Sign Petition: Sign to Demand Giraffes Receive Endangered Species Status in the United States!

www.thepetitionsite.com

  • by: Care2 Team
  • recipient: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

While giraffe populations dwindle, products made from their skins and bones are flooding into the United States. The good news is that the U.S. government has agreed to consider giving giraffes Endangered Species Act protections, which would curb these imports and save countless giraffe lives. The bad news is that the decision deadline is all the way in 2024. We must encourage the U.S. agency to act quickly before the iconic species’ numbers dwindle beyond recovery!

Sign the petition now to demand the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service list giraffes under the Endangered Species Act well before the November 2024 deadline!

Giraffes, like so many Savanna animals, have been at heightened risk in the past few decades. From poaching and habitat loss to climate change, the beloved long-necked mammals have had a dwindling population since the 1990s. Only 69,000 mature individuals remain in the wild – a whopping 40% reduction in the past three decades. And unfortunately, Americans have played a big role in those plummeting numbers.

The United States is a top importer and seller of giraffe parts, including heads, feet, tails, legs, and skins. This greed has led to rampant trophy hunting and poaching of giraffes all across sub-Saharan Africa. That means that it is the job of the United States, a country primarily responsible for giraffe trade and trafficking, to institute protections for the species before it is too late. 

Conservationists and related organizations have been pushing to increase giraffe protections for years. In April 2017, the Center for Biological Diversity, Humane Society International, and the Humane Society of the United States filed a petition to request giraffe protections, but the agency missed the legal deadline for a decision. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service cannot continue to delay this decision, but instead must act quickly to protect all remaining giraffe lives, which are precious and still at high risk. Sign the petition now if you agree! more

Sign Petition⬇️

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/325/090/364/?z00m=33032796&redirectID=3220321711

U.S. Allows Hunters to Import Some Elephant Trophies From African Countries

Elephants at a waterhole in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe.
Credit…Eric Baccega/agefotostock, via Alamy

After settling a lawsuit filed during the Trump administration, the Fish and Wildlife Service granted six permits to bring elephant parts into the country. It may approve more in the coming months.

www.nytimes.com

April 1, 2022

Miranda Green

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service informed some hunters last month that it would allow the import of six elephant trophies into the United States from Zimbabwe. The African elephant carcasses will be the first allowed into the country in five years.

The decision reverses an agencywide hold on processing elephant trophy import permits that was put in place during the Trump administration in November 2017, and has since prevented any elephant tusks, tails or feet from being brought into the country.

The reversal is the result of a September 2021 settlement with the Dallas Safari Club, a big-game hunting organization that sued the Trump administration in December 2019 for pausing trophy permit processing. The environment and tourism ministry of Namibia was also a plaintiff in the case. The Fish and Wildlife Service is required under the settlement to process the permits of the 11 hunters named in the suit, as well as 73 other outstanding permit applications. That could potentially lead to additional trophies being brought into the United States from countries that allow limited hunting of elephants for sport.

According to a Fish and Wildlife Service spokesperson, both parties “negotiated a settlement they consider to be in the public interest and a just, fair, adequate and equitable resolution of the disputes set forth in the plaintiffs’ complaint.”

The service’s decision to settle the lawsuit continues a long-running dispute between hunters and biodiversity experts over whether trophy hunting is beneficial or harmful to big game species, particularly endangered animals like the two species of African elephants. It has also prompted criticism from activists and biodiversity groups who question why the agency did not fight the lawsuit or reinstate a similar ban that was instituted during the Obama administration.

They point out that the move goes against President Biden’s commitment on the campaign trail to limiting hunting imports. The critics also say it is the latest in a series of confounding steps by the Biden administration to acquiesce to lawsuits leftover from the Trump administration and a failure to invest in more protections under the Endangered Species Act, like conserving more gray wolves. They argue these actions show that Mr. Biden hasn’t kept his word on environmental priorities.

“We expected the Biden administration would have halted everything and taken a hard look and made some tough decisions that maybe this isn’t something we should be doing given the biodiversity crisis,” said Tanya Sanerib, senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “So to have the reality be the exact opposite of that, it feels like whiplash.”

For trophy hunters and big game groups, the reversal came as a long delayed win.

“It’s a victory for conservation because in a lot of these places where elephants reside, the habitat is only made available because of hunting dollars,” said Lane Easter, 57, an equine veterinarian in Texas whose trophy permit was approved under the settlement for a Zimbabwe hunt he did in 2017.

The majority of trophy hunters are from the United States. Under the federal Endangered Species Act, hunters must prove before they import a trophy that killing the animal aided in the “positive enhancement” of a species.

The Fish and Wildlife Service’s perspective, which predates Mr. Biden’s election, is that trophy hunting can qualify as species enhancement if it’s “legal, well-regulated hunting as part of a sound management program,” the agency spokesperson said.

Big game hunters say that the money they spend on hunts is later invested in the rehabilitation of the species and economically benefits nearby communities, preventing poaching. They also say that hunting certain animals like elephants and lions can benefit overall herd health.

Hunters can spend upward of $40,000 on an African hunt in Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Zambia and Namibia, and many of them win the rights through bidding wars held at national conferences like the Safari Club International’s annual convention.

But groups like Humane Society International say that hunting a species does not benefit its survival and that the Fish and Wildlife Service should not allow paid hunts to qualify as a method of species enhancement, especially on animals the United States considers threatened. The International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2021 revised its listing for both species of African elephant to highlight that both are at greater risk of extinction.

Critics also say there is little proof that money paid for a hunt ultimately helps the species recover, especially when corruption has been found to be rampant in several of the countries where African elephants reside.

“There is no evidence that trophy hunting advances conservation of a species,” said Teresa Telecky, a zoologist and the vice president of wildlife at the Humane Society International.

When Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, big game hunters expected it would be easier to import elephant trophies. The week before Thanksgiving in 2017, the Fish and Wildlife Service reversed an Obama-era ban, allowing hunters to import elephant trophies from several African countries. The news set off a storm of disapproval and criticism, with even staunch allies of Mr. Trump warning the move might increase the “gruesome poaching of elephants.”

Just 24 hours later, Mr. Trump tweeted that he would put the decision on “hold.” After that tweet, not a single elephant trophy was approved for import to the United States.

“Because the president found trophy hunting distasteful he essentially abrogated the law with a tweet,” said George Lyon, the lawyer who represented the Dallas Safari Club, “and that’s not how the administrative process is supposed to go.”

So far, the wildlife service said it had processed eight permits. In addition to the six it allowed, it denied two, and it is expected to rule in coming months on more. Mr. Lyon estimated that as of last September, close to 300 elephant trophy permits from various African countries were awaiting processing.

