied wholefood, plant-based diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables, together with exposure to sun. Many herbivorous mammals, including cattle and sheep, absorb B12 produced by bacteria in their own digestive system. B12 is found to some extent in soil and plants. These observations have led some vegans to suggest that B12 was an issue requiring no special attention, or even an elaborate hoax. Others have proposed specific foods, including spirulina, nori, tempeh, and barley grass, as suitable non-animal sources of B12. Such claims have not stood the test of time.

In over 60 years of vegan experimentation only B12 fortified foods and B12 supplements have proven themselves as reliable sources of B12, capable of supporting optimal health. It is very important that all vegans ensure they have an adequate intake of B12, from fortified foods or supplements. This will benefit our health and help to attract others to veganism through our example.
Getting an adequate amount of B12

National recommendations for B12 intakes vary significantly from country to country. The US recommended intake is 2.4 micrograms a day for ordinary adults rising to 2.8 micrograms for nursing mothers. The German recommendation is 3 micrograms a day. Recommended intakes are usually based on 50% absorption, as this is typical for small amounts from foods. To meet the US and German recommendations you need to obtain sufficient B12 to absorb 1.5 micrograms per day on average. This amount should be sufficient to avoid even the initial signs of inadequate B12 intake, such as slightly elevated homocysteine and methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels, in most people. Even slightly elevated homocysteine is associated with increased risk of many health problems including heart disease in adults, preeclampsia during pregnancy and neural tube defects in babies.

Achieving an adequate B12 intake is easy and there are several methods to suit individual preferences. Absorption of B12 varies from about 50%, if about 1 microgram or less is consumed, to about 0.5% for doses of 1000 micrograms (1 milligram) or above. So the less frequently you consume B12, the higher the total amount needs to be to give the desired absorbed amount.

Frequent use of foods fortified with B12 so that about one microgram of B12 is consumed three times a day with a few hours in between will provide an adequate amount. Availability of fortified foods varies from country to country and amounts of B12 vary from brand to brand, so ensuring an adequate B12 supply from fortified foods requires some label reading and thought to work out an adequate pattern to suit individual tastes and local products.

Taking a B12 supplement containing ten micrograms or more daily provides a similar absorbed amount to consuming one microgram on three occasions through the day. This may be the most economical method as a single high potency tablet can be consumed bit by bit. 2000 micrograms of B12 consumed once a week would also provide an adequate intake. Any B12 supplement tablet should be chewed or allowed to dissolve in the mouth to enhance absorption. Tablets should be kept in an opaque container. As with any supplement it is prudent not to take more than is required for maximum benefit, so intakes above 5000 micrograms per week should be avoided despite lack of evidence for toxicity from higher amounts.

All three options above should meet the needs of the vast majority of people with normal B12 metabolism. Individuals with impaired B12 absorption may find that the third method, 2000 micrograms once a week, works best as it does not rely on normal intrinsic factor in the gut. There are other, very rare, metabolic defects that require completely different approaches to meeting B12 requirements. If you have any reason to suspect a serious health problem seek medical advice promptly.
Symptoms of B12 deficiency

Clinical deficiency can cause anaemia or nervous system damage. Most vegans consume enough B12 to avoid clinical deficiency. Two subgroups of vegans are at particular risk of B12 deficiency: long-term vegans who avoid common fortified foods (such as raw food vegans or macrobiotic vegans) and breastfed infants of vegan mothers whose own intake of B12 is low.

In adults typical deficiency symptoms include loss of energy, tingling, numbness, reduced sensitivity to pain or pressure, blurred vision, abnormal gait, sore tongue, poor memory, confusion, hallucinations and personality changes. Often these symptoms develop gradually over several months to a year before being recognised as being due to B12 deficiency and they are usually reversible on administration of B12. There is however no entirely consistent and reliable set of symptoms and there are cases of permanent damage in adults from B12 deficiency. If you suspect a problem then get a skilled diagnosis from a medical practitioner as each of these symptoms can also be caused by problems other than B12 deficiency.

Infants typically show more rapid onset of symptoms than adults. B12 deficiency may lead to loss of energy and appetite and failure to thrive. If not promptly corrected this can progress to coma or death. Again there is no entirely consistent pattern of symptoms. Infants are more vulnerable to permanent damage than adults. Some make a full recovery, but others show retarded development.

The risk to these groups alone is reason enough to call on all vegans to give a consistent message as to the importance of B12 and to set a positive example. Every case of B12 deficiency in a vegan infant or an ill informed adult is a tragedy and brings veganism into disrepute.
The homocysteine connection

This is not however the end of the story. Most vegans show adequate B12 levels to make clinical deficiency unlikely but nonetheless show restricted activity of B12 related enzymes, leading to elevated homocysteine levels. Strong evidence has been gathered over the past decade that even slightly elevated homocysteine levels increase risk of heart disease and stroke and pregnancy complications. Homocysteine levels are also affected by other nutrients, most notably folate. General recommendations for increased intakes of folate are aimed at reducing levels of homocysteine and avoiding these risks. Vegan intakes of folate are generally good, particularly if plenty of green vegetables are eaten. However, repeated observations of elevated homocysteine in vegans, and to a lesser extent in other vegetarians, show conclusively that B12 intake needs to be adequate as well to avoid unnecessary risk.
Testing B12 status

A blood B12 level measurement is a very unreliable test for vegans, particularly for vegans using any form of algae. Algae and some other plant foods contain B12-analogues (false B12) that can imitate true B12 in blood tests while actually interfering with B12 metabolism. Blood counts are also unreliable as high folate intakes suppress the anaemia symptoms of B12 deficiency that can be detected by blood counts. Blood homocysteine testing is more reliable, with levels less than 10 micromol/litre being desirable. The most specific test for B12 status is MMA testing. If this is in the normal range in blood (<370 nmol/L) or urine (less than 4 mcg /mg creatinine) then your body has enough B12. Many doctors still rely on blood B12 levels and blood counts. These are not adequate, especially in vegans.
Is there a vegan alternative to B12-fortified foods and supplements?

