Petition: Speak Out for Your Rivers | 5,000 Miles of Wild – 5,000 Miles of Wild

Join us to protect wild rivers and public lands. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the wild and Scenic Rivers act in 2018, we are teaming up with partners to ask Congress to protect 5,000 new miles of wild and Scenic rivers and 1 million acres of riverside lands. And, we will make sure the rivers flowing through public lands remain unharmed by development and pollution. We can’t do it without you. Add your voice today.


Analysis: 60 Million Acres of Monarch Habitat to Be Doused With Toxic Weed Killer | Global Justice Ecology Project

Posted on March 2, 2018 by GJEP staff

PORTLAND, Ore.— Within the next two years, more than 60 million acres of monarch habitat will be sprayed with a pesticide that’s extremely harmful to milkweed, the only food for monarch caterpillars, according to a new analysis by the Center for Biological Diversity.

Monarch populations have already fallen by 80 percent in the past two decades due to escalating pesticide use and other human activities. Now the Center’s report A Menace to Monarchs shows that the butterfly faces a dangerous new threat from accelerating use of the notoriously drift-prone and highly toxic weed killer dicamba across an area larger than the state of Minnesota.

“America’s monarchs are already in serious trouble, and this will push them into absolute crisis,” said Nathan Donley, a senior scientist at the Center. “It’s appalling that the EPA approved this spraying without bothering to consider the permanent damage it will do to these butterflies and their migration routes.”

Today’s report found that by 2019, use of dicamba will increase by nearly 100-fold on cotton and soybean fields within the monarch’s migratory habitat across the heart of the United States.

Other key findings include:

Accelerating harm: In addition to 61 million acres of monarch habitat being directly sprayed with dicamba, an additional 9 million acres could be harmed by drift of the pesticide.
Deadly timing: The timing and geographical distribution of dicamba use coincides precisely with the presence of monarch eggs and larva on milkweed.
Double trouble: Dicamba degrades monarch habitat both by harming flowering of plants that provide nectar for adults as they travel south for the winter and by harming milkweed that provides an essential resource for reproduction.
Greater menace to milkweed: Research has shown that just 1 percent of the minimum dicamba application rate is sufficient to reduce the size of milkweed by 50 percent, indicating it may have a greater impact on milkweed growth than the already widely used pesticide glyphosate.

The Environmental Protection Agency in 2016 approved new dicamba products for use on genetically engineered cotton and soybeans. In 2017 there were reports of at least 3.6 million acres of off-target, dicamba-induced damage to agricultural crops and an unknown amount of damage to native plants and habitats, including forests. The EPA has refused to take necessary action to address the harms caused by the chemical.

“There’s no question that use of dicamba across tens of millions of acres will deepen risks to our dangerously imperiled monarch populations,” said Donley. “When dicamba’s use on GE cotton and soybeans comes up for reapproval later this year, the only responsible thing for the EPA to do is allow that approval to expire.”

For this analysis the Center examined monarch habitat and projected usage rates for dicamba, with a particular emphasis on examining the effects of increased use of dicamba in the coming years, which is expected to reach about 57 million pounds annually.

The decline in monarchs in recent decades has coincided with the surge in use of glyphosate, which is sprayed on crops genetically altered to survive being sprayed by the pesticide. Around 300 million pounds of glyphosate are sprayed in fields each year in the United States. The massive overuse of glyphosate triggered the large-scale decline of milkweed and the proliferation of glyphosate-resistant weeds across millions of acres. In response to the proliferation of resistant weeds, farmers have turned to dicamba — compounding the danger to monarchs and their habitat.

Via Center for Biological Diversity
Category: Climate Justice, Featured, Social Media News Tags: Butterfly, Center for Biological Diversity, monarch, Monarch Butterfly, neonic
Copyright © 2018 · All Rights Reserved · Global Justice Ecology Project

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Cambodia: Sugar for the EU is destroying our land – Rainforest Rescue

Cambodia exports sugar worth millions to Europe under the EU trade deal. Initiative, which was intended to fight poverty in developing countries, has led the sugar industry to grab the land of 12,000 Cambodian small farmers and their families, leaving them destitute. Tell the EU to stop subsidizing human right violations NOW.