Mr. Easter says he’s not wasting any time to bask in his legal victory. His elephant’s tusks are already being prepared for shipment to his home in Texas.

“They are going to hang in the living room of my house, and I will remember that elephant for the rest of my life,” he said.

He has another trophy hunt in Africa booked for August.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/01/science/elephant-trophies-hunting.html?fbclid=IwAR33VZ1781F-rUh6oYtY-jqWr6goQG1Af1p9jLNxxEg6hR7VL8YfIdXjqDk

Another One Of Biden’s Accomplishments

RIP. Mopane 🦁

A Very Proud Dellweed

Leopards on special this week: Get ’em while they’re fresh! – BEN TROVATO

bentrovato.co.za

Ben Trovato 4 – 6 minutes

Dear Brian Roodt, Owner of Quality Hunting Safaris, Purveyor of Fine Animals,

I read in the Sunday Mirror that you have rhinos and leopards on special. That’s fantastic news. There’s a special on braai packs at my local Spar, but your deal sounds way better. I could do with a juicy leopard kebab right now!

You told the paper that the idea behind the promotion is to lure hunters back to Namibia. Windhoek must be overrun with animals since global travel fell off the back of the bakkie. Can I shoot them from my hotel window? More importantly, is the 20% discount just for overseas hunters or can anyone with a weapon take up your generous offer? I only have a speargun but if I can get close enough it shouldn’t be a problem. I might need help reeling in a buffalo.

You told the Mirror that hunting is vital if Namibian wildlife is to be protected from poachers. This makes perfect sense. I bet animals often run towards you begging to be shot by a decent, God-fearing white man rather than some swarthy heathen from Mozambique.

You also said the animals always have a chance of “escaping the sights” of the shooter. It’s very kind of you to give them that option. And those that can’t dodge a bullet fired from 500m away by a man disguised as a silwerbossie only have to outrun the Land Cruiser until it runs out of fuel. Can’t get fairer than that.

You say on your website that “leopard hunting is largely an exercise in patience and can last as long as 12 days”. That can’t be right. I’m not courting a woman, you know. I’d want to get in, shoot one in the face and be back in the bar for sundowners. Couldn’t you just tie one to a tree for me? Oh, right. You say you practice “ethical hunting”.

Actually, twelve days might not be so bad. I thought it involved walking. “This time is spent quietly waiting inside the pop-up blinds located near the bait drop.” Is the bait ethically sourced? Never mind. If you left the bait right outside the hide, we could just grab him while he’s snout down, bring him back to the lodge and kick him to death around the braai. Would something like that cost extra?

“If you have what it takes,” says your website, “bagging your monster tom will be an experience you won’t soon forget.” By “what it takes”, do you mean a good aim, a high-powered rifle or the requisite sociopathic tendencies? I love that you refer to a leopard as a “monster tom”, as if he’s some huge murderous ginger tomcat with an impressive set of testicles and a penchant for roaming the neighbourhood looking for fights and casual sex.

I do like the look of your rhino special. Even though your prices are only in dollars and euros, I have a good brain and with a little help managed to convert everything into rands. So, R337 000. I don’t know what this comes to after you factor in the 20% discount. I’m not that clever. Do you do returns? I might find my rhino has a grumpy face and then I’d like to shoot another at no extra cost.

I see the fee includes five days’ accommodation in the lodge. Are drinks included? I can easily finish off a quarter of a million rand’s worth of beer in five days and wouldn’t want to be charged for that as well.

Your leopard special is a bit steep at R366 000, but if it comes with chips and a complementary cocktail, I’m in. It would mean travelling to Namibia, though, so maybe not. At least the rhino special is available in South Africa.

My favourite, though, is your combo deal. I’m a big fan. When I go to a seafood restaurant, I always have the hake and prawn combo. Your hippo and croc combo sounds delicious. Do you pair it with Jägermeister? At R242 000, it’s a pretty good deal for these violent water-based creatures, even though a visually impaired toddler would be able to shoot a croc. It’s their own fault for being so lethargic. Would I be responsible for cutting off their heads and shipping them back to my place? I hope not. It looks like messy work.

Hold on, I see you also offer five of the Tiny Ten for R136 000. That’s R27 000 apiece for something small enough to fit into a Woolies bag. Now there’s a good deal! My speargun would be perfectly suited to reeling in a steenbokkie or two. This is definitely more my thing. No heavy lifting. A klipspringer will come right up to you and eat out of your hand. You could strangle him without even spilling your drink.

See you on the killing fields, boet.

https://bentrovato.co.za/leopards-on-special-this-week-get-em-while-theyre-fresh/?fbclid=IwAR2EPxCHLygxGgUTY1kLvqNmv8e6A78U3FTUXW2ieva8JotSPiGvnNk-3o8

How the Head of the N.R.A. and His Wife Secretly Shipped Their Elephant Trophies Home

www.newyorker.com

Condé Nast


This story was published in partnership with The Trace, a nonprofit news organization covering guns in America.

In the early fall of 2013, an export company in Botswana prepared a shipment of animal parts for Wayne LaPierre, the head of the National Rifle Association, and his wife, Susan. One of the business’s managers e-mailed the couple a list of trophies from their recent hunt and asked them to confirm its accuracy: one cape-buffalo skull, two sheets of elephant skin, two elephant ears, four elephant tusks, and four front elephant feet. Once the inventory was confirmed, the e-mail stated, “we will be able to start the dipping and packing process.” Ten days later, Susan wrote back with a request: the shipment should have no clear links to the LaPierres. She told the shipping company to use the name of an American taxidermist as “the consignee” for the items, and further requested that the company “not use our names anywhere if at all possible.” Susan noted that the couple also expected to receive, along with the elephant trophies, an assortment of skulls and skins from warthogs, impalas, a zebra, and a hyena. Once the animal parts arrived in the States, the taxidermist would turn them into decorations for the couple’s home in Virginia, and prepare the elephant skins so they could be used to make personal accessories, such as handbags.

The LaPierres felt secrecy was needed, the e-mails show, because of a public uproar over an episode of the hunting show “Under Wild Skies,” in which the host, Tony Makris, had fatally shot an elephant. The N.R.A. sponsored the program, and the couple feared potential blowback if the details of their Botswana hunt became public. Footage of their safari, which was filmed for “Under Wild Skies” and recently published by The Trace and The New Yorker, shows that Wayne had struggled to kill an elephant at close range, while Susan felled hers with a single shot and cut off its tail in jubilation. Plans to air an episode featuring the LaPierres’ hunt were cancelled.

