“Rescue Dog Was Scared Of The World Until She Went On A Bike Ride With Mom | The Dodo Soulmates”

“All About Beavers”

“Brave Bull And His Brothers Escape The Slaughterhouse And How They Made It To A Sanctuary”

Catch me if you can 😬

The Heart-Warming Story Of Mama, The “Graveyard Dog”

PROTECT ALL WILDLIFE

In 2015, a heart-breaking photo circulated online. It was a picture of a broken and exhausted German Shepherd sitting on top of a grave in Serbia. The internet came to the conclusion that the dog was trying to dig a hole to stay close to her late owner. However, this was far from the truth.

When the story was first reported, the public made the assumption that this animal was someone’s pet. Dogs are famous for their loyalty and they have been known as “man’s best friend” for centuries. The story was widely shared on social media sites, people were overcome with sympathy for the grieving animal.

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But the real truth behind the viral photo is something no one expected. These photographs were taken in Serbia by an amazing woman named Vesna Mihajloski who is an animal activist and rescuer. She was moved by what she saw but, as…

View original post 440 more words

Petition · End Happy The Elephant’s 10 Years of Solitary Confinement · Change.org

www.change.org

The Bronx Zoo has been given the shameful title of the 5th worst zoo for elephants in the country. The New York Times calls Happy the Bronx Zoo’s loneliest elephant. That’s because this highly intelligent and social being is one of the only zoo elephants in the entire United States who is being held alone. And it looks like her living conditions won’t change anytime soon unless we do something about it.

I am asking you, my fellow animal lovers, to encourage the Bronx Zoo Director James J. Breheny to release Happy to a sanctuary where she can be in a more natural setting and live the rest of her life in peace.

New standards regarding the keeping of elephants were recently passed by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the accrediting organization for American wildlife institutions. Among their recommendations was that elephants be held in groups of three or more, as they are highly social creatures. Now, zoos around the country  are scrambling to comply with the regulations by AZA’s 2016 deadline. Yet, the Bronx Zoo seems steadfast in its opinion that Happy is “happy” with her solitary life. This goes against all scientific data about elephant behavior.

Happy and 6 other elephant calves were captured in the wild from Thailand and brought to the States in 1977. For 25 years, she and her companion, Grumpy, were kept as a pair in the Bronx Zoo. When Grumpy passed away, she was paired with Sammy, who sadly died in 2006. It was then that the zoo decided to end its elephant program, but it didn’t relocate the elephants it currently had.

For 10 years, Happy has been in a sort of solitary confinement, unable to truly interact with the other elephants held at the zoo. This is a social being like a monkey or a dolphin. Elephants thrive in the company of their own kind, where they form multi-generational family groups that remain loyal to one another for life, and the elders pass wisdom down to the younger ones to help them navigate their world.

Happy is likely not at all happy. She has endured a decade of loneliness and deserves the chance to be with others of her kind in a sanctuary. Please join me in telling the Bronx Zoo to release Happy to a sanctuary and let her really have a chance at happiness.

https://www.change.org/p/end-happy-the-elephant-s-10-years-of-solitary-confinement

“Ukrainian man and dog reunited in Kyiv after being separated in Bucha”

“This is what happens when animals ask humans for help”

“People Band Together To Save Puppy Stuck In Tire”

In Remarkable Rescue Op, Man Evacuates Lion And Wolf From Ukraine In Bus

Sanya Jain

A four-day mission to rescue a lion and a wolf from war-torn Ukraine had a happy ending with the two zoo animals “settling in well” in Romania, Tim Locks – the British war veteran who spearheaded the rescue op – has said. According to Daily Mail, Mr Locks, a 45-year-old Iraq veteran, had been delivering aid in Ukraine when he heard about the plight of the animals from a conservationist at his hotel. 

He embarked on a mission to save the two animals, driving from Lviv to Zaporizhzhia Oblast, where the lion and the wolf were kept in a zoo, along with two companions. 

In the remarkable rescue operation, which Mr Locks documented on Facebook, the animals were transported to neighbouring Romania in the back of a minibus. The lion, Simba, and the wolf, Akela, were driven almost non-stop until they reached the Romanian border. Then, as the final leg of their journey, the animals were taken to a zoo in the north-eastern city of Radauti in Romania on Sunday. 

Mr Locks shared an update on the animals on Wednesday. “We’ve just heard back from the zoo in Romania and it’s amazing to hear that both Simba and Akela are settling in well. Both are eating and drinking plenty and enjoying some chill time after the long journey,” he wrote.

