See the Elusive Planet Mercury in the Dawn Sky This August | Space

See Mercury above the east-northeast horizon before sunrise this month.

Continue reading here for more information and view the video.

https://www.space.com/planet-mercury-skywatching-august-2019.html?utm_source=sdc-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190806-sdc

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Digital Exclusive: Dr. Patrick Moore TEARS APART The Green New Deal | Huckabee

Nearly Extinct Pink Dolphin Gives Birth To Pink Calf

 

lifeinsider.me

Uncommon pink dolphin mother gave birth to a charming infant dolphin. She was named Pinky, and the baby dolphin has been seen in the Calcasieu River in Louisiana. The pink calf was there, as well.

This warm-blooded animal became famous 12 years back. Chief Erik Rue was the first to recognize her. The video of Pinky and her child was posted on Pinky’s Facebook page. The dolphins were swimming before a huge boat in the Calcasieu Ship Channel.

As indicated by specialists, Pinky is a Rare River Dolphin who got the pink shading from an uncommon hereditary change. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) recorded stream dolphins as jeopardized. Its populace is diminishing.

The birth of the calf gives us trust that calves have acquired their mom’s hereditary change which would help in the exertion of expanding the number of inhabitants in uncommon species.

Skipper Rue clarified that the dolphin is pink from its tail to the tip and has red eyes. Its skin is smooth and lustrous.

Pinky isn’t influenced by the earth or daylight however beyond any doubt likes to stay underneath the surface more than other animals.

She’s a fantastic mammal that conveys delight to local people, and visitors love seeing such a superb well-evolved creature.

Bridget Boudreaux spotted Pinky and her calf in the river some a time ago. She saw them swimming and bouncing around. Recognizing the mother and her child was a great encounter for her, and she even requested that the commander stop the vessel so she can see it better.

https://lifeinsider.me/nearly-extinct-pink-dolphin-gives-birth-to-pink-calf/

50+ items that you actually shouldn’t put in the refrigerator

Do you ever feel like your fridge seems to be getting smaller and smaller? Well, it’s probably because you’re putting things in there that you shouldn’t. Many Americans make the mistake of putting everything they get from the grocery store into the fridge, not knowing that it will actually kill the flavor of many foods. By removing these items from your fridge, you’re not only free up space, but you also improve but taste and quality of the items that should be stored at room temperature.

Here’s a handy list of things that really don’t need to be refrigerated.

https://homehacks.co/53-items-dont-need-refrigeration/?utm_source=twitter_ads&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=6b719901-6d93-af27-a55a-306176976dc0

Here Are 7 of Our Favorite Children’s Books With a Vegan Message

chooseveg.com

Kids love animals. So it’s no surprise that the vast majority of children’s books feature animals as the main characters. Unfortunately, many of these books still refer to animals as something, rather than someone—so finding animal-themed books that teach respect for animals is crucial to nurturing our children’s natural love of animals.

I sat down with a few parents at Mercy For Animals to find out their favorite kids books that inspire compassion for animals. Here are our top picks:

1. Sprig the Rescue Pig by Leslie Crawford

Sprig the Rescue Pig tells the story of Sprig, a pig who leaps—or falls—off a farm truck. As the little pig trades a factory farm for freedom, his world changes from grim to hopeful. Inspired by a true story, the book is a fun, funny, and beautifully illustrated adventure tale with a happy ending.

*Sprig is the first in a series of farmed animal children’s books published by Stone Pier Press. Keep an eye out for the next book, Gwen the Rescue Hen!

2. Linus the Vegetarian T. Rex by Robert Neubecker

Young kids seem to LOVE dinosaurs, so this book is a great treat! It’s a very cute story with a simple message—“I don’t eat my friends!”—that resonates with kids and will help inspire them to eat their veggies.

3. A Book of Babies by Il Sung Na

Il Sung Na is an incredible artist, and his books are all beautiful and animal themed. One of our favorites is A Book of Babies, which features all kinds of animals going to sleep with their parents—showing just how alike we really are—and is the perfect read just before bedtime.

4. Care for Our World by Karen Robbins

This is a wonderful book advocating for all life on the planet. The last lines say: “Please care for all people, and all living things, with leaves, legs, or feathers, arms, fins, or wings. This is their world and it’s yours and it’s mine. If we treat it gently, it will last a long time. This world is our home, we need one another. Please care for our world, we’re sisters and brothers.”