Records obtained by The Trace and The New Yorker show that Susan leveraged the LaPierres’ status to secretly ship animal trophies from their safari to the U.S., where the couple received free taxidermy work. New York Attorney General Letitia James, who has regulatory authority over the N.R.A., is currently seeking to dissolve the nonprofit for a range of alleged abuses, including a disregard for internal controls designed to prevent self-dealing and corruption by its executives. In a complaint filed last August, James’s office asserted that trophy fees and taxidermy work “constituted private benefits and gifts in excess of authorized amounts pursuant to NRA policy to LaPierre and his wife.” The new records appear to confirm those allegations. The N.R.A.’s rules explicitly state that gifts from contractors cannot exceed two hundred and fifty dollars. The shipping and taxidermy of the Botswana trophies cost thousands, and provided no benefit to the N.R.A.—only to the LaPierres. In the complaint, James’s office alleged that the LaPierres also received improper benefits related to big-game hunting trips in countries including Tanzania, South Africa, and Argentina. The attorney general declined to comment further on the details of the case.

Taxidermy work orders containing the LaPierres’ names called for the elephants’ four front feet to be turned into “stools,” an “umbrella stand,” and a “trash can.” At their request, tusks were mounted, skulls were preserved, and the hyena became a rug. The episode represents a rare instance in which the gun group’s embattled chief executive is captured, on paper, unambiguously violating N.R.A. rules; the e-mails show that Susan directed the process while Makris’s company, Under Wild Skies Inc., which received millions of dollars from the N.R.A., picked up the tab.

Andrew Arulanandam, the N.R.A.’s managing director of public affairs, said, over e-mail, that the LaPierres’ “activity in Botswana—from more than seven years ago—was legal and fully permitted.” The couple’s safari trips, he added, were meant to “extol the benefits of hunting and promote the brand of the N.R.A. with one of its core audiences.” Moreover, he claimed, “Many of the most notable hunting trophies in question are at the N.R.A. museum or have been donated by the N.R.A. to other public attractions.”

The LaPierres’ effort to keep their taxidermy work secret spanned four months and involved multiple individuals, companies, and countries. On September 27, 2013, the shipping company in Botswana sent its first e-mail to the LaPierres and informed them that the animal parts would be sent to a different company, in Johannesburg, South Africa, before making their way to the United States. “We will be keeping you advised on the progress of this shipment as it moves along these processes,” the message said. In early October, after multiple phone calls with Susan, the American taxidermist wrote to one of the shipping agents involved in the exportation process. He explained that there had been a recent controversy involving Makris, and that the LaPierres “can not afford bad publicity and a out cry.” The taxidermist added, “That is why they are trying not to have there names show up on these shipments so the information does not fall into the wrong hands.” Two months later, the taxidermist checked in with Makris, and asked what he should do with the items once he received them. “W and Susan will tell you how they want theirs mounted,” Makris replied, before reminding the taxidermist that “they said you could handle the import discreetly.” Makris then informed the taxidermist that he would pick up the couple’s tab.

Throughout December, 2013, e-mails show that the taxidermist negotiated with both export companies on the couple’s behalf, with Susan, and also others, copied. “AS requested by the LaPierre’s in a earlier email there name and contact information is to be replaced with my name and contact information,” one note to the Botswana company read. The organization replied that trophies “can only be exported from Botswana in the name of the licensee,” and that “it’s been that way for years, and the export regulations stipulate this.” The taxidermist replied, “This request was only made by Susan and Wayne LaPierre and understand you need to follow the law were applicable.”

The taxidermist then turned his attention to the company in South Africa. On December 10th, the taxidermist told Susan that, once the hunting trophies arrived in Johannesburg, an agent would generate a new air waybill to attach to the shipment and enter the taxidermist’s name on it as the consignee, instead of the LaPierres’. When the trophies arrived in the United States and were cleared through government agencies, it would look as though they belonged to the taxidermist. “Awesome,” Susan replied.

Once the shipping crates landed in Johannesburg, another contact of the taxidermist’s drove two hours to check if the LaPierres’ names were written on the containers. When the friend discovered that they were, he scrubbed them off. In late January, 2014, the taxidermist told Susan that the shipment had arrived. “Looks like everything is here and no protestors,” he wrote.

After Susan killed the elephant in Botswana, video shows, she was fixated on the creature’s feet. As she touched them, she said, “He’s so wrinkly. . . . Wow. A podiatrist would love working on him.” Photographs of the taxidermied appendages show that the animal’s wrinkled gray skin, the light coating of hair, and the massive, cracked toenails are all preserved, and, in the case of the stools, topped with wooden rings and black leather seating pads.

The taxidermist had successfully completed a highly sensitive, laborious project. Two years later, in 2016, he reached out to Susan because he was trying to buy a boat from someone she and Wayne knew, and he hoped that Wayne could connect them. In an e-mail, the taxidermist said it was fine if she could not help, noting that “life will go on.” Still, he asked for the courtesy of a reply, one way or the other. He did not receive one.

Arulanandam, the N.R.A spokesman, alleged that “communications” with the taxidermist stopped after he “appeared to make threats against members of an N.R.A. delegation that participated in the Botswana excursion. He also sought benefits and payments to which he was not entitled.”

The taxidermist wrote a parting e-mail three months later, expressing his frustration at the lack of response. It wasn’t so long ago, he said, that Susan had “begged” him over the phone to remove the LaPierres’ names from their “harvested Elephants” and promised him “ ‘A BIG FAVOR’ ” in return. In case she had forgotten, he reminded her, “you could not afford protesters” and a “media shit storm.”


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A Great Loss…

Petition · Justin Trudeau: PM Trudeau: Ban Trophy Hunting of Polar Bears · Change.org

Günter Singer started this petition to Prime Minister of Canada/Premier ministre du Canada Justin Trudeau

Dear Prime Minister,

Polar bears are being killed by the hundreds every year by trophy hunters from all over the globe, especially the USA, while the species is facing serious threats from climate change.

On top of it, China is today the world’s largest buyer of polar bear fur. Growing demand and rising prices for their hides is thought to have led to an increase in polar bear hunting. China has also imports live polar bears for entertainment in hotels.

There are now estimated to be as few as 20,000 polar bears remaining in the wild.

Killing polar bears for ‘recreation’ could now push this magnificent species over the edge towards extinction.

Canada has two-thirds of the world’s remaining polar bears.

It is the only country in the world that permits the commercial trophy hunting of the White Bear.