He had earlier shared photos from the rescue mission on Facebook, describing how a crane was used to lift the lion and the wolf into the minibus. “It took 3 hours to load both animals into the back of a Ford transit minibus with the seats removed using a crane and a JCB,” he had revealed.

“We kept reminding each other that we’d got a lion and a wolf in the back of the van as we were driving and looking back to see there they were, just over our shoulders,” Mr Locks told Metro News.

He said guards at checkpoints were less than amused when he declared a lion and a wolf as their cargo. “One guard told us there was a war on and it was no time to joke around,” Mr Locks said. “I took him to the side of the van, opened the door, and showed him this proper big lion, like Aslan out Narnia.”

After dropping the animals off in Romania, the trio drove back to Ukraine to assist in humanitarian missions as the country continues its fight against Russian forces.  

https://www.ndtv.com/offbeat/in-remarkable-rescue-op-man-evacuates-lion-and-wolf-from-ukraine-in-bus-2842272

This is the British army veteran saving abandoned pets from bomb-stricken shelters in Ukraine

15:31 EDT 28 Mar 2022 , updated 12:11 EDT 29 Mar 2022

Sandra Clark

EXCLUSIVE: ‘The dogs were barking like mad, artillery rounds landing everywhere.’ British army veteran tells how he and his animal rescue team dodged Russian projectiles to save 120 animals trapped in a bombed shelter in Kharkiv

  • British Army veteran, Tom, has set out to save abandoned and misplaced animals in war-torn Ukraine with his rescue group, Breaking the Chains
  • In a span of 14 days, the charity has already managed to rescue nearly 700 dogs and cats, and deliver over 100 tons of aid to those in need
  • ‘What we do is very complex and very dangerous. It’s like a military operation, so to speak,’ Tom told DailyMail.com in a phone interview from Ukraine 
  • In one recent rescue effort, the crew retrieved 120 animals trapped in a shelter in Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second largest city that has been obliterated by Russia
  • ‘It was 900 meters from the Russian frontline. There were artillery rounds landing in and around the area while we were extracting the animals,’ he said 
  • The animals are taken to a ‘safe space’ to be examined, given water, cleaned up, and transported to the border of Romania, where they’ll be placed into shelters
  • Tom, who served in the British army for 16 years, founded the charity in 2020, and credits his own dog with helping him with his struggles with PTSD

As Western allies extend their support to displaced Ukrainians amid the ongoing war with Russia, one British Army veteran has set out to rescue the forgotten victims of the invasion – abandoned animals.  

Over the course of two weeks, former soldier, Tom, and his UK-based animal rescue group, Breaking the Chains, have saved nearly 700 dogs and cats in the war-torn country and delivered over 100 tons of food and medical supplies to those in need.

The 34-year-old from Yorkshire, northern England, has been on the frontlines in Ukraine helping extract animals from bomb-stricken shelters.

The veteran, who served in the British army for almost two decades, left the armed forces two years ago, but admits trying to carry out such a mission as a civilian is still ‘very complex and dangerous.’ 

‘It’s like a military operation, so to speak,’ Tom – who asked to keep his last name secret for security reasons – told DailyMail.com in an exclusive phone interview from Ukraine. 

British Army veteran, Tom, has been rescuing dogs from bomb-stricken shelters in Ukraine amid Russia’s invasion

Tom reaches out to a dog after dropping off much needed pet food and medical supplies to a Good Samaritan who has taken in stray and abandoned animals from the war-torn streets

Rescued dogs and cats in crates as they are transported to safety after being saved from an animal shelter in war-torn Ukraine. Tom and his team work with the animal shelter owners to determine which dogs can be placed together in the crates

‘This is a war, not a natural disaster like a hurricane or a tornado. There are so many factors you need to be aware of. We need to understand the situation. We need to understand the ground. We are working with maps, satellites.’ 

He continued: ‘There are people crying out left, right and center. 

‘It’s not just shelter animals that need our help, you have rescues, you have breeders, you have people that have taken in stray and abandoned animals, there must be at least 1,000 locations that have more than 30 dogs. There are thousands of them.’

In one of his most recent rescue efforts, Tom and his four-man team were able to retrieve 120 animals that were trapped in a bomb-stricken shelter in northeast Kharkiv, the country’s second largest city, which has been obliterated by Russian troops.