5. Steven the Vegan by Dan Bodenstein

Steven the Vegan is about a boy whose class goes on a field trip to a farmed animal sanctuary. He tells everyone that the foods they are eating come from animals. The kids are shocked and all become vegan. This book is great because it normalizes the feeling of being the only vegan in the class and gives kids hope that they can change their friends’ minds.

6. Dave Loves Chickens by Carlos Patino

This is a favorite among very young vegans. Dave, a monster from outer space, loves all animals and doesn’t understand why humans eat them, especially chickens. In this heartwarming book, kids learn about how wonderful chickens are!

7. The True Adventures of Esther the Wonder Pig by Steve Jenkins

This brand-new kids book details the adventures of Esther the Wonder Pig. Rescued by her dads Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter when she was only a piglet, Esther has become an internet sensation, opening hearts and minds all around the world. This is her touching story.

Want more? Click here for 17 of our favorite kid-friendly vegan recipes for the little ones in your life!

https://chooseveg.com/blog/childrens-books-with-a-vegan-message/

How to Protect Your Car from Hail Damage Without parking???

Omar's blog

The sight of your beloved car being wrecked by a hail storm is certainly not pleasant.

In some cases, heartbreaking.  Especially, when it cost you a fortune.

So, what can you do to escape the devastating wrath of the hail-storm?

Apparently, a lot.

With some simple steps, you can escape the terrible fury of this white monster AKA hail-storm.

Following are some of the tips that you can follow to safeguard your car against hail storm.

Sign Up For Weather Alerts

There is an old (and gold) saying that precaution is better than prevention.

No matter who said that, but they are damn right.

The knowledge of a hail storm prior to the event will give you enough time to take appropriate precautions.

This way, you won’t have to prepare an emergency plan at the eleventh hour and can totally ensure that your car is safely tucked away before the…

View original post 552 more words

“Lions rescued from Romanian zoo released into South African sanctuary”

“Daylight Saving Time 101” National Geographic

Although Daylight Saving Time affects many lies whenever it’s time to change the clocks, 80% of the global population does not follow the practice.

This Winter’s Top 5 Wildlife Webcams | Sierra Club

As the biting cold rips through civilization, people seek refuge in blankets and huddled by crackling fires. But many critters brave the elements and they don’t seem to mind. While winter keeps us somewhat evolved primates in hiding, we still can appreciate this round up of wildlife webcams, all of which showcase some of the amazing adaptations and quirky behaviors. So grab a hot beverage and enjoy the show.

https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/winters-top-5-wildlife-webcams-0?utm_source=insider&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

EAGLES CAN CARRY HOW MUCH WEIGHT?

A LITTLE BIRD TRIVIA AROUND THE DINING TABLE

Bald Eagles weigh 6.6 to 13.9 lb and can carry about 3 to 4 lbs. Typical Wingspand (adult) is between 5.9 and 7.5 ft. females are about 25% larger than males averaging 12 lbs. against the male’s average weight of 9 lbs. Lifespan in the wild is 20 to 25 years. Scientific name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus.

Dr. David M. Bird

Imagine being out on the edge of a soggy field in early morning intently peering into some shrubbery for a closer peek at a small songbird. Suddenly you hear a very loud thump only a few feet away and you see a large branch weighing over ten pounds with its heavy end embedded into the soil. Curious as to its origin, you gaze upward to see an adult bald eagle veering away high in the sky. And your first thought might be…..”wow…..what if that log had hit me in the head?!”

Bald Eagle

A bald eagle lands in a tree above Brooks Falls, Katmai National Park

It turns out that such an event actually happened! In the early morning light on November 4, 2015, Alex Lamine was filming Mom Berry, one of the adult bald eagles nesting on the campus of Berry College, an educational institution begun in 1902 in Rome, Georgia. The college is home to several pairs of nesting bald eagles and an army of eagle voyeurs who watch the eagles’ nesting activities on a web cam. The first eagle pair showed up on the main campus in the spring of 2012, nesting in the top of a tall pine tree right near the main entrance. Two eaglets were successfully fledged in 2013, one in 2014, and two this past summer. A second nest on a more remote campus fledged three young in 2014, but was not active this year. A bald eagle carrying a 12-pound branch?! Sounds almost impossible, doesn’t it, but it not only happened but it was captured on film as well. This observation immediately raised three questions about bald eagles and eagles in general, and set off a flurry of emails among eagle experts, including yours truly. First, did the bird actually ‘carry’ an object weighing 12 pounds? Second, how much can eagles carry in the air? And third, do bald eagles actually gnaw off limbs from trees?

