#RallyForRangers – Rhino Protection Units in Java, Indonesia

The International Rhino Foundation Blog

Photo by Stephen Belcher

Rhino Protection Units in Java, Indonesia

The world’s sole remaining population of the Javan rhino – numbering merely 67 individuals – lives in Ujung Kulon National Park on the island of Java. Javan rhinos have survived in Ujung Kulon because they are protected year-round by Rhino Protection Units (RPUs), four-man units that patrol the park a minimum of 15 days per month, year-round, tracking rhinos, and apprehending poachers and encroachers.

Onpatrol, RPUs also collect data on all rhinos signs they encounter – footprints, wallows, feces, and evidence of feeding. These data tell us about population distribution, ranging behavior, new births, and more – critical information that helps park authorities and government officials decide how to manage and protect this Critically Endangered rhino population.

When you donate to IRF’s Rally for Rangers campaign, you’ll help Rhino Protection Units get the equipment they need to monitor and protect…

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Breaking! Did China Postpone Lifting The Ban On Rhino Horn & Tiger Bones Due To International Pressure? – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
November 12, 2018

The Jane Goodall Institute in Canada took to social media this morning to share the news today that China has postponed lifting the ban on the trade of rhino horn and tiger parts for medicine and other so-called uses.
The “detailed regulations for implementation” of last month’s highly-controversial change has been “postponed after study”, the official Xinhua news agency reported, citing State Council Executive Deputy Secretary-General Ding Xuedong.
According to Xinhua, no official reason was given as to why the postpone occurred or if it would be permanent. The most obvious reason would be due to international outrage and pressure from governments worldwide, as well as from animal advocates and conservationists who have been working tirelessly to save tigers & rhinos from extinction in the wild.
General Ding Xuedong only confirmed that as of now, that strict bans are still in place regarding the trade, transport, and use of rhino and tiger byproducts, and that any infractions of them will be “dealt with severely.”
As previously reported by WAN, late last month the Government of China shocked animal welfare advocates throughout the world with the announcement that it had legalized the trade of tiger bone and rhino horn from farmed animals for use in traditional Chinese medicine research and clinical treatments; drastically undermining international efforts for tiger and rhino conservation.
The Environmental Investigation Agency stated at the time, that the Government was evidently far more interested in stimulating and appeasing its traditional medicine and burgeoning tiger farming industries, than it is of protecting tigers and rhinos by working towards ending the vast demand in the country for their parts and products.
“In a single stroke, China has shattered its reputation as a growing leader in conservation following its domestic ban on the sale of ivory at the start of the year,” Debbie Banks, EIA Tiger Campaign Leader, said in a statement. “It is instead revealed as a sham, its international image is in tatters, and its credibility destroyed; and all for the sake of deeply questionable business sectors which serve only to drive consumer demand for the parts and products of endangered species.”

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-china-postpones-controversial-reversal-of-ban-on-rhino-horn-tiger-bones/

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,
animal welfare organizations,China,Rhino Horn,Tigers

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© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Heartbreaking News! 2 More Of The 6 Endangered Black Rhinos Relocated From South Africa To The Republic Of Chad Found Dead; Only 2 Remain – World Animal News

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By Lauren Lewis –
November 6, 2018

