Ask big corporations to stop plastic pollution! | Greenpeace

Take Action Now!

Single-use plastic costs little to companies, but the real price is paid by our planet and communities. For far too long, big companies have made big money forcing plastic packaging into our lives, most of the time without giving us the choice to avoid it.

Corporations like Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Mars, Kraft Heinz, Mondelez, Colgate-Palmolive, Johnson and Johnson, and Danone are increasing the amount of single-use plastic and, even if they claim to know little about where their plastic ends up, their solutions have only been related to recycling.

The truth is that recycling is not the solution: over 90% of the plastic ever made has not been recycled, it sits in landfills, ends up in the environment, or has been incinerated and dispersed toxic pollution back to our environment. We cannot simply recycle our way out of the plastic pollution crisis.

Our planet can’t take anymore. We need urgently to stop plastic pollution at its source. It’s time for corporations to move away from single-use plastic altogether.

We ask the CEOs of Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Mars, Kraft Heinz, Mondelez, Colgate-Palmolive, Johnson and Johnson, Danone:

to be transparent about the plastic they use and produce
to commit to reduction and set annual targets for reducing their plastic footprint
to eliminate unnecessary single-use plastic by the end of 2019
to invest in reuse and new delivery systems

The plastic pollution crisis is massive, and beach cleanups and recycling are simply not enough. We need real solutions now!

Add your name to demand that companies take responsibility for the plastic pollution crisis they helped create!

https://engage.us.greenpeace.org/onlineactions/XyTsv1fO4kCSNiPD9jB1wQ2?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=tweet&utm_campaign=plastic_invaders_global_spotlight_s&sourceid=1004728

Please phase out single-use plastic packaging and invest in alternative delivery systems

To the CEOs of Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Mars, Kraft Heinz, Mondelez, Colgate-Palmolive, Johnson and Johnson, and Danone.

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Appreciating the Good Done by President Trump

Blame It on Love

Just sharing some Trump news

Prosperity and Abundance Statuary – Pixabay

President Donald Trump is no friend of animals or animal advocates (while his daughter-in-law Lara is), but have we ever had a president that was opposed to animal agriculture, hunting, etc.? Obama’s USDA Secretary was cattle rancher Tom Vilsack, for just one example, while Trump’s USDA Secretary is Sonny Perdue, a veterinarian, businessman and politician (NOT of the Perdue chicken family), although Trump certainly has some animal agriculture people and other abusers in his administration. But, what president hasn’t?

But when the PEOPLE reverse the market demand for animal products, all that will change.

Veganism surely has a great place in my dreamed-of thriving worldwide economy, but especially here in the US which is one of the world’s most influential nations. A thriving economy makes for a happier more secure population, which makes for less animal abuse and other violence…

View original post 156 more words

Petition · Get harmful chemicals out of sunscreen · Change.org

Get harmful chemicals out of sunscreen
Arabella Hubbauer started this petition to Coppertone and 1 other

Summer means the beach, roofdecks, backyard barbecues and for many, being outside as much as humanly possible. It also means sunscreen! But what if the chemicals in sunscreen products were potentially harmful — not just to humans, but also do precious wildlife and coral reefs in the ocean?

You might not know the name Oxybenzone, but it’s a common chemical in many brand name sunscreens. But in many places around the globe — most recently Hawaii — lawmakers have been working to ban sunscreens with the chemical because of its potentially harmful side effects to human health (including possible effects on the endocrine system), and devastating impact on coral reefs and ocean life.

Coppertone and its parent company, Bayer, have a real moment to be industry leaders and remove Oxybenzone from products. Tell the makers of Coppertone to get potentially harmful chemicals out of sunscreen.

The Environmental Working Group has long considered Oxybenzone toxic, and regularly warns that using sunscreen with this chemical is problematic for health and for the environment. There are also countless sunscreens that don’t use this chemical — some even produced by Bayer! — that allow for people to continue to use sunscreen while also not dousing themselves with a chemical that could cause serious side effects, as well as bleach coral reefs that are already under terrible duress.

As one scientist who co-authored a study on coral reefs and the impact of sunscreen on them stated, “any small effort to reduce oxybenzone pollution could mean that a coral reef survives a long, hot summer, or that a degraded area recovers.”

With so many potential Oxybenzone-free sunscreens available, let’s make it the industry standard that the sunscreens we’re putting on our body remove this chemical that could harm human beings, and looks like it’s harming precious coral reefs.

https://www.change.org/p/get-harmful-chemicals-out-of-sunscreen?signed=true

138,106 have signed. Let’s get to 150,000!

Get harmful chemicals…

https://www.change.org/p/get-harmful-chemicals-out-of-sunscreen?recruiter=44240641&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=396231

 

© 2018, Change.org, Inc.Certified B Corporation

Contact Lenses Add to Earth’s Microplastic Crisis

ecowatch.com
Contact Lenses Add to Earth’s Microplastic Crisis
Lorraine Chow
4-5 minutes

Contact lenses may appear harmlessly soft and small, but a big chunk of American users are improperly disposing their used lenses and adding to the planet’s microplastic problem, Arizona State University researchers found.

In a survey of 409 wearers, about 1 in 5 responded that they flushed their used lenses down the toilet or sink instead of throwing them in the trash, according to a new study presented at the American Chemical Society’s National Meeting and Exposition.

“We found that 15 to 20 percent of contact wearers are flushing the lenses down the sink or toilet,” said Charlie Rolsky, an Arizona State University Ph.D. student who is presenting the work, in a press release.

The flushed lenses, which are mostly plastic, turn up at wastewater treatment plants and become part of sewage sludge that gets spread on farmland.