Petition: Defend Starving Polar Bears – Save the Arctic Refuge

To defend polar bears like the one seen in this tragic viral video, we need to immediately move away from dirty energy sources and embraced a clean energy future. Drilling in the Arctic Refuge would be a huge step in the wrong direction. Tell your members of Congress to protect polar bears in the Arctic and opposed drilling today.

Petition update · Breaking: Hundreds gather to block construction at LNG site ·

Stand with the Puyallup Tribe – No LNG Fracked Gas in the Salish Sea!

Puyallup Water Warriors & Redefine Tacoma

Dec 18, 2017 — At 5:30 am this morning, several hundred people gathered outside all three entrances to the construction site for Puget Sound Energy’s fracked gas LNG facility. Several water protectors chained themselves together at the gates and supporting water protectors stood in solidarity and song. When news of the devastating train wreck near Olympia, 30 miles south, broke, leaders immediately led everyone in prayer for the victims and their families. The day continued peacefully in prayer and solidarity. One activist and one elder were arrested – we will keep you updated on their situation.

You can see several live feeds of the action on Native Daily News’ Facebook page. Here is one example:

Check out more of Elliot Stoller’s beautiful photos of the event (pictured above):

This is the fourth of several direct actions we are taking to raise awareness and bring a stop to construction on this dangerous facility that is being built in violation of federal and state permits. We are deeply grateful for your support along the way. Thank you for sharing!

44,231 have signed. Let’s get to 50,000.

© 2017,, Inc.Certified B Corporation

Petition update · BREAKING NEWS: Water Protectors Lock Down at Tacoma LNG Site ·

Stand with the Puyallup Tribe – No LNG Fracked Gas in the Salish Sea!
BREAKING NEWS: Water Protectors Lock Down at Tacoma LNG Site
Puyallup Water Warriors & Redefine Tacoma

Dec 11, 2017 — Friends,

Early this morning, two water protectors locked themselves to a crane 60 feet high at the LNG build site in the Port of Tacoma. They are participating in direct action to call attention to a dangerous facility that is being built without permits, and against the wishes of the Tacoma community.

You can watch a live feed of the action and leave messages of support here:

Right now it’s very foggy out, but the water protectors are holding strong, and we are outside with them. For realtime updates follow Native Daily Network who has covered the story from the beginning. 


0 have signed. Let’s get to 50,000.
© 2017,, Inc.Certified B Corporation

2 national monuments in Utah are about to lose most of their land | Grist

Petition update · VOTE COMING THIS WEEK! ANWR Petition Could be Delivered to Senators TOMORROW! ·

Petition: Save Ladyface Mountain, California

The 300-plus-acre area consists of  many  beautiful creeks, a variety of wildlife and endangered plants and flowers. Ladyface Mountain the local landmark will be forever negatively impact by The Proposal of Triangle Ranch development, which would place McMansions at her feet and require massive grading retaining walls, loss of oak trees, creek pollution and  major traffic congestion.

Petition: Stamp out the illegal rosewood trade! – Rainforest Rescue

Petition · Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe: Stop the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley pipelines ·

Petition · NO Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge! ·

Blockade Stops Logging, Forest Protectors Need Help | Global Justice Ecology Project

Blockade Stops Logging, Forest Protectors Need Help

Posted on October 25, 2017 by GJEP staff
McKENZIE BRIDGE, OR – On October 23, Cascadia Forest Defenders [CFD] erected a road blockade at the entrance to the “W” Timber Sale to protest the current logging on National Forest Land. Already clashes have resulted in one protester sustaining minor injuries.

