Return of the ‘blood moon’: A total lunar eclipse will be visible around the world on Tuesday

Composite photograph from the total eclipse of the Moon over Titusville Florida, on February 20,2008

By Denise Chow

Skywatchers on four continents will have the chance next week to catch the last total lunar eclipse for three years.

The eclipse will occur Tuesday, with the moon set to turn blood red as it slips into Earth’s shadow. The celestial show will be visible to viewers in North and Central America, Asia, Australia, the Pacific Islands and parts of South America.

Lunar eclipses occur when the moon, Earth and sun are aligned and the moon passes into Earth’s shadow. Total lunar eclipses are sometimes known as blood moons because of the dramatic coloring caused by Earth’s atmosphere, which scatters light from the sun and brandishes it on the face of the moon.

After Tuesday’s eclipse, the next total lunar eclipse will not occur again until March 14, 2025, according to NASA.

As the moon slips into Earth’s shadow, it will first dim and darken before turning a reddish hue. Across the United States, the period known as totality — when the moon is fully engulfed in Earth’s shadow — will be visible for almost an hour and a half.

The moon will begin to enter the outer part of Earth’s shadow at 3:02 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. As the partial eclipse progresses, it will look like a bite is being taken out of the lunar disk, according to NASA.

Totality will last from 5:17 a.m. until 6:42 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. During this time, the moon will appear copper-red in color.

Weather permitting, people in Hawaii and Alaska will have the chance to see every stage of the skywatching show as it unfolds.

Unlike with solar eclipses, a lunar eclipse can be viewed safely with the naked eye. Skywatchers can even use binoculars and telescopes for more dramatic views.

“If you want to take a photo, use a camera on a tripod with exposures of at least several seconds,” say NASA officials.

While the next total lunar eclipse won’t happen until March 2025, a so-called penumbral lunar eclipse — when Earth’s faint outer shadow falls on the moon’s face — will occur next year in May, followed by a partial lunar eclipse in October 2023.

Denise Chow is a reporter for NBC News Science focused on general science and climate change.

https://www.nbcnews.com/science/space/total-lunar-eclipse-blood-moon-will-visible-world-tuesday-rcna55656?cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma

Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse to Rise on Election Day Over the United States… The last total Lunar Eclipse the Earth will see for the next three years

Follow the Sun ☀️

Great Balls Of Fire

“PREVIEW: Hell Made Of Diamonds About to Be Captured By Nasa”

Watch the lunar eclipse around the world

“Look up! The lunar eclipse in Houston is happening”

How to watch the April 2022 solar eclipse online

Sarah Rumpf

The first solar eclipse of 2022 is coming on Saturday, April 30. While the spectacular event will not be visible from North America, there are options ot watch the event online. 

Where will the partial solar eclipse be visible? 

It will be visible from the southeastern Pacific Ocean, the Antarctic and some South America countries such as Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia and Peru. 

This handout picture released by Imagen Chile shows Chilean and US scientists looking at a solar eclipse from the Union Glacier in Antarctica on December 4, 2021.

This handout picture released by Imagen Chile shows Chilean and US scientists looking at a solar eclipse from the Union Glacier in Antarctica on December 4, 2021. (FELIPE TRUEBA/Imagen Chile/AFP via Getty Images)

A partial solar eclipse is seen on June 10, 2021 in Korla, Bayingolin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China.

A partial solar eclipse is seen on June 10, 2021 in Korla, Bayingolin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. (Xue Bing/VCG via Getty Images)

Unfortunately, this partial solar eclipse will not be visible in North America or Europe. However, the next partial solar eclipse on October 25, 2022, will be visible from Europe, Northeast Africa, the Middle East and West Asia, according to NASA.

ASTRONAUT CHARLIE DUKE IS ONE OF FOUR LIVING ASTRONAUTS TO WALK ON THE MOON

What is the difference between a solar eclipse and a partial eclipse?

According to NASA’s website, “A solar eclipse happens when the Moon moves between the Sun and Earth, casting a shadow on Earth, fully or partially blocking the Sun’s light in some areas. During a partial eclipse, the Moon and Sun are not perfectly aligned, so the Moon does not completely cover the Sun. This gives the Sun a crescent shape, or makes it appear as if a “bite” has been taken out of the Sun, depending on how much of the Sun is covered by the Moon.’ 

In this case, close to 64% of the Sun’s disk will be blotted out at most, according to NASA.

Robert Burgess, Presedint of Southern Maine Astronomers, sets up a telescope with solar filters to watch a partial eclipse from the Eastern Prom in Portland Thursday, June 10, 2021.

Robert Burgess, Presedint of Southern Maine Astronomers, sets up a telescope with solar filters to watch a partial eclipse from the Eastern Prom in Portland Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Staff Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

The next total solar eclipse to cross the North American continent will be on April 8, 2024.

APOLLO 16 50 YEARS LATER: REMARKABLE IMAGES SHOW HISTORIC MISSION

Where to live stream the partial solar eclipse

NASA is planning on live-streaming the event on their YouTube channel and on their website

The India-based space YouTube channel Gyaan ki gareebi Live will begin live-streaming when the eclipse begins.

Also, Timeanddate.com will have a live stream of the partial eclipse next weekend here.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/how-watch-april-2022-solar-eclipse-online

Record Broken: Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen

www.nasa.gov

Record Broken: Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen

Andrea Gianopoulos

7 – 9 minutes


The previous record holder’s light took 9 billion years to reach Earth. It’s an enormous blue star nicknamed “Icarus.”

Earendel should not be confused with the oldest known star, nicknamed “Methuselah,” discovered by Hubble in 2013.

Hubble also holds the cosmic distance record for a galaxy. Its light took 13.4 billion years to reach Earth.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has established an extraordinary new benchmark: detecting the light of a star that existed within the first billion years after the universe’s birth in the big bang – the farthest individual star ever seen to date.

The find is a huge leap further back in time from the previous single-star record holder; detected by Hubble in 2018. That star existed when the universe was about 4 billion years old, or 30 percent of its current age, at a time that astronomers refer to as “redshift 1.5.” Scientists use the word “redshift” because as the universe expands, light from distant objects is stretched or “shifted” to longer, redder wavelengths as it travels toward us.

The newly detected star is so far away that its light has taken 12.9 billion years to reach Earth, appearing to us as it did when the universe was only 7 percent of its current age, at redshift 6.2. The smallest objects previously seen at such a great distance are clusters of stars, embedded inside early galaxies.

“We almost didn’t believe it at first, it was so much farther than the previous most-distant, highest redshift star,” said astronomer Brian Welch of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, lead author of the paper describing the discovery, which is published in the March 30 journal Nature. The discovery was made from data collected during Hubble’s RELICS (Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey) program, led by co-author Dan Coe at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), also in Baltimore.

“Normally at these distances, entire galaxies look like small smudges, with the light from millions of stars blending together,” said Welch. “The galaxy hosting this star has been magnified and distorted by gravitational lensing into a long crescent that we named the Sunrise Arc.”

After studying the galaxy in detail, Welch determined that one feature is an extremely magnified star that he called Earendel, which means “morning star” in Old English. The discovery holds promise for opening up an uncharted era of very early star formation.

Upper left galaxy cluster creates a gravitational lens. Faint red arc bisects image (upper right to lower left). 3 bright spots in the arc, center one is Earendel. The spots on either side are mirrored images of a star cluster.

hubble_earendel_annotated.png

This detailed view highlights the star Earendel’s position along a ripple in space-time (dotted line) that magnifies it and makes it possible for the star to be detected over such a great distance—nearly 13 billion light-years. Also indicated is a cluster of stars that is mirrored on either side of the line of magnification. The distortion and magnification are created by the mass of a huge galaxy cluster located in between Hubble and Earendel. The mass of the galaxy cluster is so great that it warps the fabric of space, and looking through that space is like looking through a magnifying glass—along the edge of the glass or lens, the appearance of things on the other side are warped as well as magnified.

Credits: Science: NASA, ESA, Brian Welch (JHU), Dan Coe (STScI); Image processing: NASA, ESA, Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

“Earendel existed so long ago that it may not have had all the same raw materials as the stars around us today,” Welch explained. “Studying Earendel will be a window into an era of the universe that we are unfamiliar with, but that led to everything we do know. It’s like we’ve been reading a really interesting book, but we started with the second chapter, and now we will have a chance to see how it all got started,” Welch said.

When Stars Align

The research team estimates that Earendel is at least 50 times the mass of our Sun and millions of times as bright, rivaling the most massive stars known. But even such a brilliant, very high-mass star would be impossible to see at such a great distance without the aid of natural magnification by a huge galaxy cluster, WHL0137-08, sitting between us and Earendel. The mass of the galaxy cluster warps the fabric of space, creating a powerful natural magnifying glass that distorts and greatly amplifies the light from distant objects behind it.

Thanks to the rare alignment with the magnifying galaxy cluster, the star Earendel appears directly on, or extremely close to, a ripple in the fabric of space. This ripple, which is defined in optics as a “caustic,” provides maximum magnification and brightening. The effect is analogous to the rippled surface of a swimming pool creating patterns of bright light on the bottom of the pool on a sunny day. The ripples on the surface act as lenses and focus sunlight to maximum brightness on the pool floor.

This caustic causes the star Earendel to pop out from the general glow of its home galaxy. Its brightness is magnified a thousandfold or more. At this point, astronomers are not able to determine if Earendel is a binary star, though most massive stars have at least one smaller companion star.

Confirmation with Webb

Astronomers expect that Earendel will remain highly magnified for years to come. It will be observed by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. Webb’s high sensitivity to infrared light is needed to learn more about Earendel, because its light is stretched (redshifted) to longer infrared wavelengths due to the universe’s expansion.

“With Webb we expect to confirm Earendel is indeed a star, as well as measure its brightness and temperature,” Coe said. These details will narrow down its type and stage in the stellar lifecycle. “We also expect to find the Sunrise Arc galaxy is lacking in heavy elements that form in subsequent generations of stars. This would suggest Earendel is a rare, massive metal-poor star,” Coe said.

Earendel’s composition will be of great interest for astronomers, because it formed before the universe was filled with the heavy elements produced by successive generations of massive stars. If follow-up studies find that Earendel is only made up of primordial hydrogen and helium, it would be the first evidence for the legendary Population III stars, which are hypothesized to be the very first stars born after the big bang. While the probability is small, Welch admits it is enticing all the same.

“With Webb, we may see stars even farther than Earendel, which would be incredibly exciting,” Welch said. “We’ll go as far back as we can. I would love to see Webb break Earendel’s distance record.”

Record Broken: Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen

Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Lead Producer: Paul Morris

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and ESA (European Space Agency). NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, conducts Hubble science operations. STScI is operated for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy in Washington, D.C.

Media Contacts:

Claire Andreoli
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
301-286-1940

Leah Ramsay
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

Ray Villard
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

Science Contacts:

Brian Welch
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Dan Coe
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

Last Updated: Mar 30, 2022

Editor: Andrea Gianopoulos

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2022/record-broken-hubble-spots-farthest-star-ever-seen

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope reaches alignment milestone, shares stunning view of cosmos

While the purpose of this image was to focus on the bright star at the center for alignment evaluation, Webb's optics and NIRCam are so sensitive that the galaxies and stars seen in the background show up.

While the purpose of this image was to focus on the bright star at the center for alignment evaluation, Webb’s optics and NIRCam are so sensitive that the galaxies and stars seen in the background show up. (Credits: NASA/STScI)

Julia Musto

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has reached another milestone, with the agency announcing that its main mirror is fully aligned.

NASA said the Webb team completed the stage of alignment known as “fine phasing” on March 11, with every optical parameter for Webb’s Optical Telescope Element performing “at, or above, expectations.” 

JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE TAKES FIRST IMAGES, SELFIE

The group also found no critical issues or measurable contamination or blockages to Webb’s optical path. 

NASA said the observatory is able to successfully gather light from distant objects and deliver it to its instruments without an issue.

“More than 20 years ago, the Webb team set out to build the most powerful telescope that anyone has ever put in space and came up with an audacious optical design to meet demanding science goals,” Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, said in a statement. “Today we can say that design is going to deliver.”

Webb – an international venture with the European Space Agency (ESA) and Canadian Space Agency – is the first telescope in space to use segmented primary mirrors, like the primary mirror’s 18 hexagonal, beryllium segments.

The team has also now fully aligned Webb’s primary imager, the Near-Infrared Camera, to the observatory’s mirrors.

Over the course of the next six weeks, the Webb team will further act to align the telescope to include the Near-Infrared Spectrograph, Mid-Infrared Instrument and Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph.

JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE’S IMAGE OF STAR GETS PHOTOBOMBED BY GALAXIES

All of this comes before the $10 billion telescope’s final alignment step will begin, in addition to adjustments of any small, residual positioning errors in the mirror segments.

“We have fully aligned and focused the telescope on a star, and the performance is beating specifications. We are excited about what this means for science,” Ritva Keski-Kuha, deputy optical telescope element manager for Webb, said. “We now know we have built the right telescope.”

This new "selfie" was created using a specialized pupil imaging lens inside the NIRCam instrument that was designed to take images of the primary mirror segments instead of images of the sky.

This new “selfie” was created using a specialized pupil imaging lens inside the NIRCam instrument that was designed to take images of the primary mirror segments instead of images of the sky. (Credits: NASA/STScI)

NASA shared additional engineering images from its NIRCam instrument during the “fine phasing,” revealing the star 2MASS J17554042+6551277 and galaxies and stars in the background. The image uses a red filter to optimize visual contrast. 

