“Earth Day 2020- Message from Wildlife SOS co-founder Kartick Satyanarayan”

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Vietnamese toddler suffers severe poisoning after drinking rhino horn powder – Tuoi Tre News

Smuggled rhino horns are confiscated by police officers in Vietnam. Photo: A.X. / Tuoi Tre
Tuoi Tre News July 31,2019

Doctors in Ho Chi Minh City have been able to save a 22-month-old baby from severe poisoning after her parents attempted to treat her fever with rhino horn powder.

The young patient is N.K.A.D., who resides in Cu Chi District, the Children’s Hospital 2 confirmed on Wednesday morning.

D. was taken to the infirmary in District 1 by her parents on the afternoon of July 18 with such symptoms as high fever, fatigue, and cyanosis.

As doctors did not detect any heart and lung problems after performing X-ray and echocardiography tests on the toddler, they suspected the cause might be poisoning.

The patient was then given a blood test, whose result indicated that her Methemoglobin level had reached 30 percent, about ten times higher than the normal limit.

The parents stated they had given her a type of drink made from rhino horn powder, believing it could help treat her febrile seizure.

But her condition only got worse, with bluish and purplish colors found on the skin of her fingers, they admitted.

In order to rescue the child, doctors used a ventilator to support her breathing and activated carbon to absorb the toxic substances.

She also underwent blood transfusion and other types of supportive therapy.

D. was able to breathe on her own five days after admission to the hospital, while her cyanosis was also alleviated.

As the functions of her organs were back to normal, the patient was transferred to the Department of General Internal Medicine for further monitoring and treatment.

According to Nguyen Van Loc, a senior doctor at the hospital, D. suffered from Methemoglobinemia, a condition caused by elevated levels of methemoglobin in the blood, which leads to an overall reduced ability of the red blood cell to release oxygen to tissues.

Children can be affected by the condition after consuming certain types of medicine, chemicals, or food, Dr. Loc elaborated.

Methemoglobin concentration in normal people remains at zero to three percent, he stated.

Tissue hypoxia, fatigue, headache, and dizziness may occur if the level reaches 15 to 30 percent, Loc continue, adding that it can be fatal if Methemoglobin concentration exceeds 70 percent.

Rhino horn powder is believed by many in Vietnam to have medicinal or even magical properties.

But Dr. Loc strongly advised against the use of rhino horn as medicine as there has been no scientific evidence showing that they could treat febrile seizure or other health conditions.

https://tuoitrenews.vn/news/society/20190731/vietnamese-toddler-suffers-severe-poisoning-after-drinking-rhino-horn-powder/50832.html

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Photography collective takes a stand against wildlife crime

theartnewspaper.com
Tom Seymour

Neil Aldridge’s image of a blindfolded young white rhino, which was sedated for transport to preserve it from poachers, features in the book. The price of rhino horn on the black market is more valuable by weight than gold, diamonds or cocaine, according to a study NEIL ALDRIDGE/photographersagainstwildlifecrime.com

At the beginning of the 20th century, half a million rhinos roamed Africa. Today, there are fewer than 5,000. In 2007, 13 rhinos were poached; since 2013, more than 1,000 have been killed each year. Overwhelmingly, their horns end up on the Chinese and Vietnamese market, where a burgeoning elite views rhino products as an elixir for all manner of ills, or as an ornamental trinket—the ultimate status symbol.

Rhinos are the most iconic of a host of endangered species driven to extinction by such rampant black markets. Pangolins, the only mammal with scales, are frequently found roasted and served in restaurants across East Asia. Black bears are farmed for their bile, which is extracted for use in traditional medicines, while shark fins and turtles are turned into soup. More than 6,000 tigers are held in captivity in China today—before their skeletons are soaked in rice wine and sold to the elite.

This has posed a challenge to some of the world’s most celebrated wildlife photographers. Should their practice and livelihood change as the animals they spend their careers capturing teeter on the brink of extinction?