We ask you to ban all trophy hunting of polar bears, and to halt commercial trade in polar bears and their body parts.

https://www.change.org/p/justin-trudeau-pm-trudeau-ban-trophy-hunting-of-polar-bears?recruiter=1086472198&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_initial&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial&recruited_by_id=9e9feb60-8fb3-11ea-82d1-6f0ab3ee3181&utm_content=fht-29409338-en-us%3A0&fbclid=IwAR3AIR9YSeD0mcwzEhNkuT3mNqOtZh8jcIEPsXOBXpFm5DtdvvEWNvb4DgA

Petition · Ban lion trophy hunting imports into the UK · Change.org

www.change.org

Pieter Kat started this petition to Conservative Party Leader Boris Johnson and 6 others

In 2019, Barbara Creecy – South Africa’s Minister of Environmental Affairs – set up a High Level Panel to review the policies, legislation and management regarding the breeding, hunting, trade and general handling of elephants, lions, rhinos and leopards. The Panel recently came back with their decision – recommending that Cabinet endorse a report calling for the end of lion farming, captive lion hunting, cub-petting and the commercial farming of rhinos.

Also in 2019, the UK government made some promises to halt the import of trophies collected by British hunters abroad. This promise was repeated in the most recent Queen’s Speech on 11th May – “Legislation will also be brought forward to ensure the United Kingdom has, and promotes, the highest standards of animal welfare [Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill, Kept Animals Bill, Animals Abroad Bill].”

The highest standards of animal welfare? Well there ARE some very good things listed as government intentions in the Queen’s Speech. For example the entire of issue of animal sentience. The UK was a pioneer with their Protections of Animals Act 1911, which basically said animals can feel pain. Slowly, slowly other animal protections emerged.

If Animal Sentience is going to be discussed in a Bill, does that same Bill not also have to take into account the sentience of the animals being snuffed out by trophy hunters?  This Bill risks being remembered for its shortcomings in terms of lion conservation.

The UK government has prevaricated on the issue of trophy hunting imports for more than a decade. Unlike the High Level Panel conclusions in South Africa and an inevitable need for a clear government response there, the UK government continues to sit on its hands with their own consultations.

Ignoring:

1. A public consultation on the issue organized by the government itself. Submissions of various detail had a submission deadline of January 25th, 2020. The government decided to extend the submission deadline to February 25th – saying that some people might have not been able to submit their views because of the Christmas and New Year holidays. The government promised to publish results 12 weeks later. That would be May 2020. We are now a year overdue.

2. Our many requests to government about the delayed publication of the public consultation results have been met with recalcitrance and delaying tactics. Ministers contacted have latterly claimed the COVID situation as a reason for the many delays.

3. We are approaching 700,500 signatures, counting upward per day, in our LionAid petition to end lion trophy imports into the UK. At Change.org, this level of response is the highest recorded petition for ANY animal issue to date. The UK government does not acknowledge results of the petition to date.

Instead:

The UK government promotes the weak position that they will “bring forward legislation to ensure UK imports and exports of hunting trophies are not threatening the conservation status of species abroad”.  Who is going to determine whether UK imports of hunting trophies threaten their species conservation status?

The UK seems to be adopting an anaemic version of the USA import restrictions. The USA decided to place lions on their own ”threatened” list of species. Took many years, and public consultations, but eventually the decision was made. The USA made also the consequential decision that as captive bred lions were in no way important to the conservation of the species, that all hunting trophy imports of captive bred lions would cease.

The UK government really needs to step up to the plate. Hiding behind “sustainable” use as a reason to allow trophy hunting imports in the future slaps the faces of all in the voting public who have long since made up their minds about such trophy hunting imports.

So — let’s have the results provided by the UK Ministers, unredacted, of the public consultation to start? And decisively, a ban on the import of all trophies, whether from wild or captive bred lions.

As you can see, there are still huge amounts of work to be done and we rely on your continued and wonderful DONATIONS to keep our work moving steadily forward.

PLEASE if you can, dig deep and continue to help us by DONATING to keep the lion’s roar sounding across African savannas.

https://www.change.org/p/ban-lion-trophy-hunting-imports-into-the-uk?recruiter=48709276&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=twitter&recruited_by_id=e3e5af90-90ba-0130-e145-3c764e049c4f

Hunter Ambushed by Elephant, Trampled to Death

www.newsweek.com

Jack Dutton

A hunter in his late fifties was killed in Gabon when he was ambushed by an elephant and trampled to death.

The drama unfolded last week in Roungassa village, in the province of Ogooue Lolo, Gabon Media Time reported.

The website reported that the victim was a resident of the village and was “known to all.”

The remains of the man, whose identity has not been revealed, were found lying in the forest by members of the Central Brigade of the capital of Ogooué Lolo, residents told the website.

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This kind of hunting accident has been occurring more frequently in Gabon in recent months. More and more animals, especially elephants, are staying closer to the villages because of deforestation, which destroys the habitat and the trees whose fruits the animals feed on, the website reported.

Similar tragedies have been recorded in the provinces of Ngounié and Woleu-Ntem in recent months, according to the news website.

Gabon is home to a large colony of forest elephants, which can be dangerous when close to humans.

A similar incident took place in Northern Namibia on March 13, when a farmer was killed after being trampled on by an African savanna elephant. Abner Petrus, 46, lost his life after one of the animals attacked him from behind in Okatha-Kiikombo, a village in the Omusati region.

African forest elephants, which are smaller than the African savanna elephants, occupy most of the tropical forests in West and Central Africa, with the largest populations found in Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

Increased threats of poaching and loss of habitat have made Africa’s elephant more endangered, according to a report released in March by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Both the African forest elephant and the African savanna elephant are considered endangered.

The number of African forest elephants has fallen by more than 86 percent over a 31-year period, the report said, while the population of savanna elephants dropped by more than 60 percent over a 50-year period. The International Union for Conservation of Nature rates the global extinction risks to the world’s animals.

Africa currently has 415,000 elephants, counting the forest and savanna elephants together, according to the agency.

The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) has predicted that the African elephant could be extinct by 2040, with poaching and human-wildlife conflict as a result of habitat loss and fragmentation the main threats to the survival of the species.Forest elephants are seen at Langoue Bai in the Ivindo national park, Gabon, on April 26, 2019. A man in his late fifties killed at a hunting party in Gabon after being ambushed and trampled upon by an elephant.Amaury Hauchard/Getty

https://www.newsweek.com/hunter-ambushed-elephant-trampled-death-1594646?amp=1&fbclid=IwAR29Tr_CwCe1MVH1ACKDJ4PP77yS0ob8AnnFM-Nn7djdItpAkSvEsotW8mo&__twitter_impression=true

SIGN: Stop Trophy Hunters From Slaughtering 500 Elephants in Zimbabwe

trophy hunter elephant dead

ladyfreethinker.org

Lady Freethinker 2 minutes

Image Credit: Facebook (Jewell Crossberg)

PETITION TARGET: Ambassador of Zimbabwe to the United States Ammon Mutembwa

Trophy hunters may soon slaughter up to 500 endangered African elephants as Zimbabwe prepares to sell hunting licenses to legally kill these majestic creatures.