As reported by WAN earlier this year, six critically endangered black rhinos were translocated to a national park in the Republic Of Chad in North Central Africa from South Africa, to reintroduce the species after a nearly 50-year absence.
On October 22nd, WAN shared the tragic news that two of the six black rhinos died after their carcasses were found in Zakouma National Park.
Today, WAN sadly mourns the death of another two of the endangered black rhinos.
In a joint statement, the Governments of South Africa and the Republic of Chad, along with African Parks and SANParks, confirmed that the total mortalities has now grown to four, but stated that none of the deceased rhinos had been poached.
While the cause of their deaths are being investigated, the statement continued to explain that, “On the advice of a team of veterinarians experienced in working with black rhinos, the remaining two animals are being recaptured and placed in holding facilities in order to facilitate closer management.”
A SANParks veterinarian was dispatched to Zakouma National Park to assist with the process and one rhino has since been captured and is reportedly doing well in their enclosure.
Meanwhile, post-mortems have been conducted on the rhino carcasses and various samples of blood, tissue, and fecal matter were sent to specialist pathology laboratories in South Africa. Histopathological results thus far have not indicated infectious diseases or plant toxicity as the cause of death. Serological evidence has however indicated exposure to trypanosomes, a blood borne parasite transmitted by tsetse flies, but at this stage it is not suspected to be the cause of the mortalities.
Low fat reserves suggest that maladaptation by the rhinos to their new environment is likely the underlying cause, although tests to be taken on brain and spinal fluid may shed additional light on their exact cause of death.
The Governments of the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Chad, including SANParks and African Parks remain active, as efforts continue to be made to establish clarity around the exact cause of death of the four black rhinos, and to safeguard the remaining two animals.
The six rhinos had been held in bomas in the national park for two months after their arrival in Chad on May 4th, before being released into a temporary sanctuary for another two months to enable their acclimation to their new environment.
In late August, the sanctuary fence was removed and the rhinos were allowed to roam freely in the park where they continued to be monitored.
The translocation took place in terms of a Memorandum of Understanding between the two countries on the reintroduction of black rhinos in Chad, undertaken to restore critical biodiversity and aid the long-term conservation of the species on the continent.
There are only an estimated 5,000 black rhinos left in the wild in Africa.

https://worldanimalnews.com/heartbreaking-news-2-more-of-the-6-endangered-black-rhinos-relocated-from-south-africa-to-republic-of-chad-found-dead-only-2-remain/

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TAGS:Africa,Animal Protection,black rhinos,Rwanda,South Africa

Contact us: contact@worldanimalnews.com

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

23 Alleged Rhino Poachers Arrested In South Africa Since Tragic Death Of Ranger Respect Mathebula At Kruger National Park! – World Animal News

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By Lauren Lewis –
August 8, 2018

R.I.P. Ranger Respect Mathebula
While still mourning the tragic death of one of their own late last month, members of the Rangers Corps in South Africa are responsible for the recent arrests of 23 suspected rhino poachers in Kruger National Park (KNP).
Tragically, as previously reported by WAN, on Thursday, July 19th, Respect Mathebula became the second Ranger casualty since 1958 involving a poacher contact in Park. Mathebula was shot after making contact with a poaching group that they had been tracking.
As per the organization, Respect joined SANParks in February 2015 as Field Ranger at Shangoni Ranger Section. In July 2016, he moved to Crocodile Bridge Section in the same position and worked there until he passed away.
In a statement released earlier this week by South African National Parks, Managing Executive of KNP, Glenn Phillips commended the work of the Rangers saying they are resilient in the aftermath of the tragic loss of a colleague.
“The arrests are a sign that the Spirit of Respect is being honored by the Rangers Corps,” noted Phillips. “Further to this, the fact that no poachers were wounded or killed in these contacts is a clear demonstration of the professionalism and discipline that embodies our Ranger Corps.”
According to Phillips, there has been relentless poacher activity since Mathebula’s passing, with 156 incidents reported including contacts.
“We are still making a plea to our neighbouring communities to help us in this fight by exposing those who are exploiting their children, husbands, and relatives to hunt rhino illegally,” continued Phillips. “These people do not have the welfare of the communities at heart but are criminals without a conscience, and they need to be put behind bars for a long time for their criminal acts.”
The 23 arrested suspects were also in possession of 10 high calibre rifles and poaching equipment. They will be facing charges related to poaching and possession of unlicensed firearms and ammunition.
“Very few people have the courage and necessary skills to perform this important task other than Rangers, in which Respect was and will forever be part of. Etlela hi kurhula Respect – May your soul rest in peace,” the organization shared in a tribute to the lost hero who left behind his wife, Wisdom Ndlovu, their four children, five brothers, two sisters and all other family members. “You upheld the Ranger values and flew the SANParks flag high with honour. We are poorer with your absence but will continue where you left off.”
WAN salutes Mathebula and his fellow Rangers who continue to work tirelessly and selflessly to protect some of the world’s most endangered species from some of the planet’s most egregious predators, greedy humans!

