Three bottlenose dolphins rescued from Indonesian tourist attraction are released into ocean

www.foxnews.com

Cortney Moore

Three bottlenose dolphins that were rescued from a resort hotel in Indonesia in 2019 are now swimming free — after they were rehabilitated by a specialized animal sanctuary.

The dolphin trio — Johnny, Rocky and Rambo — were rescued by the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center. 

It’s a dolphin care facility that the Indonesian government set up in Banyuwedang Bay, West Bali, according to the Associated Press.

SICK DOLPHIN WITH ‘LOW’ CHANCE OF SURVIVAL NURSED BACK TO HEALTH IN THAILAND

Indonesia’s Bali Forestry Department and Ministry of Forestry are the two nature conservation agencies that started the rehab center, according to Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project, a Santa Monica-based nonprofit that partnered with the initiative.

Umah lumba is the Balinese word for dolphin, according to the Dolphin Project.

In this photo released by Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022, rescued bottlenose dolphin Rocky — equipped with a GPS tag — swam through the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in Banyuwedang Bay, West Bali, Indonesia.

In this photo released by Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022, rescued bottlenose dolphin Rocky — equipped with a GPS tag — swam through the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in Banyuwedang Bay, West Bali, Indonesia. (DolphinProject.com via AP)

The Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center takes in dolphins that have been retired from performances.

Johnny, Rocky and Rambo were set free in Banyuwedang Bay on Saturday, Sept. 3, after three years of care by the rehab center — which receives labor from the Jakarta Animal Aid Network as well as financial support and supervision from the Dolphin Project. 

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“It was an incredibly emotional experience to see them go,” said Lincoln O’Barry, an animal rights activist and campaigns coordinator at the Dolphin Project, in an interview with the Associated Press.

Animal rights activists and filmmakers Lincoln O'Barry (left) and Ric O'Barry (right) work to protect dolphins around the globe through Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project, a nonprofit focused on dolphin welfare.

Animal rights activists and filmmakers Lincoln O’Barry (left) and Ric O’Barry (right) work to protect dolphins around the globe through Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project, a nonprofit focused on dolphin welfare. (Barry King/WireImage)

O’Barry, 50, is the son of Ric O’Barry, 82, who started the Dolphin Project in 1970 after seeing the toll that show business took on dolphins.

In the 1960s, Ric O’Barry trained dolphins on the set of “Flipper,” a TV show that lasted for three seasons.

RARE WHITE DOLPHIN SEEN IN FLORIDA CANAL

Ric O’Barry then shifted his career from dolphin trainer to “dolphin defender” after the show dolphin named Kathy, “who played Flipper most of the time, died in his arms,” according to the Dolphin Project.

The father-and-son O’Barry pair were both in attendance during Johnny, Rocky and Rambo’s release.

The three dolphins were captured in Indonesia and spent years performing in traveling circuses until they ended up in a small, chlorinated swimming pool at a resort hotel in North Bali, according to the Dolphin Project.

“Day after day, [they were] forced to perform for paying tourists during loud theatrical shows,” the Dolphin Project wrote in a press announcement for the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in 2020.

During their captivity, the three dolphins sustained injuries, the Dolphin Project reported.

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Johnny, the eldest of the group, experienced skin damage, a pectoral fin injury, a cornea injury, malnourishment and worn-down teeth that went below his gum line.

This summer, Johnny received dental crowns that allow him to catch his own fish.

Rocky and Rambo reportedly gained weight and strength during their rehabilitation, according to the Dolphin Project.

When the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center opened their underwater gates to free the three dolphins, Johnny, Rocky and Rambo did not immediately leave, the Associated Press reported.

It reportedly took about an hour for the dolphins to venture out into Banyuwedang Bay.

Johnny was the first to leave, according to the Associated Press.

On Sat., Sept. 3, 2022, Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar (center) opened the gates to release three rescued dolphins — Rocky, Rambo and Johnny — from a dolphin sanctuary. The dolphins were freed in Banyuwedang Bay, located in West Bali, Indonesia.

On Sat., Sept. 3, 2022, Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar (center) opened the gates to release three rescued dolphins — Rocky, Rambo and Johnny — from a dolphin sanctuary. The dolphins were freed in Banyuwedang Bay, located in West Bali, Indonesia. (DolphinProject.com via AP)

The three dolphins reportedly circled the sanctuary that freed them before they departed the area.

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“They turned back around and came back to us one more time, almost to say thank you and goodbye,” said Lincoln O’Barry, in a statement. “And then they headed straight out to open ocean and disappeared.” 

The Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center will monitor Johnny, Rocky and Rambo through GPS tracking, the news agency reported.

“Where they head next, we don’t know,” O’Barry told the AP. “But we wish them a good long life.”

In this photo released by Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022, rescued bottlenose dolphin Johnny swam to the surface of Banyuwedang Bay after he was released from the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in West Bali, Indonesia.

In this photo released by Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022, rescued bottlenose dolphin Johnny swam to the surface of Banyuwedang Bay after he was released from the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in West Bali, Indonesia. (DolphinProject.com via AP)

The World Wildlife Fund estimates that the global bottlenose dolphin population is around 600,000.

“Dolphins live off fish, and they work cooperatively to herd their prey to the surface for easier feeding,” the WWF wrote in a common bottlenose dolphin profile. 

“Because they live so close to the shore, they are threatened by bycatch, coastal development and environmental degradation.”

The Associated Press contributed reporting to this article. 

Cortney Moore is an associate lifestyle writer/producer for Fox News Digital. Story tips can be sent on Twitter at @CortneyMoore716.

https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/three-bottlenose-dolphins-rescued-indonesian-tourist-attraction-released-ocean?intcmp=tw_fnc

Facts About Dolphin Captivity | Dolphin Project

Facts About Captivity Dolphins Performing

Dolphins Belong In the Wild, Not a Tank

A pod of wild dolphins can travel up to 100 kilometers a day in the open ocean. Family members teach each other skills to survive in the wild and frequently remain together for life. Dolphins are known to have signature whistles much like how humans have names, and social communication and interaction among the pod is a key component of their daily lives. These mammals have perfectly evolved to thrive in the ocean, where they deserve to live freely. Captivity simply cannot provide an adequate environment for these wild species.

A Delphinus dolphin at the Xel-Ha eco-park has injuries on it's rostrum and body. Credit: Empty the Tanks/Dolphin Project

Life In Captivity

Dolphins living in captive conditions face circumstances vastly different than those of the ocean. The surroundings are bare and sterile, with little mental stimulation or diversion. Many captive dolphins are regularly treated with ulcer medication or antidepressant medication to alleviate the frustration of captivity.

Physical Detriments of Captivity

This dolphin was seen at the Dolphinaris inside the Grand Bahia Principe Resort with a wound on his or her back. Credit: Empty the Tanks/Dolphin Project

Because tanks lack the depth or size of the open ocean, captive dolphins experience a range conditions not commonly seen in their wild counterparts.

A Lifetime of Training

Wild-captured dolphins must endure significant training to adapt to captivity. They must learn to accept a new diet of dead fish, as well as to undergo a variety of invasive operations, such as tube-feeding and medical examinations.