Contact lenses recovered from treated sewage sludge Charles Rolsky

With 45 million contact users in the U.S., the research team estimated 6-10 metric tons of plastic lenses end up in wastewater in the U.S. alone each year.

Rolf Halden, the director of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University and one of the authors of the new study, noted at a press conference on Monday that these contacts do not decompose.

“They don’t degrade. They don’t attenuate but they become smaller. So they create what we know as microplastic pollution, which is contaminating the oceans,” he said.

Halden said that fragments have been found in sewage sludge, which can contaminate the soil environment and become ingested by earthworms when it’s spread on land.

“We know that earthworms take up soil and can ingest plastics, and then if birds eat the worms it creates a pathway for plastics to enter the food chain,” he said. Further, after heavy rains, the plastic bits can trickle out into streams and other waterways and make their way into the ocean.

And it’s not just the contact lenses themselves that are an environmental problem. Dailies, weeklies and monthlies are packaged by the billions in polypropylene plastic containers and aluminum lids, and “the unfortunate news is that they do not get recycled very effectively,” Halden said. Only one manufacturer, Bausch + Lomb, has a take-back recycling program.

Soft contacts are usually made of a combination of poly(methylmethacrylate), silicones and fluoropolymers, which makes them feel watery and gel-like. Halden suggested that people flick their contacts down the sink or toilet because they do not feel like solid plastic waste.

The researchers hope their study will teach users to stop flushing their contacts. They are also calling on lens manufacturers, at the very least, to label their products with proper disposal instructions.

“Ultimately, we hope that manufacturers will conduct more research on how the lenses impact aquatic life and how fast the lenses degrade in a marine environment,” Halden said in the press release.

Angela Lashbrook, who reported about the new study for The Atlantic, admitted to flushing lenses down the toilet herself. She also polled a few of her contact-wearing friends and was surprised to find they all flushed their lenses, too.

Thanks to the study, she and her friends vowed to make the simple switch of throwing used contacts in the trash.

“It’s quite possibly the easiest change to my behavior I’ve ever had to make that could avoid hurting the environment. My contacts-wearing friends, without my scolding, all pledged to do the same,” Lashbrook wrote.

Watch here to learn more about the study:

https://www.ecowatch.com/contact-lenses-microplastic-waste-2597484024.html?utm_source=EcoWatch%2BList&utm_campaign=4d13d4e552-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-4d13d4e552-86074753

Petition · Ask Costco to stop selling styrofoam products · Change.org

change.org
Petition · Ask Costco to stop selling styrofoam products · Change.org
David Sergi started this petition to Costco Wholesale
2 minutes

Did you know Americans throw away billions of styrofoam cups each year — cups that create pollution that stays in our environment for generations.

More and more people are dumping styrofoam — finding solutions for cups, plates, containers and other materials that don’t poison the environment.

Costco sells styrofoam cups and serving trays. We are asking Costco to stop selling styrofoam products to encourage paper products that are better for the environment. Will you join us?

More and more corporations are looking for ways to encourage sustainability. Just this year big companies like McDonald’s and Dunkin Donuts announced that they would be phasing out styrofoam cups, and companies like IKEA have already said they’d phase out styrofoam packaging.

The companies making styrofoam products also make products that are better for the environment. By Costco selling more of the environmentally-friendly products, it will help lower cost and ensure environmentally-friendly products are accessible to everyone. That’s why we’re urging Costco to set a better standard for retail stores, and stop carrying styrofoam products in their stores.

https://www.change.org/p/ask-costco-to-stop-selling-styrofoam-products/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=393474&utm_content=&sfmc_tk=Y65ELrEVwnOSO7%2bDYTtOcUH1V6LjbFFCIgnb9Xcx%2fpOqiqvB5XWG8alkVoyJ5fF4&j=393474&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=64877233&mid=7233053&jb=864

Petition: Please stock paper straws for your customers! · Change.org

Please stock paper straws for your customers! · Change.org
John Lyman started this petition to Sysco Corporation
1-2 minutes

Sysco is one of the largest restaurant product suppliers in the United States, supplying straws to thousands of restaurants around the country. But they only stock plastic straws for their customers.

I have spoken with multiple restaurant owners who want to buy paper straws, but don’t have a viable option to do so. Once Sysco has them, they can easily order them along with their other standard supplies.

In the U.S. alone, 500 million plastic straws are used every single day. Many restaurant customers want to avoid plastic straws, but have no other option when dining out.

Once restaurant suppliers make it easy for restaurants to offer paper straws, many will do so. This will have a huge impact on the generation of plastic waste. That’s why I’m asking Sysco, one of the world’s leading restaurant supply companies, to make it easier for restaurants to purchase paper straws and offer alternatives to single-use plastic straws.

https://www.change.org/p/sysco-corporation-please-stock-paper-straws-for-your-customers/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=382875&utm_content=&sfmc_tk=Y65ELrEVwnOSO7%2bDYTtOcai29H5kdKvIa%2fjB8tVejWeO%2fzDdQZM0Gz%2fh3oVee5Dk&j=382875&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=64689389&mid=7233053&jb=1359

Adopt a Plastic Straw Upon Request Policy · Change.org

change.org
Adopt a Plastic Straw Upon Request Policy · Change.org
Sophia and Amanda started this petition to Dunkin’ Donuts
2 minutes

Our names are Amanda and Sophia. One day in science class, we came upon an article on plastic straws. The article stated that Americans use more than 500 million straws a day- and throw them away. That is equivalent to 125 school buses filled with plastic straws. We also learned that by 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish.