At the beginning of alignment, NASA released a mosaic image, with 18 individual images of the star HD 84406. 

A new “selfie” was also created using a specialized pupil imaging lens inside the NIRCam instrument that was designed to take images of the primary mirror segments. It shows all of Webb’s 18 primary mirror segments collecting light from the same star in unison.

The Webb team will include all aspects of Optical Telescope Element alignment by early May. 

Webb’s first full-resolution imagery and science data will be released over the summer.

https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasas-james-webb-space-telescope-alignment-milestone-view-cosmos

The Beaver Moon partial lunar eclipse on Nov. 19 will be the longest of the century. Here are its stages explained.

www.space.com

Joe Rao

  1. The next eclipse of the moon will greet early risers before dawn on Friday morning (Nov. 19) across North America. 

It will be the second lunar eclipse of 2021 and, in some ways, will be similar to the last one on May 26. Most North Americans will again need to get up early and look low in the west toward daybreak. And again, the farther west you are the better, as the moon will appear much higher from the western part of the continent as opposed to locations farther to the east. It will also be the longest partial lunar eclipse in 580 years, lasting just over 6 hours, with its pass through the darkest part of Earth’s shadow taking about 3 hours, 28 minutes and 23 seconds, and also the longest this century.

But in another way, it will be different. This lunar eclipse will fall just shy of being total; 97.4% of the moon’s diameter will become immersed in the Earth’s dark umbral shadow at maximum eclipse, leaving just the southernmost limb ever-so-slightly beyond the outer edge of the umbra. 

To those watching with the naked eye, binoculars and small telescopes, the lower edge of the moon will likely remain much brighter than the deep red or ochre hue we can expect across the rest of the moon’s face. 

To prepare for the Beaver Moon lunar eclipse of 2021, check out our guide on how to photograph the moon with a camera. If you need imaging gear, consider our best cameras for astrophotography and best lenses for astrophotography to make sure you’re ready for the next eclipse.

A map showing the visibility of the partial lunar eclipse on Nov. 18-19, 2021.
A map showing the visibility of the partial lunar eclipse on Nov. 18-19, 2021. (Image credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio)

Studying the diagram and map courtesy of Fred Espenak’s Eclipsewise.com, along with our timetable, tells what to expect at your location and when. As you watch the progress of the eclipse it appears that the Earth’s shadow is creeping across the moon’s face. But as you can see from the diagram, it’s really the moon that is doing the creeping. As it moves in its orbit around the Earth, the moon moves from west to east (right to left) through the Earth’s shadow. The Mercator map shows that those near the West Coast will see the maximum phase of the eclipse happen high in a dark sky long before sunrise. Skywatchers farther east will find the moon sinking lower toward the west around mid-eclipse. 

If you’re in Hawaii, the eclipse happens deep in the night and nearly overhead. For New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China and Southeast Asia, it comes on the evening of Nov. 19 local date. 

Related: Amazing photos of the Super Flower Blood Moon of 2021 Local circumstances for the partial lunar eclipse on Nov. 19, 2021 EventESTCSTMSTPSTMoon enters penumbra1:02 a.m.12:02 a.m.*11:02 p.m.*10:02 p.m.Penumbra first visible?1:54 a.m.12:54 a.m.*11:54 p.m.*10:54 p.m.Moon enters umbra2:18 a.m.1:18 a.m.12:18 a.m.*11:18 p.m.Mid-eclipse4:02 a.m.3:02 a.m.2:02 a.m.1:02 a.m.Moon leaves umbra5:47 a.m.4:47 a.m.3:47 a.m.2:47 a.m.Penumbra last visible?6:10 a.m.5:10 a.m.4:10 a.m.3:10 a.m.Moon leaves penumbra7:03 a.m.6:03 a.m.5:03 a.m.4:03 a.m.

*Times listed with an asterisk denote times prior to midnight; the corresponding calendar date is Nov. 18.

Because the moon will arrive at apogee — the farthest point in its orbit from Earth — on Nov. 20, it will also be moving at its slowest speed in its orbit. That’s why it will seem to move at an almost “leisurely pace” through the Earth’s shadow, taking over 100 minutes from the time of first umbral contact to the time of greatest eclipse, and vice versa (greatest eclipse to last umbral contact). 

Phases of the eclipse

This diagram shows the stages of the partial lunar eclipse on Nov. 18-19, 2021.
This diagram shows the stages of the partial lunar eclipse on Nov. 18-19, 2021. (Image credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio)

This eclipse will occur in five phases, with different things to watch for at each.

Phase 1: “Moon enters penumbra” is when the moon’s leading edge enters the pale outer fringe of Earth’s shadow: the penumbra. But the shadow is so weak that most people won’t see anything of the penumbra until about 70% of the moon’s diameter is inside of it. Watch for a slight darkening to become apparent on the moon’s celestial southeast (lower left) side. The penumbral shading gradually becomes more evident as the moon moves deeper in.

Phase 2: “Moon enters umbra” marks the beginning of the partial eclipse. This will be a much more obvious and dramatic sight as the moon’s leading-edge slips into the umbra, where no direct sunlight reaches. With a telescope, watch as the umbra’s edge engulfs various lunar features such as craters, mountains and valleys.

And as the moon wanes to a crescent, be sure to take a look around the sky. Before the eclipse began, the sky was bright; the moon acting like a spotlight obliterating all but the brightest stars. But as the moon becomes more and more diminished, you’ll begin seeing more and more of the fainter stars. At maximum eclipse, the moon could appear nearly 10,000 times dimmer than before the eclipse began. One object that will certainly stand out during the darkest phase of the eclipse will be the famous Pleiades star cluster which will be positioned about a half dozen degrees above and slightly to the right of the moon. 

Phase 3: “Maximum eclipse” will be when just a final bright arc remains on the moon’s lower rim, while the rest of the moon is showing a foreboding reddish glow. This ruddy coloration shining onto the moon is sunlight that has skimmed and bent through the Earth’s atmosphere; the combined light of all the sunrises and sunsets that ring our world at this particular moment. If an astronaut were on the lunar surface. He or she would see the sun hidden behind a dark Earth ringed with a thin, brilliant band of reddish or orange-yellow light. If our hypothetical astronaut were located on the moon’s southernmost regions, however, a narrow edge of the sun would be evident along the dark edge of the Earth. At this time, 97.4% of the moon will be immersed in the Earth’s dark shadow.

Dark or bright?

The mainstream media has come to refer to a total (or in this case, almost total) lunar eclipse as a “blood moon” because the moon’s tendency to glow a ruddy color at maximum eclipse. 

But this is not always so. 

Two factors affect a lunar eclipse’s color and brightness. The first is how deeply the moon penetrates into the umbra; the umbra’s center is much darker compared to its edge. The other factor is the state of the Earth’s atmosphere along the sunrise/sunset line. If the air is very clear, the eclipse is bright with shades of reddish copper or orange, almost like a shiny new penny. But in the aftermath of a major volcanic eruption, the stratosphere, about 30 miles (50 km) high, becomes polluted with an aerosol cloud — a thin global haze — causing the moon to appear more similar to a chocolate brown, ashen gray, or on rare occasions (as was the case in 1963 and 1992) almost totally black. 

In addition, look carefully near the moon’s south rim for tinges of blue that is slightly refracted through, and tinted by, Earth’s ozone-rich upper atmosphere.

Final phases

Phase 4: “Moon leaves umbra.” After the partial eclipse attains its maximum and as the moon continues eastward along its orbit, events replay in reverse sequence. 

Phase 5: “Moon leaves penumbra.” When the last scallop of the Earth’s umbra exits the moon’s disk, only the last, penumbral shading is left. By about 25 minutes later, nothing unusual remains at all and our November full moon appears as bright as ever. 

If it’s cloudy, North Americans won’t have to wait long for more lunar eclipses. In 2022 there will be two total eclipses, the first coming on May 15-16 and the second occurring on Nov. 8. Both will be visible across much of North America, with the first coming during “prime-time” evening-to-midnight hours, while the second takes place (again) during the early hours of the morning; moonset and sunrise will interrupt the latter stages for those living in the East. Interestingly, in both cases the duration of totality will be the same, lasting 85 minutes. 

Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers’ Almanac and other publications. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

Joe Rao

Joe Rao is Space.com’s skywatching columnist, as well as a veteran meteorologist and eclipse chaser who also serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers’ Almanac and other publications.

https://www.space.com/beaver-moon-lunar-eclipse-longest-of-century-phases?utm_source=pocket_discover

In Jupiter’s swirling Great Red Spot, NASA spacecraft finds hidden depths

www.npr.org

 

Brendan Byrne


This new perspective of Jupiter from the south makes the Great Red Spot appear as though it is in northern territory. This view is unique to Juno. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstäd/Seán Doran © CC NC SA hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstäd/Seán Doran © CC NC SA

This new perspective of Jupiter from the south makes the Great Red Spot appear as though it is in northern territory. This view is unique to Juno.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstäd/Seán Doran © CC NC SA

Jupiter is well-known for being the biggest planet in our solar system, and it’s also home to the biggest storm. It’s called the Great Red Spot, an enormous vortex that has been swirling for centuries. It’s bigger than our own planet, and yet we don’t know much about it. Until now, scientists could only observe the spot from afar. But thanks to a NASA spacecraft launched a decade ago, we’re finally getting a look inside Jupiter’s storm.

The Great Red Spot is like a storm here on Earth, but supersized. “It’s basically clouds,” says Paul Byrne, a planetary scientist at Washington University in St. Louis. Really, “it’s not all that dissimilar to the kinds of things we know as cyclones or hurricanes or typhoons on Earth.”

At 10,000 miles across, the Great Red Spot is the largest storm in our solar system and has been continually observed for around 200 years, but it’s been around for much longer. (Compare that with big storms on Earth, which generally last a few days or weeks at most.)

“We believe this thing is really old,” says Scott Bolton, principal investigator of NASA’s Juno mission. “How it lasts that long is a mystery.”

Before Juno, scientists could only observe the storm from afar. Even from a distance, they noticed it was changing shape and actually shrinking.

This illustration depicts Juno in an elliptical, polar orbit around Jupiter. NASA hide caption

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NASA

This illustration depicts Juno in an elliptical, polar orbit around Jupiter.

NASA

NASA’s Juno mission launched from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida back in 2011 and arrived at Jupiter in 2016. In 2019, the spacecraft changed course slightly and passed over the Great Red Spot twice.

Bolton and his team used microwave sensors to slice into the depths of the storm, getting the first 3D model of the Great Red Spot. “It’s a pancake, because it’s so wide at the top. But the depth of that pancake is much thicker than what we would have anticipated.”

The microwave observations show these storms on Jupiter, called vortices, extend below the cloud deck of the planet. In the case of the Great Red Spot, it extends at least 200 miles into the clouds of Jupiter, beyond the depths of where clouds form and water condenses.

“That’s very different than the way we think Earth’s atmosphere works, which is largely driven by water, clouds, condensation and sunlight,” says Bolton. “How that works is going to require new models and new ideas to explain.”

Measuring the Great Red Spot’s gravity

During its 2019 pass over the Great Red Spot, the Juno spacecraft buzzed the planet at a blistering 130,000 miles per hour. The storm is so massive that its gravity field actually jostled the spacecraft during its flyby.

“The local gravity tends to pull and push away the spacecraft as it flies over the vortex, and this creates sort of like bumps in the road for Juno,” says Marzia Parisi, a Juno scientist from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and lead author of a paper in the journal Science on gravity overflights of the Great Red Spot.

Scientists here on Earth could see the effect of these gravitational “bumps.” That’s because every time they jostled Juno, they nudged the spacecraft closer to or farther from Earth. That changing distance caused the radio waves sent back to Earth some 400 million miles away to be subtly squeezed and stretched, a phenomenon known as a Doppler shift.

Using this effect, the spacecraft could pick up tiny jostles as small as 0.01 millimeters per second.

“The precision required to get the Great Red Spot’s gravity during the July 2019 flyby is staggering,” says Parisi. The findings from the gravity observations complemented Bolton’s earlier microwave measures, concluding the storm penetrates some 300 miles into Jupiter’s atmosphere.

The shrinking spot

Observations of the Great Red Spot show that it’s shrinking. For nearly a century and a half, the iconic spot has been getting smaller and it’s unclear just how long it will last.

Juno is taking a closer look at this phenomenon. “What we’re doing is seeing up close what’s happening while that shrinking has happened,” says Bolton.

The spacecraft is observing flecks of the storm getting caught up in neighboring clouds. The storm itself also appears to be trapped by powerful conveyer belts of wind on the planet that are stabilizing the storm.

“I don’t think the theory is very far advanced to the sense where we can connect all of that to the changes in the size,” said Bolton.

Data from Juno will help scientists predict what could possibly happen to the Great Red Spot.

“Understanding what’s happening with the storm now allows scientists to make much more sophisticated models to simulate what we see and then make predictions for what will happen in the future, including up to perhaps when the Great Red Spot may eventually go away,” says planetary scientist Paul Byrne.

Understanding other Jupiter-like planets

The findings from the Juno spacecraft are shedding light on the early formation of giant planets like Saturn, Uranus and Neptune — and even planets beyond our own solar system.

“When we get up close, and this is the first planet we’ve actually been able to open up and look inside, this is going to tell us a lot about how giant planets work throughout the galaxy,” says Bolton.

The JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft captures a Jovian cyclone known as a barge type in polar jet stream called “Jet N4.” NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS. Image processing: Gerald Eichstädt CC BY hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS. Image processing: Gerald Eichstädt CC BY

The JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft captures a Jovian cyclone known as a barge type in polar jet stream called “Jet N4.”

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS. Image processing: Gerald Eichstädt CC BY

To date, astronomers have identified thousands of exoplanets — planets that orbit a star other than our sun. These planets are far away, with the closest one around 10.5 light-years from Earth. That makes observing what’s happening on the surface difficult.

Around 1,400 of these exoplanet candidates are thought to be gas giants, much like Jupiter. Understanding what happens on Jupiter can help scientists get a better sense of what’s happening beyond our solar system.

“By understanding the physics and the processes that go into shaping Jupiter,” says Byrne, “we’ll get a better better understanding of not just Jupiter, but of these kinds of worlds.”

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/09/1052773575/in-jupiters-swirling-great-red-spot-nasa-spacecraft-finds-hidden-depths?utm_source=pocket-newtab-android

Hoping you have clear skies to see the meteor shower

Look to the sky

Watch “Perseids, Blue Moon and Extra Bright Planets on Tap in August”

From The Weather Channel Android App: https://weather.com/science/space/video/perseids-blue-moon-and-extra-bright-planets-on-tap-in-august?pl=pl-the-latest

You can watch it live!

Look up! The Super Flower Blood Moon lunar eclipse is coming May 26

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Joe Rao

Four eclipses will occur this year, two of the moon and two of the sun. The first of these will take place during the early hours of Wednesday (May 26) when the full moon becomes completely immersed in Earth’s dark umbral shadow, producing the first total lunar eclipse since January 2019. 

Unfortunately, those who live in the eastern third of the United States will see little or nothing of this event, because when the visual show begins to get underway, the moon will either be approaching its setting or will have already set. Those who live in the central and especially the far-western states have the advantage of seeing at least the first half of the eclipse, if not most of it, before moonset. Along a slice of the U.S. Pacific Coast, as well as the southern and western parts of Alaska and all of Hawaii, the umbral phase of the eclipse will be visible from start to finish. 

For this month’s lunar eclipse, the moon will be completely in the Earth’s dark umbra for a tantalizingly short length of time: 14 minutes and 31 seconds. The moon will slip through the northernmost part of the shadow. 

Super Flower Blood Moon 2021: When and how to see the supermoon lunar eclipse

The Super Blood Wolf Moon eclipse of Jan. 20-21, 2019, captured at mid-totality by Imelda Joson and Edwin Aguirre from the suburbs of Boston.
The “Super Blood Wolf Moon” eclipse of Jan. 20-21, 2019, captured at mid-totality by Imelda Joson and Edwin Aguirre from the suburbs of Boston. (Image credit: Imelda Joson/Edwin Aguirre)

The fraction of the lunar disk immersed in the umbra is described by the “geometrical magnitude” at mid-totality, which for this eclipse will be 1.0095 moon diameters. This is the distance from the limb of the moon closest to the shadow center across the moon to the edge of the umbra. Put another way, the moon’s northern limb will be tucked a mere 20 miles (32 kilometers) inside the umbra at the moment of greatest eclipse, which occurs at 1118 GMT. This also means that totality will likely be relatively bright, because the moon’s upper limb will be closest to the outer edge of the Earth’s dark umbral shadow.

Below we provide a timetable for the principal stages of the lunar eclipse for five time zones. N.A. (“Not Available”) refers to when the moon has set and that particular stage is not visible. From Hawaii, the opening stages of the eclipse occur prior to midnight, on late Tuesday evening (May 25).

Lunar eclipses: What are they, and when is the next one? Times of stages for total lunar eclipse of May 26, 2021 Time Zone: EDTCDTMDTPDTHDTMoon enters penumbra4:47 a.m. 3:47 a.m.2:47 a.m. 1:47 a.m. 10:47 p.m. Moon enters umbra5:44 a.m. 4:44 a.m.3:44 a.m.2:44 a.m.11:44 p.m. Total eclipse beginsN/A6:11 a.m.5:11 a.m.4:11 a.m. 1:11 a.m. Middle of the eclipseN/A6:18 a.m.5:18 a.m.4:18 a.m.1:18 a.m. Total eclipse endsN/A6:25 a.m.5:25 a.m.4:25 a.m. 1:25 a.m. Moon leaves umbraN/AN/AN/A5:52 a.m. 2:52 a.m.Moon leaves penumbraN/AN/AN/AN/A3:49 a.m.

Being large and close is a drawback!

Many online sites are playing up the fact that this particular full moon will also be a “supermoon” — that is, a full moon that more or less coincides with its arrival at the perigee (closest point) in its orbit around Earth. The moon will arrive at perigee at 0155 GMT on May 26 and officially turns full 9 hours and 19 minutes later. At that moment, its distance from Earth will be 222,124 miles (357,474 km), resulting in the largest full moon in apparent size in 2021 — about 7.7% larger than normal.

However, be aware that such a situation actually ends up shortening the duration of totality. For lunar eclipses that occur during late spring and early summer, the diameter of the Earth’s dark umbral shadow is about 12% smaller compared to late fall and early winter. So, a larger-than-normal moon transiting a smaller-than-normal umbral shadow will end up being totally eclipsed for a shorter period of time. In addition, when it’s near perigee, the moon is moving a bit faster than normal, again shortening the time it will spend completely immersed in Earth’s shadow. 

These two factors, combined with the fact that the moon is barely skimming just within the northernmost part of the umbra, are the main reasons why this eclipse — ballyhooed by many because of the moon’s large apparent size — will have such a short duration of totality.     

Related: How the ‘supermoon’ looks (infographic)

A strange moonset

An interesting observation to attempt is to try and see the partially eclipsed setting moon and the rising sun simultaneously. While such a sun-Earth-moon alignment would seem to make this observation impossible, remember that the images of both sun and moon are apparently “lifted” above the horizon, thanks to refraction by Earth’s atmosphere

. This allows us to see the moon for several extra minutes after it has set and the sun for several extra minutes before it actually rises.

Observers across the central and eastern United States and Canada should pay particular attention to the full moon at or shortly before sunrise early on Wednesday morning, for as we noted earlier for this part of the country, the eclipse will just be starting when the moon sets, putting an abrupt end to this shady little drama. For North Americans, the farther west you go the better the view; as the sun

rises in the east-northeast, the moon will be going down on the opposite side of the sky in the west-southwest. 

The moon will still appear to be “full” as it sets for eastern sections of New York and Pennsylvania as well as for all of New Jersey, though sharp-eyed observers might be able to detect a faint penumbral “stain” on the moon’s left limb if their west-southwest horizon is haze-free. To some, it might look like the famous “man in the moon” has a bruise on the left side of his face above his chin.

Related: Watch a meteor smack the blood moon in this lunar eclipse video!

Take a bite!

From west-central New York State through east-central Pennsylvania and the Delmarva Peninsula, the start of the partial stages closely coincides with moonset; you might notice a small “bite” taken out of the moon at about the 9 o’clock position on the moon’s disk.  

For the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley down through the Carolinas, about one-quarter to one-half of the setting moon will already be immersed in the umbra; the shadow will appear to creep from left to right across the moon. 

Have a slice 

Across the eastern Dakotas heading southeast to Missouri and continuing down to the Alabama/Florida Gulf Coast, only a slice of the right side of the moon will be in view as it drops below the west-southwest horizon. Farther to the west, the moon will set completely immersed in Earth’s shadow.  

Depending on the clarity of your sky, however, you might only get to keep the narrowing moon in view to within about 15 minutes of local sunrise, since the dawn twilight sky is rapidly brightening. For it to still remain visible, the moon will also need to remain just high enough above any low-lying horizon haze.  

And keep in mind that this holds only for the uneclipsed portion of the moon.  

Total (with difficulty)

The moon will set in total eclipse across a roughly 200-mile (320 km) corridor that will encompass eastern Montana, the western Dakotas and down through central Kansas to the Texas/Louisiana Gulf Coast. 

Indeed, if the moon is totally eclipsed at moonset from where you live, you’ll probably have to carefully scan the west-southwest horizon with binoculars in order to possibly detect the moon, which will somewhat resemble a dim, sooty and eerily illuminated mottled softball. 

Uncharacteristic phase

Across the northern and central Rockies down into central Texas, the moon’s emergence from the umbra somewhat later will be the main spectacle. The low, partially eclipsed moon in deep blue twilight should offer a wide variety of interesting scenic possibilities for those attempting a photograph accompanied with a nearby landmark in the foreground; it will be a peculiar looking crescent moon with its cusps pointing downward while descending toward the west-southwest horizon.  

Farther west, across the intermountain region, desert Southwest and Pacific Northwest, the moon will appear to be notched on its lower portion by the umbral shadow. For places west (left) of a line running from roughly Lincoln City, Oregon to Los Angeles, the moon will have completely exited the umbra before moonset.   

Coming attractions

The next lunar eclipse after Wednesday’s will occur on Nov. 19. That one will be another early morning event, but this time it will favor all of North America.  

The November event will be an “almost total” eclipse, with more than 97% of the moon’s diameter immersed in the umbra at greatest eclipse. Next year, on the night of May 15-16, another total eclipse will take place. For those living in the eastern U.S., the eclipse will take place during the overnight hours, while out in the far west the eclipse will already be in progress as the moon rises.  

Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers’ Almanac and other publications. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

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It’s landing day on Mars! NASA’s Perseverance rover will touch down on the Red Planet today

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It’s landing day for Perseverance and all eyes are on the Red Planet.

The rover spent the last seven months flying the roughly 125-million-mile (202 million kilometers) distance to Mars on a quest to find signs of ancient life. Later today (Feb. 18), the mission will begin a daring “seven minutes of terror“-type descent, and if all goes well, its wheel touchdown will signal the beginning of the most powerful rover yet to roam the Martian surface. 

Perseverance will broadcast information back in high-definition 4K, set aside promising rock samples for a sample-return mission and launch the first interplanetary helicopter — all while photographing, laser-targeting and investigating targets in the ancient delta of Jezero Crater

You can watch the Mars landing live here and on Space.com’s homepage, courtesy of NASA, beginning at 2:15 p.m. EST (1915 GMT). The landing is expected at 3:55 p.m. EST (2055 GMT). 

Related: How to watch NASA’s Perseverance rover land on Mars
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NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover mission

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Join our forums here to discuss the Perseverance Mars rover landing. What do you hope finds?

This mission has been a decade in the making and as such, various officials from NASA expressed a lot of excitement and trepidation in a press conference Wednesday (Feb. 17). Also, understanding Perseverance best comes after putting it in context with the 50 or so years of Mars missions that came before. The groundwork to this life-seeking mission began with exploring signs of water from orbit, landing a few missions, and then sending out the first rovers in the late 1990s and early 2000s. 

The first long-running rover missions were Spirit and Opportunity, which landed in 2004 and lasted until about 2010 and 2018, respectively. “[We were] following the water, trying to understand the history of water on Mars and understanding if there were ever a time when there was enough liquid water present on the surface of Mars to support life,” Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s planetary science division, said in the press conference.

Perseverance rover’s Mars landing: Everything you need to know

“That was followed, of course, by Curiosity [in 2012] — where we really took the next step to understand the habitable environments on Mars. We were able to confirm the presence of a lake of liquid water on the surface of Mars that was sustained over a period of time, and also identify the complex organic molecules that would be the building blocks for life. 

“We’ve built on all of that knowledge to prepare ourselves now with the Perseverance rover,” Glaze continued, “which is going to take that next step — to really, actually look for those signs of life.”

Landing on Mars is the first planetary challenge the Perseverance rover, or “Percy” for short, will face as it whips into the atmosphere. Most Martian landing sites of past missions were wider plains, but Jezero Crater has more interesting terrain — craters, rock fields, sand dunes, a wealth of places to explore. 

“All those things also represent landing hazards for the spacecraft,” warned Matt Wallace, Perseverance deputy project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. “So we do have a new hazard avoidance capability we call terrain-relative navigation, which we’ll employ for the first time.”

In the last minutes before landing, Perseverance will use artificial intelligence to scan for the safest landing site below — and then it will make final adjustments to touch down softly on the surface. The computer-directed landing is a necessity because the light speed between Earth and Mars is too great for somebody to hand-steer the rover remotely, all the way down. 

Controllers have not been idle these last few months, however, rather spending the time to make sure Perseverance will stick its crucial landing. Indeed, for about nine years before Perseverance launched, they were already discussing how the last few minutes of the mission would proceed, Wallace said. In more recent weeks, there was lots of practice also, preparation of the various systems.

“Our [pyrotechnic] systems are armed and ready to execute the deployments necessary to execute entry, descent and landing,” Wallace said. “We have tested out our engines and our guidance sensors — they are ready to go, and really we just have a few more [planned] interactions with the spacecraft. But if necessary, Perseverance could land itself already, without any more help.”

Related: How the Perseverance Mars rover landing works: a step-by-step guide

Diagram of the key steps in the Mars 2020 mission's entry, descent and landing sequence of Feb. 18, 2021.
This diagram shows the key steps in the Perseverance rover’s entry, descent and landing sequence that will take place today (Feb. 18). (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The next step after landing is to start communications with Earth. Perseverance can send back simple “tones” or communications without data attached to it, and an orbiting spacecraft known as Mars Atmospheric and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) can send back a little more data a few hours after landing.