Even captive-born dolphins must become accustomed to the human interactions required of them. This is accomplished, without exception, through food deprivation training. Labeled as “positive reinforcement” or “operant conditioning”, dolphins are kept hungry enough so that they will comply with instructions from trainers, whether to learn new behaviors or to execute them during a performance or tourist encounter.

What Else To Know About Captive Entertainment

Swim-with-dolphins programs

Swimming with Captive Dolphins

Dolphin Therapy Clinic in Indonesia Captivity

Dolphin-Assisted Therapy

See page for author; CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Dolphin Petting Pools

A dolphin with rake marks and a discolored rostrum gets medical treatment at Dolphin Discovery's Isla-Mujeres location. Picture Credit: Empty the Tanks/Dolphin Project

Captivity FAQ

HOW YOU CAN HELP PROTECT DOLPHINS

Understanding the intelligence and complexity of these species, as well as how they behave in the wild helps us understand that their natural ranges in the open ocean are where they thrive. It is vital that we continue to spread awareness about dolphins to help end exploitation in captivity, and to help wild dolphin populations stay healthy!

PLEDGE

Join the pod and take the pledge to NOT buy a ticket to dolphins captive facilities!

TAKE ACTION

Sign petitions, contact authorities and take action to help protect dolphins.

SPREAD AWARENESS

Education is the first step to moving others to take action. Help spread the word about protecting dolphins!

SUPPORT

Explore giving options to help support our mission to protect dolphins from exploitation and slaughter.

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and all donations are tax-deductible as authorized by law.

© 2022 Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project. All Rights Reserved.

171 Pier Ave. #234
Santa Monica, CA 90405

https://www.dolphinproject.com/campaigns/captivity-industry/facts-about-captivity/

Four Dolphins That Became Stranded In Provincetown, Massachusetts, Were Released Back Into The Wild – World Animal News

August 18, 2022

ByKaren Lapizco

Photos from IFAW

Four dolphins were released back into the wild last week in Provincetown, MA, following 24-hours of tracking along the coast and eventual stranding in Wellfleet Harbor. They were rescued in a highly coordinated response effort and released back to deeper waters, thanks to expert staff and volunteers with IFAW (the International Fund for Animal Welfare).

IFAW received the first report of several animals close to shore off Provincetown last Wednesday afternoon. One dolphin stranded but was unfortunately pushed off by bystanders. Further human interference on land and by boat led to increased stress for the animals before responders could arrive. The team spotted the dolphins swimming farther offshore in Truro later the same day, but the tide was incoming and IFAW staff and volunteers monitored them from a distance until sunset.

“By morning light on Thursday, volunteer responders identified four common dolphins swimming near the Wellfleet Pier, and we knew something had to be done,” said Brian Sharp, IFAW’s Director of Marine Mammal Rescue & Research. “We were concerned by the animals’ behavior, the dropping tide, and given our previous experience with summer boat traffic and heat. In consultation with NOAA, we made the decision to herd the dolphins closer to shore for the best chance of a successful rescue.”

The dolphins were carefully coaxed toward shallow water and away from a dangerous stranding area known as Chipman’s Cove so that they could be stretchered. An expert-only endeavor, herding of the dolphins took place quickly and with minimal stress to the animals. This resulted in a successful rescue, calling on the skilled maneuvers of IFAW’s boat, a Wellfleet Harbormaster vessel, and additional staff in kayaks.

All four dolphins were transported to a deeper water release site off Provincetown, traveling in IFAW’s mobile dolphin rescue clinic. This one-of-a-kind vehicle was custom designed to meet the needs of what is considered a global stranding hotspot on Cape Cod. The vehicle enables IFAW veterinarians and experts to perform health assessments and stabilize the dolphins while quickly reaching the best site for release.

Thankfully, the dolphins were successfully released as a pod and swam off closely together.

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https://worldanimalnews.com/four-dolphins-that-became-stranded-were-released-back-to-the-wild-off-provincetown-massachusetts/

“DOG AND DOLPHIN SWIM TOGETHER DAILY – JO JO & ZYZZ”

This would be me 😂🐬🌊

Riding The Waves 🌊🐬

Sign Petition: Putin Is Using Dolphins to Defend a Russian Naval Base in His Illegal Invasion of Ukraine!

www.thepetitionsite.com

As anti-war activists in the 1960s warned us, war is bad for all living things. And these days, that apparently includes trained dolphins, who are being used by the Russian Navy to counter Ukrainian divers attempting to enter the port and sabotage Russian warships. We cannot allow Putin’s criminal invasion of Ukraine to include the exploitation of innocent animals!

Sign now to demand the Russian Navy immediately halt the use of marine mammals in their acts of war!

Dolphins are remarkably intelligent and highly social creatures. The charismatic marine mammals lead vibrant lives in which they develop complex relationships with one another. Each dolphin has its own name, one which other dolphins refer to it by. Dolphins are also self-aware, and famously known as one of the smartest animals on the planet. They deserve a life of autonomy and respect – not to be dragged into Putin’s brutal war games as puppets of violence and destruction. 

New satellite photos show that the Russian military has placed trained dolphins at the entrance to a port in the Black Sea, and naval analysts believe that this is part of a careful strategy to protect the base. Given that dolphins have some of the most sophisticated sonar abilities in the world, they are quick to detect mines, sometimes better than even the most sophisticated technology. The U.S. has trained dolphins and other sea creatures to do this same thing in the past.

This is just another egregious example of Putin’s illegal invasion being even more inhumane than we had previously imagined. No marine mammals – or any animals at all -– should be part of acts of war or wartime strategy. We must stop the exploitation of these dolphins now! Sign the petition to tell the Russian navy to end their use of innocent animals in war!

Sign Petition

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/571/384/824/?z00m=33012543&redirectID=3210880507

Sanctuary, or Marine Park? | Dolphin Project

A true sanctuary will limit visitor access so that the dolphins are allowed to live in peace.

www.dolphinproject.com

Based on inquiries we have received, it appears there is some amount of confusion about facilities that list themselves as “sanctuaries” yet keep dolphins for display and interactive programs. We’ve compiled some tips here to help potential customers research before they support a captive dolphin facility.

Photo ops

Selfie or photo opportunities, or any form of guaranteed petting/kisses/etc. In order for a visitor to be guaranteed that they get to touch a dolphin, that dolphin has been trained and is actively receiving reinforcement to perform.

Facility descriptions can be misleading

Names and labels can be misleading. Just because a facility calls itself a “Wildlife Sanctuary” does not make it so– do your research before visiting any park with wildlife. Also beware that some facilities use their charitable status or scientific labels to mislead.

Captive dolphin in Florida sea pen

Captive dolphin in Florida sea pen

Many marine parks claim their dolphins can “leave any time”. This may be technically true, but most dolphins will not jump a barrier or swim out of a pen because they cannot tell what is on the other side. Captive dolphin facilities would never take the risk of losing their investments. They know very well that their dolphins would not venture into the open sea, even if given the chance: Many captive dolphins have spent so much time in captivity, they have become dependent on people for food and other basic needs. Many of them were born into this unnatural existence, and they cannot simply “go home,” as they have no family pod to connect with.

A natural sea pen may also be a captive environment. It does not equate with being free in the wild.