The protesters aim to end Seneca Jones Timber Company plan to destroy thousands of acres in the McKenzie River watershed. The road blockade consists of large slash piles, multiple cars, and a refrigerator – all serving as an anchor for a human-occupied platform suspended 80 feet up a Douglas fir tree.

“We’re protecting drinking water, biodiversity, a stable climate, and – ultimately – our own survival,” said Scrimshaw Forest, of Cascadia Forest Defenders. “We oppose resource extraction and deforestation.”


The sale is part of the 2000+ acre Goose Project in the Willamette National Forest just a few miles from McKenzie Bridge. Logging began on October 16.

CFD states that this blockade isn’t about stripping Oregonians of jobs but stopping the destruction of one of the last intact roadless areas. The group hopes the companies the loggers work for are paying their employees for a full days work and the loggers can take the day off to go enjoy life away from the chainsaws.

Folks are needed ASAP at the blockade to help out the folks there. There is currently many Law Enforcement Officers present. If they leave, those there might be vulnerable to other attacks from violent yahoos. For directions call the phone number below.

Phone. 541-554-2519


Contact Cascadia Forest Defenders

Category: Bioenergy, Climate Justice, Featured, Social Media News Tags: Blockade, Cascadia Forest Defenders, CFD, Goose, logging, McKenzie River

Petition · Seattle City Council: Protect Seattle’s Discovery Park! ·

Walling Off Wildlife – Defenders of Wildlife Blog


Defenders of Wildlife Blog
19 September 2017
Walling Off Wildlife
Posted by: Bryan Bird

The Trump administration pushes forward with plan to wall off wildlife.

While the president continues his bombastic border wall talk and the administration and Congress argue over funding for this monstrosity, construction equipment is already moving in, land is being cleared and people and wildlife are being displaced in the borderlands of California and Texas.
By Hook or by Crook

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has already waived a host of environmental and other laws in order to expand the border wall along a 15-mile stretch of the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego, California. Defenders, along with a coalition of national conservation groups, sued to stop this unlawful overreach of the authority provided by Congress in the Real ID Act of 2005.

Similarly, in Texas the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have started clearing land, taking soil samples and conducting tests in areas where they plan to build new border wall – often without even notifying the landowners or the public of their actions. This was the case when the managers of the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas, discovered industrial mowers stripping vegetation from their land and imperiling more than 200 species of butterflies.

Now, CBP is trying to conceal efforts to build a 60-mile extension through the area that includes two national wildlife refuges and important habitat for the endangered ocelot and jaguarundi.

In a letter recently sent to a select group of stakeholders earlier this month, CBP requested comments on the proposed construction of 60 miles of border wall that would cut through parts of the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, the National Butterfly Center and the Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park. The letter appears to be a dubious ploy to claim that the agency is fulfilling its obligation to “seek public comment,” while not actually making the public aware of their plans. Perhaps even they realize what a terrible idea it is to construct a barrier through these sensitive habitats and critical wildlife corridors that support countless species of wildlife, including more than 500 species of birds, 300 butterfly species and 1,200 plant species.

A Tale of Two Refuges

Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge

Few places in the Western Hemisphere exhibit such a diversity of flora and fauna as the lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas, home to the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge. While small in size, the Santa Ana Refuge contains an abundance of neotropical songbirds, raptors, mammals and reptiles, including the nine-banded armadillo, Texas tortoise, Mexican free-tailed bat. It is also home to more than 400 bird species, more than 300 species of butterflies –half of all butterfly species found in North America – and more than 450 varieties of plants.

The refuge also provides habitat for at least eight species protected under the Endangered Species Act, including the highly-imperiled ocelot and jaguarundi. With fewer than 50 left in the United States, the refuge is essential to ocelot recovery.

Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Comprising several units along the Rio Grande, the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge helps protect a crucial link between coastal and river wildlife corridors. The various refuge units are located at the nexus of four climate zones – tropical, temperate, coastal and desert – and at the confluence of the Mississippi and Central flyways, making the region one of the most diverse conservation areas in North America. The Lower Rio Grande Valley is home to more than 700 vertebrate species, 300 species of butterfly and at least 18 threatened or endangered species, including the highly-endangered ocelot and jaguarundi.

The Lower Rio Grande Valley refuge complex conserves Mid-Delta Thorn Forest, a rare forest type that provides habitat for an array of small mammals and birds and serves as a key hunting ground for the ocelot. As the thorn forest has continued to diminish over the years, ocelots have been forced to cross open fields and been exposed to more dangers from vehicular traffic and predators. Further degradation of this crucial habitat from wall construction could prove devastating to the dwindling U.S. population of ocelots.
A Decisive Blow to Wildlife

The construction of an impenetrable wall through these refuges would fragment riparian habitats, block migration corridors for rare migratory birds and imperiled species, degrade and destroy habitat, and disrupt nesting, breeding and foraging by countless birds and other wildlife. Levee walls, which are proposed for at least 28 miles along this route, can trap wildlife and drown animals during severe flooding events.

Both refuges serve as important migration corridors for animals like the ocelot and jaguarundi, who travel back and forth from Mexico to the U.S. These rare cats would be cut off from crucial habitat affecting their dispersal and their potential to establish new resident populations in the U.S. The noise from increased vehicle traffic and lighting along the border wall could also greatly impair these animals’ ability to hunt and alter the behavior of their prey.
No Longer the “Land of the Free” for Wildlife

A border wall offends our core American values – freedom, equality, justice and the preservation of our natural heritage. For wildlife in the borderlands, a wall would set back decades of conservation success in the region.

We are the guardians of these imperiled animals and at Defenders we are fighting to make sure they have a voice and can continue to recover and prosper in our country. The illicit and secretive actions by the current administration would have disastrous consequences for wildlife.
Act now!

Tell the administration you won’t stand for any attack on our refuges or our wildlife. Stand up for imperiled wildlife in jeopardy because of the border wall.
Stand up for wildlife now!

Tell CPB and the administration that you oppose any border wall construction that would destroy vital wildlife habitat on our national wildlife refuges and public lands.

Defenders is committed to protecting human communities, wildlife and habitat threatened by a border wall. We have joined a diverse coalition of conservation, human rights, civil rights, religious and other groups to mount substantial opposition. Please join us in this important fight.

Bryan Bird, Southwest Program Director
Bryan oversees Defenders work in the Southwest, where he has spent 23 years working on wildlife conservation. His efforts are focused on maintaining and enhancing vital wildlife habitat, and on protecting imperiled species, such as Mexican gray wolves, jaguars, desert tortoises and California condors, in the face of a changing climate, drought, and increasing development.
Categories: border wall, Habitat Conservation, habitat conservation, jaguarundi, Lower Rio Grande, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, migration corridor, ocelot, Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Take Action, Trump administration, Wildlife

Your weekly roundup of wildlife news from across the country.

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Washington, DC 20036


©2017 Defenders of Wildlife

Petition: Protect Wild Horses and Burros From Roundups and Slaughter


Nevada’s Wild Horses Are In Danger, And So Are Thousands Of Others | Care2 Causes

Care2 Causes | Nevada’s Wild Horses Are in Danger, and So Are Thousands of Others
By: Alicia Graef
September 18, 2017

Thousands of wild horses are living peacefully on public lands in Nevada right now, completely unaware that the government is coming for them soon. They will be rounded up this fall, and their advocates are raising serious concerns that they will be sent to slaughter, along with thousands of others.
Tragically, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has failed, and continues to fail, to uphold its duties under the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act, which was intended to protect wild horses from “capture, branding, harassment, or death.” It was enacted in 1971, after Congress officially recognized the value of wild horses as “living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West.”

Despite that, the agency has continued to remove and warehouse thousands upon thousands of wild horses at the expense of taxpayers – a vast majority of who strongly oppose the agency’s incredibly cruel, wasteful and ongoing mismanagement of these American icons.

