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He belongs to a dying veteran and Mr. Morris would like to see him one last time

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Shame on You Delta Airlines!!

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A disabled man and his “registered service dog”were told to get off a Delta airline plane, strictly because his service dog was a pitbull!

 

Breaking! Beginning On December 18th, Delta Air Lines Bans Support Animals On Flights Longer Than 8 Hours – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
December 11, 2018

With little more than one week’s notice, Delta Air Lines has announced more restrictions that will negatively affect pet parents and their support or service animals; especially those planning to travel during this busy holiday season.
As per its website, beginning on December 18th, Delta Air Lines will not allow any service or support animals under four months of age on any flight due to USDA vaccination requirements.
The new rules also ban emotional support animals on flights longer than eight hours.
According to the Atlanta-based airline, it will honor tickets that were purchased prior to December 18th with a request to travel with an emotional support animal.
As of February 1, 2019, however, emotional support animals will not be allowed on these longer flights regardless of when the tickets were purchased.
Perhaps Delta Air Lines should also update their website and their statement welcoming both emotional support animals and service dogs, “we know that both types of animals provide invaluable services and we welcome both on our flights.”
All airports in the United States are now required to provide designated animal relief areas to accommodate service animals and pets.
The discriminatory move follows a July 10th announcement by Delta Air Lines that it is “no longer accepting pit bull type dogs as service or support animals.”
Further information about Delta Air Lines support and service animals’ policies can be found on its website or by calling 404-209-3434.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-beginning-on-december-18th-delta-airlines-bans-support-animals-on-flights-longer-than-8-hours/

 

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

WAN Exclusive For International Assistance Dog Week with “Dogs Of Service” Founder Saralyn Tartaglia Who Helps Rescue Dogs For Military Veterans – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
August 9, 2018
Air Force veteran Eric Pina with his family which now includes his service dog, Loki. Photos from Dogs of Service.
With so much negative attention focused on service animals as of late, WAN is thrilled to acknowledge International Assistance Dog Week by featuring a unique and much-needed non-profit organization dedicated to providing service dogs and emotional support animals that have been rescued to help military veterans.
International Assistance Dog Week, which was created to recognize all the devoted, hardworking assistance dogs helping individuals mitigate their disability related limitations, began on August 5th and runs through August 11th.
Fortunately, Los Angeles-based Dogs of Service makes rescue dogs and veterans in need, a priority every day, as it works to maintain a community of support and resources for all military members and their animals.
“We chose to focus on veterans because there was a great need for innovative solutions to help veterans dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries. Sadly, the average suicide rate of veterans is 22 per day. Veterans and dogs can find a mutual understanding and provide a sense of comfort other humans can’t, and that relationship can be used to bridge further healing and treatment,” Dogs of Service Founder Saralyn Tartaglia told WAN. Further explaining that it is important that the organization, which is authorized to pull animals from city shelters, only pairs veterans with dogs who have been rescued from shelters.
“We love the unspoken understanding and bond that happens when a veteran meets a rescue dog, it’s amazing. We were inspired by the ability of rescue dogs to sense emotions and be compassionate,” continued Tartaglia. “I started this organization because veterans have made many sacrifices, so this is our way to give back to them.”

Most recently, Dogs of Service paired Air Force veteran Eric Pina, who suffers from PTSD, with a new service dog that will be trained to help him. As per Tartaglia, a service dog can provide support and comfort to help its person push through difficult situations to make progress.
“The dogs we were looking at for Eric and his family just were not working out; then this puppy walked into the shelter on her own and literally checked herself in. After a meeting, it was clear she was the dog for them. She was even playing with lil Eric,” Dogs of Service posted on its Facebook page noting they will train the dog, now named Loki, to be a PTSD service dog for Eric.
“Dogs of Service connected me with not only a service dog but a loyal friend that has become my family,” shared Pena.
Having to care for a dog also gives many people a sense of purpose that enables them to “get up every morning to be part of the world,” said Tartaglia who shared that the routine the dog sets can also be helpful to maintain a healthy and consistent lifestyle.
“On the downside, because of all the negative attention and lack of knowledge about service dogs and emotional support animals, it has become a struggle for many veterans to go out in public or travel with their dog,” Tartaglia told WAN. “Veterans are being pressed for details about their dogs, bullied out of housing, being forced to adhere to illegal requirements, and having to deal with untrained fake service dogs in public spaces that may put real service dogs and their handlers at risk.
The American Disabilities Act (ADA) has defined a service dog as one that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. The tasks performed by the dog must be directly related to the person’s disability.
ADA guidelines in regard to service dogs are written loosely to enable all people to have access to a service dog: it does not discriminate in regard to “finances, location, type of disability, and access to urban areas.
It is important to note, as per Tartaglia, that many people do not understand that the ADA only covers public spaces; it does not cover housing, airports, trains and flights.
Tartaglia also encourages people to be wary of any online registry offering service dog certification and ID Cards, because service dogs and emotional support animals do not need to be registered or certified in any way.
“Having a service dog is a choice to be made with medical and care providers, it is a big responsibility and undertaking, but for some people, it can be life-changing,” continued Tartaglia, noting that service dog costs can range anywhere from $5000.00 to $25,000.00 with owner trained service dogs being on the low-end.
Dogs of Service currently offers weekly service dog training classes in Sherman Oaks, California, and is looking to expand into the Santa Clarita Valley, and possibly the South Bay, with more classes in 2019.
The classes are designed to teach dogs the vital socialization skills they need while also allowing veterans to connect and interact with each other.

