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A Little Trick Pet Owners Are Using To Save BIG on Pet Prescriptions at Regular Pharmacies

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iHeartDogs.com

by Justin Palmer

If you’ve ever purchased a prescription for your dog at a regular people pharmacy, you might be in for a BIG surprise!

Many pet owners don’t realize that there are ways to save on pet prescriptions. Yes, and I mean WITHOUT insurance! You’ve probably realized that even if you have a good pet insurance policy, it’s unlikely to cover costly pet meds. This means that if you’re buying your dog’s prescription at a regular pharmacy, you’re likely paying a hefty price, since no insurance co-pays are involved. The iHeartDogs Rx Savings Card might just be a HUGE help!

What kind of medications are eligible for discounts?

Now let’s be upfront. The iHeartDogs Rx Savings Card will not help you if you’re buying a pet only medication (like flea or heartworm prevention) through an online only pharmacy or through your vet. However, a large percentage of pet drugs are available at your local pharmacy. If this is in fact the case, you may receive a substantial discount by using this card.

But wait, what’s the catch? Nothing is really free right?

Yes and no. The reality is local pharmacies want your business. (In fact, they make most of their money from other products people buy when they come in to fill prescriptions!) For this reason, pharmacies will pay a small fee in order to drive business into their stores. Because we can bring a large volume of customers to them, discounts are negotiated on your behalf, and you benefit from bulk discount pricing. This allows you to receive a price that in most cases is much lower than the usual and customary price your pharmacy charges when you are buying a pet prescription using no insurance.

Our Card Is Accepted by Nearly Every Pharmacy!

That’s right. Below you’ll see a sampling of the pharmacies that accept the card. You’ve got absolutely nothing to lose, simply present the card to see if the pricing we offer is better than what you’re normally charged.

Will the card ALWAYS save me money?

In most cases, our negotiated pricing will be cheaper than what your pharmacy’s cash price is. In some cases however, certain pharmacy chains will already have the lowest price available. If you present the card, you can be assured that you will ALWAYS pay the lowest price available. In some cases, your pharmacy already has a lower price in which case that is the price you pay. In other words, you lose nothing by at least printing the card and presenting it to your pharmacy.

How Much of a Discount Will The Card Provide?

The largest savings are realized on generic brand drugs and can be up to 80% off. The average savings is around 30%, with brand name drugs in the 5-15% range. You can use the price search tool on our program page here to lookup your pet’s drug price. Please be aware that savings do vary based on pharmacy location.

Get Your Free Card

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Halloween Safety Tips For Pets

Because Halloween shouldn’t be too spooky 🎃👻

By Danielle Esposito

dog holding pumpkin

Halloween comes with all kinds of fun, and it’s natural to want to get your pet in on the excitement — especially if it involves an adorable (or very, very scary) costume.

But with all that spooky fun comes its own set of dangers for pets — like the horror of your pet getting too curious about those flaming jack-o’-lanterns.

Fortunately, all of these dangers can be avoided by a little planning and some strategic placement.

“Whether it’s cats or dogs or even smaller creatures, hazards such as electrical cords, candles or other open flames pose a risk,” Dr. Paul Cunningham, senior emergency clinician at BluePearl Specialty and Emergency Pet Hospital in Michigan, told The Dodo. 

Here are some tips for keeping your pets safe on Halloween, according to Dr. Cunningham:

1. Conceal electrical cables when possible

You can do this by hiding them under carpets, behind furniture or in cord wraps. “This helps to prevent chewing or tripping,” which are common causes of household injuries in pets, Dr. Cunningham said.

2. Avoid the use of open flame candles in spaces where your pets will have access

Their curiosity may lead to a waxy mess or, worse, a house fire, so Dr. Cunningham recommends keeping any sort of open flame away from areas where your pets will be — especially if the flames will be left unattended.

3. Keep Halloween candy out of reach

Since candy toxicity spikes around Halloween due to stealthy pets sneaking into your candy stash, it’s best to completely avoid this by hiding candy bowls and bags.

4. Keep pets in separate areas when needed

“And truthfully, the best advice of all is to keep pets in separate areas of the house if they cannot be supervised at all times,” Dr. Cunningham said. “No one wants to end a holiday with a vet visit or home damage.”

This is especially true if your pet is scared of costumes or strangers, and isn’t likely to react well to trick-or-treaters.

With these simple safety steps and precautions, you can rest easy knowing your pets are safe this Halloween — which gives you more time to hunt down the perfect matching costume (for pets who don’t mind dressing up)!nullnullnull

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The Truth About Betta Fish: Read This Before You Buy One

livekindly.co

Audrey EnjoliSTAFF WRITER | LOS ANGELES, CA | CONTACTABLE VIA: AUDREY@LIVEKINDLY.COM 6-8 minutes

Colorful, iridescent betta fish are popular starter pets. Pet stores often market the vibrant swimmers as being easy to care for because they’re small—so they take up minimal space—and are inexpensive to care for. 

But proper betta care is a bit more specialized than some pet stores lead on. And although they’re appearance may make them popular for display, they are actually one of the most exploited fish in the aquarium trade.There are more than 70 different species of betta fish.

What Is A Betta Fish?

Betta fish are small, freshwater fish. They are members of the Osphronemidae family and are native to Southeast Asia. They are relatively small, ranging anywhere from six to eight centimeters long. 

There are more than 70 different species of betta fish in the wild. The fish live in shallow water, including ponds, flood plains, slow-moving streams, and marshes. They are carnivorous by nature. They have a wide-ranging diet that consists of small crustaceans, insects—including mosquito larvae, worms, and even smaller fish.

Store-bought betta splendens—also known as Siamese fighting fish—are one of the more popular species of betta fish because of their vibrant coloring.

However, these ray-finned fish look nothing like their wild counterparts. Wild betta fish typically have short fins and sport a dull grey coloring. The betta fish sold in pet stores are a product of selective breeding—the process of breeding animals to develop more desirable characteristics and traits, such as a particular color or size.

Store-bought betta fish have been bred to display a wide variety of colors. Betta fish sold in stores have also been bred to have different types of fins, such as a double tail, crowntail, delta, halfmoon, and more.Male bettas are highly territorial.

Why Do Betta Fish Fight?

Male betta fish are highly territorial, compared to their female counterparts. As such, they can become aggressive toward other male bettas when defending their territory. Male bettas will also attack similar-looking fish of other species of fish with flowing fins. When disturbed or threatened, they will often flare their fins in order to show aggression.

Male bettas are also fiercely protective of their offspring. They build bubble nests, which are formed by air bubbles that are coated with saliva in order to make them stronger, for their young. So they can also become aggressive when predators or other fish breach their territory.Betta fish are commonly kept in tiny containers in pet stores.

What’s Wrong With Buying Betta Fish?

A quick glance down the fish aisle at your local pet store will likely and you’ll likely see rows of small plastic containers filled with immobile bettas.