Unfortunately, those who are supposed to uphold the letter and spirit of the law are increasingly beholden to special interests, including livestock and extractive industries, that want to see wild horses exterminated from their rightful place on public lands.

Now, under the Trump Administration, the situation for wild horses could get even worse.

Charlotte Roe, a former science attache and environmental policy officer with the State Department noted in a recent op-ed, that in Nevada alone, the BLM intends to round up nearly 1,000 wild horses “to achieve its absurdly low population target of 60 adults and foals, leaving one horse per 10,000 acres. In the huge Antelope Valley and Triple A Complex, the BLM plans to remove over 7,000 mustangs.”

Sadly, Nevada’s wild horses aren’t the only ones being targeted for upcoming roundups, and their lives are all now in danger.

The House Appropriations Committee recently passed the Stewart Amendment as part of the 2018 budget, which would allow the BLM to kill 92,000 healthy wild horses who are currently in holding, in addition to those who are deemed excess on the range. Some lawmakers did step up to stop this, but they were shut down before their own amendments could go to the floor for a full vote.

Although the situation is looking increasingly dire for wild horses, there’s still hope that Congress will act to protect them from further roundups and slaughter. Wild horse advocates have continued to oppose any measures that would allow slaughter, and have continued to advocate for these American icons to be humanely managed on the range.

For more updates and ways to help, check out organizations including the American Wild Horse Campaign, Cloud Foundation, Equine Advocates, Wild Horse Education and Return to Freedom Wild Horse Conservation.

Photo credit: James Marvin Phelps

Tell Congress to Protect our Public Lands


Interior  Secretary Zinke just recommended that Trump downsize four national monuments and remove protections for six more. Tell Congress to block this public lands heist!

Source: Tell Congress to Protect our Public Lands

U.S. Interior chief urges changes to national monuments -report

#U.S. Legal News
September 18, 2017 / 4:22 PM / Updated 3 hours ago
U.S. Interior chief urges changes to national monuments -report
Jan Harvey, Valerie Volcovici, Timothy Gardner
WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The head of the U.S. Department of the Interior called for changes to the management of 10 national monuments that would lift restrictions on activities such as logging and mining and shrink at least four of the sites, the Washington Post reported.

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke recommended that President Donald Trump reduce the boundaries of the monuments known as Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante, Nevada’s Gold Butte and Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou.

Zinke also called for relaxing current restrictions within some of the monuments’ boundaries for activities such as grazing, logging, coal mining and commercial fishing, according to a copy of the memo that the Post obtained.

The Grand Staircase-Escalante monument has areas that “contain an estimated several billion tons of coal and large oil deposits,” Zinke’s report said, suggesting that it could be opened to energy production if Trump makes a reduction in the footprint of the monument.

The Trump administration has promoted “energy dominance,” or plans to produce more coal, oil, and gas for domestic use and selling to allies. With Grand Staircase-Escalante being remote, and oil and coal being plentiful elsewhere, it is uncertain if energy interests would actually drill and mine there, if the monument’s boundaries were changed.

Trump has said previous administrations abused their right to create monuments under the Antiquities Act of 1906 by imposing limits on drilling, mining, logging, ranching and other activities in huge areas, mainly in western states.

The monuments targeted in the memo were created by former presidents George W. Bush, a Republican, and Democrats Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. A designation as a national monument prohibits mining and sets stringent protections for ecosystems on the site.

Interior Department spokeswoman Heather Swift referred questions about the memo to the White House.

“The Trump Administration does not comment on leaked documents, especially internal drafts which are still under review by the President and relevant agencies,” White House spokeswoman Kelly Love said in a statement to Reuters.

In June, Zinke told reporters he had recommended shrinking the Bears Ears monument, the country’s newest monument, and last month he sent his recommendations to the Republican president after reviewing more than two dozen national monuments. [L1N1J917V] Trump ordered the review in April as part of his broader effort to increase development on federal lands.