Water quality in captive sea pen

Captive sea pen in the Caribbean


Wild dolphins can be exploited for profit too! If booking a swim with wild dolphins tour or whale watching tour, pursuit should never be allowed. A boat should never chase a pod of dolphins to get closer to them, or guarantee that you will see dolphins or be able to swim with them. Responsible tours do not permit touching wild dolphins or whales! A responsible tour operator will always abide by and endorse local dolphin/whale watching laws.

Activities and programs

Paid interactions or scheduled activities such as shows, exhibits, or demonstrations should be a warning– it means that the dolphins are expected to be in place and remain for a certain period of time, or perform, which are indications of active training.

Breeding or Calf Births

Breeding or the birth of calves: Staff may make it seem that dolphins are bred in captivity to help wild populations. In reality, these dolphins will not be contributing to wild populations as they will never be released. Dolphins are bred in captivity for the sole purpose of having more captive dolphins to profit from. Facilities that promote or celebrate calf births should be treated with caution.

Where did the animals come from?

If a facility buys, trades, or breeds dolphins, they are likely not a sanctuary. Real sanctuaries prefer to have as few animals as possible to ensure the most amount of space, attention and freedom. Businesses want more dolphins so they can sell more interactions. Sanctuaries have release as their top priority, rather than trying to keep as many rescues as they can.

Munjawa takes one last look at our team, seconds before she was successfully released back in her home range.

Munjawa was released to her home range by Dolphin Project’s Indonesian team after assessment.

After Rehabilitation

Many captive dolphin facilities also serve as rehabilitation centers. While it is true that some rescued dolphins cannot safely return to the wild, they should not be forced to perform and entertain in order to earn their keep. Sanctuaries would not require participation of rescued dolphins in shows or force human interactions, which can cause stress.

Captive bottlenose with basketball

Captive bottlenose with basketball

A real dolphin sanctuary is a place where non-releasable dolphins that were exploited by the dolphinarium industry can live out their lives with peace and dignity.

It is place where the dolphins’ needs are met with no strings attached.

There are no dolphin shows and no interactions programs.

The dolphins receive food without having to perform any trained behaviors.

No commercial photo ops are offered to visitors.

The dolphins live in a sea pen or a floating sea enclosure away from crowds of people, traffic, and human noise.

Every attempt is made to make the dolphins’ lives as natural and independent as possible.

The dolphins receive the food and medical attention that they need.

Whenever possible, live fish are introduced to the sea pen.

Dolphins in a true sanctuary are identified properly as victims, rather than ambassadors.

No visitors are allowed to touch or in any way handle the dolphins.

A true sanctuary makes educational material available to the public about the wrongs of capturing, confining, breeding, and exploiting dolphins in shows and various interaction programs.

A true sanctuary has a fundamental policy of opposing the use of dolphins as tourist attractions that aim to entertain.

A true sanctuary may allow visitors in order to educate them about the reasons why dolphins do not belong in captivity.

A true sanctuary acknowledges that dolphins belong in nature, wild and free.

A true sanctuary is for dolphins that cannot safely be released back into the wild.

A true sanctuary never tells visitors that the dolphins are free to leave whenever they want, as this ignores the fact that non-releasable dolphins depend on their caregivers to survive.

Captive breeding is not allowed in a real sanctuary. There is no reason for a dolphin to be born in captivity.

A real sanctuary does not accept donations from the captivity industry or the tuna industry.

Hopefully, the public will leave the sanctuary with enough knowledge to tell others not to buy a ticket for a dolphin show or captive dolphin swim program.

A true sanctuary will have clear rules in place about appropriate behavior for visitors, so that the comfort and safety of the animals remains the highest priority. A true sanctuary recognizes that visitors are guests, but the animals are the residents. They deserve dignity and respect in their home.

https://www.dolphinproject.com/campaigns/captivity-industry/sanctuary-or-marine-park/

“$20K reward in case of dolphin harassed on Texas beach”

This Mother’s Day Give A Gift Of Love To Help Another Mother

Petition · Support a dolphin sanctuary in New South Wales! · Change.org

www.change.org

Zippy, Bella, and Jet – the last three remaining dolphins in captivity in NSW – could live happy and healthy lives in a dolphin sanctuary in Coffs Harbour.

Ask NSW Minister for Environment, Matt Kean, to support completion of the feasibility study to build this sanctuary.

The sanctuary would retire Zippy, Bella, and Jet and could help rescue and rehabilitate stranded cetaceans on the east coast of Australia. 

It would see Dolphin Marine Conservation Park transition to a venue based on education, rescue and rehabilitation, and protect the jobs and income the Park brings to the Coffs region. 

The NSW Upper House recommended support for completing the feasibility study  in the recent Parliamentary Inquiry into the exhibition of cetaceans. The decision is now in the hands of the Minister for Environment – The Hon. Matt Kean. 

Can you help convince the government to support the retirement of captive dolphins to a sanctuary?Please sign the petition calling on Environment Minister Hon. Matt Kean to support this project. 

Multiple feasibility tests have already been completed, including wave and tidal analysis and animal welfare assessments. 

Your signature will help apply the necessary pressure on the Minister in charge of this decision and could lead to the building of Australia’s first-of-it’s-kind dolphin sanctuary.

https://www.change.org/p/nsw-minister-for-energy-and-environment-the-hon-matt-kean-support-a-dolphin-sanctuary-in-new-south-wales?mc_cid=b4a0f5aa58&mc_eid=521f8bb53b

Petition: Save Rare Dolphins From Human-Caused Extinction – ForceChange

forcechange.com

Caleb Macduff

Target: Janet Coit, NMFS Administrator

Goal: Label the Atlantic humpback dolphin as an endangered species to ensure their survival.

You have likely never heard of the Atlantic humpback dolphin, and unfortunately, it’s for a horrible reason. This little-known dolphin is on the brink of extinction, with less than 3,000 left in the wild. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is considering listing them as protected under the Endangered Species Act, but for now, they are still in the midst of a status review, meaning they still don’t get any federal safeguards. We must apply pressure until these dolphins are officially protected.

It’s no secret among conservation groups that this species is struggling – the NMFS status review stems from a petition by the Animal Welfare Institute, the Center for Biological Diversity, and VIVA Vaquita asking for help for the Atlantic humpback dolphin. In fact, these marine mammals are listed as critically endangered internationally, just not protected under the U.S ESA.

We need your help to get them there. A big part of conservation is achieving a higher profile, and name recognition for species in peril. Without public knowledge, it’s wildly difficult to get the financial, legal, and political assistance that conservation efforts need. Because global awareness of the Atlantic humpback dolphin’s fate has been lacking while human activity has been threatening them, their numbers have gotten incredibly low.

One of the largest issues affecting these dolphins is a phenomenon called “bycatch”. Fisheries use massive nets to catch the fish species they can sell, but often other species get trapped and killed, too; including the Atlantic humpback dolphin. Dying as bycatch is horrible – since they are mammals, these dolphins drown when they become tangled in nets and cannot surface to breathe. The netting can also cut into their flesh, causing wounds and infection.

In addition to the threat of bycatch, other human activities threaten the Atlantic humpback dolphin, which lives exclusively in shallow, coastal waters, at risk of human interaction. Coastal development depletes their habitat and noise pollution inhibits their ability to communicate, travel, and can cause injury and death.

The good news is that because these threats are all human-related, regulations and policies will make a major difference in the fight for these dolphins’ survival. But that’s only if we can get the right protections for these vulnerable creatures.