Selling “rights” to kill the endangered elephants to hunters who pay between $10,000 and $70,000 to participate, this horrifying plan is part of an effort to recoup pandemic-related tourism revenue losses. But why should defenseless elephants die for profit?

Zimbabwe’s Parks and Wildlife Management Authority claims the country’s “excessive” elephant population is responsible for violent encounters with humans, according to Bloomberg. But the government announced its intentions to permit the hunts just weeks after a new International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List assessment determined that African elephants are increasingly at risk of extinction and set the statuses for two species to “Endangered” and “Critically Endangered.”

These perilously threatened creatures do not deserve to have a price put on their lives. We must speak out to protect these elephants from government-sanctioned slaughter.

Sign this petition urging Zimbabwean Ambassador Ammon Mutembwa to oppose and fight against the government’s appalling decision to promote the needless killing of elephants and instead find humane solutions to human-wildlife conflicts.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-save-500-endangered-elephants-from-slaughter-in-zimbabwe/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Millionaire trophy hunter is caught boasting how he helped to shoot 13,000 doves

www.dailymail.co.uk

Michael Powell

By Michael Powell for The Mail on Sunday 01:55 02 May 2021, updated 02:12 02 May 2021

  • In phone call with undercover investigator, businessman Rob Weir recounted a £2,800 hunting trip
  • Mr Weir said: ‘There were five of us – one of them was a lady – and we shot 13,000 doves over four days’
  • Mr Weir owns H. J. Weir Engineering, one of world’s largest manufacturers of industrial laundry machines
  • He also said: ‘The very first time I went out there I wanted to shoot a baboon. I had a thing about shooting a baboon, I don’t know why but I did’

A millionaire trophy hunter has been caught boasting about helping to kill 13,000 doves and blasting a baboon.

In a phone call with an undercover investigator, businessman Rob Weir recounted a £2,800 hunting trip to Argentina, saying: ‘There were five of us – one of them was a lady – and we shot 13,000 doves over four days.’

He said he had limited himself to 1,500 shells a day, adding: ‘I tell you what, I’d love to go back. What an experience.’ BOASTS: Rob Weir (left), who boasted about helping to kill 13,000 doves and blasting a baboon, poses with a dead buffalo in 2017

Mr Weir, who owns H. J. Weir Engineering, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of industrial laundry machines, said he had also made repeated hunting trips to South Africa over the past seven or eight years.

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‘The very first time I went out there I wanted to shoot a baboon. I had a thing about shooting a baboon, I don’t know why but I did,’ he said.

‘I’ve shot buffalo out there, I’ve shot impala out there, I’ve shot warthogs out there, I’ve shot different gazelle-type animals out there.’ The 68-year-old businessman, who also owns the Weir Rallying motorsports team, made his comments to Eduardo Goncalves (above, at the Mirror Animal Hero awards in 2019) – the author and founder of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting

Approached for a comment, Mr Weir, who has not broken any laws with his hunting activities, said: ‘I’ve got nothing further to say.’

The 68-year-old businessman, who also owns the Weir Rallying motorsports team, made his comments to Eduardo Goncalves, the author and founder of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting.

Mr Goncalves has spent the past year posing as a trophy hunter in order to uncover the industry’s secrets for a forthcoming book.

It comes as pressure grows on the Government to implement its long-promised ban on trophy hunting, a pledge first made in the Queen’s Speech in October 2019 and repeated in the Tory Election manifesto two months later.

Despite an estimated 200 animals being killed by British trophy hunters every year, there is still no official date for introducing the ban, although it is thought it will be mentioned again in next month’s Queen’s Speech.

Campaigners are worried, however, that civil servants may try to water down legislation by including a clause allowing hunters to import trophies if they pay a ‘blood money’ fee to conservation projects.

Last night, a Government spokesman said: ‘The Government takes the conservation of endangered species in the UK and internationally very seriously, which is why we have committed to banning the import of hunting trophies from endangered species – as set out in the Government’s manifesto.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9533103/amp/Millionaire-trophy-hunter-caught-boasting-helped-shoot-13-000-doves.html?__twitter_impression=true

Unfair Game

Trophy Hunters Are Just Rich Psychopaths Who Like To Kill

If you are Oregon resident please take action to help us end the war on wildlife and score a win against brutality and cruelty!

wg.convio.net

Join Guardians in the fight to ban wildlife killing contests in Oregon

Ask your Oregon state representative for a total ban of the senseless blood sport

Dear Guardian,

The bill to ban coyote killing contests in Oregon has moved from committee and will get a floor vote in the House of Representatives! Guardians needs your voice to get this bill from the Oregon House to the Senate. Urge your state representative to step up and end this cruelty by voting yes on HB-2728, a total ban on coyote killing contests in the Beaver State.

Completely devoid of ethics, wildlife killing contests are organized events in which participants compete for prizes by attempting to kill the most animals over a certain time period. It’s a disgusting practice in which the winners are rewarded for piling up the most or biggest animals or even killing the most different kinds of species. This rule would only ban contests for coyotes specifically and would not change general hunting laws.

Killing contests aren’t sport. They’re gratuitous violence.

They also send the message that animals, like coyotes, are disposable, killing them only for fun is OK and life is cheap. These wildlife killing contests disrupt natural processes and may also put threatened or endangered species in peril. Clearly, they have no place in 21st century humane, science-based wildlife management.

The good news is that seven states—Washington, Arizona, New Mexico, California, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Colorado—have already banned or severely restricted coyote killing contests. Now we have an opportunity to end these killing competitions in Oregon.

If you are an Oregon resident, take action to help us end the war on wildlife and score a win against brutality and cruelty.

For the Wild,

Samantha Bruegger, Wildlife Coexistence Campaigner

Share this message with friends and family

WildEarth Guardians protects and restores the wildlife, wild places, wild rivers, and health of the American West.

http://wg.convio.net/site/MessageViewer?current=true&em_id=27418.0

PETITION: Justice for 500 Deer and Wild Boar Massacred in Walled-In Farm

ladyfreethinker.org

Image Credit: Twitter/Alberto Mancebo

PETITION TARGET: Portuguese Ambassador Domingos Fezas Vital

Stuck inside a fenced-in “hunting zone,” over 500 deer and wild boar desperately attempted to flee for their lives, watching as animals around them collapsed to their deaths from gunshots.

The massacre, led by 16 Spanish hunters, took place on a farm in Torrebela, where tourists are welcome to “hunt” trapped animals, according to BBC.