https://worldanimalnews.com/23-alleged-rhino-poachers-arrested-in-the-18-days-since-death-of-ranger-respect-mathebula-at-krueger-national-park/

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

8 Endangered Black Rhinos Die in Kenya After Relocation

voanews.com
NAIROBI
Eight critically endangered black rhinos are dead in Kenya following an attempt to move them from the capital to a national park hundreds of kilometers away, the government said Friday, calling the toll “unprecedented” in more than a decade of such transfers.

Preliminary investigations point to salt poisoning as the rhinos tried to adapt to saltier water in their new home, the Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife said in a statement. It suspended the ongoing move of other rhinos and said the surviving ones were being closely monitored.

Losing the rhinos is “a complete disaster,” said prominent Kenyan conservationist Paula Kahumbu of WildlifeDirect.

Conservationists in Africa have been working hard to protect the black rhino sub-species from poachers targeting them for their horns to supply an illegal Asian market.

In moving a group of 11 rhinos to the newly created Tsavo East National Park from Nairobi last month, the Kenya Wildlife Service said it hoped to boost the population there. The government agency has not said how the rhinos died. Fourteen of the animals were to be moved in all.

“Disciplinary action will definitely be taken” if an investigation into the deaths indicates negligence by agency staff, the wildlife ministry said.

“Moving rhinos is complicated, akin to moving gold bullion, it requires extremely careful planning and security due to the value of these rare animals,” Kahumbu said in a statement. “Rhino translocations also have major welfare considerations and I dread to think of the suffering that these poor animals endured before they died.”

Transporting wildlife is a strategy used by conservationists to help build up, or even bring back, animal populations. In May, six black rhinos were moved from South Africa to Chad, restoring the species to the country in north-central Africa nearly half a century after it was wiped out there.

Kenya transported 149 rhinos between 2005 and 2017 with eight deaths, the wildlife ministry said.

According to WWF, black rhino populations declined dramatically in the 20th century, mostly at the hands of European hunters and settlers. Between 1960 and 1995, numbers dropped by 98 percent, to fewer than 2,500.

Since then the species has rebounded, although it remains extremely threatened. In addition to poaching, the animals also face habitat loss.

African Parks, a Johannesburg-based conservation group, said earlier this year that there are fewer than 25,000 rhinos in the African wild, of which about 20 percent are black rhinos and the rest white rhinos.

In another major setback for conservation, the last remaining male northern white rhino on the planet died in March in Kenya, leaving conservationists struggling to save that sub-species using in vitro fertilization.

https://www.voanews.com/a/endangered-rhinos-dead-in-kenya-relocation-bid-official/4481300.html

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Updates

https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/updates/updates.asp?Rhino=&ID=1071

sheldrickwildlifetrust.org
The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Updates
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After months of hard work, we are delighted to announce the completion of the Meru Rhino Sanctuary extension and upgrade. The project, which we undertook in partnership with the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), was funded entirely through donations from supporters and offers Kenya’s rhinos a brighter future in a larger and more viable Sanctuary within the beautiful Meru National Park.

Meru National Park Meru Rhino Sanctuary

Meru Rhino Sanctuary Meru Rhino Sanctuary Fenceline

To celebrate the completion of the upgrade, on 5th of April, the DSWT and KWS held a handover ceremony attended by Robert Carr-Hartley from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, the Principle Secretary of Tourism Dr. Margaret Mwakima, and KWS Mr. Julius Kimani along with senior management from Meru National Park. During the ceremony, the DSWT also donated to KWS Meru National Park a fully customized land cruiser, to be used to further boost security within the Park.