Amy Ries, who writes a blog for the Raptor Resource Project raptorresource.blogspot.ca/2015/11/how-much-can-bald-eagle-carry was quite impressed with the herculean feat and to learn more about it, she passed on the observation to a number of bald eagle experts. She was inclined to think that the branch was already in a falling motion from the tree and thus, does not support an assertion that bald eagles can fly for any distance carrying a 12-pound object, especially a branch heavy at one end and light at the other, in just one foot.

James Grier, a retired professor at North Dakota State University in Fargo, was the first eagle expert to respond. Growing up in the world of raptor research with Jim throughout all of my life, I am well aware of his decades of climbing to bald eagle nests in the Lake-of-the-Woods region of Ontario to band eaglets in order to learn more about their movements and fidelity to nesting sites. He said that unlike ospreys which carry fish with both feet while also orienting it with the air flow to reduce drag, bald eagles usually just grab either prey or nest materials with one or both feet and carry it dangling and swinging, and yes, sometimes dropping it. Flight conditions are also important, the best ones being high air pressure with a steady wind, and equally critical, lots of room for a good take-off and an ability to stay airborne. Even under such conditions, Jim said that it can still be a lot of work and effort for the eagles to carry large items. He added that sometimes if eagles can get a large item into the air but not all the way back to the nest, they will stop somewhere along the way such as on higher ground, a low tree branch, or an open tree, to get rid of dead weight such as the entrails, further disassemble it, and/or even eat some of it.

Bald Eagle Hunting“I remember being at blinds and hearing the heavy, labored wing-beats from eagles carrying large items into the nest. I could sometimes hear the flapping from a long distance out where it almost sounded like someone beating on the side of a boat it was so loud!” Jim explained, “One of the more interesting items I remember, it wasn’t a big item but a duck that was still alive when the eagle brought it into the nest. The eagle had a hold of the duck by the back and was carrying it in one foot. The duck was looking around and its feet were paddling the air like mad when the eagle landed on the nest with it!”

On the weight-carrying question, Chuck Sindelar, also a long-time bald eagle expert in Wisconsin, was the next to weigh in (sorry… couldn’t help myself!). He believes that an eagle can seldom fly with any more than half of its body weight.

Jon Gerrard concurs with this feeling. He studied bald eagles in Saskatchewan with Gary Bortolotti (R.I.P.) for many years and he quotes a story from their wonderful co-authored book entitled “The Bald Eagle: Haunts and Habits of a Wilderness Monarch”. A female of a pair of bald eagles nesting on the Gulf Coast of Louisiana in the 1890s caught and carried snow geese weighing from 4.5 to 6 pounds for up to a mile and a half to their nest. But here is the key point — the eagle was actually flying downhill! This means that the goose was caught high in the air and the eagle basically glided downward to its nest with its prey. And this was not a one-time occurrence — more than 35 snow goose heads were found in that particular nest at one time. Since the female weighed between 8 to 11 pounds, this suggests a weight-carrying capacity of half its body weight, but for “downhill” flights only.

With all due respect to all of the aforementioned bald eagle experts, I honestly know of no one who has accumulated as many hours of watching these magnificent birds as David Hancock, the founder of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation based in Surrey, British Columbia. He basically lives and breathes ‘bald eagles’! From his late teenage days to today, David has been an avid student of these birds and he is famous for helping to pioneer the web cameras on many of their nests much to the delight of millions of eagle enthusiasts all over the world. Surely he would have some comment on this observation.

And so he did. A number of years ago, he and some assistants were three miles offshore from the Queen Charlotte Islands. They watched a male bald eagle swoop down, catch a large red snapper, and then carry it in its talons at a speed of 25 to 30 miles per hour toward an island. After about three-quarters of a mile, the eagle dropped the fish but then immediately flew down and grabbed it again. Two hundred yards later and about a half-mile from shore, it repeated this scenario, once again relinquishing the fish to the water’s surface. Not to give up on its prize though, this stubborn bird next landed on the fish and used its wings to row it to shore! All bald eagle experts will tell you that these large birds are quite good at swimming with their wings.