Please, sign the petition telling the NMFS to protect Atlantic humpback dolphins before it’s too late.

PETITION LETTER

Dear Mrs. Coit,

The NMFS is currently reviewing the status of the Atlantic humpback dolphins under the Endangered Species Act based on petitions from the Animal Welfare Institute, the Center for Biological Diversity, and VIVA Vaquita. There are less than 3,000 of these animals left in the wild, due mainly to human influence.

This letter is to let you know that I support the petitions put forward by the aforementioned groups, and urge you to include these dolphins in the ESA. Because these creatures are being hurt by human influence, regulations and policy changes will make a major difference in their survival.

Please, follow through on these petitions and ensure the Atlantic humpback dolphins’ survival.

Photo Credit: Mandy

https://forcechange.com/597494/save-rare-dolphins-from-human-caused-extinction/

Marineland charged under Criminal Code for allegedly using dolphins, whales for entertainment without licence

Niagara police have charged Marineland for using dolphins and whales for entertainment without Ontario government authorization. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

www.cbc.ca

Bobby Hristova, Dan Taekema 5 – 6 minutes

Marineland has been charged under the Criminal Code with using dolphins and whales to perform as entertainment without Ontario government authorization, according to Niagara police.

Marineland has been charged under the Criminal Code with using dolphins and whales to perform and entertain customers without Ontario government authorization, Niagara police say.

Police said they began an investigation into allegations captive cetaceans (marine mammals including whales, dolphins and porpoises) were being used at the theme park in Niagara Falls in October.

Mario Lagrotteria, the police service’s Niagara Falls district commander, said there was video evidence throughout August. He also said it’s the first time Niagara police have laid this charge.

“The information [investigators] received substantiated the allegation that this did happen within the month of August,” he said.

Police previously confirmed their investigation was launched following a complaint received in October.

Marineland said in a statement to CBC News the park is following the law and “we look forward to the opportunity to defend ourselves in a court of law.”

Law changed regarding cetaceans 

Miranda Desa, Canadian counsel for the U.S.-based non-profit Last Chance for Animals, said the group filed a complaint on Sept. 30 and a followup complaint in late October based on the use of dolphins and beluga whales for entertainment.

A member of Last Chance for Animals visited Marineland on Aug. 3 and Aug. 16, according to Desa. She said they recorded videos of dolphin and beluga whale shows, and sent them to police with their complaint.

Desa said the complaint focused on the use of belugas that were instructed to do tricks for food in front of park attendees.

The video, viewed by CBC News, appears to show dolphins doing flips and tricks for an audience with music playing in the background.

Under a section of the Criminal Code that was introduced in 2019, captive cetaceans cannot be used “for performance for entertainment purposes” unless the performance is authorized with a licence from the province.

After years of debate, the new law, part of Bill S-203, banned the captivity of cetaceans. It included a grandfather clause, however, for animals already in captivity.

Niagara police said the charge against Marineland was for the alleged use of captive cetacean for performance for entertainment purposes without authorization.

Marineland says show is educational

Marineland said in a statement the routine was an “educational presentation.”

“Our animal presentation contains marine mammals undertaking behaviours they exhibit in ocean environments. These behaviours are combined with an educational script delivered by Marineland staff, providing a foundation in understanding of these important marine species.

“Marineland continues to be committed to our mission of research, education and conservation and will continue to provide world-class care for the animals who call Marineland home,” the theme park said.

Marineland, shown in Niagara Falls, Ont., on Aug. 14, 2017, told CBC in an email Monday that it is following the law. (Tara Walton/The Canadian Press)

Lagrotteria said police found the evidence it gathered “met the threshold to lay the charge,” but couldn’t say much else as the case is before the courts.

He said any other concerns about the welfare of animals at the park should be directed to Provincial Animal Welfare Services.

Criminal charge precedent setting, expert says

Kendra Coulter, an associate professor at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., who’s an analyst of labour involving animals, expressed skepticism over the idea such performances are educational.

“Any marine animals who are being kept in tiny tanks are not behaving normally,” Coulter said in a phone interview.

“But the bigger question here is around the ethics of captivity and whether these large, complex, intellectually robust animals can in any way have healthy and positive lives in such tiny tanks and conditions … the consensus is increasingly no.”

There’s a shift toward creating ocean-based sanctuaries and other alternatives, said Coulter.

Camille Labchuk, a lawyer and executive director of Animal Justice, said Marineland is one of the only theme parks in Canada that still has whales and dolphins, let alone uses them in performances.

“It is gratifying to see Niagara police take this matter seriously because the law is only as good as its enforcement,” she said.

Representatives for Marineland are set to appear in court in St. Catharines on Feb. 14.

Under the section of the Criminal Code related to the Marineland case, anyone convicted of the offence is liable to a fine not exceeding $200,000.

Marineland has been under more scrutiny recently, with Animal Welfare Services and non-profit Animal Justice raising its own concerns.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/marineland-charged-1.6283758?fbclid=IwAR0Br49fV6XLrh25adzHeCX_6mLi2FIUQnQv-vGaW6uSxsO89WlLc_aQ6Jc

“Man who rescued Winter, star of ‘Dolphin Tale’ movies, hopes her memory inspires people”

Winter the Dolphin Dies | Dolphin Project

 

Winter the dolphin, Clearwater Aquarium 12Nov

Winter the dolphin, known for her usage of a prosthetic tail, has died.

According to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium, where she had been held in captivity for close to 16 years, Winter had been suffering from intestinal abnormalities. Despite the facility’s efforts, on the evening of November 11, during preparation for a procedure, Winter’s behavior and vital signs began to decline, resulting in her passing.

“We are saddened to learn of Winter’s passing. She could have greatly benefitted from the construction of a seaside sanctuary in the Florida sunshine instead of living in a concrete tank, inside a building. Winter could have retired in peace and dignity, and enjoyed a more normal environment – the great outdoors, the changing tides, and the sounds and rhythms of the sea. From my experience, this is where the healing process begins. While Winter will never get this opportunity, we encourage facilities such as the Clearwater Marine Aquarium to build ocean water sanctuaries for their rescued dolphins and other whales.” ~ Ric O’Barry, Founder/Director of Dolphin Project

In December 2005, the three-month-old bottlenose dolphin, after being freed from a crab pot in the waters near Cape Canaveral, Florida, was brought to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. The dolphin’s resilience prevailed – while her grievous injuries resulted in the loss of her tail – she regained her strength and survived.

One year later, in 2006, the Hanger Clinic began work to create a prosthetic tail. After eighteen months, she was fitted with the device. In a blog post written by the clinic, the technology used to fit the prosthetic on Winter resulted in the development of a gel liner, called WintersGel, which is now benefitting human patients.

A necropsy will be performed to determine the exact cause of Winter’s death. A heart attack is suspected.

Featured image: Winter the dolphin, Clearwater Aquarium. Credit: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license; Flickr; Author: Paul

Dolphin Project Take Action Now

https://www.dolphinproject.com/blog/winter-the-dolphin-dies/

They’re Jumping For Joy

“Boater Led to Naked Woman 3 Miles Offshore by Dolphins”

Take the Pledge | Dolphin Project

Take The Pledge To NOT Buy A Ticket To A Dolphin Show

Target: Sponsors of Captive Dolphins Shows & Politicians

Dolphins have evolved over millions of years, adapting perfectly to life in the ocean. They are intelligent, social and self-aware, exhibiting evidence of a highly developed emotional sense.

