Here’s why Easter Is bad for bunnies

https://api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/news/2017/04/rabbits-easter-animal-welfare-pets-rescue-bunnies?__twitter_impression=true

By Natasha Daly 13-17 minutes


PUBLISHED April 12, 2017

Roger, a rescued rabbit, peers over his owner Kyle Daly’s shoulder.

Photograph by Rebecca Hale, National Geographic

Editor’s note: Amid the coronavirus pandemic, shelters and rescue groups across the U.S. and around the world report a greater need for people to foster or adopt domestic pets, including rabbits. Some shelters even offer remote adoption screening and curbside pickups. If you’re interested in fostering a rabbit, here is a list of rescue groups by state and by country.

It’s the Saturday before Easter weekend at Petland in Fairfax, Virginia. Sixteen baby bunnies sit in three open pens, all for sale. Two teenage girls reach into a pen, scoop one up, and plop down on the floor, squealing over its cuteness: “I need it!”

The rabbits are all very young. No adult rabbits are for sale here.

“What happens to the babies who grow up before they’re sold?” I ask a salesman. “The breeder picks them up,” he says.

“What does he do with them?”

“I don’t know.”

It’s Picture Day for These Adorable Bunnies

Rabbits are the third most popular pet in America, after cats and dogs, according to the Humane Society of the United States—and the third most abandoned. Most Americans have a sense of how long cats and dogs live, the kind of care they need, their behaviors. But rabbits? I asked several of my colleagues how long they think domestic rabbits live. “One to two years?” “Maybe three?” In fact, with proper care, rabbits live 10 to 12 years. People’s understanding of them seems to be out of step with their ubiquity.

This disconnect appears to drive impulse pet rabbit purchases, says Anne Martin, executive director of the House Rabbit Society, the largest rabbit rescue organization in the U.S. Because many people think they’re short-lived, low maintenance, cage-bound animals, rabbits are seen as “starter pets,” akin to goldfish, perfect for kids. This misconception may help drive a glut of baby bunny sales ahead of Easter—and a subsequent rise in rabbit abandonments.

Jennifer McGee, co-manager of the Georgia chapter of House Rabbit Society, a shelter in the southeastern part of the state, says they normally receive one to two calls a week about abandoned rabbits. But in the six weeks after Easter, the shelter gets three to four calls a day. House Rabbit Society chapters in Idaho and Chicago report a more noticeable rise in summer, as “Easter bunnies” hit puberty and reality sets in for owners.

And here’s the reality: Although rabbits can make delightful companions, they’re not easy-care pets. Vets and insurance companies consider them exotic pets, so medical care can be more expensive than for a cat or dog. Rabbits need a lot of exercise and shouldn’t simply be pent up in a cage. This means they need to learn to use a litterbox (yes, rabbits can be potty trained), which takes patience, just as it does for cats. They’re also prey animals, and we’re, well, predators. They generally don’t like to be picked up by humans; they prefer to be in control, their feet on the ground.

“It takes a patient person to become friends with these silent and subtle animals,” says Margo DeMello, president of the House Rabbit Society.

Roger pops his head out of his travel carrier—he smells banana, his favorite treat. Likely around four years old, he was rescued from a park in Washington, D.C, where he’d been left in a cage.

Photograph by Rebecca Hale, National Geographic

Rabbits’ complexity means they often face a grim fate when purchased on a whim. Seemingly cute and cuddly, once baby bunnies mature, at between three and six months old, they can become aggressive and even destructive. Proper exercise, litterbox training, and spaying or neutering curbs the problem for most rabbits. But many new owners assume that the undesirable behaviors are the sign of a problem rabbit and get rid of it. Others may do a little research and balk at the time and money it takes to change bunny behavior. McGee says she’s often met with shock and frustration from parents: “What do you mean I have to spend $200 to fix a $30 rabbit?”

ABANDONMENTS: A YEAR-ROUND PROBLEM

It’s unclear how many rabbits are abandoned in the U.S.—and how many are Easter bunnies. There isn’t a central organization collecting data, DeMello says. Most individual shelters track how many dogs and cats are found, adopted, or euthanized, but they typically lump rabbits in with birds, reptiles, and small mammals in the “other” category.

Rescuers in local rabbit shelters from California’s Bay Area to rural Georgia to suburban Connecticut all tell National Geographic that although abandonments spike in the weeks and months after Easter, they’re a big problem year-round.

According to Martin, about two-thirds of rabbits rescued in Northern California are strays left to fend for themselves. In some cities, Las Vegas and Spokane, Washington, for example, public parks and empty lots have become dumping grounds overrun with hundreds of unfixed, unwanted rabbits. People abandon many rabbits outdoors, likely unaware that this is a death sentence. Domestic rabbits lack the survival instincts of their wild cousins, Martin says, and are unable to fight infection, build safe shelters, or adapt to heat and cold.

Kiba, an 11-year-old Netherland Dwarf, poses for the camera. He was surrendered to a shelter in 2012 in bad condition: underweight, with broken toes. He now has his own Instagram account: @kibabunny.