Bald Eagle Catching A Fish

There’s more to this story though. Wanting to know more about the fish’s weight, David flushed the eagle off the snapper and weighed it in at one and a half pounds. He also added that the fish “tasted marvelous”!

The whole incident drove David to undertake some weight-carrying tests with some captive bald eagles. He found that for 100 yards, males could carry objects weighing two pounds, and females about three pounds. Upon hearing about this latest “branch” incident, he too felt that the bird was likely carrying it “downhill” or the branch was in a falling motion from the tree, as Amy postulated.

On a related note, I contacted Sergej Postpalsky, a raptor expert in Michigan, and I asked him what was the largest prey he had seen carried by ospreys in his 40 years of studying this species in the Great Lakes. About two pounds, he replied, and on more than once occasion. Not bad for a bird that weighs less than half of a female bald eagle!

The other aspect of the original observation focused on the ‘gnawing” behavior whereupon the eagle apparently was seen chewing on the limb to remove it from the tree. Jim Grier confessed to knowing that bald eagles do engage in that activity, but knew little else about it.

Adult Bald Eagle with two chicks in a nest in a tree on the side of a cliff.

Chuck Sindelar has seen both bald and golden eagles break sticks off standing trees by hitting them with their feet with enough force to snap them off, but did not mention any observations of them actually gnawing on them to facilitate breaking them from the tree. Jon Gerrard has often seen bald eagles at Besnard Lake, Manitoba breaking off limbs in this manner, but none as big as the one collected by the Berry College eagle. He added that they are usually dead limbs. Jon also wondered whether the eagle in question actually did some gnawing at the thick end of the branch before breaking it off because this would not fit with the fact that the eagle was clutching the thin or outer end of the limb before dropping it. He suggested that perhaps the bird gnawed the limb part way through at the thick end, and then flew to grab the thin end and then using its momentum, broke it off at the thick end. Years ago, I watched a video of ospreys in Scotland wherein the birds would dive at a tree with some speed and use their feet to snap off dead branches from trees for nesting material, but there was never any prior gnawing involved.

All in all, it was a very interesting anecdote which sparked some very healthy debate among several eagle experts. As Jim Grier points out, “With today’s technologies including the eagle nest cams, more eagles around, and a lot more people watching and taking/recording pics and videos, I think we’re going to get more anecdotes like this, insights into the eagles’ lives that we’ve never seen before, and learn a lot more than we did in the past.”

I could not agree more.
The latest from Dr. Bird

https://www.askprofessorbird.com/single-post/2017/04/20/Watching-Bird-Behavior

How To Protect Yourself From Climate Denial Misinformation

globaljusticeecology.org
Posted on April 5, 2018
By Peter Ellerton

Originally appeared in The Conversation

Much of the public discussion about climate science consists of a stream of assertions. The climate is changing or it isn’t; carbon dioxide causes global warming or it doesn’t; humans are partly responsible or they are not; scientists have a rigorous process of peer review or they don’t, and so on.

Despite scientists’ best efforts at communicating with the public, not everyone knows enough about the underlying science to make a call one way or the other. Not only is climate science very complex, but it has also been targeted by deliberate obfuscation campaigns.

If we lack the expertise to evaluate the detail behind a claim, we typically substitute judgment about something complex (like climate science) with judgment about something simple (the character of people who speak about climate science).

But there are ways to analyse the strength of an argument without needing specialist knowledge. My colleagues, Dave Kinkead from the University of Queensland Critical Thinking Project and John Cook from George Mason University in the US, and I published a paper yesterday in Environmental Research Letters on a critical thinking approach to climate change denial.

We applied this simple method to 42 common climate-contrarian arguments, and found that all of them contained errors in reasoning that are independent of the science itself.

In the video abstract for the paper, we outline an example of our approach, which can be described in six simple steps.

The authors discuss the myth that climate change is natural.

Identify the claim: First, identify as simply as possible what the actual claim is. In this case, the argument is:

The climate is currently changing as a result of natural processes.

Construct the supporting argument: An argument requires premises (those things we take to be true for the purposes of the argument) and a conclusion (effectively the claim being made). The premises together give us reason to accept the conclusion. The argument structure is something like this:

Premise one: The climate has changed in the past through natural processes
Premise two: The climate is currently changing
Conclusion: The climate is currently changing through natural processes.