Those numbers concern us. So when we joined the Earth Club at our school, the leader suggested using change.org, which is how we came upon this website. All 500 million of these plastic straws end up in a landfill or worse, the ocean. When plastic straws get into the ocean, the fish mistake it for food, eat it, and get sick or die. In fact, science shows that when you eat fish, you might as well be eating plastic!

We both think that Dunkin Donuts is a very tasty and an influential company. By choosing this business, we hope to make them take this issue very seriously. These shops have a lot of people coming in every day, almost all of them getting cold beverages containing plastic straws. However, those straws add up to the landfill and get into the ocean. Dunkin’ Donuts is a very successful company, so if they stopped giving out straws (and retained some available for customers with disabilities), won’t others follow their lead?

So please sign this petition and share it with your friends to help the environment, and the world we all live in. Remember, #StrawsSuck! Thank you!

https://www.change.org/p/dunkin-donuts-adopt-a-plastic-straw-upon-request-policy/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=385680&utm_content=&sfmc_tk=Y65ELrEVwnOSO7%2bDYTtOcVK%2fbDbHFP1HR4TLOmZza5g8gexy405l7FX6EyjcgUeW&j=385680&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=64740345&mid=7233053&jb=1906

Join One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic Movement!

onegreenplanet.org

Plastic can be found in virtually every shape and form. It is a material that makes our lives incredibly convenient, but most people rarely think about the impact plastic has on the world around us.

Unlike other materials, plastic never really goes away. We love plastic because it is durable, waterproof, and versatile, but the downside of these qualities is that it lasts forever.

Plastic does not biodegrade and it takes hundreds of years for it to break down through a process of photodegradation. Basically, plastic can only disintegrate if it is exposed to UV rays which break its structural bonds apart – and even when this happens, it never truly goes away, it just becomes tons of microscopic pieces of plastic.
Marine Animal Extinction is the Real Cost of Convenience

Globally, we produce 300 million tons of plastic every year, 78 percent of which is NOT reclaimed or recycled.
Around 8.8 million tons of plastic get dumped into the oceans every year!
700 marine animals are faced with extinction due to the threat that plastic poses to them in the form of entanglement, pollution, and ingestion.
50 percent of sea turtles have plastic in their stomachs.
By 2050, 99 percent of all seabird species will have ingested plastic waste.

While efforts are being made to remove debris from the oceans, improve recycling systems and innovate barriers to prevent plastic from getting into waterways, we can all take action in our daily lives to stop plastic waste at the source.

“Plastic is ubiquitous in modern society and seemingly unavoidable. But is it worth risking the lives of marine species, the health of the oceans and our own future in the name of convenience? By taking baby steps to minimize hidden plastics in our lives, we can crush plastic at its source and help the world take a giant collective leap into a better future,” said Nil Zacharias, Co-Founder of One Green Planet.

If we all take steps to identify where we use plastic and actively look for alternatives, we can drastically cut down on the amount of plastic pollution that finds its way into the ocean. The average American throws away approximately 185 pounds of plastic a year. If everyone in the U.S. alone were to stop using plastic that would keep over 555 billion pounds of plastic out of the oceans!

As the leading organization at the forefront of the conscious consumerism movement, One Green Planet believes that reducing hidden plastics from our lives is not about giving up anything or sacrificing convenience, but rather learning to reap the maximum benefit from the items you use every day while having the minimum impact.
5 Ways You Can #CrushPlastic in Your Daily Life

DIY your own cosmetics instead of buying ones in plastic tubes.
Try DIY-ing your shampoo and conditioner instead of buying plastic bottles.
Skip the plastic tube toothpaste and make your own!
Switch to bar soap and shampoo to avoid plastic packaging.
Use mason jars when grocery shopping to store all your bulk food items.
Use small cloth or reusable bags instead of produce bags when food shopping.
Replace your plastic food storage bags with stainless steel tins or mason jars.
Reduce plastic packaging in your cleaning routine by making your own natural cleaners.
Avoid microbeads in your exfoliating face or body wash.
Buy plastic-free beauty, hygiene, and cleaning products, like bamboo toothbrushes, plastic-free makeup brushes and natural material sponges.

For more information on how plastic harms oceans and marine animals, click the link

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/crushplastic/.

Disney to Eliminate Plastic Straws, Stirrers, and Styrofoam Cups in All Parks, Hotels, and Cruise Line!

onegreenplanet.org
Aleksandra Pajda
Disney has announced its commitment to making a positive impact on the environment by reducing plastic waste at their parks and other venues across the globe! The entertainment giant is cracking down on non-biodegradable plastic straws and stirrers, reducing the use of plastic bags, and eliminating polystyrene cups – all in the spirit of Walt Disney’s conviction that “conservation isn’t just the business of a few people. It’s a matter that concerns all of us.”

The company will eliminate single-use plastic straws and plastic stirrers in all of its owned and operated locations globally by mid-2019. The change will reduce more than 175 million non-biodegradable straws and 13 million stirrers a year. The company has not yet revealed details as to possible alternatives.

Disney is also going to transition to refillable in-room amenities in its hotels and on cruise ships over the next few years. The switch is expected to reduce plastic in guest rooms by 80 percent. They will also slash the number of plastic shopping bags in their parks and cruise line, instead offering guests the option to buy reusable bags at a nominal price. Lastly, Disney pledged to fully end their use of polystyrene cups across all its global businesses.

“Eliminating plastic straws and other plastic items are meaningful steps in our long-standing commitment to environmental stewardship,” said Bob Chapek, Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences, and Consumer Products. “These new global efforts help reduce our environmental footprint, and advance our long-term sustainability goals.”