Join us and pledge that you won’t buy a ticket to a dolphin show.  It’s 2 easy steps:

1. Sign the Pledge below

2. On the top of the next page, Share the Pledge on your social media to complete the process.

Tw-profile-400x400

#ThanksButNoTanks

Petition by

Christine Gau

Christine Gau

Dolphin Project

To: Sponsors of Captive Dolphins Shows & Politicians
From: [Your Name]

I have taken the pledge NOT to buy a ticket to a dolphin show.

No Dolphin Parks.
No Swim With Dolphin Programs.
No Hotels and Lodges that feature captive dolphins on the property.
No Dolphin “Trainer For A Day” programs.
No Dolphin “Research” facilities that charge to interact with dolphins.
No Cruise lines that feature stops at Swim With Dolphin Parks.

Dolphins Don’t Belong in Captivity!

Sign This Petition

https://www.dolphinproject.com/take-action/take-the-pledge-not-to-buy-a-ticket-to-a-dolphin-show/

#ThanksButNoTanks
. 147,199 Signatures Collected Only 57,601 more until our goal of 204,800

Dolphin Project

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and all donations are tax-deductible as authorized by law.

© 2021 Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project. All Rights Reserved.

171 Pier Ave. #234
Santa Monica, CA 90405

Rest In Peace Kathy… You’re Finally Free

A pod of dolphins saved the life of swimmer who had been stranded at sea for 12 hours

Moray Firth Bottlenose Dolphins

mypositiveoutlooks.com

A swimmer who was stranded at sea for over 12 hours is alive today, thanks to a pod of dolphins who helped save his life.

Ruairí McSorley, 24, believed to be from Londonderry, Ireland, was rescued 4 kilometers from shore by Fenit Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) at 8:15 p.m. Given the condition he was found in, the group called it a “miracle” rescue.

McSorley was conscious but “hypothermic and exhausted” when found. He was wearing only a pair of swimming trunks when he was plucked out of the waters of Tralee Bay.Facebook

The swimmer told rescuers he had planned to swim out to Mucklaghmore Rock, 9 km out from where he set off at Castlegregory beach, where his clothes had been found. His abandoned belongings are what led to the search.

12 hours later, RNLI coxswain Finbarr O’Connell calculated where he could have ended up after analyzing tides in the area.

Fenit RNLI volunteer Jackie Murphy said it was a miracle how McSorley survived the ordeal and credited O’Connell with locating him at sea. 

Ruairi McSorley

Facebook

O’Connell said the man was surrounded by many dolphins when he was found. They were later identified as bottlenose dolphins living in Moray Firth in Scotland. Since 2019, the sea creatures have been seen off the Irish coast.

“Maybe they helped him in some way or another: who knows?” he said.

The Fenit RNLI and R118 coastguard performed an intensive search across Tralee Bay before finding McSorley.

Despite being the key to finding him, O’Connell refused to take all the credit, noting that the crew they have are “all excellent.”

“It’s good to get a positive result. Normally we go out, and it mightn’t be that positive. We are all just elated,” he said.

h/t: Independent.ie

O’Connell added that the situation could have ended worse if McSorley was left there for 30 minutes longer. None of them—including the medics—could believe he survived it, but they’re relieved that he did. 

McSorley has since been brought to the University of Hospital Kerry, where he is recovering.

“It is literally beyond us all (how he survived),” he said. “He was only wearing a pair of trunks. He had no wetsuit. Nothing. He must have been a good swimmer because he was just over two and a half miles (4km) from the beach.”

McSorley’s body temperature had also dropped to dangerously low levels. The swimmer said he went in around 8 a.m., and rescuers picked him up at 8:15.

“He did spend that amount of time in the water, and I don’t know how he did it,” O’Connell said. “It’s incredible, really.”

The Fenit RNLI crew

They first saw his head in the water and initially thought it was a seal. But then he put up his hand.Facebook

“The elation of seeing somebody floating alive in the water, rather than the other way, is so great,” O’Connell recalled. “We have had too many bad outcomes, so it was absolutely fantastic to pick him up.”

When asked how he had determined the trajectory of McSorley across Tralee Bay, O’Connell explained that they had been trained to handle scenarios like that.

They have a mannequin they throw in the water, which behaves like a person would in water. They leave it there and do an exercise for a few hours. Upon their return, they would see how far it has drifted. They pick it up and note in the chart the direction the tide is going. That’s the knowledge they applied during the rescue.

Fenit RNLI lifeboat

In light of this incident, Murphy advised swimmers to exercise caution when venturing into the water for a swim.

“Always please tell somebody what time you are due back and where you are going,” she said.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/dolphins-saved-the-life-of-swimmer-stranded-at-sea/

Protect the dolphins

Stolen From Her Family And Sold Into Slavery

Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center | Dolphin Project

 

In September 2019, BKSDA Bali Forestry Department in Bali, Indonesia and the Ministry of Forestry initiated the idea for a first ever permanent dolphin rehabilitation, release and retirement facility for formerly performing dolphins. Working with local partners Jakarta Animal Aid Network to supply the manpower and Dolphin Project to provide the financial support and supervision, the team built the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in Banyuwedang Bay, West Bali (“Umah Lumba” means “dolphins” in Balinese.)

The Umah Lumba Center is a purpose-built facility for recently confiscated dolphins from captive facilities, and for stranded or injured dolphins. The facility is designed to stabilize the mammals, return them back to health and to assess whether they are candidates for readaptation and release.

For dolphins deemed releasable, they will be taken to Camp Lumba Lumba Readaptation and Release Center in Karimun Jawa, the world’s first permanent facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and release of dolphins. The mammals will then be prepared for return into their home range. The location was specifically chosen because the majority of dolphins were captured from the Karimunjawa National Park, and releasing them here would offer a good chance for the mammals to reunite with their family pods.

For dolphins deemed unreleasable, they can retire at the Umah Lumba Center in a safe and healing seapen, and live out the rest of their lives in peace and dignity.

Presently we have three dolphins in our care: Rocky, Rambo and Johnny. Captured in the Java Sea, the dolphins, for several years, were incarcerated in a shallow, heavily chlorinated swimming pool in North Bali. Since their relocation to the Umah Lumba Center, they have benefited from a robust rehabilitation program and continue to undergo regular evaluation towards a possible release.

The dolphins receive 24/7 round-the-clock care. We have a full-time staff veterinarian, security guards and caregivers. The center is a true rehabilitation, release and retirement facility, where our team is committed to making the dolphins’ lives as natural and independent as possible. In March 2020, Dolphin Project, in anticipation of the arrival of additional confiscated dolphins (due to the COVID-19 pandemic) tripled the size of our facility.

As the world’s first permanent dolphin rehabilitation, release and retirement facility in the world, the Umah Lumba Center must be a model of success. Ideally, it will act as a prototype for others to be built globally, as demand for captive dolphins wane.