Determine the intended strength of the claim: Determining the exact kind of argument requires a quick detour into the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning. Bear with me!

In our paper we examined arguments against climate change that are framed as definitiveclaims. A claim is definitive when it says something is definitely the case, rather than being probable or possible.

Definitive claims must be supported by deductive reasoning. Essentially, this means that if the premises are true, the conclusion is inevitably true.

This might sound like an obvious point, but many of our arguments are not like this. In inductive reasoning, the premises might support a conclusion but the conclusion need not be inevitable.

An example of inductive reasoning is:

Premise one: Every time I’ve had a chocolate-covered oyster I’ve been sick
Premise two: I’ve just had a chocolate-covered oyster
Conclusion: I’m going to be sick.

This is not a bad argument – I’ll probably get sick – but it’s not inevitable. It’s possible that every time I’ve had a chocolate-covered oyster I’ve coincidentally got sick from something else. Perhaps previous oysters have been kept in the cupboard, but the most recent one was kept in the fridge.

Because climate-contrarian arguments are often definitive, the reasoning used to support them must be deductive. That is, the premises must inevitably lead to the conclusion.

Check the logical structure: We can see that in the argument from step two – that the climate change is changing because of natural processes – the truth of the conclusion is not guaranteed by the truth of the premises.

In the spirit of honesty and charity, we take this invalid argument and attempt to make it valid through the addition of another (previously hidden) premise.

Premise one: The climate has changed in the past through natural processes
Premise two: The climate is currently changing
Premise three: If something was the cause of an event in the past, it must be the cause of the event now
Conclusion: The climate is currently changing through natural processes.

Adding the third premise makes the argument valid, but validity is not the same thing as truth. Validity is a necessary condition for accepting the conclusion, but it is not sufficient. There are a couple of hurdles that still need to be cleared.

Check for ambiguity: The argument mentions climate change in its premises and conclusion. But the climate can change in many ways, and the phrase itself can have a variety of meanings. The problem with this argument is that the phrase is used to describe two different kinds of change.

Current climate change is much more rapid than previous climate change – they are not the same phenomenon. The syntax conveys the impression that the argument is valid, but it is not. To clear up the ambiguity, the argument can be presented more accurately by changing the second premise:

Premise one: The climate has changed in the past through natural processes
Premise two: The climate is currently changing at a more rapid rate than can be explained by natural processes
Conclusion: The climate is currently changing through natural processes.

This correction for ambiguity has resulted in a conclusion that clearly does not follow from the premises. The argument has become invalid once again.

We can restore validity by considering what conclusion would follow from the premises. This leads us to the conclusion:

Conclusion: Human (non-natural) activity is necessary to explain current climate change.

Importantly, this conclusion has not been reached arbitrarily. It has become necessary as a result of restoring validity.

Note also that in the process of correcting for ambiguity and the consequent restoring of validity, the attempted refutation of human-induced climate science has demonstrably failed.

Check premises for truth or plausibility: Even if there were no ambiguity about the term “climate change”, the argument would still fail when the premises were tested. In step four, the third premise, “If something was the cause of an event in the past, it must be the cause of the event now”, is clearly false.

Applying the same logic to another context, we would arrive at conclusions like: people have died of natural causes in the past; therefore any particular death must be from natural causes.

Restoring validity by identifying the “hidden” premises often produces such glaringly false claims. Recognising this as a false premise does not always require knowledge of climate science.
Flow chart for argument analysis and evaluation.

When determining the truth of a premise does require deep knowledge in a particular area of science, we may defer to experts. But there are many arguments that do not, and in these circumstances this method has optimal value.
Inoculating against poor arguments

Previous work by Cook and others has focused on the ability to inoculate people against climate science misinformation. By pre-emptively exposing people to misinformation with explanation they become “vaccinated” against it, showing “resistance” to developing beliefs based on misinformation.

This reason-based approach extends inoculation theory to argument analysis, providing a practical and transferable method of evaluating claims that does not require expertise in climate science.

Fake news may be hard to spot, but fake arguments don’t have to be.