If for any reason you choose not to use fortified foods or supplements you should recognise that you are carrying out a dangerous experiment – one that many have tried before with consistently low levels of success. If you are an adult who is neither breast-feeding an infant, pregnant nor seeking to become pregnant, and wish to test a potential B12 source that has not already been shown to be inadequate, then this can be a reasonable course of action with appropriate precautions. For your own protection, you should arrange to have your B12 status checked annually. If homocysteine or MMA is even modestly elevated then you are endangering your health if you persist.

If you are breast feeding an infant, pregnant or seeking to become pregnant or are an adult contemplating carrying out such an experiment on a child, then don’t take the risk. It is simply unjustifiable.

Claimed sources of B12 that have been shown through direct studies of vegans to be inadequate include human gut bacteria, spirulina, dried nori, barley grass and most other seaweeds. Several studies of raw food vegans have shown that raw food offers no special protection.

Reports that B12 has been measured in a food are not enough to qualify that food as a reliable B12 source. It is difficult to distinguish true B12 from analogues that can disrupt B12 metabolism. Even if true B12 is present in a food, it may be rendered ineffective if analogues are present in comparable amounts to the true B12. There is only one reliable test for a B12 source – does it consistently prevent and correct deficiency? Anyone proposing a particular food as a B12 source should be challenged to present such evidence.
A natural, healthy and compassionate diet

To be truly healthful, a diet must be best not just for individuals in isolation but must allow all people all over the world to thrive and achieve a sustainable coexistence with the many other species that form the “living earth”. From this standpoint the natural adaptation for most (possibly all) humans in the modern world is a vegan diet. There is nothing natural about the abomination of modern factory farming and its attempt to reduce living, feeling beings to machines. In choosing to use fortified foods or B12 supplements, vegans are taking their B12 from the same source as every other animal on the planet – micro-organisms – without causing suffering to any sentient being or causing environmental damage.

Vegans using adequate amounts of fortified foods or B12 supplements are much less likely to suffer from B12 deficiency than the typical meat eater. The Institute of Medicine, in setting the US recommended intakes for B12 makes this very clear. “Because 10 to 30 percent of older people may be unable to absorb naturally occurring vitamin B12, it is advisable for those older than 50 years to meet their RDA mainly by consuming foods fortified with vitamin B12 or a vitamin B12-containing supplement.” Vegans should take this advice about 50 years younger, to the benefit of both themselves and the animals. B12 need never be a problem for well-informed vegans.

https://www.vegansociety.com/resources/nutrition-and-health/nutrients/vitamin-b12/what-every-vegan-should-know-about-vitamin-b12

Good information supports vegan health, pass it around.
Further information

Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline, National Academy Press, 1998 ISBN 0-309-06554-2
Vitamin B12: Are you getting it? by Jack Norris
Homocysteine in health and disease, ed. Ralph Carmel and Donald W. Jacobsen, Cambridge University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-521-65319-3
this open letter is available on many other websites too, including here, here and here.

Endorsers of the above information include:

EVA Ethisch Vegetarisch Alternatief, Belgium,
Farm Animal Reform Movement (FARM)
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)
Vegan Action, US
Vegan Outreach, US,
The Vegan Society, UK
Paul Appleby, medical statistician, UK
Dr Luciana Baroni, MD, Neurologist-Geriatrician, President of Società Scientifica di Nutrizione Vegetariana, Italy
Amanda Benham, Accredited Practising Dietitian, Dietitians Association of Australia’s nominated expert on vegetarian nutrition
Dr Glynis Dallas-Chapman, MB, BS, UK
Brenda Davis, RD, Co-author of Becoming Vegan and former Chair of the Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group of the American Dietetic Association
Michael Greger, MD, USA
Dr William Harris, MD, USA
Prof. em. Dr. Marcel Hebbelinck, Belgium
Alex Hershaft, PhD, President, FARM, USA
Sandra Hood, State Registered Dietitian and UK Vegan Society dietary consultant
Dr Gill Langley, MA PhD MIBiol, author of Vegan Nutrition, UK
Stephen R. Kaufman, MD, USA
Vesanto Melina, MS, RD, Co-author of Becoming Vegan, http://www.nutrispeak.com
Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, Nutrition Advisor, The Vegetarian Resource Group, USA
Virginia Messina, MPH, RD, Co-author of the Dietitians Guide to Vegetarian Diets
Jack Norris, RD, Vegan Outreach director
Dr John Wedderburn, MB, ChB, Founder of the Hong Kong Vegan Society
Portuguese Vegetarian Association (Associação Portuguesa Vegetariana)
French Société végane

This information sheet was prepared by Stephen Walsh, a Vegan Society trustee, and other members of the International Vegetarian Union science group (IVU-SCI), in October 2001. The information may be freely reproduced but only in its entirety (list of endorsers may be omitted).
Since you’re here…

Join us as a member and support the vegan movement from just £2 a month. Since 1944, our members have been integral to supporting us as we spread the vegan message, help vulnerable vegans in need and work with institutions and governments to turn the world vegan. As a reward, you’ll receive over 100 vegan-friendly discounts, The Vegan quarterly magazine, podcast extra, access to a vegan dietitian and a community of vegans and much more.