Handover of donated landcruiser

The Meru Rhino Sanctuary is an important stronghold for Kenya’s rhino population and one that at the request of KWS DSWT has been able to extend and upgrade to better accommodate the rhinos that call it home, and hopefully see the existing population increase substantially in the future. Through the support of DSWT donors, we have been able to expand the Sanctuary from 48km² to 83.5km², providing more space for the growing resident rhino population that live within the sanctuary’s protected boundaries, which according to a KWS report in 2017, stood at 61 white rhinos and 28 black rhinos.

As part of the upgrade, we have also built two security bases which house KWS Security rangers and DSWT funded fence maintenance teams. This brand new perimeter electric fence line has been redesigned to be unobstrusive and has been extended a further 25.6 km, we have also incorporated 20 strategically located wildlife corridors with a design that allows the free movement of elephants and other wildlife in and out of the Sanctuary, with the exception of rhinos. These simple but effective corridors consist of thick, short posts spaced across a gap in the fence and prevent rhinos from moving beyond the Sanctuary since they are unable to climb over, or squeeze between, the posts.

Part of the Fenceline

The DSWT has a long and rich history of rhino conservation in Kenya and was involved in establishing the country’s first fenced special rhino sanctuaries in both Lake Nakuru National Park and later in Tsavo West National Park in conjunction with the Eden Wildlife Trust and African Wildlife Foundation. Moreover, in the early 1960s, our Founder Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick pioneered the milk formula and the husbandry necessary to hand rear orphaned black rhino calves and, over the years, Daphne and DSWT have hand-raised 16 orphaned black rhinos and rehabilitated them successfully in Solio Ranch, Tsavo East National Park and Nairobi National Park.

As we strive to help KWS protect these iconic creatures from the threat of poaching, fuelled by the demand for rhino horn, The DSWT will continue to support KWS in Meru National Park with a second phase being the redoing of the boundary fence lines for Meru National Park, rebuilding them into a 14 strand unshortable barrier electical fence along with the ongoing operations of DSWT/KWS Veterinary and De-snaring Teams based there, and these two teams have already been active in this area now for six years.

In particular, since its launch in 2013, the DSWT/KWS Meru Mobile Veterinary Unit, headed by KWS Veterinary Officer Dr Bernard Rono, has directly supported Meru’s rhino population attending to 165 rhino related veterinary incidents in the greater Meru ecosystem, comprising of ear notching excercises to ensure that individuals are easy to identify and to treat wounds brought about due to fighting and wounds made from the filarial fly, and a further 529 cases of other wildlife species in total have been treated by this Unit. Additionally, since its inception in 2014, the DSWT/ KWS Meru De-Snaring Unit (comprising of graduates from KWS Field Training School in Manyani) has confiscated 5,236 illegally lain snares and significantly contributed to deterring illegal activities due to regular patrols along the vulnerable boundaries of the National Park.

Some members of the DSWT funded Meru De-snaring team DSWT/KWS Meru Desnaring Team

DSWT KWS Mobile Veterinary Unit

Given the suitability of habitat for rhinos in Meru National Park, the Meru Rhino Sanctuary offers them a secure sanctuary and a place for sustainable growth, and it is our hope that in the coming years, it will house one of the largest rhino populations in Kenya. Our sincere thanks to everyone who donated towards this vital initiative to protect and preserve Kenya’s black rhino population, and special thanks goes to our conservation partner the Kenya Wildlife Service.

World’s last male northern white rhino dies

msn.com
World’s last male northern white rhino dies
By Joshua Berlinger, CNN 8 hrs ago
5-6 minutes
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY NICOLAS DELAUNAYA caregiver calms Sudan, the last known male of the northern white rhinoceros subspecies, on December 5, 2016, at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Laikipia County — at the foot of Mount Kenya — that is home to the planet’s last-three northern white rhinoceros.As 2016 draws to an end, awareness of the devastation of poaching is greater than ever and countries have turned to high-tech warfare — drones, night-goggles and automatic weapons — to stop increasingly armed poachers. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), at the African Black market, rhino horn sells for up to 60,000 USD (57,000 euros) per kilogram — more than gold or cocaine — and in the last eight years alone roughly a quarter of the world population has been killed in South Africa, home to 80 percent of the remaining animals. / AFP / Tony KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images): A caregiver calms Sudan — the last known male of the northern white rhinoceros subspecies — in 2016 at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Laikipia County, at the foot of Mount Kenya. © TONY KARUMBA/AFP/AFP/Getty Images A caregiver calms Sudan — the last known male of the northern white rhinoceros subspecies — in 2016 at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Laikipia County, at the foot of Mount Kenya.
FILE PHOTO: The last surviving male northern white rhino named ‘Sudan’ is seen at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia: The last surviving male northern white rhino named ‘Sudan’ is seen at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia, Kenya, June 2017. The world�s last male northern white rhino has died, leaving only two females of its subspecies alive in the world. World’s last male northern white rhino dies.