Some of these fish that are sold in U.S. pet stores are captured in the wild. But the vast majority are bred in countries like Thailand in Southeast Asia.

An investigation by the Asian branch of animal rights organization PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Asia exposed the ways in which bettas suffer in the global fish trade. The exposé highlighted Thailand’s betta fish industry. A video released with the investigation shows betta fish confined to small containers that were not filled with an adequate amount of water to cover their bodies.

PETA Asia’s undercover investigator visited ten different betta breeding factories and packing operations. Dead bettas were seen on the floor; some were seen left out of water for extended amounts of time while they were prepared for shipping.

Once shipped, it can take days for bettas to reach their destination. The investigation found tranquilizers are sometimes added to the bettas’ water to keep the fish from consuming their own tails out of distress. Some bettas are dead upon arrival. A company that supplies betta fish to Petco told the investigator that of the 100,000 bettas shipped per week to the U.S., up to 1,000 of them die before reaching distributors.Bettas require specialized care if kept in captivity.

What’s Wrong With Home Aquariums?

Bettas, and other fish, that are held in captivity in home aquariums can suffer from inadequate environments and lack of proper care.

Unlike some other types of fish, bettas require warm water and supple filtration. They must be fed and have their tanks cleaned on a regular basis. They also need environmental enrichment. This can be in the form of caves and plants that they can spend their time traversing. Too-small of a tank and poor water quality can impact bettas’ overall well-being.

Studies show captive bettas can suffer from a host of physical ailments. These include loss of color or appetite, listlessness, cloudy eyes, frayed fins, bloating, weight loss, labored reservations, and erratic swimming. They can also suffer from a number of other health issues like fin rot, bacterial infections, and fungus.

Similar to humans and other animals, bettas can suffer emotionally. They can experience boredom, depression, and stress due to being held in captivity. A 2017 study into the potential welfare issues impacting captive bettas found that most captive environments lack the complexities common to their natural habitat. This negatively impacts bettas’ wellbeing.

“We do know obviously that fish, in general, are more than what we thought they were, in a sense that their cognition is more developed than we previously thought and that they may even experience emotions, for example when in pain,” the study’s author, Christel P.H. Moons told the National Geographic.Bettas can suffer emotional and physical ailments in captivity.

Should You Have Pet Fish?

Although bettas may be regarded as easy to care for by some, they need highly specialized care. They also require an enriched environment similar to their natural habitats. This is in order to promote good health, both physically and emotionally.

Regardless—whether it be a dog, cat, rabbit, or fish—adding a pet to the family should be a decision that entails much consideration and deliberation.  If you are dead set on keeping a pet fish, and already have an adequately-sized aquarium with a stimulating environment, see if anyone in your area is offering fish for adoption to avoid supporting the fish trade.

https://www.livekindly.co/truth-about-betta-fish/?goal=0_8051ea5750-41b2aeb1d2-136082747&mc_cid=41b2aeb1d2&mc_eid=5db4ddecf5

Your furry friends are relying on you to keep them safe

Fireworks & Lost Pets: How To Prepare For July 4th

pawboost.com

Katy K. 5-7 minutes

Fireworks & Lost Pets: How To Prepare For July 4th

As you prepare for the biggest celebration of the summer, you may not know that shelters across the nation are preparing for their busiest time of the year.

The number of missing pets skyrockets (no pun intended) in the days following July 4th. PawBoost can attest to this. On July 5th 2019, the number of lost pets reported to PawBoost was 117% higher than the daily average for the previous three weeks!

What is it about July 4th that has such an impact on the lost pet problem in the U.S.? Maybe unsurprisingly, it’s all about the fireworks.

Although the light shows are incredible for us to watch and see, for our furry friends the fireworks demonstrations can be a terrifying experience.

The resounding blasts and flashing lights can feel like a kind of attack on our pet’s senses – and such intense sounds and sights may be disorienting to dogs and cats, causing them to run off as they attempt to escape the noise and lights.

 Photo Credit: Pexels

Photo Credit: john paul tyrone fernandez via Pexels

How To Prepare:

Before July 4th

  • Tag – You’re It: Use the week or so in advance of the holiday festivities to check that your pet has securely fastened and up-to-date identification tags and is microchipped with a functioning implant. It’s always a good idea to do these things, but it is extra important around Independence Day because of the high risk posed to your pet.
 Photo Credit: Maialisa via Pixabay

Photo Credit: Maialisa via Pixabay

  • Snap To It: Double check that you have access to an up-to-date, high resolution photo of your pet. The odds are good that your phone’s photo gallery is already filled with hundreds of adorable photos of your fur baby, but in the event that it isn’t, we recommend using a high-quality camera to snap several up-close and full body shots prior to the start of the holiday celebrations.

On July 4th

  • Give Your Pet the Run Around Before the Blasts: PetFinder recommends taking your pets for an extra-long walk or throw the ball around a bit longer than you normally would the morning of any holiday celebrations. A tired, de-stressed pet is more likely to sleep throughout the day rather than become overly excited by all the new stimuli in their environments.
 Photo Credit: Pexels

Photo Credit: Pixabay via Pexels

  • Keep Your Pets Indoors During the Fireworks Shows: Going to a fireworks display? Keep your pets in the house and safely indoors, ideally in an escape-proof part of your home. The closer the pet is to the resounding booms of fireworks, the more likely they are to run off away from the direction of the noise if they become frightened.
  • Securely Fasten all Doors, Gates and Windows: Before heading out for any July 4 celebrations or evening shows, check to ensure that all windows, doors and gates are securely closed and locked. Turn on fans or the air conditioning to help keep pets cool while you are out – you want to avoid creating any accidental escape routes by leaving windows or doors open.
 Photo Credit: Pexels

Photo Credit: stiv xyz via Pexels

  • Create A Pet Safety Space: Create a small space inside your home where your pet can go if he/she becomes frightened. When pets are unable to orient loud and unfamiliar sounds, they may want to retreat to small, enclosed areas. So before any fireworks displays begin, move your pet’s crate or carrier into a central room of your house away from the windows. Closing all blinds and placing a curtain or towel over the crate can also help to reduce your furry loved one’s overexposure to unfamiliar stimuli during the fireworks event.
  • Keep Your Pet Calm by Using White Noise: You can create a “white noise” environment in your house by playing music or other sounds designed to calm your pet’s nervous system throughout the fireworks displays and up until bedtime.
  • Treat Yo’ Pet: While you are out enjoying the annual fireworks show, plan to leave something for your pet to enjoy (and stay distracted!) as well. Perhaps a frozen toy filled with your pup’s tasty treats or a toy with the preferred catnip for your favorite feline.
 Photo Credit: Lydia89 via Pixabay

Photo Credit: Lydia89 via Pixabay

  • Consider Staying Home: If you have a particularly skittish pet, it may be best to opt for spending this year cuddling with your favorite four-legged friend on the couch instead of attending this year’s fireworks show in person. Your pet will feel more comfortable with the familiarity of your presence in the house and you can get some precious best paw pal time in – it’s really a win-win!
 Photo credit: Pexels

Photo Credit: StockSnap via Pixabay

What To Do If Your Pet Becomes Lost

Despite careful preparation and planning, accidents can still happen. With all the overwhelming stimuli from the July 4th celebrations, you may come back from a day trip or fireworks display to discover that your pet is nowhere to be found.