Stop Everything and Eat These 10 Vegan Christmas Cookies Immediately | VegNews

Tis the season for vegan Christmas Cookies! 🍥

 

We’ve rounded up our absolute favorite festive sweet treats for you to make this holiday season. You’re definitely going to want to indulge in these delicious cookies as you snuggle up by your fire.VegNews.8NoBakeCoconutSnowballs

 

Not a baker? No worries! Try the ‘No Bake Coconut Snowballs’ these little gluten-free and nut-free coconut snowballs from the Veggie Society don’t require an oven and will satisfy everybody’s holiday season sweet tooth.

https://vegnews.com/2019/12/stop-everything-and-eat-these-10-vegan-christmas-cookies-immediately

Happy Holidays!

Super-Easy Vegan Pumpkin Pie in 3 Easy Steps | PETA

Three-Step Vegan Pumpkin Pie

Ingredients

1 15 oz. can puréed pumpkin
3/4 cup full-fat coconut milk
3/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 tsp. vanilla extract
3 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
1/2 tsp. salt
1 store-bought vegan pie crust, prepared according to package directions

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350°F.
In a bowl, combine the puréed pumpkin, coconut milk, brown sugar, cornstarch, maple syrup, vanilla extract, pumpkin pie spice, and salt and blend using a hand mixer until smooth.
Pour into the pie crust and follow the baking instructions on the pie crust package.

Makes 6 to 8 servings

http://Vegan

Vegan Thanksgiving to Go! 5 Places That Offer Takeout | PETA

Not a cook? That’s okay. For Thanksgiving you can get prepared vegan foods from grocery stores, order takeout, or use these meal-delivery services. Interested? Then pursue these options:

https://www.peta.org/living/food/vegan-thanksgiving-to-go-delivery/?utm_source=PETA::E-Mail&utm_medium=E-News&utm_campaign=1119::veg::PETA::E-Mail::Vegan%20Pumpkin%20Pie%20and%20Vegan%20Online%20Shops::::living%20e-news

White Wine Roasted Vegetables

veggiessavetheday.com
Veggies Save The Day » Vegan Side Dish Recipes » White Wine Roasted Vegetables

White Wine Roasted Vegetables get a boost of flavor while using less oil. Combine your favorite seasonal vegetables with dry white wine, garlic, and rosemary for a delicious side dish perfect for the holidays or any night!

Do you ever cook with wine? Adding your favorite wines to recipes adds extra flavor along with moisture. And forget about buying “cooking wine”.

I highly recommend cooking with wine that you would actually drink.

For this recipe, I recommend purchasing a dry white wine, such as a Chardonnay
White Wine Roasted Vegetables is a perfect dish for holiday entertaining and are flavorful and tender.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Servings: 6

Calories: 197kcal

Ingredients

1/2 bunch broccoli, cut into florets
3 carrots, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
3 yellow potatoes, cut into chunks
2 cups butternut squash, peeled and cubed
8 Brussels sprouts, quartered
1 red onion, sliced
6 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 cup dry white wine, (such as Chardonnay)
1 Tablespoon fresh rosemary, finely chopped
salt, to taste

pepper, to taste

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl, toss the vegetables with the olive oil, white wine, rosemary, salt, and pepper to coat.

Spread the vegetables in a large baking dish (or two) in a single layer.

Roast the vegetables for 45-50 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes, until they are tender and lightly browned, and the wine is evaporated.

Adjust the seasonings to taste and enjoy!

Nutrition

Calories: 197kcal | Carbohydrates: 28g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 5g | Sodium: 57mg | Potassium: 938mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 10570IU | Vitamin C: 90.3mg | Calcium: 106mg | Iron: 4.1mg
Get your FREE ebook Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes & Tips

https://www.veggiessavetheday.com/white-wine-roasted-vegetables/

38 Vegan Holiday Recipes For Thanksgiving, Christmas, Or Any Fall And Winter Meal

https://www.buzzfeed.com/whitneyjefferson/holiday-recipes-that-are-totally-delicious-and-totally?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Tasty%2011%2F20&utm_term=Tasty%20confirmed%20(engaged)

The Vegan 8 Vanilla Cupcakes

Tuesday's Horse

My most favourite vegan chef is Richa Hingle, known to the world as Vegan Richa. Hot on her heels is another tremendous vegan chef, Brandi Doming, or The Vegan 8 (the 8 representing that her recipes contain 8 ingredients or less).

I discovered The Vegan 8 on Instagram and fell in love with Doming’s baked goods — me being the obsessed baker that I am. I would love to bake than cook any day. Truly my great love besides family and animals is baking.

Today I want to feature a cupcake recipe that is particularly dear to my heart. It’s a vanilla cupcake recipe made with rice flour and no oil. This is melt in your mouth vegan heaven.

Here’s what it looks like on Instagram. I list the ingredients just below that. There are some ingredients that are not likely to be on your shelf, vegan or not, so…

View original post 589 more words

These Super Satisfying Vegan Meatballs Couldn’t Be Easier

delish.com
Lena Abraham

Park Feierbach

Few comfort foods satisfy like a hearty bowl of spaghetti and meatballs. Now, my vegan friends, you TOO can enjoy this comfort sans guilt! These chickpea based meatballs pack tons of flavor, come together quickly, and even provide a good amount of protein and fiber. Here’s why we think our vegan meatballs are the best:

No Flax

Lots of vegan recipes call for making a “flax egg”, which is basically a stand-in for eggs. Don’t get us wrong, sometimes a flax egg is the best option. Unfortunately, flax seeds can have a fishy aftertaste—NOT a flavor you want in a dish that should taste, well, beefy. We’ve found that chia seeds soaked in water give us a similar effect, but without the aftertaste. Plus, chia seeds are rich in antioxidants, fiber, and omega-3 fatty acids, benefits you’d never get from an actual meatball.