‘It was a shelter that had been blown up twice. No one could go to it, no one could reach it and help the animals, so we went in,’ he said. 

‘It was 900 meters (980 yds) from the Russian frontline. There were artillery rounds landing in and around the area while we were extracting the animals. The dogs were barking like mad, then they settled down. 

‘One was trying to bite me because he was scared. They were all scared, but we were able to get all the animals out of there, so that’s good.’  An animal shelter in Kharkiv that was bombed twice. Tom and his team were able to retrieve 120 dogs and cats  that are now being held in shelters in Romania

Tom escorts a Saint Bernard to safety after it had been left behind by its owners who were forced to flee

Ukraine Abandoned cats are seen being taken from a shelter in northeast Kharkiv that had been blown up twice

Tom and his crew have been transporting the animals in one vehicle, a long wheelbase dog transport van, throughout the operation. 

‘There were 50 different crates already built into it,’ he explained. ‘The shelter owner knows their dogs and knows which ones to put together in the same crate, and we can get three or four cats into the same one. Soon as that van starts driving, they all just go to sleep.’ 

‘It was quite humorous because when we were driving, some cats escaped from a crate and ended up sleeping on the dashboard. We had one cat on the steering wheel, and two others sitting on our shoulders.’

After nearly 30 hours and 1,100 miles, the animals were brought to what Tom described as a ‘safe place’ where they met with their transport team.

The animals were then examined, given water, cleaned up, and taken to the border of Ukraine where they were met by another transport team which took them to shelters in Romania.

Another rescue involved delivering food and supplies to four shelters in the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv, and bringing back 50 dogs that were left behind by their owners upon evacuation. 

Tom has always been an animal lover. He even put a tiny pup in his pocket while serving with the British army

Yuki, a chihuahua, Tom rescued from a bombed-out shelter in Ukraine. When we drove away, Yuki wouldn’t stop barking, so I opened the cage and said, come on then, and I picked him up and he turned into the softest, most cuddly thing ever and fell asleep on my lap’

The kennel of dogs consisted of mostly larger breeds, all of which were severely emaciated and in need of medical attention.

‘The big challenge that we have is with the shelters because they have anywhere between 500 to 600 animals. Right now the maximum we can retrieve is about 100 dogs and cats,’ Tom explained. 

‘Ideally, we would like to get three more vehicles, two sprinters and a four by four pick-up. This way we could have more teams on the ground. 

‘This would give us time to save more animals from other places and deliver more food and supplies.’ 

Tom’s vision for the displaced animals of Ukraine extends far beyond rescuing them from their volatile country. 

Breaking the Chains had teamed up with UK-based animal rescue, Dog Bus Rescue, and together they will expand upon a current shelter in Romania that will house some 1,200 animals. 

A curious cat pokes its head out of a covered crate while being transported to the Ukrainian-Romanian border where it will be taken to a safe shelter

A sweet looking St. Bernard was among 50 malnourished dogs rescued by Tom and his team. The pups were all large breeds that had been left behind when their owners evacuated the country

Tom created Breaking the Chains animal rescue after serving in the British army for over thirty years. He credits dogs for saving his life more than once including one special dog that helped him during his struggles with PTSD which inspired Tom to devote his life saving animals

‘The shelter will be beautiful, with lots of outdoor space and a heated interior. Once there, the dogs will be examined, vaccinated and quarantined before going to other shelters across Europe where they will be adopted out to their forever homes.’

Volunteers are encouraged to contact Dog Bus Rescue directly if they are interested in coming to Romania to help build the shelter. 

Having served in the British army for 16 years, Tom says he’s an expert when it comes to working in conflict zones.

‘I joined the army at the age of 16. So from 16 until two years ago, I have been conditioned to warfare,’ he said. 

‘I was in the infantry, Iraq, Afghanistan. I have traveled all over the world. To me this is normal because this is all that I know.’

In 2020, Tom founded Breaking the Chains, a rescue group aimed at raising awareness and helping innocent animals around the world, especially dogs which he credits for saving his life more than once.

The animal lover and his team are also delivering tons of pet food and medical supplies to an animal shelter in Kyiv, the capital of Ukraine. To date, they have brought over 100 tons of food to various locations in desperate need of help

Tom bottle feeding a black furry puppy

Tom kisses a dog that had been abandoned by his owners when they fled the country

‘I have always loved animals. I grew up with animals, had them as a kid all my life. I worked alongside them in the military and they saved my life more times than I can count, both physically and mentally,’ said Tom.