“Magazines shy away from publishing such imagery. It doesn’t sell well”

Bigeye Thresher Shark Caught in Net by Brian Skerry (2012) © Brian Skerry

A new collective, Photographers Against Wildlife Crime, has formed to address this question and to confront the nation primarily connected to this horrific rise in poaching: China. Co-founded by the award-winning photographer Britta Jaschinski, the group includes some of the most renowned wildlife photographers in the world, including Adrian Steirn, Brent Stirton and Brian Skerry. It was formed in part due to wildlife crime’s lack of visibility in Western publications, Jaschinski says.

“Millions of animals are caught and harvested from the wild and sold in China as food, pets, tourist curios, trophies and for use in traditional Chinese medicine,” she says, adding that the issue doesn’t get the column inches it deserves. “The subject is so upsetting for a lot of people that magazines shy away from publishing such imagery,” Jaschinski adds. “It doesn’t sell well.”
Reaching the target audience

Together, Jaschinski and her colleagues crowdfunded and self-published a collection of their photographs alongside contemporary reporting on the issues behind wildlife crime. The book was initially published in English and quickly sold out. “But we realised we weren’t reaching the target audience that really mattered,” Jaschinski says.

Working in conjunction with a Chinese printer based in London, Jaschinski and her team have translated the book into Mandarin. After months of negotiating with the authorities, they are now in the process of distributing the book across the Chinese mainland.

The book is the first of its kind to be created specifically for a Chinese audience, and explicitly sets out to end the demand for wildlife products in China. It will be launched across the country in July and August, actively targeting the Chinese wildlife consumer market, the trading nucleus for one of the biggest black markets in the world.

Frozen pangolins by Paul Hilton © Paul Hilton

The illegal wildlife trade is the world’s fourth biggest criminal trade after drug smuggling, illegal firearms trade and human trafficking. The price of rhino horn on the black market, Jaschinski points out, is more valuable by weight than gold, diamonds or cocaine, according to a study by Science Advances. Rhino horn is estimated to fetch up to $60,000 per pound on the black market, and the illicit industry as a whole is estimated to be worth $20bn. Andrea Crosta, the director of the Elephant Action League, has called ivory the “white gold of jihad”, pointing out that al-Shabaab, an Islamic terrorist organisation, is funded directly by the illicit ivory and rhino horn trade in China.
Ban is barely enforced

In 2017, the Chinese authorities announced that all trade in ivory and its products would be made illegal. But the ban was barely enforced, Jaschinki says. The trade in rhino and tiger has been prohibited since 1993, but in October 2018, China alarmed conservationists by announcing that products from captive animals are authorised “for scientific, medical and cultural use”.

“I’ve worked on wildlife crime for 25 years—and I don’t distinguish between legal and illegal wildlife crime,” Jaschinski says. “China is becoming the economic leader of the world; I wanted to look at the horrendous treatment of animals and nature in the country, and especially at the link between poaching and trade in the country, and the mistreatment of animals in captivity in China.”

Bruno D’Amicis’s image of a Fennec fox pup offered for sale to a tourist after being caught in the desert in Tunisia. (Kebili Governorate, Tunisia, May 2012) © Bruno D’Amicis

While the images are often appalling, they have artistic merit, for each photographer involved has approached the subject from a different perspective, and by employing a different style. In the introduction to the book, Roz Kidman Cox, the chair of the Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year jury, writes: “Some set out to highlight injustice through statement art, creating images that are unforgettable through their power—fury expressed beautifully. Others take dismembered beauty and reincarnate it in a haunting arrangement, turning evidence into art. Or they use the iconography of classical art to give their compositions human resonance, echoing a crucifixion, a deathbed repose or the spoils of war.”

https://www.theartnewspaper.com/amp/news/photography-collective-takes-a-stand-against-wildlife-crime?__twitter_impression=true

What to Do if You Witness Wildlife Crime While Traveling

sierraclub.org

Kim Carson Cianciola, an insurance subrogation specialist out of Englewood, Colorado, was appalled when she spotted jaguar and tiger cubs chained within a tent in the middle of a marketplace while on vacation in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. For a few bucks, tourists could get a snap with these young big cats.

Cianciola didn’t believe what she was seeing could be legal, but she didn’t know what to do about it. “I was so furious and upset when I saw that,” she says. “The little tiger cub was just looking at me, and the jaguar cub looked so sad, and there was nothing I could do about it.”