But what is really required for real-time updates is the muscle of the long-running Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), a frequent relayer of information from surface spacecraft. MRO recently received a new set of software to relay data from the rover, said Allen Chen, Perseverance’s entry, descent, and landing lead, at JPL. The data sent back during landing will be slow at only eight kilobits per second, roughly half the speed of a dial-up Internet connection, but it will be valuable to see how the spacecraft did.

“We’ll be able to show you what’s going on in real time — and show ourselves as well,” Chen said. “We’ll be able to see what mode we’re in, where we think Perseverance is looking, how fast we’re going, how high we are above the ground, even an estimate of how much fuel we have left as well. We hope to use that to assess what’s going on and to show everybody else what’s going on, as it’s happening.”

Related: A  spacecraft fleet will watch NASA’s Perseverance rover land on Mars 

All of MRO’s and Perseverance’s information will be useful to numerous future landing missions, NASA officials said, allowing spacecraft in years to come to fly and land more precisely. Such information would in fact be useful for any world with an atmosphere, such as the intriguing moon of Saturn, Titan, which has prebiotic chemistry and may help us understand more about the origins of life in the solar system.

The first few weeks after Percy’s landing will be intense, as the team temporarily works on “Mars time” (a Martian day or “sol” of 24 hours, 37 minutes) to make the most of the first action-packed weeks on the surface. Data will flow back constantly from the rover to the science team, which will need to interpret what they see and then figure out what to do the next day. Next, that information needs to be coded into the rover and sent to Mars for execution.

“This is a very fast-paced, high-stakes operation. It’s kind of a race to get it done. And it also involves literally hundreds of people having to work together seamlessly. I can tell you, this is not what scientists usually do. Scientists do not usually perform under these kinds of circumstances,” Ken Farley, Perseverance project scientist at the California Institute of Technology, said at the press conference.

So JPL — as JPL often does — turned to simulation. Farley said the team sent scientists out to the Nevada desert with instruments for a week to simulate rover activities, while the rest of the science team remained at JPL or at home — a necessity given that everyone still needs to largely self-quarantine amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“One special skill we’ve had to pay attention to — and it’s different than ever before — is the science team is not going to be shoulder-to-shoulder doing this for the foreseeable future,” Farley said. “We are going to be operating remotely. So literally, the science mission is going to be executed from people’s living rooms and bedrooms, all around the country and all around the world. It’s spectacular that we are able to do that. It’s a big challenge and I think we are ready.”

Ground images from the rover will be needed to figure out the best and safest pathway forward for exploration. Perseverance’s wheels are beefed up compared to the delicate wheels of Curiosity, which got unexpectedly torn up due to tough terrain in its early mission before JPL made driving adaptations. Using images from Perseverance and orbit, the team will look for key scientific targets — “rocks that we think will tell us the most about the geologic history of Jezero Crater,” Farley said.

“They are the places where we think there may be evidence for past life on Mars, where we might find biosignatures and places where we are likely to collect samples, so getting onto that trajectory will be something that we do very early in the mission,” he added. 

“So, I can tell you that the science team is very excited for this transition. And I personally am extremely excited for those first images that are going to come back. They will be fabulous from a scientific point of view and also, a huge milestone after so many years of effort in this mission.

Visit Space.com today for complete coverage of the Perseverance Mars rover’s landing on the Red Planet.

Follow Elizabeth Howell on Twitter @howellspace. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

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Halloween night sky 2020: Rare ‘Blue Moon’ shines with Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Don’t miss these celestial treats this Halloween!

Star trails swirl over three smiling jack-o'-lanterns in this night-sky photo by amateur astronomer Gowrishankar L.

Star trails swirl over three smiling jack-o’-lanterns in this night-sky photo by amateur astronomer Gowrishankar L. (Image: © Gowrishankar L.)

Based on the latest national forecast, skies will be mainly clear on Saturday evening (Oct. 31) across about 90% of the contiguous United States, as costumed kids arrive at the door looking for candy or some other Halloween treat. 

A storm moving across Lake Superior will drag a cold front across parts of the Northern Plains and western Great Lakes. It’s not likely to bring any precipitation, but perhaps will spread some cloudiness across parts of North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. ADVERTISINGnull

The rest of the country, however, will be in fine shape with a bright full moon lighting up the evening sky. More on that in a moment.

Related: Rare Halloween ‘Blue Moon’ is a spooky treat for us all Click here for more Space.com videos…

Be careful!

If you plan to accompany children around your neighborhood, you might want to enlighten them by pointing out some of the objects that will be visible in the sky. Of course, in this year of the coronavirus pandemic, you will need to take extra precautions. Be sure that youngsters are wearing face masks; they can help curb the spread of the coronavirus and to protect other people. And remember physical distancing of at least 6 feet (2 meters) from others. It can make a big difference!

“King of the planets” and the “Lord of the Rings”

Jupiter and Saturn will be the first objects to vie for attention as the sky darkens; about a half-hour after sunset both will be near their highest point in sky, about one-third of the way up from the south-southwest horizon. You really can’t miss them; Jupiter — the largest planet in our solar system — appears to shine with a very bright, silvery-white light, while dimmer Saturn, shining sedately with a yellowish tinge will also be evident slightly above and to the left of the “king of the planets.” 

With even a small telescope using low magnification you’ll be able to see Jupiter’s disk as well as all four of the famous Galilean moons, so named because Galileo Galilei was the first to see them with his own crude telescope in 1610. On this Halloween night, you’ll see one satellite all by itself on one side of Jupiter — that will be Europa — while the other three reside on the other side of Jupiter. 

Going outward from Jupiter will be Io, Ganymede and finally Callisto.null

This sky map shows where to see Jupiter's four Galilean moons on Oct. 31, 2020.
This sky map shows where to see Jupiter’s four Galilean moons on Oct. 31, 2020. (Image credit: SkySafari app)

But as interesting as Jupiter is with its obvious disk and four bright moons, many will consider Saturn as the most beautiful of all the planets. Saturn’s rings are still wide open, with the north face tilted some nearly 21 degrees to our line of sight. 

But if you hope to show off the moon, Jupiter and Saturn to trick-or-treaters through a telescope, do it as soon as it gets dark because later in the evening their images likely will be shivering and churning about, due to poor viewing quality near the horizon. Jupiter will set around 10:20 p.m. local time and Saturn about a half hour later. 

The god of war

There’s another very bright and more colorful planet that will attract the attention of most folks: Mars, a  fiery-colored object hovering in the eastern sky as twilight ends. Its reddish-orange tinge suggested the color of blood, which is why this planet was named for the Roman god of war. 

Almost four weeks ago, Mars made the closest approach it will make to Earth until 2035. Its distance from us on Halloween night has since receded from 38.6 million miles (62.1 million kilometers) to 43.4 million miles (69.8 million km) and is virtually a match with Jupiter for brilliance at magnitude -2.1. Through even a small telescope it will show up as an orange-yellow disk with some darker markings streaked across its surface. Admittedly not as impressive as Jupiter’s moons or Saturn’s rings, but still, some of your neighborhood ghosts and goblins will likely want to see it nonetheless.

The Halloween “Blue Moon”

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Of course, the main celestial object that will attract everyone’s attention will be the moon, which will be full on Halloween. I suppose that next to Christmas Eve night, the holiday that is most associated with a full moon is Halloween. Who can forget, for example, that scene in the annual Halloween classic, “It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown,” when the silhouette of Snoopy — not the “Great Pumpkin” — rises up out of the pumpkin patch, backdropped by a bright full moon? 

This will also be the second full moon in October 2020, so it will also be branded a “Blue Moon.” The phrase “Once in a blue moon” was first noted in 1824 and refers to occurrences that are uncommon, though not truly rare. Yet, to have two full moons in the same month is not as uncommon as one might think. In fact, it occurs, on average, about every 32 months.  

But to have a full moon coincide with Halloween is truly quite rare. 

I did a survey of the dates of all full moons occurring from 1900 to 2100 and found that — across all United States time zones — there are only eight Halloween full moons that take place: in 1906, 1925, 1944, 2020, 2039, 2058, 2077 and 2096. 

Notice that there is an interval of 19 years running in between most of these years. That’s the Metonic Cycle, defined as 235 synodic lunar months, a period which is just 1 hour 27 minutes and 33 seconds longer than 19 tropical years (a tropical year is equal to 365.2422 days). So, most of the time, a full moon recurs on the same date after 19 years has elapsed. 

But unfortunately, the cycle is not exact, and as a result there are occasions where a full moon will recur one day later. That was the case in 1963, 1982 and 2001 — when the full moon fell not on Halloween, but the following day (Nov. 1). Our Halloween full moon this year breaks a 76-year drought going back to 1944. However, after this year, the Metonic Cycle will work to bring a Halloween full moon back to us at 19-year intervals four more times, through the rest of the 21st century.

Still, over a span of two centuries, a full moon occurring on Halloween only happens about 4% of the time. 

Or truly, once in a blue moon!

Helpful hints for young telescope viewers

In the September 2019 issue of The Astronomical League Magazine “Reflector,” author Richard W. Schmude Jr., offered some tips for those who plan to do a public outreach for astronomy on Halloween:

“Firstly, children sometimes grab or touch the eyepiece, so use an inexpensive one. I gently warn children not to touch the telescope. In my area, parents have learned to tell their children not to touch the telescope. In some cases, a child will grab the eyepiece, causing the telescope to shift. For this reason, a Dobsonian telescope with a good finderscope is a good choice for Halloween outreach. A small stool or booster ladder may help very small viewers. Sometimes, parents hold their children up to look through the eyepiece. One may also place a monitor-connected video camera in the telescope and people can easily see the object on a screen.” (I would add that in this year of the pandemic, that might be the solution of all). “Finally,” adds Mr. Schmude, “I have my bag of goodies next to my telescope so that the children get two treats!”

© Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

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The Orionid meteor shower peaks this week! Here’s what to expect. | Space

The Orionid meteor shower peaks this week! Here’s what to expect.

On a night this past summer, soon after sunset, a number of people gathered at a little-league field, not far from my home, eagerly awaiting nightfall and the appearance of the stars. We had also gathered there because there wasn’t much in the way of light pollution and we were afforded a clear and unobstructed view toward the northwest. As the sky darkened, we finally could see it: Comet NEOWISE, displaying a lovely, curved tail. 

“Not a bad show, considering we’re looking at a cosmic litterbug,” I said to the coterie of comet gazers. “Really, what we’re looking at is a piece of garbage out in space; think of that beautiful tail as ‘cosmic litter’; little pieces of dust and grit left behind by NEOWISE, all cluttering up the solar system.” nullADVERTISINGnull

If you step outside before dawn during the next week or so, you might try to catch a view of cosmic litter that has been left behind in space by an even more famous comet: Halley’s. We call that cosmic litter the Orionid meteor shower. And 2020 will be an excellent year to look for them, since the moon will be a slender crescent, four days past new phase and will have set before 9:30 p.m. local time on the night of their peak activity, and will not pose any hindrance whatsoever to prospective meteor observers.

Related: How to see the best meteor showers of 2020 Click here for more Space.com videos…

If the December Geminids and August Perseids can be considered ranking as the “first string” among the annual meteor showers in terms of brightness and reliability, then the Orionids are on the junior varsity. This year they are scheduled to reach their maximum before sunrise on Wednesday morning (Oct. 21). 

The name “Orionid” comes from the fact that the radiant — that spot on the sky from where the meteors appear to fan out from — is just above Orion’s second brightest star, ruddy Betelgeuse

Currently, the Orion constellation appears ahead of us in our journey around the sun and has not completely risen above the eastern horizon until after 11 p.m. local daylight time. At its best several hours later, at around 5 a.m., Orion will be highest in the sky toward the south.

But to see the greatest number of meteors, don’t look in the direction of the radiant, but rather about 30 degrees from it, in the direction of the point directly overhead (the zenith). Your clenched fist held at arm’s length is roughly equivalent to 10 degrees wide, so looking “three fists” up from Betelgeuse will be where to concentrate your view. null

Best times to watch

Orionid visibility extends from Oct. 16 to Oct. 26, with peak activity of perhaps 15 to 30 meteors per hour coming on the morning of Oct. 21. Step outside before sunrise on any of these mornings and if you catch sight of a meteor, there’s about a 75% chance that it likely is a byproduct of Halley’s Comet. The very last Orionid stragglers usually appear sometime in early to mid-November. 

The best time to watch begins from about 1 or 2 a.m. local daylight time until the first light of dawn (at around 5:45 a.m.), when Orion stands highest above the southern horizon. The higher in the sky Orion is, the more meteors appear all over the sky. The Orionids are one of just a handful of known meteor showers that can be observed equally well from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. 

Orionid meteors are normally dim and not well seen from urban locations, so it’s suggested that you find a safe rural location to see the best Orionid activity. 

“They are easily identified … from their speed,” authors David Levy and Stephen Edberg wrote in their book, “Observe Meteors: The Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers Meteor Observer’s Guide” (Astronomical League, 1986). “At 66 kilometers (41 miles) per second, they appear as fast streaks, faster by a hair than their sisters, the Eta Aquarids of May. And like the Eta Aquarids, the brightest family members tend to leave long-lasting trains. Fireballs are possible three days after maximum.” 