Disney is also looking forward to making further progress on its overall sustainability goals. According to the company’s data, in 2017, it reduced its net greenhouse gas emissions by 41 percent and diverted almost 50 percent of waste from landfills and incineration.

“Disney has always been inspired by nature – and it is a uniquely powerful brand that inspires, educates, and entertains, all at the same time,” said Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International. “Today’s announcement is more than about reducing single-use plastic waste, it’s also about showing millions of kids and adults from around the world the many ways we can change our daily habits to care for the oceans and protect nature that sustains us all. It also builds on Disney’s longstanding commitment to conservation and environmental stewardship, a legacy that stretches from the highlands of Peru to the islands of the South Pacific.”

In America, 500 million plastic straws are used every day! While it is wonderful to see companies take steps to eliminate unnecessary plastics, we can all make the same effort in our daily lives. To find out how you can be a part of the change by reducing your personal use of single-use plastics, check out One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic campaign!

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/disney-eliminate-plastic-straws-stirrers-styrofoam-cup/

Image source: rgrivas/Pixabay

Petition: Nike, Just Do It! Commit to Using 100% Recycled Plastic

by: Care2 Team
target: Nike

Polyester plastic is used in about 50% of Adidas products. And if you consider the number of shoes and clothes the company makes a year that’s a lot of plastic.

But over the past few years, Adidas has stepped up to help our environment. In 2016 they stopped using plastic bags in all their stores. They have experimented with using biodegradable fabric that would disintegrate quickly after use. And recently the sports apparel giant partnered with an environmental group to make special edition shoes wholly made of recycled water bottles.

But now they are going a step further. The company has started to phase out using new plastic in their entire production line by the end of 2018. By 2024, the company hopes to use nothing but 100% recycled polyester in all their products.

Their decision to make the change couldn’t have come sooner. Plastics are wreaking havoc on our environment. Every day tons of the material ends up in landfills, or worse, in our oceans. In fact, according to experts, in the next three decades, there could be more plastic in our seas than fish.

If Adidas can make the switch, so can Nike. The iconic American brand is the largest sportswear producer in the world and has an enormous plastic footprint. In the past, they have used recycled plastics to make uniforms but they have yet to commit to making the “big switch” to using 100% recycled plastic in their entire production and product line like Adidas has just done.

Care2 wants to challenge Nike to follow in Adidas’ footsteps and commit to using only recycled plastics to make their products.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/883/104/352/

 

Environmentally-Friendly Alternatives – Balloons Blow

balloonsblow.org
Environmentally-Friendly Alternatives – Balloons Blow

There are many alternatives to balloon releases. To avoid unintentionally littering with balloons, you can instead have fun, celebrate, and remember with environmentally-friendly alternatives.

Let your imagination soar and who knows what creative, one-of-a-kind idea you might come up with!Unsustainable alternatives
Sky lanterns: (Chinese paper lanterns) are not an environmentally-friendly alternative. Leaving a fire unattended is against fire code. Sky lanterns have started huge fires, caused serious burns, and have killed animals.
Butterfly gardens – not butterfly releases

Butterfly releases: Lepidopterologists warn butterfly releases are not good for the environment. They also promote the breeding and exploitation of animals. Click here or here for more information.

Dove releases: Wildlife rehabilitators advise against the release of all domestic birds. Casualties are still common even when a professional is used. They also promote the breeding and exploitation of animals. http://balloonsblow.org/environmentally-friendly-alternatives/ here for more information.
Here are some ideas to get you started…

Honoring with Living Memorials

Plant in remembrance – A great way to honor and remember a loved one or an important issue is to bring more life to our planet. By planting a native tree, flower garden or butterfly garden you are not only giving life to that plant you are also providing shelter, resources, and clean air to all kinds of wildlife and people. This remembrance will last a very long time and you can visit your tree or flower bed as much as you want and create more life by doing so!

Flowers and trees can also be used at fundraising events as incentives to donate. They could then be planted in a public area, perhaps taking on different shapes or words, or can be taken home by participants to be planted elsewhere as a living memory. Here’s a great place to find trees: GiveTreeGifts.com. There are urns to plant as well. You can also help reforestation with memorial, celebration, or pet loss trees by visiting The Trees Remember.

Flags, banners, streamers and dancing inflatables – Many businesses are realizing the benefits of using reusable eye-catching signage. Colorful streamers, flags and banners save money and time over balloons, ribbons and helium. They are also weather resistant, save Helium, and can be reused again and again! Here are some great companies: Ribbon Streamers, Custom Made Flags, Fort Myers Banners.

Ribbon dancers – Instead of giving kids and guests balloons at parties or events, why not give them something a little more engaging? Balloons will simply sit tied up or be gone in a flash if released (not to mention harm wildlife and deplete helium resources). Ribbon dancers are beautiful and require people to move around and have fun!

A group of people spinning and twirling with a colorful long ribbon following their every move is surely a sight to see. You can even have guests make their own ribbon dancer, decorations and all!

Kites & garden spinners – Vibrant fabric that dance in the high winds or eye-catching colors spinning in the garden. Unlike balloons, kites and spinners can be enjoyed for years. Here’s a couple awesome places to find both, and more: Zephyr Kites, Lainie’s Way, Fun with Wind. Kites can be a great prize to give people who donate and can then be flown to draw attention. Here is an example of a successful group that uses kites for fundraising.

Bunting – A great way to decorate for parties and celebrations is bunting! These beautiful waves of fabric can be made at home and uniquely designed with different patterns, shapes, and colors. They are also reusable, fun to make, and are sure to light up the party! Here is a link to learn how to make your own bunting.