Category: Climate Justice, Featured, Social Media News Tags: climate change, Climate Denial, critical thinking, The Conversation

https://globaljusticeecology.org/how-to-protect-yourself-from-climate-denial-misinformation/#comments

The world’s oldest known wild bird is about to become a Mum at 67, baffling scientists (Midway atoll, USA)

The ocean update

January 8th, 2018. One Laysan albatross is brazenly defying the norms for her species. Wisdom, the world’s oldest known wild bird, has returned to home port and laid an egg – at the magnificent age of 67 years old.

View original post 586 more words

How To Fix Youtube Black Screen – YouTube

Petition: Don’t Ban To Kill A Mockingbird


https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/706/570/340/

Petition · Google: Take down instructional videos for illegal automatic gun modifications! · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/google-take-down-instructional-videos-for-illegal-automatic-gun-modifications/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=155203&sfmc_tk=QO1jHMcMNgJVzKVuN3Ni52d%2beygt7gvFfrHCSZbuqw%2f%2bzkK%2bnVFvBdUa%2fTNTxEsn&j=155203&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=29237968&mid=7233053&jb=282

Hate daylight saving time? Here’s what it would take to ditch it. | Grist


Hate daylight saving time? Here’s what it would take to ditch it.
By Katie Herzog on Nov 4, 2016

People across the country will go through the mild torture of circadian disruption as daylight saving time (DST) comes to an end on Sunday morning. In preparation, writers from all corners of the internet have started debating the merits of falling back and springing forward. They cite various studies proving that adjusting our clocks either increases or decreases energy use, saves lives or costs them, and makes crime rates go up or down.

But no matter the evidence, a whole lot of people just hate DST, complaining that springing ahead leads to more car crashes, sleepier students, and added stress. The haters have launched many, many online petitions to scrap it entirely. One petition asks Congress to “please stop the messing with our schedules.” A 2014 poll found that half of Americans simply don’t see the point.

So what would it take for this anti-DST contingent to kill daylight saving once and for all? Can something as seemingly intractable as time be changed by government decree?

You bet! Daylight saving time was created by government decree after all. The United States actually adopted DST during World War I to save fuel, following Germany’s lead. (That’s right. It had nothing to do with helping farmers get more hours of daylight back in the olden days, contrary to the beliefs of most elementary school students and a number of Grist staffers). Farmers, in particular, opposed the change, and Congress repealed DST after the war ended.

The latest iteration springs from the 1966 Uniform Time Act, which has been tweaked several times since. In 1974, DST was observed year-round in response to the OPEC oil embargo, and it’s been extended twice since then, in 1986 and again in 2005.

States can opt out through legislation or executive action. Legislators in Alaska, California, and several other states have tried (and failed) to end their state’s participation. Two holdouts — Hawaii and Arizona (minus the Navajo Nation) — leave their clocks alone all year long. Scrapping DST nationwide, however, would likely prove more difficult, because it requires an act of Congress.

But the main reason DST is here to stay, says Michael Downing, author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time, is that it’s good for business. Retailers, home-improvement shops, and other industries benefit from an extra hour of summer daylight, giving people more time to shop, play, and work in the yard. The golf industry, for example, estimates that DST brings in an additional $200 million each year.

Not only do these industries lobby to continue this practice, but they also fight to make it longer. The main push for extending DST into November, Downing says, came from the makers of Halloween candy. Lobbyists even put candy pumpkins on every senator’s chair during DST hearings in 1985.

The only way to end daylight saving time, it seems, is to get big business out of Congress. So until that happens, enjoy the extra hour of sleep. You’ll pay it back in March.

A Beacon in the Smog®

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Philadelphia: From Defective London Made Liberty Bell to Defective S. Korean Rail Cars (Hyundai Rotem, Rot’em or Rotten?)

 

“Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof Lev. XXV. v X.” “The Museum found a considerably higher level of tin in the Liberty Bell than in other W…

Source: Philadelphia: From Defective London Made Liberty Bell to Defective S. Korean Rail Cars (Hyundai Rotem, Rot’em or Rotten?)

‘Whale vomit’ could fetch $70,000 | WPMT FOX43

image

‘Whale vomit’ could fetch $70,000
Posted 6:22 PM, April 14, 2016, by FOX43 Newsroom

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A couple in the UK stumbled across a large rock that many are calling “whale vomit.” The “rock” could be ambergris, which is a rare substance used to make perfumes last longer on the skin.

A couple in the UK stumbled across a large rock that many are calling “whale vomit.” The “rock” could be ambergris, which is a rare substance used to make perfumes last longer on the skin.