Undoubtedly this is connected in some way to the makeup of Halley’s Comet. 

Halley’s legacy

Comets are the leftovers of the earliest days of the solar system, the odd bits and pieces of simple gases — methane, ammonia, carbon dioxide and water vapor — that went unused when the sun and planets came into their present form. Meteoroids that are released into space out of this cometary debris are the remnants of a comet’s nucleus. All comets eventually disintegrate into meteor swarms and Halley’s is well into that process at this time. 

These tiny particles — mostly ranging in size from dust to sand grains — remain along the original comet’s orbit, creating a “river of rubble” in space. In the case of Halley’s Comet, its dirty trail of debris has been distributed more or less uniformly all along its entire orbit. When these tiny bits of comet collide with Earth, friction with our atmosphere raises them to white heat and produces the effect popularly referred to as “shooting stars.” 

And Halley’s Comet has left a legacy that is visible to us in the form of not just one, but two annual meteor showers. This is because its orbit closely approaches the Earth’s orbit at two different places. One intersection point (alluded to by Levy and Edberg) is in the early part of May, producing a meteor display known as the Eta Aquarids. The other point comes right now, in the middle to latter part of October, producing the Orionids. 

At this moment in time, Halley itself is nearing the far end of its long elliptical path around the sun, out beyond the orbit of Neptune. Its last visit through the inner solar system was in the winter of 1986. It will arrive at aphelion — its farthest point from the sun, 3.28 billion miles (5.28 billion km) — in early December 2023. Thereafter, it will begin its long journey back toward the sun, due to return in the midsummer of 2061. If you were born any time after 1983, you probably have a better than 50-50 chance to catch it on its next return. 

But for folks like myself — who will probably not be around when it returns — the Orionids will give us a chance to at least catch a view of some of the cosmic debris Halley has left behind in its wake.

https://www.space.com/orionid-meteor-shower-2020-peaks-soon?utm_source=Selligent&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=9155&utm_content=SDC_Newsletter+&utm_term=3223716&m_i=U87DZIIa%2BfCuNcCyJW5Iypl7yi6_x7WM%2BlOFZNp9x26w_l9I8IE%2B33MJaPkAVECMkONAM4e70Tjui007meu9UMFGT3uGiqLKDrFzchUUUK

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News | ‘Shallow Lightning’ and ‘Mushballs’ Reveal Ammonia to NASA’s Juno Scientists

In the center of this JunoCam image, small, bright “pop-up” clouds seen rise above the surrounding features. Clouds like these are thought to be the tops of violent thunderstorms responsible for “shallow lighting.” Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill © CC BY
› Full image and caption


The spacecraft may have found where the colorless gas has been hiding on the solar system’s biggest planetary inhabitant.


New results from NASA’s Juno mission at Jupiter suggest our solar system’s largest planet is home to what’s called “shallow lightning.” An unexpected form of electrical discharge, shallow lightning originates from clouds containing an ammonia-water solution, whereas lightning on Earth originates from water clouds.

Other new findings suggest the violent thunderstorms for which the gas giant is known may form slushy ammonia-rich hailstones Juno’s science team calls “mushballs”; they theorize that mushballs essentially kidnap ammonia and water in the upper atmosphere and carry them into the depths of Jupiter’s atmosphere.Get the Latest JPL News: Subscribe to the Newsletter »

The shallow-lightning findings will be published Thursday, Aug. 6, in the journal Nature, while the mushballs research is currently available online in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

Since NASA’s Voyager mission first saw Jovian lightning flashes in 1979, it has been thought that the planet’s lightning is similar to Earth’s, occurring only in thunderstorms where water exists in all its phases – ice, liquid, and gas. At Jupiter this would place the storms around 28 to 40 miles (45 to 65 kilometers) below the visible clouds, with temperatures that hover around 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius, the temperature at which water freezes). Voyager, and all other missions to the gas giant prior to Juno, saw lightning as bright spots on Jupiter’s cloud tops, suggesting that the flashes originated in deep water clouds. But lightning flashes observed on Jupiter’s dark side by Juno’s Stellar Reference Unit tell a different story.

“Juno’s close flybys of the cloud tops allowed us to see something surprising – smaller, shallower flashes – originating at much higher altitudes in Jupiter’s atmosphere than previously assumed possible,” said Heidi Becker, Juno’s Radiation Monitoring Investigation lead at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and the lead author of the Nature paper.

Becker and her team suggest that Jupiter’s powerful thunderstorms fling water-ice crystals high up into the planet’s atmosphere, over 16 miles (25 kilometers) above Jupiter’s water clouds, where they encounter atmospheric ammonia vapor that melts the ice, forming a new ammonia-water solution. At such lofty altitude, temperatures are below minus 126 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 88 degrees Celsius) – too cold for pure liquid water to exist. https://www.youtube.com/embed/tq_6DClZ0Ns

This animation takes the viewer on a simulated journey into Jupiter’s exotic high-altitude electrical storms. Get an up-close view of Mission Juno’s newly discovered “shallow lighting” flashes and dive into the violent atmospheric jet of the Nautilus cloud. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill

“At these altitudes, the ammonia acts like an antifreeze, lowering the melting point of water ice and allowing the formation of a cloud with ammonia-water liquid,” said Becker. “In this new state, falling droplets of ammonia-water liquid can collide with the upgoing water-ice crystals and electrify the clouds. This was a big surprise, as ammonia-water clouds do not exist on Earth.”

The shallow lightning factors into another puzzle about the inner workings of Jupiter’s atmosphere: Juno’s Microwave Radiometer instrument discovered that ammonia was depleted – which is to say, missing – from most of Jupiter’s atmosphere. Even more puzzling was that the amount of ammonia changes as one moves within Jupiter’s atmosphere.

“Previously, scientists realized there were small pockets of missing ammonia, but no one realized how deep these pockets went or that they covered most of Jupiter,”said Scott Bolton, Juno’s principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “We were struggling to explain the ammonia depletion with ammonia-water rain alone, but the rain couldn’t go deep enough to match the observations. I realized a solid, like a hailstone, might go deeper and take up more ammonia. When Heidi discovered shallow lightning, we realized we had evidence that ammonia mixes with water high in the atmosphere, and thus the lightning was a key piece of the puzzle.”

This graphic depicts


This graphic depicts the evolutionary process of “shallow lightning” and “mushballs” on Jupiter. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/CNRS
› Full image and caption

Jovian Mushballs

A second paper, released yesterday in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets,envisions the strange brew of 2/3 water and 1/3 ammonia gas that becomes the seed for Jovian hailstones, known as mushballs. Consisting of layers of water-ammonia slush and ice covered by a thicker water-ice crust, mushballs are generated in a similar manner as hail is on Earth – by growing larger as they move up and down through the atmosphere.

“Eventually, the mushballs get so big, even the updrafts can’t hold them, and they fall deeper into the atmosphere, encountering even warmer temperatures, where they eventually evaporate completely,” said Tristan Guillot, a Juno co-investigator from the Université Côte d’Azur in Nice, France, and lead author of the second paper. “Their action drags ammonia and water down to deep levels in the planet’s atmosphere. That explains why we don’t see much of it in these places with Juno’s Microwave Radiometer.”

“Combining these two results was critical to solving the mystery of Jupiter’s missing ammonia,” said Bolton. “As it turned out, the ammonia isn’t actually missing; it is just transported down while in disguise, having cloaked itself by mixing with water. The solution is very simple and elegant with this theory: When the water and ammonia are in a liquid state, they are invisible to us until they reach a depth where they evaporate – and that is quite deep.”

Understanding the meteorology of Jupiter enables us to develop theories of atmospheric dynamics for all the planets in our solar system as well as for the exoplanets being discovered outside our solar system. Comparing how violent storms and atmospheric physics work across the solar system allows planetary scientists to test theories under different conditions.

More About the Mission

The solar-powered Jupiter explorer launched nine years ago today, on Aug. 5, 2011. And last month marked the fourth anniversary of its arrival at Jupiter. Since entering the gas giant’s orbit, Juno has performed 27 science flybys and logged over 300 million miles (483 million kilometers).

JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA’s New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built and operates the spacecraft.

More information about Juno is available at:

https://www.nasa.gov/juno

https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

https://www.facebook.com/NASAJuno

https://www.twitter.com/NASAJuno

News Media ContactDC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Alana Johnson / Grey Hautaluoma
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-672-4780 / 202-358-0668
alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov / grey.hautaluoma-1@nasa.gov

Deb Schmid
Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
210-522-2254
dschmid@swri.org

François Maginiot
French National Centre for Scientific Research, Paris
+33 1 44 96 51 51
presse@cnrs.fr

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Magic in the night sky this month

One of the brightest comets in decades is passing Earth. Here’s how to see it.

National Geographic Logo

Photograph by Ivan Vagner, Roscosmos Read Caption

By Dan Falk PUBLISHED July 9, 2020

A comet called NEOWISE is paying a visit to Earth’s neighborhood this month, and astronomers say it may end up ranking as one of the brightest comets seen in our skies in more than a decade. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0

The comet is currently bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye, if you know where to look. It’s already delighting sky-watchers across the Northern Hemisphere who have been rising before dawn to gaze at the glowing celestial traveler.

Chris Schur, an astrophotographer based in Payson, Arizona, describes the comet as “gorgeous.” When he trained his binoculars on it on the morning of July 7, he estimated that its tail spanned about five degrees in length, which is about 10 times the apparent size of the full moon. If the tail continues to grow, which astronomers say is possible, “it could be very dramatic,” Schur says.

For the next week or so, NEOWISE will be strictly a predawn target. To see it, head outside at least 45 minutes before sunrise and look just above the northeastern horizon. The bright star Capella can serve as a marker, as the comet lies just below it, while the brilliant planet Venus is visible to the east. In about a week’s time, the comet will transition to the evening sky, making it even easier to spot. Beginning around mid-July, the comet will be visible in the northwestern sky after sunset, arcing slowly upward beneath the stars of the Big Dipper.

Comet NEOWISE was captured over Lebanon in this composite image, composed of photos taken on July 8.Photograph by Maroun Habib

To have the best chance of glimpsing the celestial transient, a little planning goes a long way. “It’s not like you’re just going to glance up and, Oh wow, there it is!” says Dave Schleicher, a senior astronomer at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. “You need to have a good idea of where to look—and binoculars will help.”

Still, judging by photos posted on social media over the past few days, the comet is putting on a quite a show—arguably the best since Comet Hale-Bopp, which lit up the night sky in 1997. Comet McNaught, which passed by Earth in 2007, was also brighter than NEOWISE is now, but it was primarily visible from the Southern Hemisphere. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0

“The buzz around this comet is justified,” says photographer Malcolm Park, who captured an image of NEOWISE and its tail from his home in eastern Ontario on the morning of July 5.

Flying close to the sun and Earth

Named for the space telescope used to discover it in late March, the comet’s full official moniker is C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE). It made its closest approach to the sun, known as perihelion, on July 3, and the fact that the comet is still visible at all has sky-watchers breathing a sigh of relief. Many comets don’t survive the heat of a close approach to our host star. Comets, often described as “dirty snowballs,” are made up of rock, dust, gases, and ice—a combination that doesn’t always hold together in extreme temperatures. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0

“As it comes closer to the sun, it heats up, it blows off all kinds of material, and you get a spectacular tail,” says Laura Danly, curator of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. “But sometimes they just fall apart completely, and they disappear.”

NEOWISE seems to be a survivor, emerging from its encounter with the sun sporting a long tail of gas and dust. “We’ve already gone past that point of closest approach, and the comet is still there,” Danly says. “So we can hope for another month of good viewing.”

Several factors determine the comet’s brightness. Having passed the sun, it’s now reflecting less of the star’s light toward us, but it is also getting closer to Earth. NEOWISE will make its closest approach on July 22, when it comes within 64 million miles of our home planet. After that, it will gradually fade from view as it heads back to the outer reaches of the solar system. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html?n=0

To catch the best view, should you get up early to see the comet this week, or wait until later in the month when it’s more conveniently positioned in the evening sky? Many sky-watchers, fearing that the comet’s show may be fleeting, suggest setting a morning alarm and seeing the comet as soon as possible. And with many people feeling a bit stir-crazy due to the pandemic, a passing comet might be the perfect excuse to get outside and engage with nature, Danly says.

“Get your kids up early, if you have them, or get yourself up early, and go see this beautiful sight,” she says. “And maybe stay for the sunrise.”

https://api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/science/2020/07/one-of-brightest-comets-in-decades-passing-earth-how-to-see?__twitter_impression=true

July 2020: The Next Full Moon is the Buck Moon – NASA Solar System Exploration

solarsystem.nasa.gov

By Gordon Johnston

July 2020

When is the Next Full Moon?

The next full Moon will be early Sunday morning, July 5, 2020, appearing opposite the Sun at 12:44 a.m. EDT. This will be a partial penumbral eclipse of the Moon, visible from most of North America.

The next full Moon is called the Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, Mead Moon, Rose Moon, Guru Moon, and Dharma Day. There also will be a partial penumbral lunar eclipse.

The next full Moon will be just after midnight on Sunday morning, July 5, 2020, appearing opposite the Sun (in Earth-based longitude) at 12:44 a.m. EDT. The Moon will be close enough to opposite the Sun that its northern edge will pass through the partial shadow of the Earth — called a partial penumbral eclipse.