Super Sturdy

Once baked, these balls have a near-perfect texture. Not at all mushy on the inside, and perfectly firm and almost crisp on the outside. Toss them in your favorite sauce, stuff them into a meatball sub, or even serve them on top of a salad! They’re sturdy enough for any application, making them ideal repurposed leftovers or for meal prepping.

A Special Secret Ingredient

Any guesses? Fennel seeds! Don’t sleep on ’em! These little guys will give you that familiar meaty flavor. They’re smoky and savory and they make these meatballs EXTRA addictive—don’t skip!

Yields: 3 – 4 servings

Prep Time: 0 hours 10 mins

Total Time: 0 hours 45 mins

Cooking spray, for pan

2 c. canned chickpeas

2 1/2 tbsp. chia seeds

6 tbsp. water

1/2 c. rolled oats

1 1/2 tbsp. tomato paste

3 tbsp. chopped basil

1 clove garlic, minced

1/2 tsp. fennel seeds

1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 425°, then line a medium baking sheet with aluminum foil and grease with cooking spray.
Drain chickpeas, reserving liquid. Transfer chickpeas to a food processor and process until broken down.
Make chia egg: Combine chia seeds and water in a medium bowl and stir to combine. Let sit 5 minutes, until mixture gels and becomes thick.
Add chia egg, oats, tomato paste, basil, garlic, fennel seeds, and red pepper flakes into the food processor and blend until combined. If mixture is too dry, add liquid from chickpea can 1 tablespoon at a time until desired consistency is reached. Season with salt and pepper.
Form mixture into 16 meatballs and place on prepared baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, flip meatballs, and bake 8 to 10 minutes more, until golden and crisp. Serve with your favorite pasta and sauce.

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/a28708508/vegan-meatballs-recipe/

Breaking! New Report Estimates That By 2040 60% Of “Meat” Will Not Come From Animals – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
June 14, 2019

According to a new report, 60% of “meat” will no longer come from slaughtered animals by 2040.
While the ultimate goal for many is that 0% of what we eat will come from animals or their byproducts, as per global consultancy firm AT Kearney which released the report, an estimated 35% of all meat will be cultured by 2040, and 25% will be vegan replacements.
According to the report, which was based on interviews with experts, the threat to disrupt the multi-billion-dollar global meat industry is predominately due to environmental impacts such as climate change, as well as the public’s growing concern for not only their own health but for the welfare of animals.
“The large-scale livestock industry is viewed by many as an unnecessary evil,” the report states. “With the advantages of novel vegan meat replacements and cultured meat over conventionally produced meat, it is only a matter of time before they capture a substantial market share.”
The report estimates that approximately one billion dollars has already been invested in vegan meat replacements.
As reported by WAN, the shift toward plant-based diets has resulted in the formation of innovative and successful new start-ups such as Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, which already have products available in restaurants and supermarkets in several countries.
The move also has many companies and brands scrambling to restructure their food products by eliminating meat completely or incorporating plant-based options into their offerings.
With plant-based options becoming more mainstream and available to consumers at retail outlets, restaurants, and fast food eateries such as: Burger King, Del Taco and KFC, the percentage of people NOT consuming meat from animals by 2040 may be much higher than the report’s 60% estimation.
We truly hope so!
You can help all animals by choosing compassion on your plate. #GoVeg

Help us continue to bring you the latest breaking animal news from around the world and consider making a Donation.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-new-report-estimates-that-by-2040-60-of-meat-will-not-come-from-animals/

Please Go Plant-Based!

“One Person CAN Make A Difference”

TAGS: Animal News,Animal Protection,Plant Based,Plant-Based Diet,Plant-Based Meat,
Vegan Food,veganism

SHARE

Previous article
The Honeybee Conservancy Launches BeeBlitz, A National Program To Help Protect Endangered Native Bees Throughout The U.S.
Next article
Animal Advocates In New Zealand Call For An End To Farm Animal Exports On International Awareness Day To Stop Live Transport
Lauren Lewis
RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR
Breaking! Nearly 200 Cats, Kittens & Several Dogs Rescued In Large-Scale Alleged Neglect Situation In Texas
Animal Advocates In New Zealand Call For An End To Farm Animal Exports On International Awareness Day To Stop Live Transport
The Honeybee Conservancy Launches BeeBlitz, A National Program To Help Protect Endangered Native Bees Throughout The U.S.
MUST READ
Breaking! Nearly 200 Cats, Kittens & Several Dogs Rescued In Large-Scale…
Karen Lane – June 14, 2019
0
The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) is assisting the City of Killeen, Texas, in removing nearly 200 cats, kittens and several dogs…
– Advertisement –
– World Animal News Partner –
– World Animal News Sponsors –
– World Animal News Partners –
– Advertisement –
EDITOR PICKS
Breaking! Nearly 200 Cats, Kittens & Several Dogs Rescued In Large-Scale…
June 14, 2019
Animal Advocates In New Zealand Call For An End To Farm…
June 14, 2019
Breaking! New Report Estimates That By 2040 60% Of “Meat” Will…
June 14, 2019
POPULAR POSTS
Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation To Award A Historical $15.6 Million In Grants…
July 14, 2016
Breaking! France Passes Historic Bill Ordering Cameras In All Slaughterhouses
January 13, 2017
Heartbreaking News: Trump Legalizes Killing Hibernating Wolves, Bears And Their Cubs…
April 6, 2017
POPULAR CATEGORY

News2075
Video46

  • World Animal News Partner –
    World Animal News
    ABOUT US
    World Animal News brings you the latest breaking news in animal welfare from around the globe.
    Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com
    FOLLOW US
    © Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Pear and Apple Crisp [Vegan]

onegreenplanet.org

By Jessica Bose

There’s nothing like a nice warm, crisp pie filled with deliciously sweet fruit. This apple and pear crisp is great all year round, and it pairs perfectly with your favorite dairy-free ice cream!
Pear and Apple Crisp [Vegan]