While traveling abroad, tourists may witness wildlife crime and abuses on many fronts, including at restaurants and in local shops. Travelers don’t have to feel helpless, however. Here are some tips from representatives at the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the nongovernmental organization TRAFFIC, which specializes in the wildlife trade on a global level.

Know Before You Go

“I’m sure the overwhelming majority of tourists don’t wish to encourage illegal or questionable wildlife trade, but there are a number of ways in which they may inadvertently do so,” says Richard Thomas, global communications coordinator at TRAFFIC.

For instance, many tourists may know that wildlife products like ivory are a big no-no but might not be aware that certain species of shell like the queen conch—widely harvested in the Caribbean—are also protected by international law, says Thomas. Another example of an item illegally sold in the Caribbean is the coral necklace, says Christina Meister, national public affairs specialist with USFWS.

However, not all distasteful wildlife activity is illegal. That situation with the two big cat cubs, while no doubt unpleasant for Cianciola to witness, could have been legal in Mexico, depending on the origin of the cubs. Because laws and regulations (as well as at-risk wildlife species) vary by region and country, it’s important to research the area you’re visiting beforehand, says Meister. You can do so by visiting the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna’s (CITES) website. Meister says you can also call or email USFWS ahead of your trip with any specific questions or concerns: 1-844-FWS-TIPS (397-8477) or fws_tips@fws.gov.

Trust Your Gut and Ask Questions

So you’ve reached your vacation destination and something makes you feel uncomfortable. What should you do? “We usually tell people the best thing to do is be situationally aware and trust their guts,” says Meister.

If you think you’ve encountered questionable wildlife activity and you feel comfortable doing so, ask the vendor questions like “Do you have the paperwork for this?” and “Where did this come from?” Meister says tourists most frequently encounter illegal wildlife activity at restaurants and shops and adds that it might not always “look” like crime. To illustrate this point, she uses an example of an elderly woman on the corner selling coral jewelry.

Also, consider where animals originated and where they may end up. “A slow loris used as a photo prop is doubtless sourced from the wild, probably snatched from its mother and having had its teeth removed,” says Thomas. “Elephants used for trekking may be wild sourced and beaten into submission before they enter service; what happens to a lion cub once it grows too big for petting

Gather Details for Authorities

Once you decide that you’ve encountered a potential wildlife crime, collect as many details as you can. The more facts you can include in your report—this includes information like license plate numbers, time of day, exact location, and a description of the animals and people—the better. “Just those little details can help law enforcement officials,” says Meister.SIERRA-Monkey seized in Spain during Operation Thunderbird INTERPOL-WB(2)

Monkey seized in Spain during Operation Thunderbird Courtesy of Interloper

Be Safe and Discreet

Although reporting wildlife crime is important, never do anything to jeopardize your own safety. This may mean reporting the crime when you get home, and that’s OK. “Slightly older information is better than none at all . . . it all helps to build up the overall picture of wildlife markets,” says Thomas. “Clearly, information that is actionable needs to come in as soon as possible, but the issue of personal safety is critical.”

Meister adds that aside from asking the basic questions mentioned above, tourists should resist confronting anyone they suspect may be involved in wildlife crime. “I’d rather leave that up to local law enforcement,” she says.

Coral necklaces | Courtesy of Rachel Kramer

Photograph the Scene (or Don’t)

You can also take photos if you feel comfortable doing so. “I wish that I’d taken a bunch of pictures, but I was so upset,” Cianciola said of her brush with big cat photo tourism in Mexico.