If you happen to come across a smelly rock while taking a long walk on the beach, it could be your lucky day.

A couple in the UK stumbled across a large rock that many are calling “whale vomit.” The “rock” could be ambergris, which is a rare substance used to make perfumes last longer on the skin.

“Ambergris is definitely not vomit,” Christopher Kemp, author of “Floating Gold: A Natural (and Unnatural) History of Ambergris,” told CNN. “It’s more like poop, and it comes from the same place as poop, but it’s only made by a small percentage of sperm whales, as a result of indigestion.”

Gary and Angela Williams followed a pungent smell while walking on Middleton Sands beach near Morecambe Bay that led them to what they believe to be a large lump of ambergris.

“Ambergris feels a little waxy, and smells very complex: a mixture of dung and the ocean, and old wood, and tobacco, and moist earth, and ozone,” Kemp said.

The substance, often called “floating gold,” is produced only by a tiny percentage of sperm whales. It can float in the ocean for decades until it eventually washes up on shore, where people like the Williamses find it.

Before going out to scour the nearest beach to find ambergris, be warned that it is extremely rare and found infrequently. And it’s very hard to know if you’ve actually found ambergris, Kemp said.

“That’s why so many people think they’ve found it, and then discover they haven’t,” he said.

Kemp suspects that the couple’s find may not be genuine ambergris. While ambergris is waxy, the substance they found is “a little too waxy” and looks more like animal fat than ambergris, he said.

If it is genuine ambergris, the British couple’s lump could be worth an estimated $70,000. They are reportedly in negotiation with potential buyers in New Zealand and France.

In 2012, an 8-year-old British schoolboy found a 1.3-pound mass of it in the sand that was worth about $63,000. Good, high-quality ambergris is worth thousands of dollars per pound, Kemp told CNN.

Although the harvesting of ambergris isn’t harmful to the whales, the trade of it is banned in the United States in an effort to not exploit the endangered species.

Honolulu Elephant Death Not Forgotten | Blog | peta2.com

Honolulu Elephant Death Not Forgotten | Blog | peta2.com.

Research Says Cats Can See Things That Are Invisible To Us

Igor Purlantov

New scientific data shows that cats, long a symbol of mysticism, are able to see things that are invisible to us. Cats apparently see psychedelic stripes on flowers and patterns on the wings of birds that are completely invisible to the human eye. According to this study, cats, dogs, and some other animals are able to see types of light, like UV light, that we don’t see at all.  “There are plenty of things that reflect UV radiation, which some sensitive animals are able to see, while we are not,” said Ronald Douglas, professor of biology of the City University of London and co-author of the study. “For example, these may be certain patterns on flowers that show where the nectar is, or traces of urine of an animal. Also, reindeer can and see polar bears as the snow reflects UV radiation, while white fur does not.”

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The Right To Be Wild

The Wolf Preservation Blog

mexican wolf

Image of Nina: the last female Mexican Gray Wolf found in the wild. Courtesy of Emily Renn: Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project  

“About The Film and our Mission

The Right to be Wild, is a tale of Hope, Struggle, Survival and Determination.  It is the story of the Mexican Gray Wolf; a wolf that is one the Most Endangered Mammals in North Americaand the most endangered subspecies of Gray Wolf in the World. It is also a story about people who work hard and tirelessly trying to save them.

 

Mexican gray wolveswere completely eradicated from the United States by the mid 20th century, and extremely close to extinction in the wild.

In 1976, they were listed under the endangered species act and protecting the species  became the law. Then, after an agreement was made between the U.S. and Mexico, a trapper hired by the…

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5 Myths about tigers

The Wall of the Dead: A Memorial to Fallen Naturalists

strange behaviors

We go to great lengths commemorating soldiers who have died fighting wars for their countries.  Why not do the same for the naturalists who still sometimes give up everything in the effort to understand life?  Neither would diminish the sacrifice of the other.  In fact, many early naturalists were also soldiers, or, like Charles Darwin aboard HMS Beagle, were embedded with military expeditions.