Pinwheels – With flashy colors fluttering in the wind, pinwheels are sure to catch many eyes. They are great for attracting attention to businesses, awareness projects, birthday parties and more! Kids can have fun making their own, find easy instructions here. Click here for printable patriotic pinwheel. Here are examples of pinwheels making a point: Pinwheels for Prevention, Pinwheels for Peace.

Tissue Paper Pompoms – For some color burst at parties or celebrations, tissue paper pompoms are spectacular! These pretty, colorful poof balls can be easily made at home and are reusable. They are also fun activities for kids to make too! Here’s a simple step-by-step guide to make your own pompoms.

Drumming – The drum has been called the heartbeat of Mother Earth. Using drums to celebrate does not create waste or cause danger to wildlife. The beat brings people together and can be used for any occasion. Here is a great example of how drumming can replace harmful celebrations.

Get flocked – A flock of pink flamingos brightens everyone’s day. Fake flamingos can be placed on the lawn of one’s choice for a donation, where they will stay for a few days before moving to the next scheduled location. They can be reused for years of flocking fun. Here is a great example.

Floating flowers – For some, the upward drifting of balloons gives them a sense of letting go, and at the same time thinking the balloon will eventually reach their loved one. Because remembering a loved one by potentially killing another life isn’t exactly the best feeling, there are many alternatives. Floating flowers or flower petals down a calm stream can give you the same sense of letting go. You will be able to be in nature and feel the energy of your loved one and all the life that surrounds you! Be sure to use native flowers and not let go an excessive amount.

Wildflower seed bombs – A great way to give a gift that grows is by making your own flower seed bombs! It’s important to only use native seeds. These little pounces will spread life-giving, beautiful flowers. Learn how to make your own seed bombs here.

Jump rope for a cause – Jump roping is fun, good for your body, and a great way to get people together! Using jump ropes to bring awareness to a cause engages participants and will bring attention from others who see. Here is a cause that has been very successful using jump ropes to bring awareness and funds to a growing issue.

Environmental Fundraising – Fundraising with Earth-themed and eco-conscious products. Raise funds and keep the environment clean of wasteful plastic straws. Fundraising with glass straws or here.

Ten eco-friendly fundraising ideas – Green Child Magazine has a great post.

Birthday parties without balloons – Birthday parties can be festive & exciting without boring, wasteful balloons. Here are some great examples.

Painted rocks – A stone can be used to paint memorials or celebrations! These beautiful stones can be placed in favorite spots, under trees, in gardens, along walkways, or inside. This is great for families or anyone that wants to leave a mark by using your imagination. Please be mindful when finding rocks to paint.

Lighting candles & Luminaries – A great way to remember a loved one or welcome new life is by lighting candles. On the anniversary of the passing or the birthday of new life, everyone can light a candle and remember their loved one or wish and be filled by the light of the candle. This can be a lasting, and comforting connection between you and another life! Luminaries are beautiful at night and can be used to line sidewalks or placed in a group. Learn how to make a frosted Mason jar luminary. You can also find luminaries with designs on them here.

Blowing bubbles – Blowing bubbles is always fun; watching them bounce around towards the sky and twist with the wind. It also requires you to exhale and breathe. This is a great way to release your feelings as well and just let go. Imagine the spectacular sight of a countless number of bubbles floating away into the sky with a piece of every person that have gathered together! Here is a quick homemade recipe.

Giant bubbles – We love bubbles! And the good people at Dr. Zigs can get you started on creating your own giant bubbles. They ‘strive to be a sustainable company and are driven by strong ethical and environmental principles’. These bubbles are a sight to behold and fun for everyone. Easy-to-use wands allow anyone to blow their own. Let the breeze carry them away!

The Bubble Bus is also exciting for events, celebrations, fundraisers or parties. Millions of bubbles big and small will surround everyone with joy! Make homemade bubble wands to create your own big bubbles here.

Mass Gathering – Having people come together to create a shape, word, or image can be very unifying and beautiful! This has been done to bring awareness to an issue/cause, for memorials, and celebrations. Everyone gets to participate to be a part of something bigger than themselves!

Memorials for beloved pets – Turn your pets cremations into nurturing memorials that will encourage more life. Planting native trees or wild flowers is a beautiful way to perpetuate your pets memory. You can find great alternatives here and here.

Origami Whales – Make your own pod of whales with origami whale instructions. Bring awareness to these gentle giants instead of harming them with balloons. Here is an example of how children can come together and make a difference.

Colored lights – Colored lights catch attentions during parties, holidays, and even on certain issues! It can replace a normal white light year-round at a business or be used temporarily on special days. Here is a great example of how colored lights can be used to bring awareness to an issue.

Races, walks and organized games – Engaging your audience is a key to a successful event. Fundraisers and awareness events can have racers, walkers or players donate to participate, all while attracting positive attention to the issue and having fun!

Marches – It is hard to pass by a large organized group of people and not wonder what brought them together that day. Marches are a great way to bring attention to a pressing issue or honorable individual from local people to large media networks!

Book and food drives – There are many items that can be collected by holding a drive like books, nonperishable food, art supplies, shoes, clothes, etc. All of the items gathered can be used to directly help provide to others in need and spread awareness at the same time.

Flying Wish Paper – Write your wishes on these thin pieces of paper, roll them up, light them, and watch them rise. There is very little ash left and way to get the floating effect without harming the environment. Check them out on Flying Wish Paper.