Support Now

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Show Your Support – Adopt A Dolphin

JOHNNY

Johnny at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali Indonesia

Captured in the Java Sea, Indonesia, Johnny is an older dolphin who lived several years in isolation inside a shallow swimming pool at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. Crowds of people bought tickets to swim with him, and those were the only times he had any company. To make the water appear clean to paying customers, hotel staff added chlorine and other harmful chemicals. This hurt Johnny’s eyes so badly, he went blind. In addition, Johnny has no teeth left, and his right pectoral fin has been permanently damaged. When we first found him, he was also critically underweight. Johnny was destined to spend the rest of his life trapped in the tank, performing for tourists and other guests.

On October 8, 2019, we rescued Johnny from the hotel and transported him to our facility. Under our 24/7 expert care, he has since gained weight and strength, and spends his days exploring the large sea pen, where he experiences the natural rhythms and sounds of the sea. Johnny’s diet consists of high-quality fresh fish, and he is gaining weight and strength. The healing properties of a diet consisting of high-quality fresh fish, along with real ocean water are having a positive effect: Johnny often expresses his joy with energetic jumps, and he spends much time swimming, diving, and playing. We are continuing to evaluate Johnny for potential release, and are committed to doing everything in our power to ensure the rest of his life is filled with peace and dignity. Adopt Johnny today to help provide for his care!

Johnny Adoption Package

WHAT YOU’LL GET

With a recommended minimum donation of $25, you’ll get a personalized adoption certificate for Johnny (its beautiful artwork suitable for framing), gorgeous underwater photos which are perfect for adorning all your electronic devices, Johnny’s biography, Dolphin Facts, a Dolphin Warrior booklet and quarterly updates about Johnny!

AdoptJohnny

ROCKY

Rocky in floating sea pen, Bali, Indonesia.

Rocky at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

 

When Rocky was violently captured in the Java Sea several years ago, he lost everything that makes life worth living for a dolphin: his family, his world of sound, and the ability to swim freely in a vast ocean world. Rocky spent several years incarcerated in a shallow, heavily chlorinated swimming pool at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. He was trained to obey commands and perform in theatrical shows that attract crowds of fun-seeking holiday makers. In between repetitive, rowdy shows, Rocky spent much time logging on the surface, and could only swim a few feet before a wall stopped him. Confinement in such barren, unnatural surroundings took a heavy toll on Rocky’s well-being, and his future looked bleak and hopeless.

Thankfully, we were able to rescue Rocky on August 5, 2019, and transported him to a temporary floating sea enclosure in Sanur. In December 2019 Rocky was transported from Sanur to our facility. Here, in the crystal-clear waters of our spacious sea pen, he is once again enjoying the natural rhythms and sounds of the sea. Rocky is benefitting from the healing properties of natural sea water and is gaining weight and strength. Rocky loves to participate in boisterous, energetic play, and he especially loves to swim fast. Never again will he have to perform tricks for food or experience confinement in a minuscule concrete tank. Our 24/7 expert team of veterinarians and caregivers are currently evaluating Rocky for possible release. Adopt Rocky today to help provide for his care!

Rocky adopt a dolphin package

WHAT YOU’LL GET

With a recommended minimum donation of $25, you’ll get a personalized adoption certificate for Rocky (its beautiful artwork suitable for framing), gorgeous underwater photos which are perfect for adorning all your electronic devices, Rocky’s biography, Dolphin Facts, a Dolphin Warrior booklet and quarterly updates about Rocky!

Adopt Rocky

RAMBO

Rambo at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

Rambo at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

Adopt Rambo

Rambo was torn from his family and pod members in the Java Sea during a violent capture several years ago. He was confined to a shallow chlorinated swimming pool at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali for the purposes of entertaining crowds of tourists during loud theatrical performances. Rambo shared a tank with a dolphin named Gombloh, and the two dolphins formed a close friendship. Sadly, Gombloh took his last breath on August 3, 2019, just two days before we were able to rescue and relocate Rambo. Hotel staff found Gombloh’s lifeless body in the same tank where Rambo was confined.

We rescued Rambo on August 5, 2019 and transported him to a temporary floating sea enclosure in Sanur. In the following weeks, Rambo gained weight and strength, and in December 2019 Rambo was transported to our facility. There will be no more languishing in a small, barren concrete world, and no more theatrical dolphin shows to perform. All of that is behind him. Rambo is a younger dolphin who appears to be in good health, highly energetic and full of life. He is enjoying the healing benefits of natural sea water and the ability to dive and swim. Our 24/7 expert team of veterinarians and caregivers are currently evaluating Rocky for possible release. Adopt Rambo today to help provide for his care!

Rambo adopt a dolphin package

WHAT YOU’LL GET

With a recommended minimum donation of $25, you’ll get a personalized adoption certificate for Rambo (its beautiful artwork suitable for framing), gorgeous underwater photos which are perfect for adorning all your electronic devices, Rambo’s biography, Dolphin Facts, a Dolphin Warrior booklet and quarterly updates about Rambo!

Adopt Rambo

SUPPORT OUR BALI DOLPHIN SANCTUARY NOW

Remembering Dewa 

Captured in the Java Sea, Dewa was an older dolphin who was severely affected by the trauma he suffered during his confinement at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. There, he spent years confined in the hotel’s shallow, heavily chlorinated swimming pool, exploited in a commercial dolphin-assisted therapy program for people with paralysis and other disabilities. Our rescue team transferred Dewa from the swimming pool to our facility on October 8, 2019. Since we introduced Dewa to natural sea water, his condition improved but he was still plagued with several health problems including chronic pneumonia., Dewa succumbed to his longstanding illness and took his last breath on March 11, 2020.

Remembering Gombloh

Gombloh was captured in the Java Sea and, sadly, did not survive his encounter with humans. Gombloh died at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali on August 3, 2019, just two days before our team was able to rescue Gombloh’s beloved companion Rambo. We are happy we arrived at the hotel in time to rescue Rambo, Rocky, Dewa, and Johnny from the shallow and heavily chlorinated swimming pools, but at the same time heartbroken that we got there too late to get Gombloh out of there. We will always remember Gombloh, who is one of countless dolphins to have fallen victim to consumers’ demand to watch dolphins perform and to swim with them.

The Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center and Camp Lumba Lumba Readaptation and Release Center form an incredible partnership with the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia, BKSDA Bali, Dolphin Project, Jakarta Animal Aid Network, Karimunjawa National Park and the West Bali National Park. Together, we built Umah Lumba, the world’s only permanent dolphin rehabilitation, release and retirement facility for previously captive dolphins and Camp Lumba Lumba, the world’s first permanent facility dedicated to the readaptation and release of dolphins in Kemujan, Karimun Jawa. Ric O’Barry, Founder/Director of Dolphin Project has pioneered readaptation for captive dolphins and has released a number of dolphins into the wild.

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and all donations are tax-deductible as authorized by law.

© 2021 Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project. All Rights Reserved.

171 Pier Ave. #234
Santa Monica, CA 90405

https://www.dolphinproject.com/campaigns/indonesia-campaign/bali-sanctuary/

The dolphin project

“A Tale Of The Dancing Dolphins” by TomFoolery

Bottlenose Dolphin Mom Adopts Pilot Whale Calf in New Zealand

people.com

Vanessa Etienne

New Zealand’s Far Out Ocean Research Collective spotted a bottlenose dolphin caring for a young pilot whale, and this isn’t the first time the species has stepped in as a surrogate mom.