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Dogs of Service has an application process so that they can figure out what the veteran needs and find a dog that is the best fit for them and their life.
Tartaglia also often helps veterans navigate the legal side, as well as ensuring that they can have dogs in their residences and assisting them with travel guidelines. To ensure a good pairing, Dogs of Service works with behaviorists and trainers for training to ensure that the veterans can learn how best to work with their dogs.

https://worldanimalnews.com/wan-exclusive-for-international-assistance-dog-week-with-dogs-of-service-founder-saralyn-tartaglia-who-helps-rescue-dogs-for-military-veterans/

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Veteran’s service dog has a touching reunion with the inmate who trained him

positiveoutlooksblog.com

It takes a lot of guts to be a part of the military, you have to be physically fit, mentally stable, and emotionally strong. The time that soldiers spend in the battlefield, away from their family, friends and loved ones surely have an adverse effect on our honorable military men.

In the Vietnam war alone, 15 percent of the Vietnam veterans were diagnosed with PTSD or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD is a mental health disorder acquired after experiencing a traumatic, shocking, scary or dangerous event.

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, there are a lot of ways to help one cope up with PTSD. The site advises people with PTSD to consult a psychologist or psychiatrist for professional mental health care. It also encourages people with PTSD to engage in positive activities such as sports to distract themselves with. Another way to overcome PTSD is to surround yourself with a support group and as well as acquiring the help of a service dog.

A 47-year-old veteran named Sgt. Bill Campbell who suffers from PTSD, chose to be assisted by a service dog called Pax. The veteran who also suffers from memory loss, and fear of crowds, was given a yellow Labrador, Pax, to help him cope.
According to the veteran, Pax has been a great help especially when he’s having an episode of PTSD. Without the yellow Labrador, he would have a lot of difficulties. Hence, Sgt. Bill was really interested to meet the trainer who nurtured Pax with the skills he has today.

Wanting to express his gratitude in person, Sgt. Bill reached out to Pax’s trainer, who turned out to be a woman named Laurie Kellog. After learning that Pax used to live at Bedford Hills Correctional Facility, taken care of by a number of female inmates, as a part of the service dog training program, Sgt. Bill made his move.

The veteran traveled to meet Laurie, Pax’s trainer, to express his sincere gratitude for nurturing Pax. There, Sgt. Bill learned that Laurie had taken delight in training Pax to be a PTSD service dog. According to the trainer, she too suffered from PTSD after being a victim of domestic violence.

Laurie admitted that even when Pax was still in training, the dutiful dog had brought her back to live in the present when she was having a PTSD attack. She recalled how the service dog made her feel safe around him. Thus, when she found out that Pax would lend his assistance to a soldier who also suffered from PTSD, she was more than happy.

Laurie was not the only one who was thrilled to be reunited with the dog who changed her life. Evident in the way Pax wagged his tails upon seeing his old trainer, the dog was happy and excited as well. Pax, remembering Laurie, wasted no time and ran right up to her, showering her with lots of kisses!

With both of them understanding how it feels like to have a PTSD, Laurie, and Sgt. Bill greeted each other with an embrace. Pax also had the best moment of his life when his former and present owners, bonded with each other.

True enough, any baggage carried by more than one person, gets lighter and easier to carry. Fortunately for us humans, we have our pawed pals to entrust our life and share our problems with! Indeed, dogs are man’s best friend!

Watch the heartwarming reunion between Pax and his inmate trainer Laurie that will surely pull strings to your heart.

 

https://positiveoutlooksblog.com/2018/07/26/veterans-service-dog-has-a-touching-reunion-with-the-inmate-who-trained-him/

Photo and Video l The Ophra Winfrey Show