If you find yourself in this situation, follow the steps found in this article on spreading the word about your lost pet. And of course, make sure you file a missing pet report with PawBoost!

 Photo Credit: Mixed Pet

Photo Credit: wagwalking.com

For more information on how to best practice pet safety this July 4th holiday, be sure to check out these sites for additional tips and resources:

https://www.pawboost.com/blog/2017-6-27-be-prepared-this-fourth-of-july/

The right diet and exercise make a world of difference for this dog

Does Your Dog Have Bad Breath? Here Are Seven Ways To Help Him

thedodo.com

By Danielle Esposito 6-8 minutes

dog has bad breath
DodoWell

Because doggy kisses don’t have to be stinky.

We independently pick all the products we recommend because we love them and think you will too. If you buy a product from a link on our site, we may earn a commission.

While doggy kisses are one of life’s greatest pleasures, getting close to a pup with bad breath is not.

And believe it or not, bad dog breath isn’t as normal as you’d think.

In fact, if your dog suffers from obnoxiously stinky breath, it’s a good idea to get him checked out by your vet for any underlying health issues.

Why does my dog have bad breath?

“A dog’s bad breath is not normal and may be a clue to underlying oral disease — such as periodontal disease or a tumor in the mouth,” Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, a veterinarian with Animal Medical Center in New York City, told The Dodo. 

  A serious case of bad breath should send you and your dog to the veterinarian’s office ASAP, she said.

While the issue could be a simple plaque buildup, it’s always better to make sure.

Your vet might check your dog for a variety of issues including:

– Poor oral hygiene
– Dental disease
– Diabetes
– Gross dietary habits (like eating poop)
– Kidney disease
– Liver disease

How do I help my dog’s stinky breath?

If you’ve gone to the vet and your dog has been cleared of any serious underlying health issues, there are other ways that you can help get his breath a bit more tolerable. 1. Brush his teeth regularly  “Veterinarians recommend daily brushing,” Dr. Hohenhaus said. 

  Just like with people, brushing your dog’s teeth will help to combat his breath. Find a toothpaste flavor that your dog will love to make it a better experience for you both.

  We recommend: Virbac CET Vanilla/Mint Toothpaste. Buy it now from Amazon for $9.99.
  2. Get some dental chews Dental chews are a great way to help your dog’s breath — and they can be mistaken for treats!

  “Chewing helps prevent plaque and tartar buildup and assists in boredom relief,” Dr. Stephanie Austin, a veterinarian at Bond Vet in New York City, told The Dodo. While there are a lot of dental chews on the market, make sure to look for ones that contain breath-freshening chlorophyll or delmopinol for the best results. 

  We recommend: OraVet Dental Hygiene Chews for Dogs. Buy them now from Amazon for $14.99+.
  3. Sprinkle cinnamon on your dog’s food Believe it or not, cinnamon is actually a great trick for freshening breath!

  We recommend: McCormick Ground Cinnamon. Buy it now from Amazon for $5.78.
  4. When in doubt: coconut oil Coconut oil isn’t just beneficial for humans — it can also help your dog’s breath! You can drizzle some over your dog’s food in the mornings, or even use it in combination with his toothpaste and brush his teeth with it. 

  “Just be careful of the fat content in any oil supplement!” Dr. Austin said.

  We recommend: Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil. Buy it now from Amazon for $13.22
  5. Add probiotics to his diet Probiotics work by introducing good bacteria into your dog’s mouth, helping to combat the ones that cause bad breath. Get a probiotic specifically made for dogs, and you’ll likely see (or smell) an improvement. 

  We recommend: Zesty Paws Probiotic Bites. Buy them now from Amazon for $25.97. 
  6. Give your dog some wheatgrass A great source of chlorophyll, wheatgrass helps to neutralize odors to fight off bad breath. You can chop up some fresh wheatgrass to sprinkle on his food, or try a shelf-stable powder. You can even freeze some into ice cubes to use as a treat.

  We recommend: Amazing Grass Organic Wheat Grass Powder. Buy it now for $19.99.

  While bad breath is something to look into with your vet, once your dog is given a clean bill of health, these tips will help you get your sweet-smelling pup back!

https://www.thedodo.com/amphtml/dodowell/does-your-dog-have-bad-breath?__twitter_impression=true

New Guidelines for Pet Owners from CDC

onegreenplanet.org

By Eliza Erskine 4-5 minutes


The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has released new guidelines for pet owners and coronavirus. After two cats tested positive for the coronavirus in different parts of New York, the new guidelines are out to share with pet owners how to care for pets in the pandemic and how to keep them safe.

Public health officials stated that there is “no evidence” that pets are part of spreading the virus. The CDC stressed the importance of the need for additional information and testing to be able to provide specific guidelines for pet owners. The CDC recommends treating pets like family members and to practice social distancing for animals too.  In the meantime, the CDC has reocmmended:

  • “Do not let pets interact with people or other animals outside the household.
  • Keep cats indoors when possible to prevent them from interacting with other animals or people.
  • Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining at least 6 feet from other people and animals.
  • Avoid dog parks or public places where a large number of people and dogs gather.”

If you’re sick with coronavirus, suspected or confirmed, follow the CDC guidelines and let someone else care for your pet while you’re sick, avoid contact until you’re well and use face coverings and hand washing if you must care for your animal during your illness.

IDEXX Laboratories said it would be providing a COVID-19 test to veterinarians. The agency also said it would continue to provide updates as more information was available.

Learn more about pets and coronavirus, including transmitting the virus to pets, how to keep pets healthy during coronavirus,  how to adopt a pet during social distancing, shelters struggling during coronavirus, and the man that fostered 100 dogs in the pandemic.

Read more about protecting yourself from coronavirus. Check the CDC website for more information on how to protect yourself and check our latest article to learn how COVID-19 differs from the flu.

Scientists believe that the spread of COVID-19, or coronavirus, started at an exotic animal market in Wuhan, China. You can help stop the incidence of viruses like these by signing this petition to ban the wildlife trade.

Eating more plant-based foods is known to help with chronic inflammation, heart health, mental wellbeing, fitness goals, nutritional needs, allergies, gut health and more! Dairy consumption also has been linked to many health problems, including acne, hormonal imbalance, cancer, prostate cancer and has many side effects.

Interested in joining the dairy-free and meatless train? We highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App — with over 15,000 delicious recipes it is the largest plant-based recipe resource to help reduce your environmental footprint, save animals and get healthy! And, while you are at it, we encourage you to also learn about the environmental and health benefits of a plant-based diet.