Gallery by Reuters

The world’s last male northern white rhino has died, leaving only two females left to save the subspecies from extinction.

The 45-year-old rhino named Sudan had been in poor health in recent days and was being treated for age-related issues and multiple infections.

A veterinary team made the decision to euthanize Sudan after his condition deteriorated significantly, the conservation group WildAid announced Tuesday.

Sudan lived in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, surrounded by armed guards in the days leading up to his death to protect him from poachers.

“He was a gentle giant, his personality was just amazing and given his size, a lot of people were afraid of him. But there was nothing mean about him,” said Elodie Sampere, a representative for Ol Pejeta.

Researchers were able to save some of Sudan’s genetic material in the hopes of successfully artificially inseminating one of the two females left, Sampere said.

“We can only hope that the world learns from the sad loss of Sudan and takes every measure to end all trade in rhino horn. While prices of rhino horn are falling in China and Vietnam, poaching for horn still threatens all rhino species,” said WildAid CEO Peter Knights.

Rhinos are targeted by poachers, fueled by the belief in Asia that their horns cure various ailments. Experts say the rhino horn is becoming more lucrative than drugs.

In addition to round-the-clock security, the Ol Pejeta Conservancy also put radio transmitters on the animals and dispatched incognito rangers into neighboring communities to gather intelligence on poaching.
Old and frail

At 45, Sudan was elderly in rhino years and suffered from problems associated with age.

During his final years, he was not able to naturally mount a female and suffered from a low sperm count, which made his ability to procreate difficult.

His daughter Najin, 28 and granddaughter, Fatu, considered young by comparison. Najin could conceive, but her hind legs are so weak she may be unable to support a mounted male.

Sudan made headlines last year when the Tinder dating app named him the “most eligible bachelor in the world” in a campaign to raise funds to save the subspecies.

The western black rhino was declared extinct seven years ago as a result of poaching. All five remaining rhino species worldwide are considered threatened, according to the conservation group Save the Rhino.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/worlds-last-white-rhino-dies/ar-BBKs7Ej?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Humane Society International: Take Action


https://action.hsi.org/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=104&ea.campaign.id=64499&ea.tracking.id=email_wildlife_sa_rhinos_17&utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=wildlife_sa_rhinos&utm_content=022117+Global+SA+rhino+mm&ea.url.id=858041&forwarded=true

Petition: JUSTICE FOR THULA THULA RHINO CALVES AND BRUTAL ATTACK/RAPE ON CARETAKERS AND SECURITY AT THE RHINO ORPHANAGE.


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/684/417/752/?taf_id=34202538&cid=fb_na

Take Action Against the Rhino Horn Trade


https://takeaction.takepart.com/actions/take-action-against-the-rhino-horn-trade?cmpid=action-eml-2016-09-22

Thunderclap: #MarchAgainstExtinction


https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/45355-marchagainstextinction

petition: Stop Namibia From Inviting Rich Hunters to Kill Endangered Black Rhinos!

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                                                   http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/911/935/167/

petition: Urge The Pennsylvania Legislature to Ban The Sale of Ivory and Rhino Horns To Protect Endangered Wildlife!, Pennsylvania

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                                                    http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/115/509/179/

Halt Legalization of Rhino Horn Trafficking

 

An African nation is considering legalizing the rhino horn trade within its borders. Trafficking rhino horns is a devastating practice that killed over 1,338 rhinos in 2015 alone. Stop Swaziland from legalizing it.