Horrifying images of the slaughter’s aftermath are going viral on social media, inciting outrage and demands for justice among activists and public officials, including Portugal’s Environment Minister João Fernandes.

An onslaught of this magnitude grossly exceeds the alleged purpose of allowing hunting as a means of animal population control. And killing caged animals who have no chance to escape is simply despicable.

There is no excuse for the mass killing of wildlife, and this heartbreaking incident must not go unchecked. Sign this petition urging Portuguese Ambassador Domingos Fezas Vital to push for a full investigation of this appalling event, the thorough prosecution of all perpetrators, and new hunting laws that protect animals from being slaughtered in confined areas.

https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-justice-for-500-deer-and-wild-boar-massacred-at-walled-in-farm/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email

Sign the Petition: End Cruel and Unnecessary Trapping on Public Lands

Sign our petition calling on the U.S. Department of the Interior to end trapping in the National Wildlife Refuge System!

The Petition

There is no place for cruel and unnecessary traps – snares, Conibear traps, or steel-jaw leghold traps – on public lands, which include national parks, national preserves, and national wildlife refuges. Instead of areas of safety, these sacred places have been transformed into killing fields. Each year, millions of animals who call these public lands home languish in cruel traps for hours, and even days, before they are brutally killed. Even iconic North American species such as bald eagles, black bears, grey wolves, bobcats, and other sensitive species have been found in leghold traps and snares. The U.S. Department of the Interior and the corresponding agencies should immediately and publicly announce their support for ending cruel and unnecessary trapping on public lands. Email Address* First Name* Last Name*  I would like to join Born Free USA’s email list. SIGN THE PETITION 9055 Signatures 91% Goal: 10000

+ 2912 Offline Signatures

 Visit the #TrapFreeTrails Campaign Page

https://bornfree.salsalabs.org/tftpetition/index.html

PETITION TO STOP BIG CAT FACTORY FARMING!

Target: Cyril Ramaphosa, President – South Africa

MR PRESIDENT: SHUT DOWN YOUR BIG CAT FACTORY FARMS!

In 2019, the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting exposed how a South African company was breeding TIGER cubs… and then selling sick tiger trophy hunts.

We also revealed that there are now a staggering 300 factory farms in South Africa breeding LIONS in cages – for trophy hunters to kill for “fun”.

The animals are shot in fenced enclosures where they have NO CHANCE of escape. Their bones are often sold onto Asian dealers for so-called traditional Chinese ‘medicines’.

In our latest investigation, we reveal how over 17,000 tigers and tiger body parts have been traded or seized over the past 5 years. Over 80% were destined for the traditional Chinese ‘medicine’ market.

The figure includes a number of tigers that were shot in South Africa by trophy hunters …

We can also reveal that South Africa now breeds LEOPARDS – so they can be shot by trophy hunters for fun, and their skins sold to traders.

Leading conservationists and politicians from around the world are backing the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting’s call to BAN this sick trade.

Now we are launching this mass petition to the President of South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa. The South African government has just announced it is appointing a high-level ‘panel of experts’ to review its policies on breeding wild animals for trophy hunters to kill for kicks, and the terrible trade in lion bones and leopard skins.

We say: It’s time to BAN this wicked trade and CLOSE these sick Big Cat ‘Factory Farms’ NOW!

 

 

Please sign and share this petition – and help save endangered big cats TODAY!

To: Cyril Ramaphosa, President – South Africa
From: [Your Name]

I call on you to CLOSE South Africa’s Big Cat Factory Farms.

Breeding lion and tiger cubs to be cuddled for cash and killed for kicks is IMMORAL.
It is a stain on South Africa’s standing in the world.

It is time to end the big cat bone trade and to ban trophy hunting altogether.

Please act TODAY – for the good of wildlife, and for the good of South Africa’s reputation.

 

https://actionnetwork.org/petitions/stop-big-cat-factory-farming?source=twitter&

 

The BIG LIE about lion trophy hunting – Africa Geographic

africageographic.com

About Simon Espley

lion skin, trophy hunting

So often we hear from the pro-hunting lobby that by killing free roaming lions, trophy hunters are actually saving lions.

Well, if my aunt had balls she’d be my uncle.

That term “sustainable offtake” often creeps into the justification. The trophy hunting of free roaming lions is about as sustainable as putting ice cubes in a mug of steaming coffee. Let’s dig deeper into this issue of sustainable, shall we? A lion skin as a trophy from a hunt in Namibia ©Ton Koene/Alamy

Consider the following six examples of why the trophy hunting of free-roaming lions is NOT sustainable – from the very countries held high by the trophy hunting industry itself as being paragons of sustainable hunting practices:

1. The Namibian government does not know how many breeding-age desert-adapted lions are left, how many territory/pride males there are, or even how many of each sex are killed during human-lion conflict. They told me so – see this article written by me. And yet each year they set trophy hunting quotas for large male desert-adapted lions. The awarding of trophy hunting quotas off the back of no relevant statistics is NOT sustainable.

2. Namibian laws permit rural livestock owners to request for the lethal removal of predators targeting their livestock – so-called ‘problem animals’. Fair enough. BUT trophy hunters are often used to perform the execution, and we know that trophy hunters want to shoot big male lions. And communities benefit financially when ‘problem animals’ are identified and taken down by hunters. Is it coincidence then that there is a large bias towards male lions amongst those lions reported as being ‘problem animals’, and consequently executed by trophy hunters?

In the last scientific research report on Namibia’s desert-adapted lions, published in 2010, the author states, when referring to six collared male lions killed by trophy hunters as ‘problem animals’: “In all six cases, however, it is arguable whether the adult males that were shot, were in fact the lions responsible for the killing of livestock.”

This gap in legislation – empowering the two beneficiaries of ‘problem animal’ execution to act as witness, jury, judge and executioner – is NOT sustainable.

3. The above report concluded: “The long-term viability of the desert lion population has been compromised by the excessive killing of adult and sub-adult males. There is an urgent need to adapt the management and utilisation strategies relating to lions, if the long-term conservation of the species in the Kunene were to be secured.”

Since then the situation has worsened as regards male lion offtake, with some areas now almost devoid of male lions. Even the last known adult male lion in the Sesfontein Conservancy was earmarked to be shot – again conveniently classified as a ‘problem animal’ – until international pressure forced the Minister to change his mind. A rapidly reducing male/female lion ratio is NOT sustainable.

4. Craig Packer, director of the Lion Research Center at the University of Minnesota, has led a series of studies identifying over-hunting as the major reason for the steep decline in lion populations in Tanzania, the lion hunting mecca. Packer was banned from entering Tanzania for exposing corruption with regard to lion trophy hunting.