Catch up on our latest coronavirus coverage in One Green Planet, check out these articles:

For more Animal, Earth, Life, Vegan Food, Health, and Recipe content published daily, subscribe to the One Green Planet Newsletter! Lastly, being publicly-funded gives us a greater chance to continue providing you with high-quality content. Please consider supporting us by donating!

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Tick season is here, make sure you check every spot on your pet!

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URGENT Advisory: Coronavirus and Companion Animals – Katzenworld

katzenworld.co.uk URGENT Advisory: Coronavirus and Companion Animals – Katzenworld Marc-André 3 minutes PETA Offers Tips on Caring for Cats and Dogs During COVID-19 Quarantines London – Although experts from the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and elsewhere agree that cats and dogs are not at risk of getting COVID­-19 nor transmitting it to humans, PETA is offering information about the best ways to keep animal companions and their guardians safe and healthy during this unprecedented outbreak. Never put face masks on animals, as they can cause breathing difficulties. Allow animals to move about your home normally – don’t cage or crate them. People who are sick or under medical attention for COVID-19 should avoid close contact with animals and have another member of their household care for animals so as not to get the virus on their fur. The coronavirus can be left on animals’ fur, just as it can remain on a doorknob, a handrail, another human hand, or any other surface that an infected person has touched.

Don’t stockpile unnecessarily – as this could result in shortages for others – but do plan ahead and ensure you have adequate food and medicine, if needed, for your companion animals (approximately two to three weeks’ worth). Assist neighbours who may not be able to shop for their companion animals and donate companion-animal food to food banks. “Our dogs and cats rely on us to take care of them year-round, and especially during times of crisis,” says PETA Director Elisa Allen. “PETA is asking everyone to ensure that their animals are still getting healthy food, plenty of exercise, and lots of love.” PETA – whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way” – opposes speciesism, which is a human-supremacist worldview. For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk Don’t miss out! Subscribe To Newsletter Receive top cat news, competitions, tips and more! Give it a try. You can unsubscribe at any time. Click to purchase the sleepypod mobile pet bed. We regularly write about all things relating to cats on our Blog Katzenworld! My partner and I are owned by four cheeky cats that get up to all kind of mischief that of course, you’ll also be able to find out more about on our Blog If you are interested in joining us by becoming a regular contributor/guest author do drop me a message.

A dog friendly car 🐕

How to Protect Your Pet From Pet Theft

Cherry Bligg

pet theft header

In just a few seconds, your dog or cat could be taken–snatched from your yard or dragged off of your front porch–only to be sold to research laboratories, used as fighters or bait in dog fighting rings, or “flipped” for profit. In fact, in the time it takes you to read this sentence, someone could have stolen your pet.

Since many pet thefts go unreported, it’s impossible to know exactly how many animals are taken but, historically, an estimated two million pets are stolen in the United States each year.

Pet Theft Awareness Day

Observed annually on February 14–also known as Valentine’s Day, which sees a considerable uptick in pet thefts–LCA first created National Pet Theft Awareness Day in 1988 to raise awareness for the issues of pet theft and to educate the public about how to keep their companion animals safe from unscrupulous thieves.

Common Reasons for Pet Theft

Reward: One of the most common reasons for pet theft, “dog flipping” occurs when dogs are stolen for the purpose of being sold for profit. Stolen dogs are typically resold to unsuspecting new owners, to puppy mills, or to backyard breeders where they are continually bred so their offspring can then be sold for profit. Dogs raised in by backyard breeders or in puppy mills do not receive adequate veterinary care and are often forced to live in deplorable living conditions.

Medical Research: USDA licensed Class B animal dealers obtain dogs and cats from random sources like animal pounds/shelters (this is known as pound seizure), other B dealers, “bunchers,” backyard breeders, or by stealing them from unsuspecting owners, only to turn around and sell them to medical research laboratories. In 2016, 820,812 animals were used in research labs in the U.S., roughly 60,797 of which were dogs. LCA’s groundbreaking undercover investigations into Class B dealers helped expose and shut down numerous dog dealers, such as C.C. Baird, as well as Barbara Ruggiero, Frederick Spero, and Ralph Jacobsen, leading LCA to become the first animal rights group to procure state and federal prison sentences for Class B dealers in 1991. (Click here to learn more about Class B dealers.)

Dog Fighting Rings: Although the vast majority of dogs are taken for the purpose of being resold or bred, many are also stolen to be used as fighters or as bait in illegal dog fighting rings. As of 2008, dog fighting is a felony offense in all 50 states (as well as in D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands). In most states, possessing a dog for the purpose of fighting is also considered a felony. (Click here to learn more about dog fighting rings.)

How to Protect Your Pets

Keep your pets indoors, especially when you are not at home. Do not leave your pets unsupervised in your yard; it only takes a minute for thieves to steal your beloved companion animals. Keep your pet on a leash and do not let your pet roam free in your neighborhood. Never leave your pet alone in a car.

Properly identify your pets with a collar, tag, and microchip.

Ensure your pets are spayed and neutered; fixed animals are less likely to wander away from home.

Keep recent photos and written descriptions of your companion animals on hand at all times, and maintain up-to-date records and licenses on all of your pets.

Be aware of strangers in your area and report anything unusual, such as suspicious neighborhood activities or a surge in missing pets, to local police and animal control.

What to Do If Your Pet Is Stolen or Goes Missing

Call the police; if your pet is stolen, ask to file a report so there is a record of the theft.

Contact your local animal control department, animal shelters, and pounds in your area. You can also file a lost pet report with each shelter.

Canvass your neighborhood and put up “missing” flyers/posters with an up-to-date photo of your dog along with accurate contact information.

Search online “lost dog” websites (such as Craigslist or Center for Lost Pets) to see if someone has found your pet.

Be aware of scams! People may claim to have your pet and insist on a reward before turning the animal over to you. If a stranger calls saying they’ve found your pet, make sure they give you a very detailed description of your pet.

https://www.lcanimal.org/index.php/campaigns/class-b-dealers-and-pet-theft/dealing-dogs-class-b-dealer-cc-baird-investigation/101-pet-theft

Is The Dog Park Bad

dogs-life11

www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org

Sassafras Lowrey

Every morning, rain, shine or snow, people stand around making conversation with strangers as their dogs chase, run and mingle. Ranging from elaborate fenced playgrounds and rolling fields to small inner-city runs, dog parks are among the fastest growing park amenities nationwide. The Trust for Public Land found that there has been a 40 percent increase in the development of dog parks since 2009.

The first dog park in the United States was the Ohlone Dog Park, which was founded by Martha Scott Benedict and Doris Richards in 1979 in Berkeley, Calif. Since then, dog parks have become standard amenities in developing city and suburban neighborhoods across the country, but are they actually good for dogs? Surprisingly, canine behavior experts aren’t so sure.