Although visible from the Americas, this slight dimming of part of the Moon should be difficult or impossible to notice without instrumentation. The Moon will appear full for about three days around the eclipse, from Friday evening into Monday morning, making this a full Moon weekend.

The Maine Farmer’s Almanac first published “Indian” names for the full Moons in the 1930’s. According to this almanac, as the full Moon in July and the first full Moon of summer, the Algonquin tribes of what is now the northeastern United States called this full Moon the Buck Moon. Early summer is normally when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. They also called this the Thunder Moon because of early summer’s frequent thunderstorms.

As usual, the wearing of suitably celebratory celestial attire is encouraged in honor of the full Moon.

Europeans called this full Moon the Hay Moon for the haymaking in June and July, and sometimes the Mead Moon (although this name and “Honey Moon” were also used for the previous full Moon). Mead is created by fermenting honey mixed with water, sometimes adding fruits, spices, grains, or hops.

Another European name is the Rose Moon, although some use this name for the previous full Moon. Some sources indicate the name “Rose Moon” comes from the roses that bloom in late June. Others report that the name comes from the color of the full Moon this time of year.

The orbit of the Moon around the Earth is almost in the same plane as the orbit of the Earth around the Sun (only about 5 degrees off). When the Sun appears highest in the sky near the summer solstice, the full Moon opposite the Sun appears low in the sky. For Europe’s higher latitudes, the full Moon nearest the summer solstice shines through more atmosphere than at other times of the year, making it more likely to have a reddish color (for the same reasons that sunrises and sunsets are red).

For 2020, this full Moon in early July is closer to the summer solstice and will be lower in the sky than the full Moon in June. For the Washington, D.C. area, on the morning of July 5, 2020, the full Moon will reach only 26.2 degrees above the southern horizon at its highest for the night, about 1.5 degrees lower in the sky than the full Moon was in early June.

For Hindus this is the Guru Full Moon (Guru Purnima) and is celebrated as a time for clearing the mind and honoring the guru or spiritual master. For Buddhists, this full Moon is Dharma Day, also known as Asalha Puha or Esala Poya. For Theravada Buddhism this is an important festival celebrating Buddha’s first sermon.

In most lunisolar calendars the months change with the new Moon, and full Moons fall in the middle of the lunar months. This full Moon is the middle of the fifth month of the Chinese calendar and Tammuz in the Hebrew calendar. In the Islamic calendar the months start with the first sighting of the waxing crescent Moon after the New Moon. This full Moon is near the middle of Dhu al-Qidah, one of the four sacred months during which warfare is prohibited.

Since this is the Thunder Moon, a quick note on lightning safety. Most of the lightning that strikes the ground arcs from the negatively charged bottom of the storm to the ground underneath the storm. Much rarer is positive lightning, which arcs from the top of a thunderstorm to strike the ground up to eight miles away. Positive lightning can sometimes strike areas where the sky is clear (hence the term “bolt out of the blue”). Because it arcs across a greater distance it tends to be 5 to 10 times more powerful than regular ground strikes. Because it can strike dry areas outside of the storm, positive lightning tends to start more fires than negative lightning. Although positive lightning is rare (less than 5% of all lightning strikes), the lack of warning combined with its greater power tends to make it more lethal.

A good rule to follow is, if you can hear the thunder, you can be struck by the lightning. As a former bicycle commuter (before I retired from NASA), I am well aware that the inch or so of rubber tire between my metal bicycle and the ground will make little difference to a bolt that can arc across miles of air from the top of a thunderstorm to where I am riding.

As usual, the wearing of suitably celebratory celestial attire is encouraged in honor of the full Moon. Be safe (especially during thunder storms), avoid starting wars, and take a moment to clear your mind.

More Skywatching

As for other celestial events between now and the full Moon after next:

As summer begins, the daily periods of sunlight begin to shorten. For the Washington, D.C. area (using the location of NASA Headquarters), on the day of the full Moon (Sunday, July 5, 2020) morning twilight will begin at 4:37 a.m., sunrise will be at 5:49 a.m, solar noon will be at 1:13 p.m. when the Sun reaches its maximum altitude of 73.8 degrees, sunset will be at 8:36 p.m., and evening twilight will end at 9:48 p.m. By the day of the full Moon after next (Monday, Aug. 3, 2020) morning twilight will begin at 5:06 a.m., sunrise will be at 6:11 a.m, solar noon will be at 1:14 p.m. when the Sun reaches its maximum altitude of 68.4 degrees, sunset will be at 8:17 p.m, and evening twilight will end at 9:22 p.m.

Jupiter and Saturn Watching

On the evening of July 4, 2020 (the evening before the full Moon after midnight on July 5), as evening twilight ends, the bright planet Jupiter and the fainter planet Saturn will appear in the east southeast, with Jupiter to the right about 6 degrees above the horizon and Saturn on the left about 3 degrees above the horizon. The bright star closest to appearing directly overhead will be Arcturus, appearing 64 degrees above the southwestern horizon. The three bright stars of the “Summer Triangle” will appear towards the east, with Vega appearing 55 degrees above the horizon in the east-northeast, Deneb about 35 degrees above the horizon to the lower left of Vega, and Altair in the east about 26 degrees above the horizon.

As the lunar cycle progresses, the background of stars and planets will appear to shift towards the west. This summer should be a great time for Jupiter and Saturn watching, especially with a backyard telescope. Jupiter will be at its closest and brightest for the year on July 14, 2020, while Saturn will be at its closest and brightest on July 20, 2020, (called “opposition” because they will be opposite the Earth from the Sun). Both will appear to shift towards the west over the summer months, making them visible earlier in the evening sky (and friendlier for backyard stargazing, especially if you have young ones with earlier bed times). With clear skies and a small telescope you should be able to see Jupiter’s four bright moons, Ganymede, Callisto, Europa, and Io, shifting positions noticeably in the course of an evening. For Saturn, you should be able to see the brightly illuminated rings as well as the motions of Saturn’s moons, particularly the largest moon, Titan.

Comet Watching

We may have a naked eye comet visible in the evenings later in July 2020. However, we had two other promising comets this year [C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS) and C/2020 F8 (SWAN)] that both broke up as they got closer to the Sun and did not end up being visible. This current comet, C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE), was discovered on March 27, 2020. It will make its closest approach to the Sun on July 3, passing closer to the Sun than Mercury. If (and this is a big if) it does not break up, in its current orbit it should make its closest pass by the Earth on July 23. For the Washington, D.C. area, we may be able to see it near its closest on July 22 after moonset (at 10:14 p.m. EDT), when it will be about 20 degrees above the horizon in the northwest, but before the comet sets in the north-northwest just after 1 a.m. on July 23, 2020.

This comet was discovered by NASA’s Near Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE). NEOWISE was launched as the WISE mission on Dec. 14, 2009, using stored liquid hydrogen to keep its long-wavelength and far infrared detectors cold for astronomy observations. After this stored cryogen ran out, it observed for four months using only its mid-wavelength infrared detectors. The spacecraft was put into hibernation in February 2011. In September 2013 it was revived to make observations in the mid-wavelength infrared looking for Near Earth Objects (NEOs). So far, NEOWISE has discovered 28 comets and 313 near Earth asteroids (NEAs), including 57 potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) that might someday make threatening close approaches to the Earth.

By the evening of the full Moon after next on Aug. 3, 2020, as evening twilight ends (at 9:22 p.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area), the bright planet Jupiter and the fainter planet Saturn will appear in the southeast, with Jupiter to the right about 19 degrees above the horizon and Saturn on the left about 18 degrees above the horizon. The bright star appearing closest to overhead will be Vega, the brightest of the stars of the “Summer Triangle,” appearing 72 degrees above the eastern horizon. The other bright stars of the “Summer Triangle” are Deneb, which will appear about 50 degrees above the horizon in the east-northeast, and Altair, which will appear about 43 degrees above the horizon in the east-southeast.

On the morning of the full Moon on Sunday, July 5, 2020, as morning twilight begins (at 4:37 a.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area), four visible planets will be above the horizon (Neptune and Pluto will also be above the horizon but are not visible without a telescope). Venus will be the brightest, appearing about 11 degrees above the horizon in the east-southeast near the bright star Aldebaran. Next in brightness will be Jupiter appearing about 18 degrees above the horizon in the southwest. Saturn (the faintest of the four) will appear to the upper left of Jupiter at about 23 degrees above the horizon. Mars, third in brightness, will appear about 42 degrees above the horizon in the southeast.

Venus and Mercury Watching

Wednesday morning, July 8, 2020, will be when the brightest of the planets, Venus, reaches its greatest brilliancy (a geometric approximation of its greatest brightness). The bright star appearing to the lower left of Venus will be Aldebaran. Also around July 8, 2020 (depending upon viewing conditions), the planet Mercury should begin emerging from the glow of dawn about 30 minutes before sunrise, appearing low on the horizon in the east-northeast. Venus and Aldebaran will appear at their closest to each other on the morning of Sunday, July 12, 2020, about 1 degree apart. Starting the morning of Thursday, July 16, 2020, the planet Mercury will be above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (at least for the Washington, D.C. area), making all five of the naked eye planets visible (if you have a clear view of Mercury on the horizon in the east-northeast and Jupiter and Saturn on the horizon in the southwest). Mercury will appear at its highest above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins on the morning of Sunday, July 26, 2020 (3.5 degrees above the horizon in the east-northeast for the Washington, D.C. area), after which Mercury will begin shifting towards the glow of dawn again. Monday, July 27, 2020, will be the last morning that Jupiter will be above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (for the D.C. area, at least).

By the morning of the full Moon after next on Monday, Aug. 3, 2020, as morning twilight begins (at 5:06 a.m. for the Washington, D.C. area), the brightest of the visible planets, Venus, will appear about 25 degrees above the horizon in the east. Jupiter will have already set, so next in brightness will be Mars, appearing 54 degrees above the horizon in the south-southeast. Almost as bright as Mars, Mercury will appear only about 1 degree above the horizon in the east-northeast. The faintest of the visible planets, Saturn, will just be setting in the west-southwest, and this will be the last morning that Saturn will be above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins.

Meteor Showers

If you happen to find yourself in a place with clear, dark skies, away from city lights, especially if the Moon has already set and it is after midnight but before the sky starts to show any sign of dawn, keep a look out for meteors. Last month I mentioned the June Bootids, which peaked on June 27 and are expected to end by July 2, so I won’t write much more here. The Southern Delta-Aquariids are expected to be active from around July 12 to Aug. 23, peaking on July 27, 2020. Under ideal conditions (a clear, dark night in the southern hemisphere) near this peak you might be able to see 25 meteors per hour, although fewer meteors are expected be visible for us in the northern hemisphere. The best time to look should be on Monday morning, July 27, 2020, after moonset (12:20 a.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area) and before any sign of dawn (before about 4:17 a.m.), but only if the weather is clear with no clouds or high hazes, you can find a place that has a clear view of a wide expanse of the sky especially towards the south, and it is a place that is far from any light sources or urban light pollution.

If you do go out looking for meteors, be sure to give your eyes plenty of time to adapt to the dark. The rod cells in your eyes are more sensitive to low light levels but play little role in color vision. Your color-sensing cone cells are concentrated near the center of your view with more of the rod cells on the edge of your view. Since some meteors are faint, you will tend to see more meteors from the “corner of your eye” (which is why you need a view of a large part of the sky). Your color vision (cone cells) will adapt to darkness in about 10 minutes, but your more sensitive night vision will continue to improve for an hour or more (with most of the improvement in the first 35 to 45 minutes). The more sensitive your eyes are, the more chance you have of seeing meteors. Even a short exposure to light (from passing car headlights, etc.) will start the adaptation over again (so no turning on a light or your cell phone to check what time it is).

The Perseids are expected to be active from July 17 to Aug. 24, peaking on Aug. 12, 2020. Since this peak will be after the full Moon after next, I’ll write more next month.

Even though they are not usually visible, I include in these Moon missives information about Near Earth Objects (mostly asteroids) that may pass the Earth within 5 lunar distances, because I find it interesting that we have discovered so many. Early on Monday morning, June 29, 2020, at 12:09 a.m. EDT (2020-Jun-29 04:09 UTC), Near Earth Object (2020 JX1), between 46 and 103 meters (152 to 339 feet) across, will pass the Earth at 3.3 lunar distances, traveling at 5.00 kilometers per second (11,180 miles per hour).

July 1, 2020

On Wednesday afternoon, July 1, 2020, at 4:27 p.m. EDT (2020-Jul-01 20:27 UTC), Near Earth Object (2020 MK3), between 18 and 41 meters (60 to 135 feet) across, will pass the Earth at 1.8 lunar distances, traveling at 8.35 kilometers per second (18,670 miles per hour).

July 2, 2020

On Thursday night, July 2, 2020, the bright star Antares will appear to the lower right of the waxing nearly-full Moon.

July 4, 2002

Saturday morning, July 4, 2020, the Earth will be at aphelion, its farthest from the Sun in its year-long orbit. The Earth will be 3.4% farther from the Sun than it was at perihelion in early January. Since light intensity drops off as the square of the distance from the light source, the sunlight reaching the Earth at aphelion will be about 6.5% less bright than sunlight reaching the Earth at perihelion.