With that in mind, I started to construct a very preliminary Naturalists’ Wall of the Dead, to at least assemble the names in one place, as I was researching my book The Species Seekers.  If I have missed someone, or made other mistakes, please suggest changes in the comments.  I am trying to focus on naturalists who died in the course of their work.  Though he may have acquired Chagas disease in his travels, for instance, Darwin died at home, age 73, of unknown causes, and…

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WOLF MEDICINE

Cheryl O'Connor - Cheoco Enterprises

Image

Wolves in general over time have been given a rather bad name and many fear them, simply because they do not understand them and I doubt our perception of them in stories like Little Red Riding Hood and The Three Little Pigs etc. did much to endear them to us as children.

Highly intelligent creatures and for me extremely beautiful animals they exist within a pack that has a very definite hierarchy.  Each Wolf knowing its place within that system.  Whilst this system exists there is also a certain amount of democracy to the way they function.  Just depends on the circumstances of the moment as to whether the rules are followed or freedom of choice is allowed and all know what is and isn’t appropriate behaviour and the consequences should they choose to break the rules.

They are very strong animals, extremely protective of their young, they work together – bringing…

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What People Abroad Really Think of Americans

WebInvestigator.KK.org - by F. Kaskais

ByBess Rattray

Living in a small Canadian town taught me the near-obsession of outsiders’ scorn. Finally, I’m ready to push back.

We litter. We are loud. We are fat. We eat standing up. We drive aggressively. We don’t make eye contact. We don’t open doors for people. We rush. We are rude to wait staff in restaurants. We are prone to domestic violence. We are spoiling for a fight. We put our nose into others’ business. We are sanctimonious. We think we won the War of 1812. We manufacture bad cars, brew bad beer and eat flavorless potato chips. We won’t stop waving the flag. We are bad sports, especially during the Olympics. We think we are the center of the universe, and that money entitles us to everything. But the worst of our sins? We brag—nonstop.

These are just a few of the charms of Americans, according…

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Hey! Did somebody frack my favorite beer?

Hey! Did somebody frack my favorite beer?.

Use science to make a bubbly brew this Halloween!

WPMT FOX43

[ooyala code=”9sbDVlcTqcYu_cLsG_mp5ag-GJVixEPK” player_id=”b4e1f6aa8f3147189a3fe75aa0a86854″]

Make a bubbling, frothy brew this Halloween that is not only fun, but teaches kids some science too! All you need to get started is a glass jar or cup, vinegar, food coloring, dish soap, glitter (optional), baking soda, and a cookie sheet or baking pan to act as a drip tray. First, fill up the glass cup about halfway with vinegar and place on the tray. Add food coloring of your choice and a dash or two of the dish soap to the vinegar. Give it a quick stir to mix. Add some glitter to the mixture if desired. Take a heaping tablespoon of the baking soda, and dump it into the glass jar. Immediately a chemical reaction begins to take place between the baking soda and the vinegar. Frothy bubbles form as carbon dioxide is created during the reaction. The dish soap helps to amplify…

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Download These 5 Smartphone Apps for a Safer Halloween

TIME

Talk about a candy-crush saga: This Friday, the nation’s kids will take to the streets to collect a dentist’s ransom in sugary treats. It’s all good — if a little fattening — fun, but not without a few risks.

For example, some of those streets may be dark. Certain candies could be on the FDA’s recall list. And how well do you really know your neighbors, especially the ones a few blocks over? There might be houses on the route that are best avoided.

It’s okay to worry — that’s what parents do, after all — but if you’re armed with a smartphone, you can make Halloween a bit less of a fright-night. For starters, use the built-in flashlight app to help everyone navigate poorly lit sidewalks. Then fire up these five safety-minded apps. They’re all free and guaranteed to give you some added peace of mind.

1) Life360

Price:…

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This Technology Lets You Become a Dolphin TakePart

18 irritating things you want to avoid doing at airports

myfox8.com

Whether they’re cutting their fingernails mid-flight or aggressively establishing armrest hegemony, we’ve already addressed the most irritating things travelers do on airplanes.

But what about the airport itself?

Shouldn’t it be easy to escape your fellow fliers’ antisocial behavior in a space as large as an arrival hall or a departure terminal?

Sadly, it isn’t.

As this list of annoying airport behaviors supplied by CNN Travel staff, writers and readers shows, courtesy and sense (neither are as common as they ought to be) are often the first two things to fly out of the gates.

Got an irksome airport behavior to vent about? Share it in the comments below.

1. Traveling without moving

Moving walkways — “travelators,” if you want to get fancy — are delightful.

They make us feel like super people (If only we could always walk this fast!) and help us get to our gates without feeling…

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