Ingredients

2 bosc pears
2 granny smith apples
1/2 teaspoon orange zest
1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup rolled oats
1/3 cup oat flour or all-purpose flour
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup vegan butter, cold
powdered sugar to garnish (optional)

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350°F.
Peel, core, and dice the pears and apples into medium-sized chunks.
In a medium bowl, stir the prepared fruit with orange zest, lemon zest, fresh orange juice, fresh lemon juice, brown sugar, cinnamon, cardamom, salt, and cornstarch. Place the mixture into an 8 inch pan or dish.
Make the topping: combine rolled oats, oat flour, brown sugar, and salt. Use your hands to rub the butter into the oat mixture until crumbly. Place the topping on top of the fruit.
Bake for 40-50 minutes or until the topping is brown and the filling is bubbly. For a very crisp topping, switch the oven to broil for the last 10 minutes.
Sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve warm – don’t forget the plant-based ice cream.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-recipe/pear-and-apple-crisp-vegan/

About The Author

Jessica Bose

See My Recipes

Hi there! I’m Jess. I’m a baker, blogger, and highly caffeinated barista with an affinity for exploring the grand outdoors, growing my food, and livi… ng minimally. One day you’ll find me on the road with my traveling confectionary. Until then, I’ll be making food and playlists to share with the world from my little apartment in Los Angeles.

Easy Vegan Comfort Food Recipes To Help You Through Veganuary

Veganuary = eating vegan for the entire month of January.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/whitneyjefferson/easy-vegan-recipes-comfort-food-veganuary?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Tasty%201%2F6%2F18&utm_term=Tasty%20confirmed

It’s Really Vegan Complete Pancake and Waffle Mix Review

Vegan Treasure Hunter


I must be honest, I haven’t had pancakes in a long, LONG time! I have very little time to cook, and the store-bought stuff is full of chemicals and other stuff I don’t want to eat, so I just kind of gave up on the idea of having pancakes. Well, I was THRILLED to find It’s Really Vegan Complete Pancake/Waffle Mix!


As the name indicates, this product is vegan, soy-free, egg-free, and dairy-free! All you need to do is add water, give the batter a quick mix, and within a few minutes on a hot skillet or griddle, you have light, airy, and golden-brown pancakes!

The Original Mix has a subtle sweetness to them so they are extra delicious! I really enjoyed these with maple syrup and fruit on top. After taking these pictures, I added some blueberries to the batter, and oh my goodness, these blueberry pancakes were better…

View original post 155 more words

Triple Decker Carrot Cake [Vegan] – One Green Planet

By Gretchen

This looks like a traditional carrot cake with walnuts, cinnamon, and of course cream cheese frosting … but it’s more than that. This triple decker carrot cake is super-moist and loaded with carrots, plus the addition of tart Granny Smith apples for more moisture and flavor. The spices in combination with the perfect amount of toasted walnuts is going to send you and your guests to carrot cake paradise.
Triple Decker Carrot Cake [Vegan]
Ingredients
For the Cake:

1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup, plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 cup cake flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 3/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
3 tablespoons ground flax seeds
6 tablespoons hot water
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 medium-sized carrots, approximately 2 cups
1 medium Granny Smith apple, peeled
1/4 teaspoon orange zest
3/4 cup toasted walnuts, plus more for garnish

For the Cream Cheese Frosting:

2 cups vegan cream cheese
1/2 cup vegan butter
2 cups confectioner’s sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup vegan buttercream (optional)

For the Buttercream:

1 cup vegan butter
1 cup hi-ratio vegetable shortening
6 cups confectioner’s sugar
4 tablespoons non-dairy milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preparation
To Make the Cake:

Preheat oven to 350°F.
Combine the flax with the hot water and let stand to thicken.
In a large bowl combine the sugars with the oil, vanilla extract and the flax mixture, whisk smooth
Add the orange zest.
Then, sift together all of the dry ingredients directly into the bowl and whisk smooth.
Add the grated carrots and apple and the nuts then mix smooth.
Pour batter into greased 7-inch cake pans and bake for approximately 25-40 minutes depending on the size of your pans. Bake until they are done.
Cool cakes while you prepare the cream cheese frosting.

To Make the Cream Cheese Frosting:

Smooth cream cheese and butter with a paddle attachment.
Add sifted confectioners sugar and blend on low just to combine.
Add extract then add optional buttercream icing.
Mix until smooth.

To Make the Buttercream:

Cream the butter and shortening together with a paddle attachment until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
Add the alternative milk of your choice and continue whipping for about 1 more minute.
Add the sifted confectioner’s sugar and blend on low until smooth.
Add the vanilla extract.
Blend until smooth.

Notes

Frosting makes 3 cups. You can freeze un-iced carrot cake layers wrapped well for up to one month. Frosted cake must be kept refrigerated but may stay at room temperature for up to 3 hours max.
Nutritional Information

Total Calories: 12004 | Total Carbs: 1422 g | Total Fat: 673 g | Total Protein: 71 g | Total Sodium: 4756 g | Total Sugar: 1206 g Calculation not including optional buttercream. Note: The information shown is based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

his://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-recipe/triple-decker-carrot-cake/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&amp;utm_campaign=af8479f4fe-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-af8479f4fe-106049477

About The Author Gretchen Price

See My Recipes

Vegan recipes from a professional baker that will make everyone the best bakers they can be. My name is Gretchen Price and I am a professional pastr… y chef of over 20 years. For the last 5 years, I have been sharing all the recipes from my bakery at Gretchen’s Bakery.com as well as my experiences in the professional baking industry. I make it my personal mission to help make everyone the best bakers they can be by teaching the science of baking while making delicious recipes. I recently transitioned my blog to vegan to get my business life in alignment with my personal beliefs.