According to a 2018 survey conducted by the National Recreation and Park Association (N.R.P.A.), 91 percent of Americans believe dog parks provide benefits to their communities. This was especially true among millennials and Gen Xers, who overwhelmingly recognized dog parks as beneficial amenities. The study found that the top two reasons responders cited for supporting dog parks were that 60 percent thought that they gave dogs a safe space to exercise and roam freely, and 48 percent felt that dog parks were important because they allowed dogs to socialize.

Especially for urban dogs that don’t have backyards to exercise in, dog parks can sound like a great idea. There is nothing natural, however, about dogs that aren’t familiar with one another to be put in large groups and expected to play together. Many of us just accept the assumption that dog parks are good places to socialize a dog, but that may not be the case.

The socialization myth

Nick Hof, a certified professional dog trainer and chair of The Association of Professional Dog Trainers, explained that in terms of canine behavior, the term “socialization” isn’t just dogs interacting or “socializing” with other dogs, but rather, “the process of exposing young puppies under 20 weeks to new experiences.”

“This helps them have more confidence and adapt to new situations,” Mr. Hof said.

Though socialization is critical for the healthy development of puppies, the dog park is not where you want to bring your puppy to learn about appropriate interactions with other dogs, Mr. Hof added.

“Dog parks are not a safe place to socialize a puppy under 6-12 months old,” he continued. “During our puppy’s early months, they are more sensitive to experiences, so a rambunctious greeter at the park may be enough to cause our puppy to be uncertain of all dogs,” Mr. Hof explained.

The goal for socializing young puppies is to ensure they have only positive interactions, and to avoid any overwhelming or frightening interactions. Instead of taking puppies to a dog park for socialization, Mr. Hof encourages owners to attend puppy classes with their dog to meet age-appropriate playmates.

Socialization with older dogs is a bit more challenging, because in a behavioral sense, older dogs have already had all of their formative socialization experiences. Dog guardians generally mean well when they bring a shy dog to the dog park with the intention of giving that dog positive interactions with other dogs. Unfortunately, this can backfire; a dog who is nervous or uncomfortable is more likely to be easily overwhelmed in a park setting, which can lead to dog fights or a long-term fear of encountering other dogs. A park setting also allows dogs to pick up bad habits from one another, and is definitely not a place you want to bring a dog who is under-socialized.

Playground bullies

Although dogs are social animals and regularly engage in various forms of play, the artificial setup of a dog park can be challenging. Many people bring their dogs to the park to burn off excess energy, but these dogs often display over-aroused and rude behavior that can trigger issues between dogs. Dr. Heather B. Loenser, senior veterinary officer of the American Animal Hospital Association cautioned that “unfortunately, just because an owner thinks their dog plays well with others, doesn’t mean they always do.”

Having your dog in a dog park requires trusting that everyone in the park is monitoring their dog, and is a good judge about whether their dog should be in the park in the first place. That’s a lot of trust to put in a stranger.

Unlike doggy day cares or play groups, most dog parks are public spaces that are not screened or supervised by canine professionals.

This can be an issue with fights between dogs that can lead to dogs learning inappropriate behaviors from other dogs. “Bad experiences can also ripple outward and cause our dogs to have issues or concerns outside of the dog park as well,” Mr. Hof said, adding that dogs at dog parks might pick up bad habits such as being pushy when greeting or engaging in play with other dogs. On other hand, dogs that are overwhelmed by the boisterousness of others may become withdrawn, skittish and nervous when meeting other dogs in and out of the dog park.

Injuries

One of the biggest dangers of dog parks is that they often don’t have separate play enclosures for large and small dogs, or when they do, owners can choose to disregard those spaces. Even without meaning to, a large dog can easily cause serious injury or even kill a smaller dog.

From minor scuffles to serious incidents, injuries are common at dog parks. Bite wounds are common, even from rough play. Even if the wound seems small, “seek veterinary care immediately,” Dr. Loenser advised.

Bites that occur in fights or during play often involve tearing under the skin, which can be complicated to heal, and may carry a greater risk of infection. Muscle strains and sprains from lunging and rough play are also common. “Anytime dogs quickly pivot on their back legs, they are also at risk for tearing the ligaments, specifically the cranial cruciate ligament in their knees,” Dr. Loenser said. These types of knee-and-ligament injuries often require expensive surgery and extensive healing and rehabilitation.

Diseases

Even clean and well maintained dog parks can pose health risks, in particular the spread of easily communicable diseases. One challenge of dog parks being unregulated public spaces is that while most post signs saying dogs should be vaccinated, no proof of vaccinations is actually required.dogs-life8

The American Animal Hospital Association advises owners who bring their pets to the park to have them vaccinated with the Bordetella vaccine, which prevents “kennel cough,” as well as distemper. You’ll also want to have your dog vaccinated against leptospirosis, as communal water bowls, puddles and other water features in dog parks can carry leptospira bacteria. All dogs should be vaccinated against rabies, and dogs that visit dog parks should be on flea and tick prevention as well as year-round heartworm prevention. Dogs that visit dog parks should also be vaccinated against canine influenza (dog flu) that can be transmitted through the air.

Dr. Loenser cautioned that although “currently, the influenza vaccines available cover for the strains that are most commonly seen, if new strains are introduced or mutate, these vaccines might not provide cross-protection.” If that were to occur, dogs that visited dog parks and had contact with a large number of dogs that might or might not be fully vaccinated would be at risk of getting sick.

Body language

Most dog owners aren’t skilled at reading their dog’s body language beyond a wagging tail, so warning signs that your dog is uncomfortable, unhappy or angry are often ignored. This leads to minor and major dog fights. Understanding canine body language is key to supporting your dog’s comfort and safety, and assessing if a playgroup at the dog park is going to be a good match.

“The dog park is not a place for you to let your dog run unsupervised while you socialize with other people,” Mr. Hof said. “Keep an eye on your dog and make sure that they are both being good and having a good time.” This means watching the actions and behaviors of your dog and the other dogs in the park. If things are getting too intense, that’s a good time to leave.

But what exactly should you be watching for? Dr. Loenser says that subtle signs of fear or aggression include “lip licking, yawning or panting when not hot.” Other signs of discomfort or a brewing issue include stiff bodies and erect tails. Keeping an eye out for these signs can give you the edge to intervene on your dog’s behalf before an interaction with another dog escalates.

Even dogs that appear to be playing well together may be at risk. “Healthy play between dogs should include small breaks or pauses,” Mr. Hof said. “If you are uncertain about if all dogs are happy, I recommend stopping the dog who may be too over-the-top and seeing what the other dog does. If the other dog tries to re-engage, it’s a good indicator that everything was okay. If the other dog runs off though, a break was a good idea.”

Any kind of behavior that involve one dog pinning another dog is also one to avoid. Barking, growling and other vocalization occasionally during play is normal, but frenzied barking is generally too much.