‘When I was discharged from the British army with complex PTSD, I was in a really bad place so I got a dog who was also in a really bad place and together we helped each other. That’s what made me truly understand the power of animals and what they bring to us. 

‘From that moment, I decided you know what I am going to make the world a safer place for animals and ever since that I have been doing what I am doing.

Back home in England, Tom has five dogs, including Gypsy, the devoted dog he adopted during his struggles with his post-traumatic stress disorder. 

‘Gypsy is still with me. He is a blind Springer Spaniel. He is a veteran himself, bless him.’

Donations to Breaking the Chains can be made at: https://warpaws.org/donations/aid-for-ukraine-animals/ 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10660071/Saving-forgotten-dogs-frontlines-war-torn-Ukraine.html

Free road transport for Ukrainian family pets from Poland

www.animalcouriers.com

Animalcouriers

Animalcouriers is offering free road transport for Ukrainian family pets from Poland to the UK (or to other selected locations on the route, such as Frankfurt, Brussels and Paris).

Our idea is to transport pets for owners who’ve had to leave Ukraine and are making their own way to the UK (or to other destinations on the route).

For all pets, we need to know what veterinary records are available. For dogs, cats and ferrets, we need to know if they have microchips and current rabies vaccinations.

UK entry requirements

To enter the UK, dogs, cats and ferrets will need microchips, current rabies vaccinations and EU pet passports. We can help organise all these steps. Once an EU pet passport is issued, the pet has to wait three weeks before it can enter the UK. We can organise boarding at Calais for those pets, and collect them once their passports become valid for UK entry.

Eurostar doesn’t take pets

Pet owners should be aware that pets aren’t allowed on Eurostar trains. For Ukrainian owners planning to use Eurostar to travel to London, we can offer collection of their pets at continental European locations for onward travel by road to the UK.

Make an enquiry

To enquire about this service, please email courier@animalcouriers.com and put ‘Ukrainian pet travel from Poland’ in the subject line of your email.

https://www.animalcouriers.com/2022/03/04/free-road-transport-for-ukrainian-family-pets-from-poland/

Information for people leaving Ukraine with their pets

www.animalcouriers.com

Animalcouriers

Information for people leaving Ukraine with their pets

The situation for people leaving Ukraine with their pets is evolving. Poland, for example, is allowing all pets into the country, whether or not they have microchips, rabies vaccinations or any form of pet passport.

Other EU countries are accepting pets at border crossings and many are taking the same approach as Poland. They’re making exceptions to their usual rules about dogs, cats and ferrets needing microchips, rabies vaccinations and pet passports. In some cases, the arrival country is microchipping and vaccinating such pets on arrival.

IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, is responding to the situation in Ukraine by providing emergency animal aid to the country. It’s also gathering and verifying resources for pet owners fleeing Ukraine.

Access the IFAW resources page here: https://www.ifaw.org/eu/news/resources-flee-ukraine-pets

Check back regularly as the situation is dynamic and resources may be changed or added.

UK entry requirements

Owners of dogs, cats and ferrets travelling from Ukraine should bear in mind that, to enter the UK, their pets will need microchips, current rabies vaccinations, successful rabies titre tests, and EU pet passports.

Eurostar doesn’t take pets

Pet owners travelling from Ukraine should be aware that Eurostar trains don’t allow any animals on board.

Ask if we can help

Animalcouriers is here to help. Families leaving Ukraine (or their representatives) can contact us for advice about their individual situation and to see whether our road transport services within the EU might be appropriate for their pets.

Please courier@animalcouriers.com and put ‘Ukrainian pet travel’ in the subject line of your email.

https://www.animalcouriers.com/2022/03/06/information-for-people-leaving-ukraine-with-their-pets/

Update on Ukraine horses

Tuesday's Horse

Finally, some news. Not much . . . but some.

Charity Foundation set up

HorseTalkNZ reported on 3rd March :—

The newly established Belgian-registered Ukrainian Equestrian Federation Charity Foundation, led by the federation’s secretary-general Mykhaylo Parkhomchuk, aims to help horse owners, riding schools, athletes, equestrian clubs, stables and professionals. It will also provide counselling and needs-based assistance on the ground, including the relocation of horses, and gathering and distributing goods for equestrians and their horses both in Ukraine and in their temporary locations in Europe.