On May 17, the Far Out Ocean Research Collective, based in Paihia, New Zealand, shared that they observed a female bottlenose dolphin interacting with a pilot whale calf like the newborn was her own offspring. Researchers believe that the dolphin adopted the young whale over a month ago and has been caring for the little creature.

“An interesting observation of an adult oceanic bottlenose dolphin with a newborn long-finned pilot whale off north-eastern New Zealand. Earlier in the day, the dolphin was part of a mixed-species group of false killer whales, pilot whales, and oceanic bottlenose dolphins,” the organization announced on Facebook.

RELATED: Dolphins Spotted Swimming in Venice’s Grand Canal: A ‘Beautiful and Rare Moment’

Far Out Ocean also noted that this is not the first time a bottlenose dolphin has been observed caring for the young of another ocean mammal. It is unclear why this species seems comfortable stepping in as a surrogate parent, but researchers have theories.

“It could be a misguided motherly instinct, or she lost her own calf,” said Far Out Ocean Jochen Zaeschmar, marine researcher, 1 News reports. “Pilot whales spend seven years with their calves. There is a good chance it will eventually join another pod of pilot whales as they often cross paths.”

Far Out Ocean has taken photos documenting the special relationship between the bottlenose dolphin and the young pilot whale they spotted this spring. The organization plans to continue watching the pair’s journey and sharing their findings with their social media followers.

“The individual is a well-known member of the north-eastern New Zealand offshore bottlenose dolphin population and regularly associates with pilot whales and false killer whales. We are hoping to re-encounter her to monitor this interesting phenomenon,” Far Out Ocean said on social media of the interspecies duo.

https://people.com/pets/bottlenose-dolphin-mom-adopts-pilot-whale-calf-new-zealand/?amp=true&__twitter_impression=true

Urgent Action Needed: Dolphins and Porpoises

firepaw.org

Marine scientists are calling on the EU to adopt a comprehensive plan to protect dolphins and porpoises from fisheries bycatch in European waters. To help address the bycatch issue, which is the primary global threat to dolphins and porpoises, the researchers put forward a framework to reduce bycatch levels.

The scientists have outlined a two-step approach that involves establishing a quantitative management objective for each population and implementing monitoring programs:

To ensure an accurate estimation of bycatch levels, the experts recommend using electronic monitoring systems that allow a more comprehensive and representative sampling of the fleets.

The scientists also recommend regular formal assessments of small cetacean populations, including generation of estimates of abundance and bycatch mortality. If total bycatch has been estimated to exceed the calculated biological reference point, then a mitigation strategy needs to be put in place while monitoring is continued until levels are below the reference points.

“Bycatch of small cetaceans in European fisheries is widespread, including very large numbers of common dolphins in trawl fisheries and bycatch of the critically endangered population of harbor porpoise in the Baltic Sea…The failure to effectively conserve Europe’s dolphins and porpoises is not a result of a lack of scientific knowledge or difficulties in monitoring fisheries and bycatch. Instead, it reflects a lack of political will to ensure that these iconic animals are protected from unsustainable mortality in commercial fisheries throughout European waters. We can and must do better.”

-Professor Andrew Read, Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment


Journal reference:  Emer Rogan, Andrew J Read, Per Berggren. Empty promises: The European Union is failing to protect dolphins and porpoises from fisheries by‐catch. Fish and Fisheries, 2021; DOI: 10.1111/faf.12556


https://firepaw.org/2021/05/21/urgent-action-needed-dolphins-and-porpoises/

Free dolphin study guides

Indonesian officials close dolphin attraction facility in Sanur after viral video

coconuts.co

By Coconuts Bali

Indonesian officials are facing a new wave of criticism following their decision to relocate the dolphins rescued from the banned Dolphin Lodge in Sanur to Bali Exotic Marine Park in Benoa, which animal welfare organizations describe as a “setback.” 

Despite some objections, the Natural Resources Conservation Center (BKSDA) in Bali defended their decision and said that it was made with various considerations. 

Meruanto, BKSDA Bali’s head of administration, explained those considerations to Coconuts this morning, noting how the marine park is a legal conservation center and was chosen because BKSDA currently does not have a shelter for aquatic animals. In addition, the park is deemed the closest facility for rescue efforts. 

“For us, the most important thing is that the animals survive while waiting for the next step,” Meruanto said. 

Seven dolphins were recently rescued from the Dolphin Lodge, a swim-with-dolphins attraction operated by PT Piayu Samudra Loka, that has been banned by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry since April 2020. The facility remained operational until at least earlier this month despite official orders to shut. 

A viral video featuring dangdut singer Lucinta Luna swimming with a dolphin there sparked widespread calls for authorities to step up their efforts in protecting animals, leading to the Dolphin Lodge’s closure.

The rescued dolphins, an Indo-Pacific species also known as tursiops aduncus, have since been moved to the Bali Exotic Marine Park, Meruanto said. They have been deemed healthy while still being under close supervision, and are set for rehabilitation and eventual return to the ocean. 

However, some animal welfare organizations have raised concerns over the latest developments, as they see the Bali Exotic Marine Park as a “commercial captivity center.” 

A conservation foundation called Rare Aquatic Species of Indonesia (RASI) noted in a statement issued yesterday that the marine park does not have a sea pen for the dolphins, which means the sea mammals will have to rehabilitate in a chlorinated pool. 

“I hope there is sympathy for these dolphins so they can be freed from commercial exploitation. Because dolphins belong in the open sea, not in a manmade pool,” Danielle Kreb, a scientific program advisor at the foundation, said.

READ MORE

CITY: BALICATEGORY: NEWSSUB-CATEGORIES: ANIMALS

https://coconuts.co/bali/news/indonesian-officials-close-dolphin-attraction-facility-in-sanur-after-viral-video/

Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center | Dolphin Project

Bali Dolphin Sanctuary

In September 2019, BKSDA Bali Forestry Department in Bali, Indonesia and the Ministry of Forestry initiated the idea for a first ever permanent dolphin rehabilitation, release and retirement facility for formerly captive dolphins. Working with local partners Jakarta Animal Aid Network to supply the manpower and Dolphin Project to provide the financial support and supervision, the team built the Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center in Banyuwedang Bay, West Bali (“Umah Lumba” means “dolphins” in Balinese.)

The Umah Lumba Center is a purpose-built facility for recently confiscated dolphins from captive facilities, and for stranded or injured dolphins. The facility is designed to stabilize the mammals, return them back to health and to assess whether they are candidates for readaptation and release.

For dolphins deemed releasable, they will be taken to Camp Lumba Lumba Readaptation and Release Center in Karimun Jawa, the world’s first permanent facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and release of dolphins. The mammals will then be prepared for return into their home range. The location was specifically chosen because the majority of dolphins were captured from the Karimunjawa National Park, and releasing them here would offer a good chance for the mammals to reunite with their family pods.

For dolphins deemed unreleasable, they can retire at the Umah Lumba Center in a safe and healing seapen, and live out the rest of their lives in peace and dignity.

Presently we have three dolphins in our care: Rocky, Rambo and Johnny. Captured in the Java Sea, the dolphins, for several years, were incarcerated in a shallow, heavily chlorinated swimming pool in North Bali. Since their relocation to the Umah Lumba Center, they have begun their rehabilitation and evaluation towards possible release.