Being tagged as the cause of crashing lion populations makes trophy hunting of lions in Tanzania NOT sustainable, and the widespread use of fraud and corruption as a business tool suggests a morally bankrupt industry.

5. When 13-year-old Cecil the lion was shot in Zimbabwe, the over-riding justification was that he was ‘too old’ to breed or to successfully hold a territory (as if those are the only uses of a mature lion). Then, Cecil’s son, Xanda, was also shot by a hunter, at the age of six – and the professional hunter Richard Cooke knew that Xanda was a pride male with cubs, and lied about the situation. In fact, Cooke also led the hunt that killed Xanda’s other son – at the age of four.

So, lions of all ages are being shot, and the trophy hunting industry lies and re-invents the justifications each time to suit their need to keep the business model rolling. That is NOT sustainable.

6. Rural communities living amongst wild lions have to see meaningful and sustainable benefit from having lions in the area. Lions are often a threat to lives and livelihoods and these people have the right to expect to be compensated to behave differently. After all, the rest of the world has mostly sanitised itself of large predators.

Surely for trophy hunting to be truly sustainable, these communities must receive a significant portion of the trophy fee? A 2013 study by Economists at Large, an Australian organisation of conservation-minded economists, found that on average only 3% of money generated by trophy hunting winds up in the hands of local people.

During research for my article referred to in point one above, Namibian government officials told me that the relevant community only receives about 12.5% of the trophy hunting fee for a quota lion (US$10,000 of the ± US$80,000 fee) – and only about 1% in the case of a ‘problem animal’ hunt. The rest goes to the professional hunting operator. This is NOT fair or sustainable.

This is what we do know about lions: Populations have crashed from about 450,000 in the 1940’s to about 20,000 today – mostly due to human-wildlife conflict, habitat loss, prey base loss and trophy hunting (US Fish and Wildlife Services).

The remaining pockets of lions are increasingly isolated from other populations, and no longer able to disperse and so maintain population genetic diversity and stability. When young males flee from dominant pride males, and seek out other lions, they leave protected areas and are picked off by hunters and livestock farmers – thus preventing the vital dispersal of young lions to other areas.

The surgical removal of big male lions by trophy hunters within the context of the above is NOT sustainable in any way, shape or form – regardless of what the other causes of lion population reductions are. The trophy hunting industry claim of sustainable practises is nothing but a lie. It’s a fiercely protected justification to continue the senseless and outdated fetish for killing off Africa’s big male lions for fun and ego. The fantasies of a few rich people are taking precedence over the survival of an African icon, over the proper functioning of Africa’s wild places and over the tourism industry which brings in many times more revenue, jobs, skills enhancement and societal benefits.

The trophy hunting of Africa’s wild, free roaming lions is NOT sustainable and has to stop.

https://africageographic.com/stories/trophy-hunting-wild-lions-big-lie-sustainability/

Urge U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to Cease Issuing Permits for Trophy Imports! | Born Free USA

The United States is the world’s top importer of wildlife “trophies.” Sign our petition to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), urging the agency to cease issuing trophy import permits!

The Petition

I strongly oppose trophy hunting and recognize that trophy hunting does not significantly aid in wildlife conservation efforts. Instead, because hunters frequently target animals of already imperiled species, such as elephants, lions, and rhinoceros, trophy hunting is just one more deadly pressure on these species.
  
The majority of Americans believe trophy hunting is an outdated and brutal sport without any conservation benefits. And, opposition to trophy hunting is not a partisan issue; people from across the political spectrum oppose it. Yet, the United States is the world’s top importer of wildlife trophies and of trophies of threatened and endangered CITES-listed species, with more imports than the next nine highest countries combined.

Therefore, I call on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to cease issuing permits for hunters to import wildlife trophies into the U.S.

Follow Born Free USA on Social Media

https://www.bornfreeusa.org/action-center/trophyhuntpetition/?eType=EmailBlastContent&eId=0114c23a-6707-4456-87b6-c944466b3b80

BREAKING: Emaciated Lions Found Again At Captive-Breeding Farm in Limpopo, South Africa

Walter Slippers is the one on the right.

The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) are in the process of laying animal cruelty charges in terms of the Animal Protection Act (APA), 71 of 1962, against Walter Slippers, owner of two captive predator breeding facilities in Alldays, Limpopo.

Leaked photos show the emaciated lions at Walter Slippers’ Lion Breeding Farm – March 2020. All photos supplied.

During inspections in April and May 2020, the NSPCA found deplorable conditions with underweight lions, lack of adequate shelter, lack of veterinary treatment, as well as unhygienic and small enclosures.

Slippers has 72 lions on his farm, which is in liquidation, and he allegedly feeds them a giraffe every two to three weeks.

On 12 May 2020, the NSPCA was informed that seven of the lions housed at one of Slippers’ facilities had escaped… which appears to support their findings that he is not only negligent in the way these lions are kept from a welfare point of view, but also in terms of public safety.Lions at Walter Slippers Lion Breeding Farm – April 2018

“We believe that permits should never have been granted to keep lions, or any other predators like the tigers, as not only was the fencing wholly inadequate, but there are specific dramatic shortfalls on the welfare of these animals – and their welfare has consistently been compromised,” said Senior Inspector Douglas Wolhuter (Manager NSPCA Wildlife Protection Unit).

The NSPCA has issued further warnings in terms of contraventions of the APA to all role players concerned. A deadline has also been issued for an action plan regarding the animals and the NSPCA is taking further legal action, which will see criminal charges brought about.Walter Slippers Lion Breeding Farm – July 2016

Sadly, this is not the first time that evidence of shocking animal neglect and cruelty has emerged from Slippers farms, with images of malnourished lions surfacing in 2015, 2016, 2018, and 2020. More in Home

In 2016, Slippers accepted responsibility and promised the NSPCA he would address the frequency and quantity of his lion feeding regime, as well as provide them with ongoing vet records.

With subsequent evidence of abuse in 2018 and now again in 2020, a consistent pattern of neglect is unfortunately emerging from his farm, putting Slippers in breach of his permit conditions and in further non-compliance with the APA, according to a press statement from Blood Lions.

“In the absence of national norms and standards for the captive keeping and breeding of big cats for commercial purposes, sadly animal cruelty and issues of neglect are rife in this industry,” says Dr Louise de Waal (Blood Lions Campaign Manager).

“Considering there are at least 8,000 lions in captivity in South Africa, but probably many more, the scale of such welfare issues is of huge concern.”