Shaved heads – This look can bring a lot of attention when a group of people are willing to shave their heads for a cause or person. This alternative is used at outreach events and memorials and can catch on fast with participants. The press is sure to pick up on the unusual look that so many people choose to wear.

http://balloonsblow.org/environmentally-friendly-alternatives/

Ikea to Phase Out Single-Use Plastic Products by 2020!

onegreenplanet.org
Ikea to Phase Out Single-Use Plastic Products by 2020!
Aleksandra Pajda
3-4 minutes

IKEA has just joined the global fight against plastic pollution by committing to phase out single-use plastic products from its stores and restaurants by 2020. The Scandinavian chain decided to go for this anti-plastic move in order to help its customers live more sustainably in response to the growing concern about plastic pollution and its impact on the oceans.

The retailer announced that it will eliminate plastic straws, plates, cups, freezer bags, bin bags, and plastic-coated paper plates and cups, replacing the items with alternatives where possible, the Guardian reports. While all the details of the phase-out are not yet settled, the company is clearly moving forward and finding new solutions.

“We don’t have all the answers yet but we are working together with our suppliers to find solutions that are good for both people and the planet,” said an IKEA spokesperson.

The retailer says it wants to help customers live more sustainably by offering products such as a tap nozzle that could save over 90 percent of water used. The chain will also start offering solar panels in 29 markets by 2025 – up from the five that offer them now. IKEA also plans to introduce more vegetarian and vegan food options into the stores’ cafes.

“Through our size and reach we have the opportunity to inspire and enable more than 1 billion people to live better lives, within the limits of the planet,” said Torbjörn Lööf, the Chief Executive of the retailer’s parent Inter IKEA group. “Change will only be possible if we collaborate with others and nurture entrepreneurship. We are committed to taking the lead working together with everyone – from raw material suppliers all the way to our customers and partners.”

IKEA has already pledged to phase out oil-based plastics and is seeking to ensure that all its plastic products are made using recycled materials by August 2020. To make that vision a reality, the company has invested in a plastics recycling plant. It has also invested in wind farms and put solar panels on its stores in order to meet the goal of relying on renewable electricity and heat in its stores by 2020.

Being one of the most popular and recognizable furniture retailers with more than 363 stores worldwide, IKEA has the opportunity to influence the habits and choices of hundreds of millions of its customers, have a serious impact on other retailers and businesses, and significantly reduce the amount of plastic waste it generates – and it is incredible to see the company take that chance!

Each of us can play a small part in making a change and reducing plastic pollution for the benefit of our planet. To find out how you can help by ditching disposable plastics, check out One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic campaign!

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/ikea-phase-single-use-plastic-products/?utm_source=Green+Monster+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=642fbf4340-NEWSLETTER_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bbf62ddf34-642fbf4340-106049477

Image source: William Murphy/Flickr

Petition · Monsanto: Ban neonicotinoids from pesticide products used for agriculture · Change.org

Ban neonicotinoids from pesticide products used for agriculture
Moira Vodila started this petition to Monsanto and 1 other

Since 1990, beekeepers have noticed a drastic decline in the bee population. Bee colonies have been disappearing left and right due to the excess use of Neonicotinoids. These chemicals are harmful to the species and are causing a pandemic for these honeybees. Before planting, some might use a product by Monsanto or Bayer to help the plants with pesticides. By doing this, though, they have made it so when a bee goes to pollinate, it will get sick to the point where it will not be able to survive. More and more bees have not been able to live through the winters because of the harmful chemicals left in their bodies. Without bees, we will lose a drastic amount of agricultural products, which will hurt not only the food industry, but our economy.

This petition is to ban the use of neonicotinoids in our pesticides. It is far more harmful to the insects and is killing off species. We must make a change if we do not want to see our food die off or become unsustainable. The bees are far more important to the human race than we make them out to be. Not only do they provide honey, they pollinate our agriculture and give us a source of food. We must save the bees to save ourselves.

https://www.change.org/p/monsanto-ban-neonicotinoids-from-pesticide-products-used-for-agriculture/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=346813&utm_content=&sfmc_tk=Y65ELrEVwnOSO7%2bDYTtOcSMlNOkxsMvLDNmMR%2be2DEC55qn0tKy0l6FI39WBYH%2fk&j=346813&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=62028692&mid=7233053&jb=103

© 2018, Change.org, Inc.Certified B Corporation

Petition: Whole Foods – Tell Tyson to Clean Up Meat

Whole Foods – Tell Tyson to Clean Up Meat

by: Mighty Earth
target: John Mackey, CEO, Whole Foods

92,079 SUPPORTERS
95,000 GOAL

Industrial meat producers like Tyson are the main source of water pollution across the country, and Whole Foods is turning a blind eye. Excess manure and fertilizer pollution from the vast quantities of feed grown to raise meat is polluting local waterways in the Heartland, washing downstream along the Mississippi River until it reaches the Gulf of Mexico. This pollution is contaminating drinking water, and causing one of the largest Dead Zones on record in the Gulf.

As one of America’s largest grocery stores with a brand trusted for sustainability, Whole Foods should be holding its suppliers accountable to make meat less polluting. But Whole Foods is currently selling you meat from Tyson Foods, one of the top polluters of our nation’s waters.

Urge Whole Foods to hold Tyson and other suppliers accountable for improving agricultural practices to make meat less polluting.