Both Meister and Thomas warn that vendors might not take kindly to photos, so if you decide to document the scene, take care. “Photos are obviously very useful as they help confirm species identification and potentially can be counted, but I’d urge caution in taking them,” says Thomas. “The overriding consideration must be personal safety, first and foremost.”SIERRA-Repository Ryan Moehring USFWS-WB(2)

Courtesy of Ryan Morning/USFWS

 

Finally, Report the Incident

There are a number of ways to report wildlife crime while abroad:
  1. Download and use Wildlife Witness, an app from TRAFFIC available on Apple and Android devices. “All such reports are analyzed by a specialist in TRAFFIC and we pass on all credible reports to appropriate authorities,” says Thomas. During the 2017–18 period, the organization received 268 submissions from 159 users in relation to 156 unique locations across nine countries in Southeast Asia, says Thomas.
  2. Call or email USFWS’s 24-hour wildlife hotline: 1-844-FWS-TIPS (397-8477) or fws_tips@fws.gov. According to the USFWS website, you can call anonymously or work with officers as a confidential informant. While the Fish and Wildlife Service may not have jurisdiction in the country you visited, the information you provide may help with a larger international or ongoing investigation, says Meister.
  3. Contact local authorities or nongovernmental organizations yourself. This will require research on your part, but you can start by looking for local environment departments or ministries and local nonprofit organizations specializing in wildlife rescue.

https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/what-do-if-you-witness-wildlife-crime-while-traveling?amp&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=sierramag&utm_medium=social&__twitter_impression=true

Thousands of wild animals seized in smuggling crackdown

3000

 

theguardian.com
Agence France-Presse

Nearly 600 arrests in Interpol operation that nets primates, big cats, birds and reptiles
Caged animals seized during a police crackdown
The operation, which covered 109 countries, led to 582 people being detained. Photograph: Kerek Wongsa/Reuters

Police across the globe have seized thousands of wild animals, including primates and big cats, and arrested nearly 600 suspects in a crackdown on illegal wildlife smuggling, Interpol has said.

Covering 109 countries, the operation was carried out in coordination with the World Customs Organization (WCO), with investigators homing in on trafficking routes and crime hotspots, the international policing body said.

Operation Thunderball, based in Singapore, was aimed at transnational crime networks seeking to profit from wildlife smuggling activities. It was the third such Interpol mission in recent years.

An Interpol spokeswoman said police were holding 582 suspects, with further arrests and prosecutions expected to follow. Among the animals seized were 23 primates, 30 big cats, more than 4,300 birds, nearly 1,500 live reptiles and close to 10,000 turtles and tortoises, the organisation said.

They also confiscated 440 elephant tusks and an additional 545kg of ivory, the organisation said, pointing to a flourishing illegal wildlife trade online.

In Spain, 21 people were arrested thanks to an online investigation, and in Italy, a similar probe led police to seize 1,850 birds.

“Wildlife crime not only strips our environment of its resources, it also has an impact through the associated violence, money laundering and fraud,” said Interpol’s secretary general, Jürgen Stock.

Interpol said slight declines in the seizures of certain species were a sign that continued enforcement efforts were working and that compliance levels were improving.

“It is vital that we stop criminals from putting livelihoods, security, economies and the sustainability of our planet at risk by illegally exploiting wild flora and fauna,” said Ivonne Higuero, secretary general of CITES, an international treaty to protect wild animals and plants.

Interpol has previously carried out similar large-scale crackdowns in 2017 and 2018 that netted seizures worth several million dollars.
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Poachers slammed with 80 year sentence for illegal poaching

dailynews.co.tz
Tanzania Standard Newspapers Ltd

THE Manyoni District Court in Singida Region yesterday sentenced two poachers to 80 years imprisonment for unlawful dealing in government trophies by killing five wildlife animals and illegal possession of firearm.

Resident Magistrate Stella Kiama convicted the duo, Ramadhan Saidi, alias Kitoweo, and Mohamed Rashid Sanda, of the offences after being satisfied by the evidence produced by prosecution witnesses.

The prosecution’s team led by State Attorneys Salimu Msemo, Patrida Muta and Tulumanywa Majigo had told the court that the convicts were involved in killing of three elephants and one giraffe, which are government trophies.

Magistrate Kiama sentenced both convicts to 20 years in jail each for dealing in trophies by killing the four elephants and another 20 years imprisonment sentence for dealing in trophies by killing the giraffe.

The convicts were also sentenced to 20 years in jail each for being found with a rifle in suspicious circumstances, while Kitoweo alone was given additional 20 years custodian sentence for unlawful possession of firearm.