July 5, 2020

As mentioned above, the next full Moon will be early Sunday morning, July 5, 2020, appearing opposite the Sun at 12:44 a.m. EDT. This will be a partial penumbral eclipse of the Moon, visible from most of North America, but the slight reduction in brightness on part of the Moon will be difficult to notice with the human eye. The Moon will start to enter the partial shadow on Saturday night, July 4, 2020, at 11:07 p.m. EDT. On Sunday morning at 12:30 a.m. (the peak of the eclipse) about 35 percent of the Moon will be in the partial shadow. The Moon will finish exiting the partial shadow of the Earth at 1:52 a.m.

On Sunday night into Monday morning, July 5 to 6, 2020, the full Moon and the planets Jupiter and Saturn will form a triangle. The Moon will appear in the southeast at about 3 degrees above the horizon as evening twilight ends, with Jupiter above the Moon and Saturn to the left of the Moon. The Moon will reach its highest in the sky for the night on Monday morning (at 2:11 a.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area), with Jupiter to the right and Saturn above, and the Moon will be about 19 degrees above the horizon in the southwest as morning twilight begins (at 4:38 a.m. EDT).

July 8, 2020

Wednesday morning, July 8, 2020, will be when the brightest of the planets, Venus, will reach its greatest brilliancy (a geometric approximation of its greatest brightness) for this apparition. The bright star appearing to the lower left of Venus will be Aldebaran. For the Washington, D.C. area, Venus will rise in the east-northeast at 3:29 a.m. EDT, Aldebaran will rise around 3:40 a.m., morning twilight will begin around 4:40 a.m., but Venus should be bright enough to remain visible well into dawn. Since Venus will be near aphelion (its farthest from the Sun in its orbit), Venus will not be as bright this apparition as it can be in other apparitions.

Also Wednesday morning (depending upon viewing conditions), the planet Mercury should begin emerging from the glow of dawn about 30 minutes before sunrise, appearing low on the horizon in the east-northeast (rising at 5:21 a.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area). Mercury passed between the Earth and the Sun on June 30, 2020.

July 11, 2020

On Saturday morning, July 11, 2020, the planet Mars will appear to the left of the waning gibbous Moon. For the Washington, D.C. area, Mars will rise about 8 degrees to the left of the Moon at 12:21 a.m. EDT and they will appear to move closer together until Mars is lost in morning twilight, which will begin at 4:42 a.m.

July 12, 2020

By Sunday morning, July 12, 2020, the waning gibbous Moon will appear to have shifted to the other side of the planet Mars. For the Washington, D.C. area, the Moon will rise in the east at 12:38 a.m. EDT with Mars appearing about 5 degrees to the upper right of the Moon, and morning twilight will begin at 4:43 a.m.

Also Sunday morning, Venus and Aldebaran will appear at their closest to each other, about 1 degree apart. For the Washington, D.C. area, Aldebaran will rise to the lower right of Venus in the east-northeast at 3:24 a.m. EDT and they will appear about 15 degrees above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (at 4:43 a.m.).

Sunday afternoon, at 3:27 p.m. EDT, the Moon will be at apogee, its farthest from the Earth for this orbit. Sunday evening, the waning Moon will appear half-full as it reaches its last quarter at 7:29 p.m. EDT.

July 14, 2020

On Tuesday morning, July 14, 2020, the planet Jupiter will appear opposite the Sun as seen from the Earth (called “opposition”). Jupiter will be at its closest and brightest for this apparition, effectively a “full Jupiter,” rising around sunset and setting around sunrise.

July 16, 2020

Starting the morning of Thursday, July 16, 2020, the planet Mercury will be above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (at least for the Washington, D.C. area). This will make all five of the naked eye planets visible (if you have a clear view of Mercury on the horizon in the east-northeast and Jupiter and Saturn on the horizon in the southwest).

July 17, 2020

On Friday morning, July 17, 2020, the brightest of the planets, Venus, will appear near the waning crescent Moon and the bright star Aldebaran. For the Washington, D.C. area, Venus will rise in the east-northeast at 3:11 a.m. EDT, with the crescent Moon to the upper left and the bright star Aldebaran to the upper right. By the time morning twilight begins (at 4:48 a.m.) Venus will be about 18 degrees above the horizon in the east, after which it will become harder to see Aldebaran and the crescent Moon as the sky lightens with dawn.

July 19, 2020

Sometime around Sunday, July 19, 2020 (2020-Jul-19 05:32 UTC with 1 day, 12 hours, 59 minutes uncertainty), Near Earth Object (2016 DY30), between 2 and 5 meters (7 to 15 feet) across, will pass the Earth at between 2.0 and 34.7 lunar distances (nominally 9.0), traveling at 15.09 kilometers per second (33,760 miles per hour).

Also Sunday morning, if you have a very clear view of the horizon in the east-northeast, you might be able to see the waning crescent Moon to the left of the planet Mercury. For the Washington, D.C. area, the pair will rise a few minutes before morning twilight begins, and will become more difficult to see as they rise farther and the sky brightens with dawn. If you use binoculars to look for the pair, be sure to stop looking well before sunrise!

July 20, 2020

Monday afternoon, July 20, 2020, at 1:33 p.m. EDT, will be the new Moon, when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from the Earth. The day of or the day after the New Moon marks the start of the new month for most lunisolar calendars.

The planet Saturn will appear opposite the Sun as seen from the Earth (called “opposition”). Saturn will be at its closest and brightest for this apparition, effectively a “full Saturn,” rising around sunset and setting around sunrise.

July 21, 2020

The sixth month of the Chinese calendar starts on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 (at midnight in China’s time zone, which is 12 hours ahead of EDT).

Sundown on Tuesday, July 21, 2020, will mark the start of Av in the Hebrew calendar. In the Islamic calendar the months traditionally start with the first sighting of the waxing crescent Moon after the New Moon, although many Muslim communities now follow the Umm al-Qura Calendar of Saudi Arabia, which uses astronomical calculations to start months in a more predictable way.

Sunset on Tuesday evening will probably mark the beginning of Dhu al-Hijjah, the twelfth and final month of the Islamic year, a sacred month that is the month of the Hajj. Making the Hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia at least once in your life is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. This year, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Saudi Arabia has imposed considerable restrictions on the Hajj to protect the health and safety of all involved.

July 22, 2020

On Wednesday morning, July 22, 2020, the planet Mercury will reach its greatest westward separation from the Sun as seen from the Earth, called greatest western elongation. Because the angle of the Sun-Mercury line and the horizon is becoming more perpendicular, the date when Mercury appears highest above the horizon as morning twilight begins will be after when Mercury and the Sun appear farthest apart as seen from the Earth.

On Wednesday evening, if you have a clear view of the horizon in the west-northwest, you might be able to see the thin, waxing crescent Moon above the bright star Regulus. For the Washington, D.C. area, evening twilight will end around 9:36 p.m. EDT, Regulus will set about 18 minutes later at around 9:54 p.m., and the Moon will set around 10:14 p.m.

July 23, 2020

Keep an eye on the news, as this may change, but we might have a naked eye comet visible in the evenings in July 2020. Comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) was discovered on March 27, 2020, and will make its closest approach to the Sun on July 3, 2020, passing closer to the Sun than Mercury. If (and this is a big if) it does not break up as it passes close to the Sun, in its current orbit it will pass its closest to the Earth on July 23, 2020. For the Washington, D.C. area, on Wednesday evening, July 22, 2020, we may be able to see this comet near its closest between moonset at 10:14 p.m. EDT when it will be in the northwest about 20 degrees above the horizon (and the light of the Moon will no longer interfere with comet viewing) and around 1 a.m. on July 23, 2020, when the comet will set in the north-northwest.

July 25, 2020

Early Saturday morning, July 25, 2020, at about 1 a.m. EDT, the Moon will be at perigee, its closest to the Earth for this orbit.

July 26, 2020

On Sunday morning, July 26, 2020, Mercury will appear at its highest above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (3.5 degrees above the east-northeast horizon for the Washington, D.C. area), after which Mercury will begin shifting towards the glow of dawn again. Because the angle of the Sun-Mercury line and the horizon is becoming more perpendicular, Mercury will appear highest above the horizon as morning twilight begins four days after Mercury appeared farthest apart from the Sun as seen from the Earth.

On Sunday evening, the bright star Spica will appear about 7 degrees below the waxing, nearly half-full Moon. They will appear in the southwest as evening twilight ends and Spica will set first in the west-southwest (at 11:38 p.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area).

July 27, 2020

Monday morning, July 27, 2020, will be the last morning when Jupiter will be above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (for the D.C. area, at least). The Moon will appear half-full as it reaches its first quarter at 8:33 a.m. EDT.

The Southern Delta-Aquariids are expected to be active from around July 12 to Aug. 23, peaking on Monday, July 27, 2020. At the peak, under ideal conditions (a clear, dark night in the southern hemisphere) you might be able to see 25 meteors per hour, although fewer meteors will be visible for us in the northern hemisphere. If the weather is clear with no clouds or high hazes, you find in a place with a clear view of a wide expanse of the sky (especially towards the south) that is far from any light sources or urban light pollution, the best time to look should be on Monday morning, July 27, 2020, between moonset (after 12:20 a.m. EDT for the Washington, D.C. area) and any first signs of dawn (before about 4:17 a.m.).

July 29, 2020

On Wednesday night into early Thursday morning, July 29 to 30, 2020, the bright star Antares will appear about 5 degrees below the waxing gibbous Moon. For the Washington, D.C. area, evening twilight will end around 9:28 p.m. EDT when the Moon will be 30 degrees above the horizon in the south. Antares will set before the Moon in the southwest Thursday morning at about 1:34 a.m.

Aug. 1, 2020

On Saturday morning, Aug. 1, 2020, if you have a clear view of the horizon in the east-northeast, you might be able to see the bright star Pollux about 7 degrees to the upper left of the planet Mercury. For the Washington, D.C. area, Mercury will rise at about 4:49 a.m. EDT and will be only about 2 degrees above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins at 5:04 a.m.

Saturday also is Lammas Day, a Christian holiday celebrated in some English-speaking countries that may have derived from earlier pagan celebrations. We currently divide the year into four seasons based upon the solstices and equinoxes, with summer ending on the autumnal equinox in September. This approximates summer as the quarter of the year with the warmest temperatures. The Celts and other pre-Christian Europeans celebrated “cross-quarter days” halfway between the solstices and equinoxes, and divided the seasons on these days. Using this definition, summer was approximately the quarter of the year with the longest daily periods of daylight, with summer traditionally ending August 1st (the middle of our summer). Names for this end of summer and start of fall harvest season include Lughnasadh, Lughnasa, Lúnasa, Lùnastal, and Luanistyn.

Aug. 2, 2020

On Saturday night into Sunday morning, Aug. 1 to 2, 2020, the bright planet Jupiter will appear above the waxing gibbous Moon with Saturn appearing to the left to form a triangle. For the Washington, D.C. area, the Moon will be about 17 degrees above the horizon in the southeast as evening twilight ends at 9:24 p.m. EDT. The Moon will reach its highest in the sky for the night just after midnight on Sunday morning (at 12:01 a.m.), and Jupiter will set first in the west-southwest at 4:35 a.m., followed by the Moon (at 4:49 a.m) and Saturn (at 5:14 a.m.).

Aug. 3, 2020

Monday morning, Aug. 3, 2020, will be the last morning that Saturn will be above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins (for the Washington, D.C. area, at least).

Sometime around Monday, Aug. 3, 2020 (2020-Aug-03 23:36 UTC with 1 day, 14 hours, 25 minutes uncertainty), Near Earth Object (2018 BD), between 3 and 6 meters (8 to 19 feet) across, will pass the Earth at between 3.8 and 24.4 lunar distances (nominally 7.5), traveling at 9.41 kilometers per second (21,060 miles per hour).

The full Moon after next will be mid-day on Monday, Aug. 3, 2020, appearing opposite the Sun in Earth-based longitude at 11:59 a.m. EDT.

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4th of July eclipse to kick off busy month for astronomy

 

4th of July eclipse to kick off busy month for astronomy

Mother Nature will be providing the fireworks in July as the new month brings the chance to see three unique astronomical events, capped off by dueling meteor showers at the end of the month.

This will be the perfect month for people with a new telescope to learn how to use it with the moon, Jupiter and Saturn all serving as easy and interesting objects to find and observe through the eyepiece of a scope. However, no telescope is required for any of the events.

Here are the top three astronomy events to look for in July:

1. Lunar Eclipse
When:
July 4-5

The first weekend of the month will feature a lunar eclipse that will be visible in areas of the world that missed out on the lunar eclipse that happened in early June.

On the night of Saturday, July 4, into the early hours of Sunday, July 5, the moon will graze Earth’s shadow to create a penumbral lunar eclipse.

This will be the perfect astronomical event for people of all ages across the United States following Independence Day firework displays.

The eclipse will begin on July 4, at 11:07 p.m. EDT and last until 1:52 a.m. EDT. The best time to look will be around 12:30 a.m. EDT during the middle of the event.

The moon will once again be the center of attention on the night after the eclipse as it passes extremely close to Jupiter and Saturn. The trio will be packed together so tightly that they may appear in the same field of view of some telescopes or binoculars.

2. Jupiter and Saturn reach peak brightness
When:
The middle of July

The two biggest planets in the solar system will be the highlight of the night sky in July as the planets shine brighter than they will throughout the rest of the year.

Around the middle of the month, both Jupiter and Saturn will reach opposition, or the point in their orbits when they are closest to the Earth. As a result, it is the best opportunity to observe the planets both with and without a telescope.

Jupiter will reach opposition first on July 14, followed by Saturn a few nights later on July 20.