For more information about Tyson’s water pollution problem, read our report “Mystery Meat II.”
Update #17 hours ago
Tyson is feeling the heat from our campaign and have pledged to improve farming practices on about half their feed acres. Unfortunately, Tyson hasn’t shared any details about how they will get that done. We’ll be delivering our petition to urge Whole Foods to demand better from Tyson this Tuesday. Please share the petition now to help us hit 100K supporters! Thanks!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/783/792/837/

Patagonia vs. Donald Trump | GQ

gq.com
Patagonia vs. Donald Trump | GQ
Rosecrans Baldwin

This is not your parents’ fleece-maker. We’re past the old jokes about Patagucci or Fratagonia. Sure, you still see a Synchilla vest on every venture capitalist in Palo Alto; not for nothing does the Jared Dunn character on Silicon Valley possess a Patagonia collection supreme. But the vest also crisscrosses popular culture: DeRay Mckesson, one of the faces of Black Lives Matter, wears Patagonia so often his vest has its own Twitter feed. A$AP Rocky shows up in Snap-T sweaters. Louis Vuitton cribbed its Classic Retro-X jacket for a mountaineering look. Universities from Oregon to Ole Miss are Patagonia-saturated, and meanwhile, vintage finds—the rarest featuring the original “big label” logo—fetch a premium on eBay.

The company’s HQ looks like a cross between a college campus and a recycling center. Solar panels everywhere. Wet suits drying on the roofs of cars—the five-acre spread is a short walk from the beach. The company has an on-site school where employees can enroll their kids through second grade, one of the reasons that Patagonia has near gender parity among employees. Many of its CEOs have been female, including the current one, Rose Marcario. Chouinard writes in his memoir–cum–business bible, Let My People Go Surfing, “I was brought up surrounded by women. I have ever since preferred that accommodation.”

Chouinard was born in Maine but formed in California. The son of a hardworking French-Canadian carpenter, he moved with his family to Burbank, just north of Los Angeles, in 1946, when Chouinard was 8; it was his mother’s idea, to improve his dad’s asthma. In California, Chouinard stood out, not in a good way. He was short, spoke French, and had a name like a girl. He hated school. High school history class was for practicing holding his breath, so he could free-dive deeper to catch wild lobster off Malibu. “I learned a long time ago that if you want to be a winner,” he told me, “you invent your own games.” So he ran away, to Griffith Park to hunt rabbits, the Los Angeles River to catch crawdads. It was a funny wilderness in the Valley—his favorite swimming hole was fed by a movie studio’s film-development lab. “Yeah, I used to swim in the outfall,” he said, cracking up.

Then he discovered climbing. In the 1950s, age 16, Chouinard drove to Wyoming and climbed Gannett Peak, the state’s highest mountain. Soon he met other young climbers, like Royal Robbins and Tom Frost, and migrated to Yosemite, where he lived off scraps—at one point, tins of cat food—and made first ascents up the granite walls. “In the ’60s, it was kind of the height of the fossil-fuel age,” he said. “You could get a part-time job anytime you felt like it. Gas was 25 cents a gallon. You could buy a used car for 20 bucks. Camping was free. It was pretty easygoing.”

Chouinard and his friends would transform rock climbing, helping to bring about the modern “clean” version, where you no longer hammer iron spikes into the cracks to aid your progress. This led to athletes like Caldwell, a Patagonia “climbing ambassador,” pulling off accomplishments no one thought possible—like the first free climb of Yosemite’s Dawn Wall. Chouinard also met his wife of 47 years, Malinda, in Yosemite. At the time, she was a climber who worked as a weekend cabin maid. According to Chouinard, the moment that clinched it was a day they were hanging out and Malinda saw some women pull up and throw a beer can out the window. She told them to pick it up. They gave her the finger. Malinda went over, tore the license plate off their car with her bare hands, and turned it in to the rangers’ office. Chouinard was in love.

Patagonia got its start as Chouinard Equipment, selling the climbing gear that Yvon was making for his friends. The first apparel was equally functional, designed to resist rock: sturdy corduroy trousers, stiff rugby shirts like the ones Yvon brought back from a climbing trip in Scotland. When the clothing started to take off, they decided to separate the garments from the gear; they just needed a good name. As Chouinard explained: “To most people, especially then, Patagonia was a name like Timbuktu or Shangri-la—far-off, interesting, not quite on the map.”

These days, that “far-off” land is thriving. With Marcario at the company, revenue and profits have quadrupled. In addition to clothing, the company produces films, runs a food business, even has a venture-capital fund to invest in eco-friendly start-ups; one, Bureo, makes skateboards and sunglasses from former fishing nets. Along the way, Patagonia began donating 1 percent of its sales to environmental groups—$89 million as of April 2017—and led the garment industry in cleaning up its supply chains, demanding better practices from factories overseas. (Chouinard, his wife, and their two adult children remain the sole owners of Patagonia.)

https://www.gq.com/story/patagonia-versus-donald-trump?mbid=synd_digg

Tell Starbucks: Don’t trash our planet with plastic | Greenpeace

starbucks on the hudson

Each minute the equivalent of a garbage truck full of plastic ends up in the ocean, so why do 4 billion plastic line Starbucks paper cups get thrown away every year along with masses of it single-use plastic lids, straws, and culturally?

Starbucks is part of the global plastic problem: tell the coffee giant to stop trashing our planet with plastic!

By 2050 the world’s oceans are projected to have more plastic than fish. Yet Starbucks has no plan to reduce it’s plastic trash and continues to serve paper coffee cups that are nearly impossible to recycle because of the plastic lining.

The sheer amount of plastic trash created by Starbucks is out of control – and it’s ending up in the waterways and other fragile ecosystems.

In 2008, Starbucks said it would serve a 100% recyclable paper cup and increase reusables to 25% by 2015. To date it has not done either.

It’s time for Starbucks to live up to its promises.

https://engage.us.greenpeace.org/onlineactions/4TqezR4pHEO4LxfSzpanMA2?emci=28b6497f-0917-e811-80c2-00155da7a518&emdi=c0e11f4d-d117-e811-80c2-00155da7a518&fn=Nancy&ln=Keiter&em=nackpets%40gmail.com&pc=&hp=5555555555&mp=&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=180222_starbucks_plastics_email1(ns)&sourceid=1001273

Demand Tyson Foods Stop Polluting Waterways

Tyson Foods has been linked to the biggest dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, but refuses to clean up its pollution. Sign the petition below to demand reduced pollution in our waterways.