Today, Parkhomchuk is taking a horse truck with “humanitarian cargo” to Ukraine and will evacuate several horses to Poland on his return trip. He is also negotiating the organisation of logistical hub for humanitarian aid and as a pick up place for evacuated horses.

He is planning to negotiate with the Polish veterinary service about the possibility of simplifying the border-crossing procedure with horses for…

View original post 337 more words

Helping the Animals of Ukraine

“Watch Underwater As This Huge Sea Turtle Swims Back Home”

“Raccoon Still Visits Her Favorite Human Years After She Was Released In The Wild

Moose tramples and crushes Iditarod dogsled team in Alaska

www.independent.co.uk

An Alaskan woman training her dogs for the Iditarod race was attacked by an angry moose with her dogs trampled on and left seriously injured.

In a Facebook post, Bridgett Watkins shared her experience of the day a moose charged at her and her dogs while she was training them through a 52-mile run on 3 February.

While moose sightings in Alaska aren’t that uncommon, they rarely attack humans unprovoked.

Ms Watkins, a 38-year-old musher, initially thought when she spotted the moose that it would go way, she told local media outlets.

Ms Watkins, along with her friend and handler Jen Nelson, was running her sled dogs in the interior Alaska’s Fairbanks area. The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is an annual long-distance sled dog race run in early March from Anchorage to Nome in which 14 dogs run for miles for 15 days or more to reach the finish line.

She was midway through the training run when she noticed a moose along the Salcha River trail system which had shed its antlers. Her dogs were tied to the snow machine.

“I had given this moose lots and lots of space,” Ms Watkins, who has lived in Alaska all her life, told Outdoor Life.

However, soon the large bull hid amidst the trees and reappeared, eventually coming just a few feet away from the team. This triggered Ms Watkins to take out her gun and fire a few shots to startle the animal.

I was like, Well, he left again. I guess I’m just going to sit here and wait. We have to wait a while and make sure he’s gone. It wasn’t 10 seconds later that I looked up and he was charging full speed right at me,” she told the outlet.

“I even said to myself, Take a deep breath. Steady yourself. I was aimed and waiting – hoping he’d deflect – just steady. I let him get close,” Ms Watkins told Outdoor Life.

However, the moose didn’t stop. Ms Watkins, a part-time emergency room nurse, fired five times at the charging moose which became entangled with the sled dogs, the report says.

Ms Watkins said she quickly cut six dogs loose and they managed to flee. However, the dogs hooked to the sled were trampled by the moose.

The bull stood over them, stomping them for hours, she said.

“I have never felt so helpless in my life,” she said in a Facebook post. “He would not leave us alone and he even stood over top of the team refusing to retreat.”

Ms Watkis said a friend then reached them and killed the animal. But many of her dogs suffered serious injuries and are fighting for their lives.

The animal was fairly distant, she told local media outlets, so it didn’t worry Ms Watkins, who has been an Alaskan all her life and owns Kennel on a Hill.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/iditarod-dog-sledge-team-moose-attack-b2010690.html

Determination and a caring heart can make the world a better place

They’re living hell is over…

Enjoying her retirement

Let’s Get Them Home

Fundraiser by Charlotte Maxwell-Jones

$273,676 raised of $400,000 goal ● 4.7K donors

ShareDonate now

Charlotte Maxwell-Jones is organizing this fundraiser to benefit Kabul Small Animal Rescue (Ksar).   In August of this year, the Kabul Small Animal Rescue tried to evacuate, and like tens of thousands of others, we were not able to. Worse, our dogs were seized against our will by the US military, troops we believed were there to protect us, and released onto the grounds of the Kabul airport, which they knew would be taken over hours later by the Taliban forces they had been fighting for two decades.
We did not give up, and despite the unforgivable and unnecessary deaths of many of our animals on the airport grounds, deaths that will always break our hearts, our staff worked constantly to recover the animals we were able to, provide care for those taken into custody at the airport, and sustain the many dogs, cats, tortoises, peacocks, and parrots that came into our shelter over the last three months. We have mustered our courage and made cordial relationships with the Taliban-led government, from whom we have seen far more compassion and humanity for our animals than was extended to us during the August withdrawal. With the help of many people who don’t sleep, we were granted an OFAC license to continue our work as a non-profit in Afghanistan, and we will continue working here for as long as it is safe to do so. To continue this life-saving work, we must evacuate the animals filling our shelter to their homes and rescues worldwide.
The majority of the funds raised for the planned August-withdrawal were saved for the evacuation flights, but much has been spent in these three months as prices for all food and medicine have tripled, and we have hired surge staffing to assist with the increased animal population. We are now asking that you help us with the final costs needed for our animal evacuation flights, $400,000 USD, which will go directly to the costs of the long-haul flight and the transit care for our 300+ animals in Dubai. With enormous gratitude to the Taliban leadership for kindness, compassion, and patience, KSAR has been granted permission to export the dogs and cats in our care, and we plan on wheels up within the next two weeks. We need your help to complete this massive effort. We will not leave behind those that cannot protect themselves, those we are responsible for. DonateShare