However, the magistrate ordered each convict to remain in jail for only 20 years because the sentences provided in every count run concurrent with the other.

In addition to such custodian sentence, the magistrate ordered for forfeiture to the government of the United Republic of Tanzania the firearm.

It was alleged by the prosecution that on diverse dates between the year 2016 and 2017 at Sikonge District in Tabora region and at Manyoni District in Singida region, the convicts dealt in government trophies by killing the said four wild animals.

According to the prosecution, the convicts committed such offences without permit from the Director of Wildlife Division.

The court was also told that on June 10, 2017 at Magumukila area within Sikonge district, Kitoweo was found with the firearm without having a valid permit.

https://dailynews.co.tz/news/2019-06-025cf37158be565.aspx

Petition: Elephant Massacre in Botswana; Restore Anti-Poaching Units Now!

change.org

Nicole Rojas started this petition to President Mokgweetsi Masisi and 1 other

On September 3rd, 87 elephant carcasses were found near the Okavango Delta wildlife sanctuary in Botswana. This is an unprecedented massacre considering Botswana has been recognized as one of the formidable defenders and conservationists of wildlife in Africa.

Botswana is home to approximately 130,000 elephants. Due to its steadfast conservation, elephants from other countries were crossing the borders into Botswana for safety.

However, after the election of President Mokgweetsi Masisi in May of this year, anti-poaching units (APU) were removed from the country’s borders and the anti-poaching teams’ weapons were confiscated. If these APUs were present, this recent killing spree of elephants could have been thwarted successfully.

According to the World Travel and Tourism Council in 2017, 74% of travel to Botswana was by tourists compared to business travel. Monies generated by tourists was 686.6 million USD or 7,119.6 million BWP (Botswana Pula) and this contributed to 26,000 jobs for 2017. The obvious reason tourists travel to Botswana is to see wildlife. If anti-poaching units are not restored, the number of wildlife will continue to dwindle and in effect lead to a loss of revenue and jobs, affecting the economy as a whole.

Each year approximately 35,000 elephants are killed in Africa. If their population continues to decline due to poaching, ecosystems will be affected. The presence of elephants in the delicate ecosystem is undeniably paramount in not only supporting other wildlife but for the people who live in Africa as well. Elephants in the wild aide in generating tourism dollars which fuels the economy that then helps to feed the hungry, finance education programs and enable health-care programs that save lives.

The wildlife presence in Botswana has an obvious overwhelming positive effect on human life. If we stand idly by, the loss of wildlife will have a negative effect in the quality of life for the people of Botswana.

President Mokgweetsi Masisi and the government of Botswana, your gravitas and solemnity are being beckoned by the world for you to restore the Anti-Poaching Units and arm game rangers. Your conservation efforts to protect the wildlife will in effect help your people and maintain the economy of Botswana.
https://www.change.org/p/president-mokgweetsi-masisi-restore-anti-poaching-units-to-prevent-future-elephant-poaching-in-botswana

Breaking! Tiger Poachers Arrested In Thailand; Authorities Warn More Criminal Gangs Are Threatening Critically Endangered Tigers In The Wild – World Animal News

By WAN –
January 24, 2019

An image found on a confiscated mobile phone documents a suspected poacher standing over a dead tiger in a forest in Thailand. Photo from Freeland Foundation.
Following a three-month investigation, Thai officials are warning that organized crime gangs that are dispatched across borders are targeting the endangered wild tigers in Thailand and Malaysia.
According to Freeland Foundation, a frontline counter-trafficking organization working for a world that is free of wildlife trafficking and human slavery, Thai authorities have arrested one of many gangs.
The investigation was initiated after the successful arrest of two Vietnamese males by Thai Police in October 2018 following a tip-off from a Thai driver-for-hire.
The observant driver, who was taking the men from the western town of Tak to Pitsanalok, thought the baggage was suspicious, so he called the police who subsequently stopped the vehicle, inspected the bag, and discovered a fresh tiger skeleton inside.
The police arrested the owners of the bag, took the suspects and tiger remains to the Nakorn Sawan Police station, and inspected the suspects’ belongings, including their phones.