Source: Demand Tyson Foods Stop Polluting Waterways

Supermarkets: Stop burning Paraguay’s forests for summer BBQs! – Rainforest Rescue

The forests of the Paraguayan Chaco are being cleared and converted into charcoal which is exported to Europe and the USA. This threatens endangered species and one of the last indigenous peoples living Untouched by this industrial society. Tell European supermarkets to stop selling charcoal made from this destruction of Paraguay’s forests.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1103/supermarkets-stop-burning-paraguays-forests-for-summer-bbqs

Get cocoa plantations out of Côte d’Ivoire’s national parks! – Rainforest Rescue

Cote d’lovire was once a Tropical Paradise, and now its last remaining patches of rainforests are being destroyed for cocoa plantations – not even national parks are safe. The major chocolate producers have turned a blind eye to the ruthless exploitation. Tell Mars and other manufacturers to get the rainforest out of our chocolate!

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1109/get-cocoa-plantations-out-of-cote-divoires-national-parks

An EU seal for illegal timber from Vietnam? NO! – Rainforest Rescue

Illegal Timber from Southeast Asia – laundered with and E U seal of approval? This could soon become reality. The EU is preparing a trade deal on tropical timber with Vietnam, a hotbed of timber trafficking. Tell the EU that Vietnam does not deserve a trade agreement until it has cleaned up its act.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1106/an-eu-seal-for-illegal-timber-from-vietnam-no

An EU seal for illegal timber from Vietnam? NO! – Rainforest Rescue

Illegal Timber from Southeast Asia – laundered with and E U seal of approval? This could soon become reality. The EU is preparing a trade deal on tropical timber with Vietnam, a hotbed of timber trafficking. Tell the EU that Vietnam does not deserve a trade agreement until it has cleaned up its act.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1106/an-eu-seal-for-illegal-timber-from-vietnam-no

Stop felling Canada’s centuries-old forest giants for lumber! – Rainforest Rescue

The temperate rainforests of British Columbia are one of the rarest ecosystems on the planet, but that’s not stopping Canadian loggers: 90 percent of Vancouver ancient giants have already been felled. Tell British Columbia’s provincial government of to stop the destruction and protect the remaining from the forest

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1120/stop-felling-canadas-centuries-old-forest-giants-for-lumber

Stop the assault on Earth’s green lung! – Rainforest Rescue

The indigenous people of the Amazon under siege – in Brazil,Ecuador, Peru and neighboring countries. The rainforest home is being destroyed. Please add your voice to indigenous peoples’ appeal to the UN and South American governments to stop the destruction of the largest and most biodiverse ecosystem on the planet.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1110/stop-the-assault-on-earths-green-lung

Stop the destruction of 47,000 km² of Amazon rainforest! – Rainforest Rescue

Brazil’s beleaguered president Temer wants to open up face swathe of protected rainforest – an area the size of Denmark -to mining and industrial agriculture. With this gift to his cronies, he is hoping to keep himself in office and out of prison for corruption on a grand scale.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1107/stop-the-destruction-of-47000-km2-of-amazon-rainforest

Samsung, get out of Papua’s rainforests! – Rainforest Rescue

Smartphones are not the only things going up in flames in the Samsung business empire: the group recently launched a joint venture with Korindo, a palm oil company notororious for slashing and burning Papua’s rainforests.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1105/samsung-get-out-of-papuas-rainforests

Rainforest to be felled with Norwegian money? Stop it! – Rainforest Rescue

The Norwegian government is considering whether to finance industrial logging in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Twenty million hecheres of virgin rainforest could be given up to the logging industry. Trade and tropical timber destroys the livelihoods of humans and animals and fuels climate change.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1102/rainforest-to-be-felled-with-norwegian-money-stop-it

Unilever: stop destroying mangroves for convenience food! – Rainforest Rescue

Unilever’s “substantial palm oil” is an empty promise. It’s palm oil supplier Wilmar, is destroying the largest mangrove forest in Indonesia and this is the only one of many such cases. Tell Unilever how to get palm oil out of its products and stop profiting from the destruction of nature.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1101/unilever-stop-destroying-mangroves-for-convenience-food

Save Białowieża, Poland’s last primeval forest! – Rainforest Rescue

there is nothing quite like Bialowieza forest in Poland. Untouched by humans for centuries, it is a treasure trove of biodiversity – but now loggers are firing up there chainsaws. Tell Portland’s government and you and ESC 02 stop the destruction of one of Europe’s last primeval Forests.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1100/save-bialowieza-polands-last-primeval-forest

Trashing rainforest for biofuel? A TOTAL disaster! – Rainforest Rescue

French oil multinational Total is stepping up its resilience on palm oil and wants to build a “biorefinery” in Marseilles to meet allegedly growing demand for diesel fuel – and this in spite of the European Parliament’s call for biofuels from palm oil to be phased out.

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1096/trashing-rainforest-for-biofuel-a-total-disaster

Stop destroying our national park: no IFC investment in Dangote! – Rainforest Rescue

Conservationist Odey Oyama is standing in an area that was once dense rainforest – part of cross river National Park in Nigeria. Industrial conglomerate Dangote clear the land for a pineapple plantation. Odey accuses Dangote of violating Nigeria law: “Plantations have no business in a national park!”

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1095/stop-destroying-our-national-park-no-ifc-investment-in-dangote