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Charlotte Maxwell-Jones OrganizerMinneapolis, MN

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https://www.gofundme.com/f/32vmsq-lets-get-them-home?utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&utm_medium=copy_link_all&utm_source=customer

UPS driver brings distraught family their missing dog

petrescuereport.com

Penny Eims 2 – 3 minutes

December 16, 2021/in dog news, Dogs /

A family in Turtletown, Tennessee, has their dog back thanks to a UPS driver who went above and beyond to lend a helping hand. As reported by Fox News, 29-year-old Darrell Slack was busy delivering holiday packages when a woman told him about her missing dog, Pete. The seven-year-old dog belonged to Paula Odom, who explained that Pete is a runner and she worried that he was lost in the Cherokee National Forest, which is near her home.

Odom told the news agency:

“In that forest there are coyotes, there are bears…my fear was that Pete is not mountain-wise and wouldn’t know what to do in a situation like that and the chance we’d see him again was slim to none.”

Slack assured Pete’s owner that he would be on the lookout for her dog and sure enough, while delivering a package in a remote area, not far from the Odom’s residence, he spotted the missing dog. Thanks to some dog biscuits that Slack keeps in his truck, he was able to lure the pooch to him.

Slack drove Pete back to his distraught owner. Odom tells the news agency that she was thrilled to see the UPS driver walk-up with her dog:

“As he held Pete in his arms I just about collapsed. I was overjoyed.”

She added:

“It speaks volumes — especially right now at Christmas,”

Follow the National Animal News Facebook page for more news, updates, and petitions.

https://petrescuereport.com/2021/ups-driver-brings-distraught-family-their-missing-dog/#es_form_f4-n3

The only difference you’ll see is the price tag!

A rescue dog bravely takes bullet to protect her family when armed robbers entered their home

mypositiveoutlooks.com

A rescue dog in South Africa bravely risked her life to protect her family when armed intruders entered their home.

Last year, the Lamont family adopted a young crossed Malinois named Kei from the Boksburg SPCA. It was love at first sight when they met her, but little did they know that the rescue dog was going to save their lives.

In the early morning hours of October 3rd, two armed robbers broke into the Lamont home in Lakefield, Benoni, South Africa. The invaders made their way upstairs to where the family slept.Facebook

Kei wearing a bandage after her surgery

One robber entered the main bedroom, while the other went into the eldest daughter’s bedroom, gun in hand. He didn’t know that Kei was also on the bed watching over her best friend. The dog immediately sensed danger and darted across the room before the criminal could get through the door.

Kei attacked him with great force, and the intruder retreated back into the hall and ran down the stairs, leaving a trail of blood behind him.

But as he fled, he shot and killed the family’s Biewer Yorkie, Holly. As tiny as she was, the pup risked her life to protect her family.Facebook

Kei with her owner

Kei continued to chase the man down the stairs and into the kitchen, where he pulled the trigger and shot the dog in the face. It left the poor dog wounded and stunned, giving the attacker a chance to escape.

The dog knew she had to get help, and despite hurting from her injuries, Kei made her way out to the gate to alert a neighbor she was friendly with. Surveillance footage from that morning shows her pacing up and down the gate, trying to get the attention of the homeowners. However, she couldn’t bark because the bullet had shattered her jaw.

With no luck, Kei ran down to the lake, a place she was familiar with, hoping to find help.

Meanwhile, the Lamont family frantically looked for her, driving out into the streets to find her. Forty minutes later, they found Kei lying on the grass by the water. They contacted the Boksburg SPCA, who came to the scene immediately and helped the family.Facebook

Kei with her dog sibling

Kei was brought to an after-hours vet, where they stabilized her and gave her lots of morphine. Things didn’t look great for her then. Later that morning, she was X-rayed, and the results revealed that the bullet had entered the side of her nose, shattered two top molars, severely injured her tongue, and had broken her jaw.