Dog park alternatives

On a good day, if the dog park you visit is large enough, it may physically tire out your dog. But the visit won’t actually provide your dog with the kind of enriching mental and emotional stimulation that dogs need. Dog parks, unfortunately, are often more about humans than they are about dogs.

As much as humans enjoy the chance to socialize with other like-minded animal lovers while our dogs play, it’s far safer and more fun for your dog to skip the dog park and spend that time engaging intentionally with you and their surroundings by going on walks, taking a training or general obedience class or even trying a new sport together. Ultimately you’re the only one who can determine if the risks outweigh the benefits of dog parks, but there is no shame in not surrendering your dog to what has become the quintessential urban dog experience: running with dozens of strangers in a small, smelly pen as people stand by, looking at their phones or gossiping. Make the time you have with your dog meaningful and enriching; after all, your dog wants to spend time with you, too.

https://www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.nytimes.com/2020/02/06/smarter-living/the-dog-park-is-bad-actually.amp.html?usqp=mq331AQCKAE%3D&amp_js_v=0.1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s&ampshare=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2020%2F02%2F06%2Fsmarter-living%2Fthe-dog-park-is-bad-actually.html

Sassafras Lowrey is a Certified Trick Dog Instructor and author of “Tricks In The City,” “Bedtime Stories For Rescue Dogs,” and the activity book “Chew This Journal” forthcoming in Summer 2020. Follow Sassafras on Twitter @SassafrasLowrey and at SassafrasLowrey.com.

PA Department of Agriculture warns dog owners of website selling fake dog licenses

HARRISBURG – Dog owners beware if you’re looking to buy new or renew dog licenses.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Dog Law Enforcement warns of a fraudulent website selling dog licenses online.

Officials said http://www.padoglicense.online sells fake PA dog licenses and pays search engines to appear at the top of search results pages for common terms, like “Pennsylvania dog license” or “renew PA dog license”.

The department offered some tips to help dog owners identify an official website:

Rather than using a search engine to reach a website to purchase a dog license, type http://www.licenseyourdogpa.pa.gov directly into your browser’s address bar.
Call your county treasurer’s office. Each county treasurer has a different process; while most offer an online option for purchase of licenses, some do not and require a paper form to be dropped off or mailed.

For more information of Pennsylvania’s dog laws, visit agriculture.pa.gov or licenseyourdogpa.pa.gov.

If you have a concern about a third-party website, contact the PA Attorney General Bureau of Consumer Protection at 1-800-441-2555.

https://fox43.com/2019/11/22/pa-department-of-agriculture-warns-dog-owners-of-website-selling-fake-dog-licenses/

Quote

MOSHOWARM&HAMMER pledges a double donation totaling $20,000 to two cat welfare welfare organization, if music video receive 2 million views by October 31,2019

Watch the official “Double Duty YouTube video here.

 

For more information on this great cause continue reading here.

via Cat Rapper iAmMoshow and ARM & HAMMER™ Release Second Single “Double Duty” and Say If you Love Cats, More Power to You – Katzenworld

Cat Rapper iAmMoshow and ARM & HAMMER™ Release Second Single “Double Duty” and Say If you Love Cats, More Power to You – Katzenworld

Chagas Disease in Dogs: Expectations vs. Reality | SimpleWag

Have any questions about the health of your dog, you go hear to ask a veterinarian for help

https://simplewag.com/chagas-disease-in-dogs/#How_Does_Chagas_Disease_in_Dogs_Spread

FACT or FICTION: Can Ice Harm Your Dog? The Truth Behind The Viral Story

 

iheartdogs.com
by Kristina Lotz

Many of you may have been alarmed by the recent blogs and articles that have been circulating the web, as things that are alarming often do, that warns you to NEVER give your dog ice or ice water as it may cause serious injury even death. There are various accounts of the article, with different dogs and different outcomes, but the story is fairly similar with most of them saying their vet told them that dogs should NEVER have ice.

When I came across this, it struck me as odd, considering most of us have given our dogs an ice cube or two throughout their lives, and of course, during the winter we have all see our dogs eat/drink snow as well as freezing water from an icy bucket without any harm done.

Another version claims that ice water can cause bloat in dogs:

So, I went to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center and received answers to my questions from Medical Director Dr. Tina Wismer.

Considering how often we have all shared ice cream, ice, popsicles, etc, with our dogs, we figured this must be a false rumor

Can Giving your Dog Ice Cause Bloat as the Story Implies?

This is not true. Dogs DO NOT BLOAT from drinking ice water on hot days. Bloat can be from food or from a buildup of gas. Either can cause the stomach to rotate and the dog to develop GDV (gastric dilatation volvulus).Bloat is most commonly seen in deep-chested large-breed dogs.

Factors that increase the risk of bloat include:

Feeding only one meal a day
Familial history of bloat
Rapid eating
Thin
Moistening dry food
Elevated feeders
Restricting water before and after a meal
Dry diet with animal fat in first four ingredients
Age (older dogs).

As you can see there are many things associated with bloat, but not one known cause.

What about feeding other “Frozen” items such as treats?

Many dogs love ice cubes. They can be given as treats or put in the water bowl. Some behaviorists even recommend freezing toys or treats in ice for dogs to chew on. The biggest risk with ice is that aggressive chewers could break teeth.

Frozen treats like ‘dog ice cream’ and yogurt have a softer texture (ice crystals are separated by fat). They have a much lower risk of causing dental damage.

Treating Heatstroke With Ice

Now that we have debunked the myth about ice, you may starting thinking great, I will pump my dog full of ice if he gets overheated, and save myself a trip to the vet’s. This would be a dangerous thing to do, however.

Dr. Wismer also mentioned that owners need to use common sense and make sure they are not trying to treat heatstroke with ice water. “If you think your dog has heatstroke you should get it to the veterinarian immediately. Do not waste time trying to get the dog to drink,” she adds.

In addition, use sense when it comes to things like a pool full ice. You wouldn’t want to go from 90 degree heat to an ice bath, and neither does your dog.

https://iheartdogs.com/fact-or-fiction-can-ice-harm-your-dog-the-truth-behind-the-viral-story/?utm_campaign=IHD-Email-Newsletter-080119&utm_medium=0000&utm_source=IHD-Email-Newsletter-080119&_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJuYWNrcGV0c0BnbWFpbC5jb20iLCAia2xfY29tcGFueV9pZCI6ICJNazJDaUsifQ%3D%3D

Its Hot In That Car

Guardians Of Life

If you need to take your companion animals with you. Then you need to leave the A.C. on in the car with water for them to drink. Otherwise, leave them at home and out of the heat. Too many times I have seen people leaving their companions in a hot car. Too many times I have had to call cops while busting the window open to save a dog’s life.

People need to understand if it’s too hot for them then it’s really too hot for their companions.

If you yourself see an animal in a hot car. You need to alert the local authorities, and let them know you had to break the window to save a life. This goes for young kids as well. Do not leave kids in the car on hot days either. Hot cars are death sentences.