Vegan Turkeys and Sauces for 2018 Thanksgiving DinnerOne Green Planet

Online shopping can help make sure you have a food you need to enjoy the holidays the way you like. We’ve already gone over how you can find every essential you need to host a plant-based Thanksgiving meal, but there’s still plenty of shopping to do.🍁🍃🍂

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/thanksgiving-2018-vegan-turkey-sauces-shop/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=af8479f4fe-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-af8479f4fe-106049477

10 Vegan Soups To Keep You Warm During Winter – Best Vegan Soup Recipes – Delish.com

Veggie- based soups have a rep for being more of a side dish than a meal, but these vegan soups recipes are here to change your mind. There are feeling cozy, and best of all, so easy to make. Cook a batch for a crown or have leftovers all week long. Check out our easy vegan recipes and vegan dinners.

https://www.delish.com/cooking/g24448567/vegan-soup-recipes/?source=nl&utm_source=nl_del&utm_medium=email&date=103118&slide=2

32 Vegan Mac & Cheese Recipes That’ll Blow Your Damn Mind

https://www.buzzfeed.com/whitneyjefferson/best-vegan-mac-cheese-recipes?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Tasty%2010%2F19%2F18&utm_term=Tasty%20confirmed

Vegan Swap How To Swap This For That To Make Vegan

Six Simple Vegan Swaps

Strawberry Lemonade Pie

Tuesday's Horse

Hello there. I am back with a wonderful dessert idea.

Need a super delicious sweet treat to take to that summer potluck? Or to serve at your next get together?

Strawberry Lemonade Pie by Feasting on Fruit. Strawberry Lemonade Pie by Feasting on Fruit.

This is tangy and sweet, gorgeous to look at and probably not like any other dessert you have tasted summer.

It’s easy. It’s Vegan. Naturally! To get you started, here’s what’s in it.

INGREDIENTS
1 ripe banana
1/2 cup non-dairy milk
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup evaporated cane juice (I did not use coconut sugar for color purposes, but you can substitute if you wish)
1 tsp lemon zest
1 tbsp cornstarch
4-5 strawberries
CRUST
1 cup quick oats (or rolled oats pulsed in the blender)
3 tbsp water
2 tbsp coconut sugar

You can get evaporated cane juice at Trader Joe’s and order on Amazon.com.

Now you’ve seen in the…

View original post 69 more words

Petition: Dunkin Donuts A Vegan Donut Would Be a Slam Dunk in Our Non-Dairy Coffee! · Change.org

Compassion Over Killing started this petition to Dunkin’ Donuts and 4 others

Like most Americans, I love a good donut—sprinkles, chocolate icing, cream-filled, you name it. But I was disappointed to see that Dunkin’ Donuts, the nation’s largest donut chain, doesn’t offer a single vegan donut for millions of potential customers like me who are choosing to eat plant-based for animals, the environment, and their own health.

Several years ago, thousands of Compassion Over Killing’s supporters asked the donut giant for vegan options, and Dunkin’ responded to this demand with a statement on its website: “You’ve Asked and We’ve Heard,” as it poured out almond milk (which it now offers nationwide!) for its coffee. And yet all of Dunkin’s donuts still contain egg and/or milk ingredients. Now it’s time to make our voices heard once more: Join me in telling Dunkin’ we want a vegan donut to dunk in our coffee!More and more Americans are choosing plant-based fare as the public grows increasingly aware of the vast animal suffering in the dairy and egg industries, in which exhausted mother cows are slaughtered when no longer able to produce milk, and male chicks, considered useless, are even ground up alive. Many consumers are ditching cholesterol-packed dairy and eggs for their own health or to cut their carbon footprints. With plant-based eating on the rise, sales of dairy alternatives are soaring, and big brands like Starbucks, Duncan Hines, sweetFrog, and Breyers are already dishing up vegan sweet treats.

But consumers are hungry for a vegan donut nationwide, and as the leading donut chain, Dunkin’ has a major opportunity to attract a massive segment of potential customers by offering one. In fact, industry magazine QSR recently cited offering vegan options as #7 in its list of “100 Ideas for Improving Your Restaurant Brand,” while international restaurant consultants Baum+Whiteman named plant-based eating the 2018 trend of the year.

Please join me today in asking Dunkin’ for a slam dunk in our coffee today: a vegan donut on its menu!Sincerely,

Antoine Knighton, the Vegan Ref

https://www.change.org/p/dunkin-donuts-dunkin-a-vegan-donut-would-be-a-slam-dunk-in-our-non-dairy-coffee

Petition: KFC, Please Give Us Vegetarian “Fried Chicken”!, United States

by: Rebecca G.
target: Greg Creed, CEO of YUM! Brands (parent company of KFC), United States
18,000 SUPPORTERS in United States
28,108 SUPPORTERS – 30,000 GOAL

To my fellow vegetarians: stop whatever you’re doing and imagine a world where buckets of crispy, fried — but plant-based and cruelty free — “chicken” was available for you at KFC restaurants nationwide.

This can be a reality! Recently, KFC announced it would be introducing mock “chicken-like vegetarian options” at its restaurants. But there’s a catch — these options will only be introduced in the United Kingdom. The company currently says there are no plans to bring these options to the U.S., so it’s up to us to convince them.

Please sign and share my petition to convince KFC to offer plant-based “fake chicken” options at U.S. restaurants too!

A recent study found that over 8 million U.S. adults follow a strict vegetarian diet. In addition, a whooping 37% percent of Americans say they are more inclined to eat a plant-based diet when dining out. And these numbers continue to grow every day.