On October 7, Kei underwent major jaw surgery. However, doctors found that the damage is quite severe and that her tongue will need further treatment. More bullet fragments were also found in her jawbone. A few days later, she was released from the hospital and had to be tube-fed.

According to specialist Professor Steenkamp of the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic hospital, Kei will need a plate in her jaw and a possible bone graph.

“This is a beautiful example of how an unwanted, cross breed, SPCA animal can go from ‘zero to hero,’” the Boksburg SPCA wrote on Facebook. “There are thousands of dogs just like Kei sitting in SPCAs around the country, waiting to be adopted. Look after your pets and we promise, they’ll look after you!”Facebook

Kei with a doctor

In an update posted on October 26, the Boksburg SPCA reported that Kei had been taken off tube feeding and could start eating soft food. In three weeks, she will undergo a big operation once the titanium plate and prosthesis are completed.

“Words cannot express how unbelievably grateful we are to all of you wonderful, kind hearted people out there,” the Lamonts said. “…We are so blessed and your acts of kindness have helped ease the trauma for us. THANK YOU to each and everyone of you for all you have done for our Kei and our family.”

The Lamont family has started a fundraiser to help pay for Kei’s surgeries, and they have decided to donate all the remaining funds to the Boksburg SPCA in honor of their beloved Holly, who is now in doggy heaven.

Here’s to hoping that Kei makes a full recovery soon so that she can go back to spending time with her family!

***Did you enjoy our feel good and positive story? You can help support our site by simply SUBSCRIBING and sharing our stories to your friends and family.

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/rescue-dog-bravely-takes-bullet-to-protect-family/

This teenager spends her free time building custom wheelchairs for animals with mobility issues 

mypositiveoutlooks.com

 


A high schooler from Minnesota is on a mission of providing mobility to animals with mobility challenges.

During her free time, Shaine Kilyun is building wheelchairs for animals in need. With no one to teach her, the 16-year-old relies on YouTube tutorials to perfect her technique. Her process and finished products become more refined as she makes more of these devices.

Each wheelchair is customized based on the animals’ specific needs. So far, Shaine has created customized mobility devices for dogs, cats, and, soon, a duck.

As she is self-taught, Shaine works on a trial-and-error basis. She has made wheelchairs for animals of all shapes and sizes—from a tiny Chihuahua to a huge Great Dane. She has also come up with a unique locomotion aid for a hedgehog!

As young as she is, Shaine is already doing fantastic work for these animals. The impact of her mission can’t be underestimated, especially because mobility can save animals from being euthanized. This young woman is literally saving lives, and she’s just getting started.

“I just love animals, and I wanted to make a difference somehow,” she told Fox 9. “I’ve saved a few lives, and I really hope to save more.”

Shaine has also launched Wheelies Dog and Cat Wheelchairs on Instagram to let the public know about her handmade and low-cost wheelchairs. Her main goal is to make these devices accessible, not to make a profit.

The teen charges only for the total cost of her materials, so her products are way more affordable than any of the mainstream wheelchairs you’d find on the market. On average, her wheelchairs cost only $300, while bigger companies offer similar devices for as high as $1,000.

Shaine hopes that the affordability of her creations will help pet owners provide their animals with a better quality of life. The teen has also been reaching out to shelters to see how she can help the animals there.

Before starting the build, Shaine needs to understand what the animal needs. Depending on their requirements, she provides front-support, full-support, and back-support models.

One of the recent recipients of Shaine’s custom wheelchairs was Scooter, a paraplegic dog who came here from Saudi Arabia via the Home For Life Sanctuary. The pup can’t use his legs, so he just drags his body forward, causing him to develop sores and lesions where his legs scrape the ground. This also puts him at risk of infection. Luckily, Shaine made him a special wheelchair.

Shaine shared photos of Scooter using his customized wheelchair on Instagram, and the pup was clearly loving it!

“This is absolutely INCREDIBLE!! I gave Scooter, who arrived from Saudi Arabia a special custom Wheelies wheelchair! It means the world to me,” she wrote.

Many people who have heard about Shaine’s mission for the animals are pitching in and helping raise funds for the teen so that she can continue her good work.

Lisa LaVerdiere, the founder and director of operations for Home for Life Sanctuary, said that the financial hardships caused by the pandemic have made it more difficult to raise money.