Energy, mining, ranching and timber industries have cheered the review, while conservation groups and the outdoor recreation industry threatened lawsuits over what they see as an effort to undo protections of critical natural and cultural resources.

The Sierra Club, an environmental group, said Zinke had “sold out” public lands. “Leaving the protection of Native American sacred sites, outdoor recreation destinations, and natural wonders to the goodwill of polluting industries is a recipe for disaster,” Sierra’s head Michael Brune said.

Senator Maria Cantwell, the top Democrat on the Senate energy committee, tweeted that former President Teddy Roosevelt, a conservationist, would “roll over in his grave” if he saw Zinke’s “attacks” on public lands.

Besides reducing the four sites, Zinke called for changes at Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters, New Mexico’s Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte, two Pacific Ocean marine monuments and another marine one off the New England coast.

Many fishing industry supporters cheered changes outlined in Zinke’s memo. Jon Mitchell, the mayor of New Bedford, Massachusetts, a large fishing port, said the marine monument designation process “may have been well intended, but it has simply lacked a comparable level of industry input, scientific rigor and deliberation.”

While the antiquities law enables a president to permanently declare certain places of historic or scientific interest a national monument, a few U.S. presidents have reduced the size of some such areas.

<^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Washington Post: Shrink at least 4 national monuments and modify a half-dozen others, Zinke tells Trump Reuters graphic on review of U.S. monuments ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^>
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

© 2017 Reuters. All Rights Reserved.

Petition: The National Trust: Revoke Land Use For ‘Trail’ Hunts, United Kingdom

Elderly couple and their dog was attacked on the beach by hounds, revoke all of their licenses.

Protect Our Public Lands from Inappropriate Development – The Rainforest Site

Protect Our Public Lands from Inappropriate Development – The Rainforest Site

Petition: Save the most bio-diverse park in Italy!

Petition: Trump: Stop the Slaughter of the American Mustang



BLM Begins Wild Horse Water Bait Trap Gather near Gerlach on Thursday, June 1

WINNEMUCCA, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Winnemucca District (WD) will begin an emergency wild horse gather on Thursday, June 1 north of Gerlach, Nevada. Due to reported safety concerns of horses crossing the highway and creating near misses with vehicles, the WD will be gathering approximately 15 horses from the area near the highway.

The BLM plans to use a water trap, consisting of corral panels stocked with water; no helicopters will be used. Because wild horses are reluctant to approach the trap site when there is too much activity, only essential gather operation personnel will be allowed at the gather site during operations.

All the horses identified for removal will be transported to the Palomino Valley Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Center north of Reno, NV where they will be prepared for the BLM adoption program. Horses not adopted will be placed in off-range pastures where they can retain their free-roaming nature. The BLM does not sell or send any horses to slaughter. For information on how to adopt a wild horse, visit

For more information, please contact Jenny Lesieutre, Wild Horse and Burro Public Affairs Specialist for the Nevada State Office at (775) 861-6594 or

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.

Return to the Press Releases
Release Date
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
Bureau of Land Management
Winnemucca District Office
Jenny Lesieutre
Utility Links
About BLM
BLM Washington Office
1849 C Street NW Rm. 5665
Washington DC 20240
Fax: 202-208-5242

Phone: 202-208-3801


Help Safeguard the Future of Our National Park System


The Antiquities Act is one of our nation’s most valuable conservation tools but it is being threatened. Our environment and wildlife depend on this Act for their protection. Please sign our petition to oppose any efforts to undermine the Antiquities Act.

Source: Help Safeguard the Future of Our National Park System


Petition · City of Scandia : Protect Log House Landing from Overdevelopment ·

Petition · Hawaii County Leeward Planning Commission: Deny SMA permit request for Ocean Villas project at Kahalu’u Bay ·

Petition · Don’t build the border wall in Big Bend National Park. ·