That adds up to hundreds of millions of new customers for KFC across the country — if only they offered more vegetarian options.

Please sign and share my petition to convince KFC to offer plant-based “vegetarian chicken” options at its U.S. restaurants!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/381/846/329/kfc-please-give-us-vegetarian-quotfried-chickenquot/?TAP=1732&utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=33f1cf373b-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_05_07_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-33f1cf373b-106049477

 

Petition Deadline is May 17th 2018 at 11:59PM – Don’t Let the Meat Industry Bully Vegan Startups! | Mercy for Animals

The meat industry is facing some tough competition these days. Delicious, healthy, and cruelty-free plant-based meat options have become a staple at most grocery stores and many restaurants, while new companies are breaking ground and creating “clean meat”—real meat without the suffering and death.

The U.S. Cattlemen’s Association, a beef-industry front group, is so afraid of this competition that they petitioned the United States Department of Agriculture to prohibit plant-based and clean meat companies from using the words “beef” or “meat” on product labels.

The USDA is now accepting public comments on this petition. Please use our simple form below to tell the USDA that restricting labels on plant-based foods and clean meat stifles competition, inhibits progress, and is both unnecessary and wrong.

Unique comments are more effective, so please consider personalizing your message before submitting. The deadline to submit comments is May 17, 2018, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern time, so act now to make sure your voice is heard!

http://www.mercyforanimals.org/contact-usda#/2

Chocolate Cashew Pudding [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

A gluten-free, totally creamy and delightful chocolate pudding – with a twist!

Chocolate Cashew Pudding [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Calories 316 Serves 4

Cook Time 15

Ingredients

1 1/5 cups soaked cashews immersed and soaked in water overnight
3 tablespoons cocoa or can use 3 tablespoons of melted dark chocolate
3 tablespoons brown sugar or, more, as needed
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Sprinkle of salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/3 cup almond milk

Preparation

Add the cashews and almond milk to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. You might have to turn your blender off and scrape down the sides a couple of times.
Add the cocoa/chocolate, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt and vanilla and blend until well incorporated
Chill for an hour at least before digging into.

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-recipe/chocolate-cashew-pudding/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=e76427252b-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-e76427252b-106049477

EXPLORE MORE RECIPES WITH THESE INGREDIENTS:

AUTHOR & RECIPE DETAILS

I’m Shashi, I believe that eating healthy is easier than you think and am on a quest to prove it! My blog is filled with mostly healthier eats and treats that also have veggies packed into them – because why not right? I hope you stop by and find something you love!

Buttery Cornbread Squares [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

The buttery flavor is attained by using a combination of avocado oil (the butteriest!) and a small dollop of vegan mayo. Definitely, use fresh corn kernels if corn is in season but if not frozen will work fine (or leave them out entirely). This vegan and gluten-free dish is southern approved!

Buttery Cornbread Squares [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Ingredients

1 cup cornmeal
1 cup gluten-free flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
pinch chili powder
1 tablespoon flax meal
1/4 cup maple syrup (or sugar)
1 1/2 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise
1/4 cup oil (avocado oil is great, but canola, grapeseed, or coconut should work as well)
1 cup water
1 cup corn kernels

Preparation

Preheat oven to 450°F. Lightly oil an 8×8-inch or a 9×9-inch baking pan with a bit of neutral oil.
In a large mixing bowl, combine dry ingredients, cornmeal through flax meal and stir. In a measuring cup combine the maple syrup, oil, and 1/2 cup water. Add to dry ingredients along with the vegan mayonnaise and remaining water. Stir well to combine.
Pour into prepared pan and bake for 20 minutes until golden and knife inserted comes out clean. Let cool for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack and cool for another 10 minutes. Cut into squares and serve. Enjoy with vegan butter (or salted coconut oil), chili, salad, you name it!

Note: (Double recipe to make a thicker cornbread)
http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-recipe/buttery-cornbread-squares/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=e76427252b-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-e76427252b-106049477

EXPLORE MORE RECIPES WITH THESE INGREDIENTS:

AUTHOR & RECIPE DETAILS

Renee Press is the founder of Fire and Earth Kitchen which offers 100 percent vegan and gluten-free cooking classes, food coaching, and chef services in Seattle Washington. She’s on a mission to make vegan, gluten-free cooking easy, accessible, and delicious for everyone. Fire and Earth Kitchen.

10 Deliciously Fruity And Chewy Gelatin-Free Gummy Snacks!

onegreenplanet.org
10 Deliciously Fruity And Chewy Gelatin-Free Gummy Snacks!
Cortne Bonilla
7-8 minutes

We all love gummy snacks but unfortunately, most contain a non-vegan ingredient: gelatin. In an effort to keep our favorite on-the-go snack available, we’ve found 10 deliciously fruity and chewy (and sweet) vegan gummy snacks that you can take with you anywhere.

Eat them on the train, or on a walk, or eat them while you lay in bed and watch Netflix. Wherever you are, pop one of these quick treats into your mouth for the ultimate vegan pleasure, at any time.
1. Organic Candy Factory Organic Gummy CubsOrganic Gummy Cubs

If you’re searching for a replacement for your childhood favorite, these Organic Candy Factory Organic Gummy Cubs are the first organic kosher gummy bear. Wow! They’re all natural, preservative and pesticide free and they contain no artificial flavors or sweeteners. These sweet little treats are made with real fruit juice and are 100% vegan and cruelty-free. You can choose from boysenberry, blackberry, raspberry or juicy peach.