“It’s very hard to raise money in these times. So for her to make not one cart but two carts for us probably saved us close to $1,000,” LaVerdiere said.

She’s grateful to Shaine for the time and effort she has devoted into making these animals’ lives easier.

“A lot of people have reached out and donated, which is just incredible,” Shaine said.

If you want to help animals with special needs gain mobility, you can donate via Zelle to Wheeliesdogwheelchairs@gmail.com. Visit the Instagram page.

Thank you, Shaine, for this wonderful initiative! You can learn more about her project in the video below.

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Heartbreaking story of elephant named Nina who was intentionally BLINDED by her cruel owners & left with…

Nina was held in chains and intentionally blinded by her owners, experts say

www.thesun.co.uk

Mark Hodge

A TORTURED elephant used for begging and as a prop for wedding processions was “intentionally blinded” by its cruel owners.

The elderly animal named Nina, aged 60, was rescued by charity Wildlife SOS in Uttar Pradesh, India.

The elephant’s eyeballs have collapsed or sunken after years of abuse

Initially, the abused elephant showed signs of PTSD such as severe anxiety and bobbing her head continually when saved earlier this year.

When elephants are captured in the wild in India they are often subjected to a brutal process called “Phajaan” which literally means “breaking of the spirit.”

The animal is put in a confined space where they are starved and beaten until they become subservient to their captors.

Shockingly, depraved people intentionally destroy the eyes of the elephants – blinding them – to gain more sympathy while begging.

Nina was also used in wedding processions where she was painted, made to carry heavy ornaments and forced to walk on hot tarmac roads from one ceremony to another surrounded by loud music.

And when she was not being brutally abused, the poor Asian elephant was held in chains, unable to move around.

The horrific work conditions and lack of proper nutrition and care led to Nina developing various physical ailments such as arthritis and damaged limbs as well as numerous scars and wounds on her body.

Dr Ilayaraja, Deputy Director of Veterinary Services at Wildlife SOS, told The Sun Online: “Nina suffers from a degenerative joint condition that affects her hind limbs. Her forelimbs are affected due to compensatory weight-bearing.

“Both eyes are damaged completely, possibly due to external trauma and lack of medical attention. She has been placed under a carefully calibrated diet to regain strength.”

After consultations with eye specialists from India and UK, the Wildlife SOS team was saddened to learn that Nina’s loss of vision was almost certainly intentionally inflicted.

Her left eyeball has completely collapsed due to an untreated injury and her right eye had shrunken.

Nina was rescued and brought to the charity’s Elephant Hospital Campus in Mathura, India first-ever medical facility for elderly and injured elephants.

STARVED AND BEATEN

She will now spend her remaining years being cared for by the team at Wildlife SOS where she is housed in an enclosure which is never changed so she can use her sense of smell and touch to navigate her way around.

The 60-year-old elephant often ventures out into the open field at the Wildlife SOS centre and even enjoys a shower every day.

Nina showed signs of discomfort in the initial days following her rescue as she found herself in a new environment, the charity says.

Yet, in the short time that the elephant has been with Wildlife SOS, she has grown comfortable with her caregiver and is adjusting to her free range enclosure.

Ms Tamarisk Grummit, who represents Wildlife SOS in the UK says, “Nina has found a happy and loving home at Wildlife SOS. Watching her evolve into a gregarious elephant is proof that we must continue treading the path to help Elephants in distress across India.”

IN GOOD HANDS

Kartick Satyanarayan, co-founder & CEO of Wildlife SOS, said: “India is the last stronghold for the Asian elephant population where 50 per cent of the remaining populations occur and it is critically important to conserve and protect this majestic species.

“At Wildlife SOS, we try our best to give the elephants a life of freedom and dignity. Caring for blind elephants, in particular, can be challenging as they require specialised care and constant monitoring.

“We are committed to creating a safer place for wildlife across India and change the perception of people towards wildlife.”

The charity, which relies on donations, is working towards raising funds for the care and upkeep of 33 elephants.

You can make a difference by contributing towards the cause at http://www.wildlifesos.org/donate.

For more details, visit wildlifesos.org or email info@wildlifesos.org. For any queries, contact the Wildlife SOS UK Campaign Officer, Debbie Haynes-+44 07831433106 Abused elephants are forced to walk for miles and then held in chains when they are not working The cracked feet of an elephant captured in the wild and then tortured in India

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/16257123/elephant-blinded-begging-india/amp/?__twitter_impression=true