Police then contacted Freeland for analytical assistance.
Freeland’s forensics experts were dispatched to the scene and provided on-the-job training. Using Cellebrite digital forensics technology, police found evidence that the poaching coordinators, originating from Vietnam, had crossed Laos into Thailand to sponsor targeted hunting inside the forests of Thailand and Malaysia, and possibly Myanmar. The poachers documented their trips on their phones, including tiger kills.
Freeland believes the poachers were working on assignment from a Vietnamese criminal syndicate.
“We do not think this was the poacher’s or poaching coordinators’ first time in Thailand, or working together, and we have reason to believe they were planning to strike again,” Petcharat Sangchai, Director of Freeland-Thailand said in a statement.
Following the discovery of the gang and poached tiger, Thai rangers were put on high alert.
“This gang has been removed as a threat, but we should be aware that whoever employed them may dispatch more hunters to kill our country’s tigers,” said Sanchai. “Police, rangers, and the public must remain vigilant.”
Tragically, there are only an estimated 2,500 tigers remaining in the wild.
Freeland Foundation is requesting that people with any information on the “poachers’ ID, whereabouts, or about other poaching coordinators” to contact them; noting on their Facebook page that “solid tips” like the one that resulted in the arrest of two poaching coordinators who are in jail now, may be rewarded.”
Freeland Thailand is located at 92/1 Soi Phahonyothin 5, Phahonyothin Road, Phaya Thai, Bangkok 10400 THAILAND. The phone number is +(66) 2-278 2033 and fax number is +(66) 2-278 2037. Tips may also be sent to info@freeland.org

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-tiger-poachers-arrested-in-thailand-authorities-warn-more-criminal-gangs-are-threatening-endangered-species/

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© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Breaking! Three Rangers Arrested On Suspicion Of Rhino Poaching In Kruger National Park, South Africa – World Animal News

By WAN –
January 18, 2019

South African National Parks (SANParks) announced today that three Field Rangers were arrested earlier this week on suspicion of rhino poaching in Kruger National Park (KNP).
The Rangers, who were based at Crocodile Bridge, were apprehended on Tuesday and subsequently held in custody for further investigation.
30-year-old Mr. Lucky Mkansi and 32-year-old Mr. Nzima Joe Sihlangu, appeared in the Skukuza Magistrate Court yesterday. They were released on bail fixed at R10,000 each with strict conditions, which include; not travelling without informing the investigating office, barring them from having contact either physically or by electronic means with rangers, as well as being under 24 hours house arrest.
The third Field Ranger arrested is due to appear at the Bushbuckridge Magistrate Court this afternoon.
“It is always very sad when your own staff become involved in poaching, however, we want to congratulate the SANParks and SAPS investigators for their diligent work in bringing these members to book. Slowly but surely, we are coming to grips with people within our ranks who are sabotaging our efforts in this campaign,” KNP Managing Executive, Glenn Phillips, said in a statement. “We still have confidence in those who are committed and loyal; and would like to encourage them to continue with their excellent work. We will not be deterred in ensuring that we are successful in continuing the fight against the scourge of wildlife crime in KNP.”
SANParks internal disciplinary procedures against the corrupt rangers are also underway.
The arrests were a joint effort by the SANParks Rangers, Environmental Investigation Unit, SAPS and Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation.
SANParks remains committed to doing everything in its power to fight the scourge of poaching.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-three-field-rangers-arrested-on-suspicion-of-rhino-poaching-in-kruger-national-park-south-africa/

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rhino poaching South Africa

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Demand Justice for Baby Rhino Orphaned by Poachers

Baby rhino David was left as an orphan after poachers slaughtered his entire family for their horns. Demand justice for David and stricter anti-poaching laws in South Africa.

Source: Demand Justice for Baby Rhino Orphaned by Poachers

Sign Petition: Justice for David — The Rhino Calf Whose Entire Family Was Killed By Poachers

by: Care2 Team
recipient: SANParks

135,530 SUPPORTERS – 140,000 GOAL

One day David the 4-month-old rhino was frolicking in the savannas of South Africa, without a care in the world, running alongside his uncles and aunts, tugging on his mother’s tail. But the next day would change his life forever.