Amazon reviewer, Bookfresser, said, “These are really good — better than any conventional gummy candy I have had! Not too sticky, not too hard; and, phew! No artificial stuff! I have subscribed, so I make my four bags last the month.” Get a 4-pack for $18.95!
2. Surf Sweets Sour Wormssurf sweet vegan worms

Surf Sweets Sour Worms are made from organic fruit juice and organic, natural sweeteners. It also contains 100% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C per serving! This is a great snack for kids, for yourself or to share with the entire family during movie night. These sweet worms are allergy friendly and are free of the top ten allergens. They’re also non-GMO verified!

On Amazon, Cindy said, “Yum! The texture is great and I love the sugar coating. The flavors are delicious.” You can buy a pack of 12 for $23.99.
3.J.Luehders Gummi’s Vegan Red Berriessoft candy red berries

These soft and delicious J.Luehders Gummi’s Vegan Red Berries are the perfect fruity snack. They contain no gelatin, no artificial colors or flavors. They’re totally vegan and taste like little bursts of perfectly sweet berries with each bite and chew.

Maggie Murphy said on Amazon, “A huge hit for our household vegan! Will definitely order again.” You can purchase them for only $4.40!
4. Wholesome Organic DelishFishwholesome delish fish

If you thought you’d never be able to have your sweet gummy fish again, you’ll be happy to know these Wholesome Organic Delishfish are available for vegans. They’re USDA Organic and Non-GMO Project Verified. With its fun fish shape and sweet raspberry flavor, this snack is the perfect candy for kids of all ages or adults of any age group.

Thomi Leary said, “These Delishfish are so delicious! They remind me of the Swedish Fish candies that I loved as a kid. I have a soy allergy and I find that soy is in a lot of candy so I have to find alternatives if I want a sweet treat from time to time. I love the flavor of these and I also love the ingredients.” You can buy them for just $3.79!
5. Sour Viking Gummy Candysour viking vegan candy

If you’re craving a candy that has more of a sour kick, then these Sour Viking Gummy Candy’s will do the trick. This Swedish Sour Gummy Candy in the shape of little vikings come in strawberry, pear, cherry, black currant, lemon and orange flavors, all which are delicious. They’re also Non-GMO, vegan, gluten-free, and have no added high fructose corn syrup!

Amazon reviewer Kate said, “So tasty! Best gummies ever!These are amazing!!” Buy them for $9.95!
6. Annie’s Organic Bunny Fruit SnacksAnnie’s Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks

These Annie’s Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks come from Annies, which is always fantastic and always completely organic. They contain no artificial flavors, synthetic colors, preservatives, or high-fructose corn syrup and are 100% vegan. These cute little bunnies make the perfect on-the-go snacks or after school treats for kids.

Jann C. says, “I love that these fruit snacks have no artificial colors or flavors, no preservatives, and the taste and texture is outstanding. They are pricey but my granddaughter is hooked on these bunnies now and no other fruit snack measures up.” You can purchase 9 large pouches for $17.01.
7. YumEarth Organic Fruit Snacksyum earth organics

These YumEarth Organic Fruit Snacks are USDA Organic, vegan, gluten-free, Non-GMO Project Verified and absolutely delicious! The flavors are perfectly sweet without being overbearing and they include Banana Blast, Strawberry Smash, Very Very Cherry, and Perfectly Peach. You’ll feel great about packing these fruit snacks for lunch. No guilt necessary.

This Amazon customer said, “These are a staple in our house. Really good little treat and I like the healthier ingredients.” Buy these treats for $3.05!
8. Veggie-Go’s Organic Fruit Snack Bitesveggie go’s organic

These Veggie-Go’s Organic Fruit Snack Bites are not only tasty but nutritious. They’re filled with whole fruits and whole vegetables. They contain wholesome ingredients, surprising flavor combinations, and a sweet, chewy texture. All of these products are certified organic. The only sugar comes from the fruits and veggies themselves!

Amazon reviewer Andrew said, “Great flavor and the chia seeds make it seem like you are eating strawberry fruit snacks. These are perfect for school lunches and they are healthier than your average fruit snack.” You can buy these for $6.99.
9. Ginger Candy ChewsGinger candy chews

These Ginger Candy Chews are jam-packed with mango flavoring and a bit of a savory kick. These are made from real Indonesian kettle cooked ginger and are all-natural, non-GMO, gluten-free and totally vegan. Enjoy them after a long day of work or on your evening commute to hold you over until dinner.

Amazon reviewer, Sherry.M said, “I love these candies! Not only do they taste good, but they have health benefits as well. They have actually helped with some intestinal issues I was having.” You can buy them in a 2-pack for $14.99!
10. Juicy Chews All-Natural Fruit Chewsjuicy chews vegan snack

If you want something that reminds you of a Jolly Rancher, then these Juicy Chews All Natural-Fruit Chews candy will surely suffice and satisfy you immensely. Not only are they kid-approved, but they’re adult favorited as well. They are completely gluten-free, vegan, non-GMO, cruelty-free and never contain any high fructose corn syrup or soy.

Amazon reviewer, poo_bear said, “Delicious! Perfect consistency, not too hard, soft or gummy, just perfectly chewy. Perfect flavor, just the right amount of sweetness, tartness and fruit flavor. Just lovely.” You can buy a bag of these for $24.38!

We highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App, it’s available for both Android and iPhone and has free and paid versions. The app is loaded with thousands of allergy-friendly & vegan recipes/cooking tips, has hundreds of search filters and features like bookmarking, meal plans and more! The app shows you how having diet/health/food preferences can be full of delicious abundance rather than restrictions!

Lead image source: Shutterstock

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/10-deliciously-fruity-and-chewy-vegan-gummy-snacks/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=ca149bddb5-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-ca149bddb5-106049477

“Cooking with Chris Williamson – Recipe for Vegan Carrot Cake”