Please be vigilant this summer and take precautions…

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“Airway, Breathing and Circulation” – Katzenworld

katzenworld.co.uk
Marc-André

Knowing your ABC’s for pets can help owners stabilise a pet in an emergency situation.

Despite our best efforts to protect our pets, accidents can and do happen. In serious cases, knowing what to do in an emergency can be the difference between life and death.

Vet charity PDSA offers resources and courses in Pet First Aid across the UK to help owners, pet business owners and animal-lovers safely deliver first aid to pets in an emergency, until they can get them to a vet.

PDSA Vet Olivia Anderson-Nathan says, “Accidents can happen at any time and require speedy action. Many people have a basic understanding of first aid for humans but when it comes to pets, there’s less awareness. In many emergency scenarios, a vet isn’t likely to be first on scene, so it’s important to know what to do.”

There are 3 steps to follow: Prepare, Recognise and Act. Always prepare for an emergency, this could help save a pet’s life.

“Taking some basic precautions can mean you have the information and tools you need to stop things from becoming more serious,” says Olivia.

Always have access to your vet’s name, address and telephone number, and keep a pen and paper handy for any instructions they give you.

Try to be vigilant and take action if you are concerned about your pet. When you recognise any concerning symptoms, it is important to consider this as a pet emergency.

Olivia added, “Having difficulty breathing, collapsing, seizures or bleeding are all emergencies. Other problems, such as severe vomiting and diarrhoea or not being able to pass any urine for over 24 hours, could also be a potential emergency, so always get in touch with your vet practice if you’re not sure.”

As soon as you recognise that you have an emergency, ensure you call your vet. They can give you advice and, if you’re heading straight there due to an emergency situation, they can prepare while you are en-route to the surgery.

You may need to act and administer pet first aid if a pet becomes unconscious or unresponsive. The key is to remain calm and don’t panic. Check their ‘ABC’ vital signs:

A – Check the Airway is clear. Pull their tongue forward and check there is nothing stuck in the throat.

B – Check they are Breathing. Look at their chest to see if it’s moving and listen over their nose or mouth for airflow. If they’re not breathing, immediately check for a heartbeat.

C – Check their Circulation. Put your hand on their chest just behind their elbow. Do they have a heartbeat?

If you are sure there is no breathing or heartbeat, you may need to perform CPR. Always call for help before starting CPR. PDSA offers free Pet First Aid courses nationally, and owners can also download a free copy of the charity’s pet first aid guide. Just visit http://www.pdsa.org.uk/firstaid.

PDSA is the UK’s leading vet charity. We’re on a mission to improve pet wellbeing through prevention, education and treatment. Support from players of People’s Postcode Lottery helps us reach even more pet owners with vital advice and information. http://www.pdsa.org.uk

https://katzenworld.co.uk/2019/05/29/airway-breathing-and-circulation/

This Woman Needs to be Stopped!!

Please make the call and share on your social network, this woman needs to be stopped!

Playcare Pets

(970)-245-0169

playcarepets@hotmail.com

348 North Ave,Grand Junction,CO 81501

 

Hairballs in Cats: Treatment Options – Katzenworld

katzenworld.co.uk
Marc-André

Following on from our past article discussing hairballs in cats and their causes, this article focuses on how to deal with those pesky balls of fur once they have formed.

When we talk about treating hairballs, we are really talking about two separate things. Usually, we are referring to a cat with chronic hairballs that requires treatment to reduce their incidence. However, sometimes we are talking about a kitty with a gut impaction caused by a hairball, which will need more intensive treatment to move it along.

Cats that have become impacted because of a hairball may retch unproductively, go off their food and act lethargic. They may have repeated episodes of vomiting and can strain in their litter trays, without producing any faeces. Within days, these guys will go from happy-go-lucky critters to very poorly cats. An owner will be able to tell that there is something amiss and should know that a vet visit is in order without delay.

To diagnose an impaction, not only will the vet check the cat over (focusing on their abdominal palpation and checking for any areas of tenderness or tension) they will usually have to perform some diagnostic tests, such as taking an ultrasound or X-ray of the stomach and intestines. Hairballs do not show up well on X-rays or scans and it is not always easy to spot them straight away. While something like a needle that was swallowed will show up as a bright white object on an X-ray, the same is not true when it comes to a ball made of fur. Sometimes, vets will have to feed the cat a special dye known as ‘barium’ before taking an X-ray, in an attempt to make the impaction more obvious. Vets may also determine that the cat has an obstruction from analysing the pattern of gas on the X-rays but may not actually know that it is a hairball until they are performing the surgery and are able to see it in person. Things that can mimic hairballs can include hair ties and clumps of wool, two things that cats are well-known for eating.

If a cat has developed a hairball that is causing a gut impaction, they will need to be urgently treated. If the impaction is only partial or a vet is confident medical therapy could be successful, some lucky cats will get away with a few days of fluid therapy and laxatives, passing the hair naturally over time once it has been moistened and lubricated. However, in more severe cases when the hairball is completely lodged and not budging, vets may actually need to perform an ‘exploratory laparotomy’. This is a surgical procedure in which the cat’s abdomen is opened and the blockage is identified. The vet will then cut into the stomach or intestine (wherever the hairball is) to remove the offending clump. After removing it, the tissue will be sutured back up. There is a risk of leakage and infection afterwards, so this is certainly not a procedure that should be taken lightly. Cats may need to spend several days afterwards in hospital being monitored as they recover.

As they have had an abdominal surgery, it will take several weeks before they can go back to their normal routine and they will need to be rested while their tissues heal. As well as surgery, many will need additional medication such as pain relief, gut motility medication and stool-softeners, to help them on their road to recovery. Many will not want to eat for a day or two, so will need to be supported with intravenous fluid therapy and syringe feeding or tube feeding. Cats who have had blockages in the past can be more prone to repeat offences going forward. These guys need to be closely monitored and will benefit the most from life-long interventions which aim to reduce hairballs from building up.

Now let’s take a look at the issue that we see more often in our pet cats and which owners will constantly quiz vets about during a cat’s annual visit: Hairball vomits! Luckily, the vast majority of hairballs do not cause obstruction and tend to either pass out unnoticed with the poop or are vomited up surrounded by lots of slimy saliva. It is these pesky hairballs that cause owners the most contention and that many abhor the sight of.

Luckily, all is not lost and when a cat has been throwing up lots of hairballs, there are a few things that we can do to treat them.