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This is a great opportunity for people to learn the ins and outs of a new telescope as the planets will be easy to spot in the southern sky all night long. The mild summer nights will also make it comfortable for many onlookers outside under the heavens.

However, no telescope is needed to spot the planets. They will be easy to find with the unaided eye as they will outshine every star in the sky — as long as cloudy conditions do not obscure the sky.

3. Double meteor shower
When:
July 28-29

The end of July will present skywatchers with something that has not been seen in months: A meteor shower.

The night of July 28 into July 29 will feature a pair meteor showers with the Alpha Capricornids and the southern Delta Aquarids both peaking on the same night. The last time that a moderate meteor shower took place was in early May.

Meteor showers can be thought of as nature’s fireworks as they put on dazzling, sometimes multi-colored, displays in the night sky. The colors are caused by the different elements that make up the meteor.

As many as 20 meteors per hour will be visible during peak night, with the Alpha Capricornids bringing an added bonus for some lucky onlookers. “What is notable about this shower is the number of bright fireballs produced during its activity period,” the American Meteor Society said.

The best time to watch the dueling meteor showers will be after 1 a.m. local time after the moon has set. The lack of moonlight will make the sky appear even darker, making it easier to spot the fainter meteors.

The June solstice marked the official start of summer in the Northern Hemisphere on Saturday, June 20, at 5:43 p.m. EDT, while those south of the equator transitioned from autumn to winter. Just hours later, a “ring of fire” solar eclipse darkened the sky over Africa and Asia, the first of two solar eclipses this year.

The solstice also brought the perfect conditions for noctilucent clouds to be visible for the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. This type of cloud can only be seen around the summer solstice and is created by meteors entering Earth’s atmosphere.

Near the start of June, the sun fired off a solar flare, the largest observed since October 2017. It was not a significant flare, but it did show signs that the current solar minimum may soon be coming to an end.

Around the middle of June, NASA announced plans to send a rover to the moon’s south pole to hunt for ice. The rover is not scheduled to launch until 2023, but could provide crucial information ahead of a crewed mission to the moon in the mid-2020s.

A few days after the announcement, the moon passed directly between Earth and Venus in an event known as an occultation.

Farther in the depths of our solar system, NASA released new images from the New Horizons space probe that showed photos of the star closest to the Earth.

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How to watch the ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse Sunday online | Space

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Update for June 21: The 2020 annular solar eclipse wowed skywatchers across Asia and Africa. See the amazing photos in our story here.

A “ring of fire” solar eclipse will briefly appear in parts of Africa and Asia this weekend, and if you aren’t out there in person, you can take in the spectacular show online.nullnull

Sunday’s solar eclipse is what is known as an annular eclipse, in which the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes between the star and Earth as seen from our planet. Instead, a ring of sunlight will still shine around the outer edge, hence its nickname: a “ring of fire” eclipse. 

The time of maximum eclipse, when that “ring of fire” event happens, will be at 2:40 a.m. EDT (0640 GMT) Sunday, June 21, when the moon crosses into the center of the sphere of the sun, from Earth’s perspective. The eclipse starts at 11:45 p.m. EDT Saturday, June 20 (0345 GMT Sunday) and ends at 5:34 a.m. EDT (1034 GMT) June 20, according to NASA.

Related: Solar eclipse guide 2020: When, where & how to see them

The annular solar eclipse of Feb. 26, 2017, as seen by the Slooh community observatory.
An annular solar eclipse, as seen by the Slooh online observatory, on Feb. 26, 2017. (Image credit: Slooh)

The eclipse will happen just a couple of hours after the moon enters the “new moon” phase. Because the moon will be near its apogee or farthest part from Earth, the size of the moon’s disk will not be quite enough to cover the sun. The small ring of sunlight still visible will make this an “annular” eclipse (from the Latin annulus, meaning ring-shaped.)

Regions in the path of visibility include the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic, South Sudan, Sudan, Ethiopia, the Red Sea, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Oman, the Gulf of Oman, Pakistan, India, China, Taiwan, the Philippine Sea (south of Guam), northern Australia and the north Pacific Ocean. 

IMPOWhile you will need to take precautions to protect your eyes if you are there in person, online the solar eclipse is perfectly safe to view with unprotected eyes. There are several options available.null

Slooh webcast

Astronomy broadcasting service Slooh will have a virtual star party starting at 1 a.m. EDT (0500 GMT). You can watch it live here on Space.com, courtesy of Slooh. 

While the general public can also stream the show on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, paid Slooh members (individual membership annual prices start at $20 USD) can join a live discussion together at Slooh.com.

“Slooh will feature live streams of the eclipse from several partner observatories in the Middle East, India, and the Far East,” Slooh said in a release. “Members will be able to snap photos of the eclipse throughout the live coverage. They can load their images into Slooh’s new Eclipse Quest, which will automatically generate a superb memento poster of the event.”

Time and Date

Time and Date, a website that tracks skywatching events, will start its own webcast at 1 a.m. EDT (0500 GMT). 

“Due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, our original plan of sending our mobile observatory to Oman had to be scrapped,” representatives stated about the broadcast. “While we are sad about not being able to go, we are working hard to make sure that we still bring you stunning live images and commentary of this extraordinary astronomical event.”

The Virtual Telescope Project

The Virtual Telescope Project will begin its webcast at 1:30 a.m. EDT (0530 GMT). The company is based in Rome, but will partner with imagers and videographers in Africa and Asia “thanks to very generous people willing to share their views with the world,” said founder Gianluca Masi in a statement. 

“Yes, it will be somewhat unique; the … solar eclipse will happen soon after the solstice, making the event even more fascinating,” Masi added.

Participants in The Virtual Telescope Project’s webcast so far include Masi himself, Ahmed Saad (Karachi, Pakistan), the Taqwa Observatory in Pakistan, Space India, the Astronomical Society of Somalia, Abu Dhabi’s International Astronomical Center, Ali Abdullah (Lahore, Pakistan) and Lij Tuha (Dodola, Ethiopia.)

A visibility map for the annular solar eclipse of June 21, 2020.
A visibility map for the annular solar eclipse of June 21, 2020. (Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

While the path of the eclipse is long — going across two continents and 14 countries — the path of greatest visibility is quite narrow, Time and Date said. In West Africa, the path reaches its maximum width of 53 miles (85 kilometers) wide and the “ring of fire” lasts for about 1 minute and 20 seconds.

Sunday’s “ring of fire” solar eclipse comes amid the so-called eclipse season of 2020, which features three eclipses (two of the moon and one of the sun) in the space of one month. 

The first event was a relatively minor penumbral lunar eclipse on June 5. After Sunday’s solar eclipse, another minor lunar eclipse will occur overnight on July 4 and 5.

Editor’s Note: If you snap an amazing night sky picture and would like to share it with Space.com’s readers, send your photos, comments, and your name and location to spacephotos@space.com.  

Follow Elizabeth Howell on Twitter @howellspace. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook

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Stunning images reveal new insights on Jupiter’s Great Red Spot | fox43.com

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Scientists are getting a better look at Jupiter’s atmosphere and the planet’s Giant Red Spot thanks to photos from two telescopes and the Juno spacecraft. Author: Erin Patterson (TEGNA) Published: 9:57 AM EDT May 11, 2020

WASHINGTON — Scientists have been getting an even better understanding of Jupiter’s massive storms with help from the Juno spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based Gemini North telescope in Hawaii.

The collective efforts by this team have given researchers new insights into turbulent weather on the planet more than 500 million miles away from Earth, according to NASA. null

Hubble and Gemini watch the planet from afar, capturing high-resolution global views of the planet that are key to interpreting Juno’s close-up observations. Juno can probe deep into the planet’s atmosphere by detecting high-frequency radio waves. The telescopes can then take that information and learn how deep the clouds are over Jupiter.

One of Jupiter’s most recognizable features is its Red Spot. It’s a massive storm, that according to NASA is twice the size of Earth, and swirls around the planet. 

And new photos from Juno show that the Great Red Spot has dark features that appear, disappear and even change color and shape over time within the storm. However, researchers weren’t exactly sure if the dark material was caused by something in the clouds or if it was holes in the clouds.

With the ability to compare Hubble’s visible-light images to Gemini’s thermal infrared images, researchers have learned that they are indeed holes in cloud layers.

NASA, ESA, and M.H. Wong (UC Berkeley) and team

“It’s kind of like a jack-o-lantern,” said Michael Wong at the University of California, Berkeley. “You see bright infrared light coming from cloud-free areas, but where there are clouds, it’s really dark in the infrared.”

In could-free regions on Jupiter, heat from the planet is emitted in the form of infrared light — otherwise blocked by high-level clouds.

“What’s important is that we’ve managed to collect this huge data set that supports the Juno mission. There are so many applications of the data set that we may not even anticipate. So, we’re going to enable other people to do science without that barrier of having to figure out on their own how to process the data,” Wong said. null

RELATED: Space rocks: Asteroids, meteors and everything in between | Weather Wise Lessons

NASA says the storms on Jupiter are “gigantic” compared to Earth’s thunderstorms. These storms can reach more than 40 miles with lightning packing a punch with ‘”flashes that are three times more energetic than Earth’s largest ‘superblots.'”

Scientists have learned that the lightning on the far off planet is in conjunction with three different cloud structures. These include deep clouds made of water, large convective towers caused by upwelling of moist air and clear regions presumably caused by downwelling of drier air.

NASA, ESA, M.H. Wong (UC Berkeley), A. James and M.W. Carruthers (STScI), and S. Brown (JPL)

Measuring the deepwater clouds on Jupiter gives researchers an idea about how much water is in the atmosphere. This is an insight into how Jupiter and the other gas and ice giants formed. Hopefully, giving researchers a better idea of how the solar system formed.

“Because we now routinely have these high-resolution views from a couple of different observatories and wavelengths, we are learning so much more about Jupiter’s weather,” said Amy Simon of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “This is our equivalent of a weather satellite. We can finally start looking at weather cycles.”

RELATED: Newly found planet close to Earth in size and temperature https://d-8605449542111200346.ampproject.net/2004252135000/frame.html

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How Halley’s Comet will spark tonight’s meteor shower

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The second meteor shower in as many weeks will dazzle the eyes of stargazers around the globe tonight.

The second meteor shower in as many weeks will dazzle the eyes of stargazers around the globe, but the light show will be battling against the glow of a nearly full moon when it reaches its peak.

The Eta Aquarids is an annual meteor shower in early May, and this year, reaches its climax on Monday night and the pre-dawn hours of Tuesday morning.

“This shower happens to be one of if not the best in the Southern Hemisphere,” AccuWeather Astronomy Blogger Dave Samuhel said. “It is a moderate shower for the Northern Hemisphere.”

People living south of the equator may count as many as 40 shooting stars per hour at the height of the celestial light show, the American Meteor Society (AMS) said. This includes Australia, New Zealand, Africa and South America.

“From the equator northward, they usually only produce medium rates of 10-30 per hour just before dawn,” the AMS added.

This year, the meteor shower will be peaking just two nights before the final supermoon of 2020. The bright moon may make it difficult to see some of the fainter meteors, but it should not completely wash out the shower.

Of course, weather and cloud cover will significantly factor into how well sky gazers in different parts of the country are able to witness the meteor shower.

Onlookers across the southern U.S. and the interior West are forecast to have the best viewing contains for 2020’s iteration of the Eta Aquarids. Mainly clear conditions are also on tap for parts of New England and into Quebec.

A storm gathering over the central U.S. will spread disruptive clouds over much of the Midwest and into parts of Appalachia, obscuring the night sky.

Clouds could also spoil the meteor shower over the Pacific Northwest as a storm moves into the region.

The Eta Aquarids will be active on the nights leading up to and immediately following the peak, so people that have cloudy weather on Monday night may be able to spot some shooting stars later in the week when the clouds clear.

No special equipment is needed to watch a meteor shower, although people should pack some patience when heading out to spend some time under the stars.

“Give yourself a solid hour to look for meteors. Get comfortable. Lay down on a blanket, or a reclining chair,” Samuhel said.

People should also avoid looking toward the moon, which will be above the horizon for most of the night. Looking at the moon can make it harder to see meteors, so try to focus in the darkest part of the sky.

Where to see the Aquarids in 2020. AccuWeather

The best time to watch the meteor shower will be after midnight once the shower’s radiant point climbs above the horizon.

The radiant point is simply the part of the sky where the meteors originate, but you do not need to look in this direction so spot meteors. However, as the radiant point climbs higher in the sky, more and more meteors will able to be seen.

Many of the meteor showers throughout the year are caused by debris left behind by comets when they visit the inner solar system. When this debris enters the Earth’s atmosphere, it burns incredibly bright for a few brief seconds.

“The majority of visible meteors are caused by particles ranging in size from about that of a small pebble down to a grain of sand, and generally weigh less than 1-2 grams,” the AMS said.

The debris that causes the Eta Aquarids is actually dust left behind by one of the most famous comets – Halley’s Comet.

Halley’s Comet only orbits the sun once every 75 years, but each year in early May, the Earth passes through some of the debris that it left behind.

“The Eta Aquarids are one of two meteor showers sparked by Halley’s comet. The other being the Orionids in October.”

What are shooting stars? This graphic explains. AccuWeather

People that miss out on the Eta Aquarids will need to wait a few months before the next opportunity to catch a meteor shower.

According to the AMS, the next major meteor shower will not peak until late July.