Source: Halt Legalization of Rhino Horn Trafficking

Don’t Lift Ban on Rhino Horn Trade

 

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The ban on rhino horn trade is being challenged once again as Swaziland seeks to sell its rhino horns on the international market. Sign this petition to demand that the dangerous proposal is rejected, and protect rhinos from the danger of increased poaching.

Source: Don’t Lift Ban on Rhino Horn Trade

Stop the Slaughter of Thousands of Rhinos

Endangered rhinos are further threatened by a plan to legalize the trade in their horns. Don’t open the floodgates to more rhino poaching.

Source: Stop the Slaughter of Thousands of Rhinos

Poachers Slaughtered More Than 1,000 Rhinos In South Africa For The 3rd Year In A Row

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/rhino-poaching_us_56a1f7dde4b0404eb8f123e3?ir=Green&section=us_green&utm_hp_ref=green

Petition update · Support Delaware Ivory Bill SB 156 · Change.org

https://www.change.org/p/enact-legislation-outlawing-ivory-and-rhino-horn-products-in-ohio/u/14949678?tk=rPhARp1hEpPrgK9LwvoueERqEAB41qeaPsOrVPPFbUQ&utm_source=petition_update&utm_medium=email

Protect Rhinos From the Brutal Ivory Trade

South Africa is considering reversing the ban on the sale of rhino horns. With less than 5,000 rhinos left in sub-Saharan Africa, the reverse of this ban would put these already endangered animals in even more danger. Sign this petition to keep the current ban on the sale of rhino horns to help protect these precious animals.

Source: Protect Rhinos From the Brutal Ivory Trade

Calling All Artists!

Fight for Rhinos

Are you a talented, serious artist?

Do you want to save rhinos?

Introducing the perfect opportunity: Art for Rhinos

karenmoorhouse 2 by Karen Moorhouse

Fight for Rhinos can’t help but notice the talented, sometimes whimsical, sometimes poignant pieces of African art out there!  At the same time, we receive a steady stream of “How can I help?” questions.

Monetary donations are ALWAYS appreciated and put directly to use! But for those of you for whom money doesn’t come easy, but art does, we are asking for your original art pieces as a donation.

*Anything original (no reprints please) involving rhinos or Africa, including landscaping, wildlife, people.

*Send us an email at fightforrhinos@gmail.com with a photo of your art

*We will send you a release form

*Send us the art, along with your bio and what you’d like included in it, along with a suggested selling price.

*Once sold, we’ll send you a receipt…

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I am not exaggerating when I say that we are at a crossroads – we can either do something to save elephants, rhinos, and other African species now or we will watch them disappear.

~ ~ ~ Please Sign Petition ~ ~ ~

URGENT: Please Help Bring Rhino Poachers to Justice

Fight for Rhinos

Kingpin poaching leader Hugo Ras, and his nine co-accused  have been charged with no less than 318 charges regarding their involvement in rhino poaching and related crimes. These people are REPEAT OFFENDERS; they are believed to be responsible for the brutal slaughter and mutilation of 24 rhino, including a pregnant cow and a small calf, in state and privately owned reserves around the country between June 2008 and June 2012.

Hugo Ras Hugo Ras, serial rhino killer

They were arrested Friday by South African’s Priority Investigation Unit, the Hawks. A spokesperson for the group, Paul Ramaloko called the syndicate’s operations the “serial killing” of rhino.

Via Allison Thompson from OSCAP (Outraged South African Citizens Against Poaching), here is a list of the accused:

ras and coconspirators Ras and his co-conspirators in court.

1. Hugo Ras (Ringleader)
2. Trudie Ras (wife of Hugo)
3. Mandla Magaguka (poacher)
4. Willie Oosthuizen (Organized Crime)
5. Joseph Wilkinson (Attorney)
6. Jacobus Steyn aka Bonnie…

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