Under the cover of darkness, poachers came upon his family and slaughtered all of them. When park officials and rescuers from David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation came upon the adult rhinos’ carcasses, they found the young rhino calf petrified and cowering next to his mother’s body.

Now David, like so many other rhino calves is an orphan. One who will never learn the vital lessons his mother could have taught him to better survive in the wild. David was so tiny that rescuers — in tears from the tragic sight — were able to lift him into the back of a truck in order to take him to his new home, a rhino orphanage.

Rhinos are under threat. In total there are less than 30,000 in rhinos left on Earth separated into five different species. From the Javan rhino which numbers less than 70 to the white rhino at 20,000. These animals are all teetering on the edge. Currently, 3 rhinos are poached per day around the world.

All in all, Africa has seen a constant slaughter of their rhino population. Over the last decade more than 7,250 were killed and in South Africa — where David’s family was massacred — more than 1000 alone were poached for their horns in the last year.

This cannot continue. The world demands that governments work harder than ever to protect Africa’s rhinos. The world demands justice for David. Please sign the petition and tell South Africa to do more to stop the poaching and bring the killers of David’s family to justice.For more info, visit the David Shepherd Wildlife foundation.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/341/366/192/

 

Dozens Of Cheetahs Are Being Sold On Social Media Platforms Contributing To The Illegal Wildlife Trade; What Is Being Done To Stop It? – World Animal News

By WAN –
November 25, 2018

A recent analysis of Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) research establishes that dozens of cheetahs are being advertised for sale every year on social media platforms.
The analysis, which covers the period between January 2012 and June 2018, aims to determine the extent to which the illegal cheetah trade exists online and to document the most relevant threats.
Cheetahs are listed under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). This means trade in wild-born cheetahs is permitted only in exceptional circumstances. However, CCF data analysis shows that 1,367 documented cheetahs were offered for sale through 906 advertisments, which is approximately one-fifth (20%) of the world’s remaining wild cheetah population. Cheetahs are on a swift decline, dropping from an estimated 100,000 individuals a century ago to fewer than 7,500 today.
The most utilized platforms in 15 countries are Instagram, 4Sale (mobile app) and YouTube, with the Gulf Cooperation Council accounting for over 90% of the ads, and Saudi Arabia totaling more than 60% of those.
The analysis focused on the three top sellers, all of whom are based in Saudi Arabia and posted 20% of all advertisments. Of these sellers, one alone accounted for 12% of all ads analyzed, and was found to offer multiple species that include: lions, tigers, jaguars, wolves, gibbons, and chimpanzees.
“The illegal trade in live cheetahs impacts the smaller, fragmented populations in East Africa the most. Mitigating the threat requires a concerted effort by governments to not only confiscate the animals, but to embark on awareness campaigns to reduce demand for endangered species as pets,” Dr Laurie Marker, CCF Founder and Executive Director said in a statement. “Already vulnerable, cheetah populations, particularly those in Ethiopia and Somalia, are at risk of local extinction because of poaching for the illegal pet trade.”
CCF estimates put the number of smuggled cheetahs out of East Africa at 300 per year. Many more die before being shipped to the Middle East.
“CCF maintains a ‘safe house’ in Hargeisa, the capital of Somaliland, where a team of animal keepers are caring for eleven confiscated cheetahs,” said Patricia Tricorache, CCF’s Assistant Director of Illegal Wildlife Trade. “Eight were confiscated within a three-week period, and two were just three-weeks-old when intercepted. One of the youngest died a few days after confiscation.”
CCF has been working on counter poaching and trafficking since 2005.
Since 2011, CCF has assisted the Somaliland government with the surrender or confiscation of 50 cheetahs. On August 28th, a landmark victory was achieved in local courts when two subjects charged with wildlife trafficking were sentenced to three years in prison and fined $300 USD and their vehicle seized; marking the first conviction for the illegal cheetah trade in Somaliland.

https://worldanimalnews.com/dozens-of-cheetahs-are-being-sold-on-social-media-platforms-contributing-to-the-illegal-wildlife-trade-what-is-being-done-to-stop-it/

 

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