Paul Tully from Captured in Africa told SAPeople: “It’s quite absurd to think that the South African Government continues to allow what are clearly crimes against nature. The connected industries of lion parks (that offer tourists a chance to pet lion cubs) and the disgraceful lion bone trade – which is still legal in South Africa and clearly promotes the continued poaching of lions (both wild and captive) for their parts – must be industries that are ended sooner rather than later, before more lions are abused and tourists scammed out of their money.”‬

In October 2018, the Lion Coalition wrote a letter to Sam Makhubele (LEDET’s Director for Wildlife Trade and Regulation) asking for Slippers’ predator breeding permit to be revoked and to ensure he would never be allowed to breed big cats again.

Notwithstanding, Limpopo’s provincial nature conservation authority has renewed his permit every single time.

Images from Walter Slippers Lion Breeding Farm – February 2015

Slippers has a history of controversy going back as far as 2010, when he attempted to purchase two white rhino bulls for pseudo-hunts involving Vietnamese citizens. It was also reported that he used to transport cubs from his breeding facility to his restaurant, Toeka Plaas Kombuis, for visitors to interact with.

The NSPCA is the statutory body tasked with responding to wild animal welfare complaints, conducting its own welfare investigations and attempting to regulate good welfare practices without state funding or resources. They need your help to carry out their duty of looking after the welfare of our wild animals. Please help by donating HERE.

https://www.sapeople.com/2020/05/13/breaking-starving-emaciated-lions-found-at-slippers-limpopo-breeding-farm-again/

Petition: ban lion trophy hunting imports into the UK

change.org

Sign the Petition Pieter Kat started this petition to Conservative Party Leader Boris Johnson and 6 others

The body parts of lions killed in gruesome hunts are being bought and imported into our country as ‘hunting trophies’. To hunt these beautiful animals for fun is inhumane and wrong – but it’s also contributing to the rapid decline of lion numbers. That’s why I’m calling on lion trophy hunting imports to be banned immediately. I lived and worked for two decades in several African countries to help the conservation of lions there and I’m now the director of Lion Aid. It pains me that their numbers continue to drop. The number of lions in Africa has decreased from over 200,000 to less than 15,000 within the past 50 years. Most of the ‘trophies’ are male lions. This has a disastrous knock on effect, pride structures are disrupted, reproduction almost grinds to a halt as cub survival is severely affected, and mortality among females increases as they attempt to protect their cubs during encounters with more and more displaced males. We must immediately stop our involvement in this cruel trade of lions killed for fun, like others around the world have. Australia, France and the Netherlands have already banned lion trophy imports. Why have we not yet joined them in doing so? In 2010 and 2015 promises were made by British MPs about introducing a ban, but years later nothing has happened. Every single day we delay makes it more and more likely that we push lions towards extinction. Please sign my petition calling on the UK to immediately ban imports of Lion trophies.

https://www.change.org/p/ban-lion-trophy-hunting-imports-into-the-uk?recruiter=566803727&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_initial&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial&recruited_by_id=c6bc6b60-433a-11e6-b0dc-8dde71f5e1db

Petition Ban Canned Hunting

Ban Canned Hunting! You came to knife fight with a loaded rifle.. Next time, come barehanded we’ll call it fair.

Born to be murdered.. South Africa is a dream for hunters – Thousand of hunting tourists from Europe and the USA travel to the region for one brutal reason, they then bring home dead animals instead of photos as souvenirs, totally unnecessary and cruel.

Nearly all wild species are available – even protected species like elephants: it’s just a question of money. An especially perfidious form of trophy hunting is “Canned Hunting” of lions.

Canned Hunting

The most extreme variety of trophy hunting is “Canned Hunting”. Most of the victims are lions, which are served to their hunters on a silver platter: The animals are kept in fenced areas and then simply shot and many have suffering because of bad aiming or handling of rifles.

The lions are bred on farms and raised by hand. They hardly demonstrate any shyness of humans. The animals can’t escape from the cages. Occasionally they are attracted with bait, sometimes they are even sedated with medicine.Anyone can go and hunt lions in South Africa – a hunting licence or proven hunting experience isn’t usually necessary. This means that many lions aren’t killed by the first shot which results in them experiencing an agonising death.

Rapid boominq breeding farms and shootings

For trophy hunting in South Africa, lions are bred on more than 190 farms, usually raised by hand and accustomed to humans. In the last six years, the number of farm lions has risen by 250 percent. Today, more than 6,000 captive animals are threatened with the same gruesome fate – more than ever before.

First a pet …

Many of the young animals must then serve as tourist attractions where people can pet them, take photos with them and take them for walks. Unwitting tourists visit these farms and pay money to look at or touch young lion cubs. That they are thereby supporting a horrific industry, an industry that even many hunting associations reject as being unethical, is something that most of the tourists don’t know.

… then shot

The lions reach the trophy age after four to seven years and are then offered to the hunters for shooting. In many cases the ‘hunting’ isn’t carried out on the same farm that the animal was bred at. Instead the lions are transported to other areas and shot there.

Danger for wild lions

The supporters of Canned Hunting claim that Canned Hunting serves to protect the species. In fact the opposite is the case: The increasing number of trophy hunting tours on offer is increasing the pressure on the lion populations living in the wild. An increasing number of animals are captured in the wild for breeding purposes

Please sign Gabo’s Petition, I will personally hand it to the government this summer when I will be working on a conservation project on South African this year..

https://www.change.org/p/south-african-government-ban-canned-hunting?recruiter=69500809&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=Search%3ESAP%3EUK%3ENonBrand%3EExact&fbclid=IwAR21MVjv3Nq3blq4zDwyQOKoIDovG6fwvoyhXZ9KCYeRuJtjcZHbGQS8kao

If you live in the UK please call

UK – Ban the Import and Export of Hunting Trophies Now: Petition

Guardians Of Life

Siobhan Mitchell started this petition to Prime Minister Boris Johnson

We demand an end to the import and export of hunting trophies from Britain, and urge Boris Johnson to follow through on his message of 2019 calling for an end to this barbaric practice.

The Government is currently running a consultation on the import and export of hunting trophies. This petition is to express support for Option 3 in the consultation, which would meana ban on all hunting trophies entering or leaving the UK.

As the director of the Campaign To Ban Trophy Hunting, I’ve long fought for an end to this barbaric practise. Killing animals for ‘trophies’ is cruel, unnecessary, and indefensible for the following reasons:

Studies show that many species targeted by trophy hunters are social, emotional, intelligent beings. Killing them for ‘sport’ goes against basic civilised values. So-called ‘canned hunting’ – breeding animals in captivity and…

View original post 270 more words

Thank you to everyone who could help!

Urgent: Your Help is Needed…Please Share

Trophy Hunters think we are bullying them….

Trophy Hunters are not Conservationist