Recently, pet food companies have launched several diets that claim to treat fur balls that are already present and to reduce the amount of fur balls being produced when fed long-term. They aid in the elimination of fur from the digestive tract and contain several sources of natural fibre which assist the gut and its movement. These foods will also contain a good amount of essential fatty acids to promote a healthy, shiny coat that is not prone to breaking. Owners can choose from wet and dry diets or may wish to mix feed. Some of the more popular diets on the market at the moment include ‘Royal Canin Hairball Care’ and ‘Purina One: Coat & Hairball’. It’s advised that the hairball diet that is chosen is the sole source of nutrition, as mixing it with a different type of feed could negate the benefits. Most hairball diets are appropriate for adult cats of all breeds, though owners should double check with their vet that it is an appropriate choice for their pet. It is critically important when introducing a new food to a cat that the diet swap is done gradually over 5-10 days. This changeover gives the gastrointestinal tract time to get used to the new food and will prevent stomach upsets.

Another important tool in our ‘Fur ball treating tool box’ is traditional ‘Hairball Paste’, a favourite of many. There are lots of different brands of pastes and gels on the market (such as ‘Katalax’ and ‘Laxapet’), each containing slightly different ingredients but all claiming to do the same thing. These products are fed every now and then in an attempt to help hairballs pass through the system naturally. Most owners will start the course when they hear that familiar retching noise or when they see a pile of undigested fur in the corner of the living room. These treatments contain mild lubricants such as paraffin oil and cod liver oil, so may result in diarrhoea if used too often. Most products are designed to be given for a maximum of two to three days in a row, rather than lifelong. Some will contain added ingredients such as vitamins and minerals, to encourage the growth of healthy fur.

Manufacturing companies work hard to make these hairball treatments palatable, meaning that most cats will be keen to lick them straight off your finger or out of their food bowl. Many will have a meaty or fishy taste, so cats are actually fooled into thinking that they are a treat. In fussy cats, the paste can be squirted onto their paw or cheek and they will automatically lick it off in an attempt to keep themselves clean; silly cats! As only a small amount is needed to be effective, this method can actually work quite well.

As with many things in life, when it comes to hairballs, prevention is better than cure. Rather than working hard to eliminate (or surgically remove!) hairballs that have already had a chance to form and create trouble, we should really be aiming to prevent them from building up in the first place.

Though many will assume that hairballs are an inevitable evil, there is actually quite a lot that can be done to make them a less common occurrence and to minimise the risks that they can pose. A dedicated owner who follows the fur ball reducing advice can help cats keep things under control, making for a happier cat and less nasty hairballs to find under the sofa or in your shoe! All of these handy hairball preventative interventions are discussed in detail in the last of our three Furball articles.

https://katzenworld.co.uk/2019/04/29/hairballs-in-cats-treatment-options/

Kitten saved by PDSA after eating toxic pollen – Katzenworld

katzenworld.co.uk
Kitten saved by PDSA after eating toxic pollen – Katzenworld
Marc-André

Lucky Luna nearly loses life after lily lark

Luna, a Ragamuffin kitten, was just four months old when her owner, Emily Pryce (29), received a bouquet of flowers for her birthday. The flowers included lilies and Emily had placed these on a table, thinking they would be out of harm’s way.

However, Emily came home for lunch one day to find Luna with pollen all around her mouth. She knew lilies could be dangerous to cats, so contacted her local vet. They advised Luna would probably need urgent treatment, but an overnight stay and all the treatment could cost around a thousand pounds.

Emily said: “I checked our insurance paperwork only to find out that it had run out the day before! Although I work, I couldn’t afford to pay that much up front.

“But I knew I had to get Luna the help she needed though, so I rang PDSA. They advised that I was eligible for their new reduced-cost service. They told me to bring her straight in, and it was such a relief to know that she would get the treatment she needed.”

Luna was examined by the vet team at PDSA and blood tests confirmed that she had eaten enough of the pollen to cause potential kidney failure, so needed urgent treatment.

She stayed at PDSA for two nights, receiving round-the-clock care to help her recover. Her confident and friendly nature meant she quickly became a firm favourite with the team, and her care plan included plenty of cuddles as well!

Thankfully, with intensive support to remove the toxins from her system, Luna remained stable and was able to go home a few days later. But not all cases have a happy ending like hers.

Veterinary Care Assistant, Jemma Hughes, said: “Lilies have become quite popular in Easter bouquets, but all parts of the plant, including the flower and leaves are toxic to cats. The biggest danger is if a cat gets some of the pollen on their fur, then grooms themselves, as ingesting even a small amount can be fatal.”

PDSA is advising people not to give lilies to anyone with cats, and for owners to be aware of the dangers.

Jemma continued: “All members of the lily family [Lilium] are toxic to cats, and a number of other plants can also pose a danger to pets, including peace lilies [Spathiphyllum], daffodils, Lily-of-the-Valley [Convallaria], Laburnum, Azalea and Cherry Laurel. If you think your pet may have eaten something they shouldn’t, call your vet immediately for advice. The quicker they get treatment the more likely it is they will survive.”

Continue reading here.

https://katzenworld.co.uk/2019/04/22/kitten-saved-by-pdsa-after-eating-toxic-pollen/

Deadly Heart Disease in Dogs Linked to Trendy Diets, report scientists – FIREPAW, Inc.

Please let your family and friends with dogs know about the findings of a new study: some of the new, trendy boutique diets popular today have been linked to deadly heart disease in dogs.

Continue reading here…

https://firepaw.org/2019/01/29/deadly-heart-disease-in-dogs-linked-to-trendy-diets-report-scientists/#comments

Myth-busting: FIV – Katzenworld

What you need to know about FIV or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) The RSPCA lifts the lid on FIV, what it is, how it is caught and what an FIV cat needs. FIV (Feline immunodeficiency virus) is a viral infection that affects cats. It causes affected animals to have a weaker immune system in comparison […]

Source: Myth-busting: FIV – Katzenworld

Cold Weather Pet Safety

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cold-weather-pet-safety.aspx

First-aid for Your Pets – Katzenworld

First-aid for Your Pets PDSA Vet Olivia Anderson-Nathan provides top tips on what to do in an emergency  Despite our best efforts to protect our pets, accidents can and do happen. In serious cases, knowing what to do in an emergency can be the difference between life and death. Life-threatening emergencies require speedy action, so […]

Source: First-aid for Your Pets – Katzenworld

Antifreeze – a Hidden Danger to Pets. – Katzenworld

Antifreeze – a Hidden Danger to Pets. This year’s National Pet Show at the Birmingham NEC is focused on promoting pet welfare, and they are working alongside the PDSA to teach pet owners how to protect and care for their pets, particularly against hidden dangers in and around the home. As we approach the colder […]

Source: Antifreeze – a Hidden Danger to Pets. – Katzenworld

Keeping Pets Safe this Autumn: How to Avoid Toxic Plants – Katzenworld

Keeping pets safe this autumn PDSA offers advice on how to avoid toxic plants Temperatures are starting to drop and that fresh, crisp autumnal feel is in the air. Autumn can be a brilliant time for you and your pets, and a time to enjoy the beautiful scenery as trees change from green to an […]

Source: Keeping Pets Safe this Autumn: How to Avoid Toxic Plants – Katzenworld