The dolphins receive 24/7 round-the-clock care. We have a full-time staff veterinarian, security guards and caregivers. The center is a true rehabilitation, release and retirement facility, where our team is committed to making the dolphins’ lives as natural and independent as possible. In March 2020, Dolphin Project, in anticipation of the arrival of additional confiscated dolphins (due to the COVID-19 pandemic) tripled the size of our facility.

As the world’s first permanent dolphin rehabilitation, release and retirement facility in the world, the Umah Lumba Center must be a model of success. Ideally, it will act as a prototype for others to be built globally, as demand for captive dolphins wane.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Rocky, Rambo and Johnny swim in the waters of the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

Rocky, Rambo and Johnny swim in the waters of the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia. Credit: Pepe Arcos

Rambo

Rambo at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

Rambo at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

Rambo was torn from his family and pod members in the Java Sea during a violent capture several years ago. He was confined to a shallow chlorinated swimming pool at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. His job was to entertain crowds of tourists who think it is fun to watch dolphins jump through hoops during loud theatrical performances. Rambo shared a tank with a dolphin named Gombloh, and the two dolphins formed a close friendship. Rambo and Gombloh, it seemed, became each other’s comfort in the bleak, dungeon-like surroundings. Sadly, Gombloh took his last breath on August 3, 2019, just two days before we were able to rescue and relocate Rambo. Hotel staff found Gombloh’s lifeless body in the morning, and we wonder what it felt like for Rambo to be confined in the same tank as his dead friend, possibly for several hours.

We rescued Rambo on August 5, 2019 and transported him to a temporary floating sea enclosure in Sanur. In the following weeks, Rambo gained weight and strength, and he bonded with Rocky, who was relocated to Sanur at the same time. The two of them are spending much time playing, socializing, and swimming together. In December 2019 Rambo and Rocky were transported to our facility. There will be no more languishing in a small, barren concrete world, and no more theatrical dolphin shows to perform. All of that is behind him. Rambo is a younger dolphin who appears to be in good health, highly energetic and full of life. As such, he is a candidate to be sent to Camp Lumba Lumba for release into his home range. Whether Rambo can be released back into the wild, however, remains to be seen. For now, he is enjoying the healing benefits of natural sea water and the ability to dive and swim.

Johnny

Johnny at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali Indonesia

Johnny at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali Indonesia

Captured in the Java Sea, Indonesia, Johnny is an older dolphin who lived several years in isolation inside a shallow swimming pool at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. Crowds of people bought tickets to swim with him, and those were the only times he had any company. To make the water appear clean to paying customers, hotel staff added chlorine and other harmful chemicals. This hurt Johnny’s eyes so badly, he went blind. To make matters worse, Johnny has no teeth left. He also was critically underweight when we first found him. Furthermore, his right pectoral fin has been permanently damaged. At some point during his confinement, his pectoral fin got injured and infected. A piece of it was cut off to prevent the infection from spreading. Johnny was destined to spend the rest of his life trapped in the tank and dealing with tourists who want to kiss, hug, and ride him.

We rescued Johnny from the hotel and transported him to our facility on October 8, 2019. Those years of exploitation in appalling living conditions caused too much damage for Johnny to be successfully released back into the wild. He now enjoys a well-deserved retirement in a large sea pen, where he can once again experience the natural rhythms and sounds of the sea. We are feeding Johnny a diet of high-quality fresh fish, and he is gaining weight and strength. The healing properties of real ocean water are having an effect: Johnny often expresses his joy with energetic jumps, and he spends much time swimming, diving, and playing. We will do everything in our power to ensure the rest of his life is filled with peace and dignity.

Rocky

Rocky in floating sea pen, Bali, Indonesia.

Rocky at the Umah Lumba Center, Bali, Indonesia

When Rocky was violently captured in the Java Sea several years ago, he lost everything that makes life worth living for a dolphin: his family, his world of sound, and the ability to swim freely in a vast ocean world. Rocky spent several years incarcerated in a shallow, heavily chlorinated swimming pool at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. He was trained to obey commands and perform in theatrical shows that attract crowds of fun-seeking holiday makers. In between repetitive, rowdy shows, Rocky spent much time logging on the surface since there was nothing else for him to do. There is nothing to explore in a concrete tank, and Rocky could swim only a few feet before a wall stopped him. Confinement in such barren, unnatural surroundings took a heavy toll on Rocky’s well-being, and his future looked bleak and hopeless.

Thankfully, we were able to rescue Rocky on August 5, 2019, on the same day we rescued Rambo, and transported him to a temporary floating sea enclosure in Sanur. In December 2019 Rocky was transported from Sanur to our facility. Here, in the crystal-clear water of a spacious sea pen, he can once again enjoy the natural rhythms and sounds of the sea. Rocky is benefitting from the healing properties of natural sea water and is gaining weight and strength. As such, he is a candidate to be sent to Camp Lumba Lumba for release into his home range. Rocky loves to participate in boisterous, energetic play, and he especially loves to swim fast. He will never again have to perform tricks for food or experience confinement in a minuscule concrete tank. Whether Rocky can be released back into the wild, however, remains to be seen.SUPPORT OUR BALI DOLPHIN SANCTUARY NOW

Remembering Dewa

Captured in the Java Sea, Dewa was an older dolphin who was severely affected by the trauma he suffered during his confinement at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali. There, he spent years confined in the hotel’s shallow, heavily chlorinated swimming pool, exploited in a commercial dolphin-assisted therapy program for people with paralysis and other disabilities. Our rescue team transferred Dewa from the swimming pool to our facility on October 8, 2019. Since we introduced Dewa to natural sea water, his condition improved but he was still plagued with several health problems including chronic pneumonia. Sadly, Dewa succumbed to his longstanding illness and took his last breath on March 11, 2020.

Remembering Gombloh

Gombloh dolphin Melka

Gombloh was captured in the Java Sea and, sadly, did not survive his encounter with humans. Gombloh died at the Melka Excelsior Hotel in North Bali on August 3, 2019, just two days before our team was able to rescue Gombloh’s beloved companion Rambo. We are happy we arrived at the hotel in time to rescue Rambo, Rocky, Dewa, and Johnny from the shallow and heavily chlorinated swimming pools, but at the same time heartbroken that we got there too late to get Gombloh out of there. We will always remember Gombloh, who is one of countless dolphins to have fallen victim to consumers’ demand to watch dolphins perform and to swim with them.

The Umah Lumba Rehabilitation, Release and Retirement Center and Camp Lumba Lumba Readaptation and Release Center form an incredible partnership with the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia, BKSDA Bali, Dolphin Project, Jakarta Animal Aid Network, Karimunjawa National Park and the West Bali National Park. Together, we built Umah Lumba, the world’s only permanent dolphin rehabilitation, release and retirement facility for previously captive dolphins and Camp Lumba Lumba, the world’s first permanent facility dedicated to the readaptation and release of dolphins in Kemujan, Karimun Jawa. Ric O’Barry, Founder/Director of Dolphin Project has pioneered readaptation for captive dolphins and has released a number of dolphins into the wild.

Bali Dolphin Sanctuary Partners

Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and all donations are tax-deductible as authorized by law.

© 2021 Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project. All Rights Reserved.

Dolphin Project

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Santa Monica, CA 90405

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