Photograph by Rebecca Hale, National Geographic

Shelters struggle to keep up. The Georgia House Rabbit Society gets more than 500 requests a year from owners looking to get rid of their rabbits—far more than they have the resources to save. Edie Sayeg, a rescuer with the group, believes thousands of rabbits are simply ditched outdoors in Georgia.

Elizabeth Kunzelman, a spokeswoman for Petland, a major national pet retailer that sells rabbits, says the spring months are “a perfect time for a child to begin caring for a new pet and learning responsibility.” But DeMello believes this mindset is problematic. “Children, honestly, want something cuddlier and more obviously attentive and are often frustrated when rabbits don’t respond to them the way they expect.” Other pet stores, including Petco and Petsmart, stopped selling rabbits several years ago because of concerns about abandonment. Kunzelman says Petland has a take-back policy for rabbits and other animals.

But two years after I visited the Petland in Fairfax, Virginia, the Humane Society of the United States released undercover footage documenting alleged mistreatment and deaths of rabbits at the store. Fairfax County police investigated and found 31 dead rabbits in a freezer in the store in April 2019. Lieutenant Ronnie Lewis, who oversaw the investigation, says that his team seized the dead rabbits as well as 17 living rabbits from the store. Police placed the surviving rabbits in custody of a municipal animal shelter. All 17 rabbits are now in foster homes and will be available for adoption shortly.

Petland has since terminated its franchise agreement with the store, saying in a statement that the company is “saddened and outraged at this alleged gross violation of Petland’s animal care standards.” The store is now closed. The cause of the rabbit deaths remains under investigation by police.

It’s not just pet stores that promote rabbit purchases. Farm stores, 4-H clubs, backyard breeders, and Facebook and Craigslist users across the country advertise baby bunnies ahead of the Easter season. Suzanne Holtz, director of Illinois-based Bunnies United Network, says these sellers can be even more problematic than pet stores because the rabbits often have a misplaced “halo of rescue” about them. Her shelter will get calls from people looking to surrender a bunny they “saved” from Craigslist, where selling animals is ostensibly banned.

It’s a challenge to discourage people from buying rabbits as Easter gifts without discouraging responsible would-be owners from having them at all, Martin says, because for those who understand how to care for them, they make fantastic pets.

I know: I have two rescue rabbits of my own. Roger, a Blanc de Hotot (a French breed notable for black-rimmed “eyeliner” eyes) was found abandoned in a small cage in a park. Rescued by D.C.-area group Friends of Rabbits, he’s curious, fearless, and loving. Penelope, an English Angora, was found on the street as a baby. A Washington Humane Society rescue, she’s bonded with Roger—they’re companions who groom and play with each other—and is opinionated and ornery. They’re litter-trained, have free rein of our apartment, and bring me and my husband joy every day.

Editor’s note: This story was updated on April 19, 2019, to include new information about the Fairfax, Virginia, Petland.

To learn more about rabbit care, visit House Rabbit Society at rabbit.org. If you’re interested in adopting a rabbit of your own, you can reach out to your local HRS chapter, or an animal shelter in your area.

Spring safety tips

Do I need to worry that my dog has coronavirus?

worldanimalprotection.us

The simple answer is no. It’s understandable that many of us are feeling concerned about the possibility of contracting coronavirus, but to turn our attention towards dogs would be entirely misguided.

Just last month, heartbreaking images of pet dogs and cats emerged from China’s Hubei Province – their eyes glazed over, their bodies lying lifeless on the pavements, some surrounded by a pool of their own blood. The fear of catching the virus had terrified their owners, believing their pets could be carriers – they were thrown from the windows of the high-rise tower blocks. People’s fears were leading to cruel and unnecessary loss of life.

While not common, some authorities have reported pets being killed (either by force or humanely euthanized) or abandoned as a precaution. Thankfully, this doesn’t appear to be the common response, and most people realize this is a completely unnecessary reaction to the coronavirus rumor mill.

Coronavirus is frequently being compared to the SARS outbreak of 2003 as it bears striking similarities. Just like with SARS, there were also fears that pets could spread the disease. By the end of the epidemic, just eight cats and a dog tested positive for the virus, but no animal was ever found to transmit the disease to humans.

Now, the world is turning its attention to Hong Kong, where an elderly, 17-year-old Pomeranian dog has tested ‘weak positive’ for coronavirus. A dog of this age might typically be quite vulnerable to infections, yet it is still showing no signs of disease relating to COVID-19. Experts will be monitoring the dog and will be repeating the test in the coming days, although more tests need to be done.

To put it into perspective, consider that there are around 750 million dogs living in the world, mostly alongside people, and of all these, just one single dog, has tested weakly positive for coronavirus. This is an extremely rare and isolated case. We need to prevent a knee-jerk reaction to our canine companions, preventing any drastic measures.

It’s still early days, and experts are unsure how the disease interacts with other animals. There have been questions on whether the dog has actually contracted the disease, or just that the virus is being harbored in its body. After all, the dog was in close proximity to its owner, who does have the disease. For a dog to contract coronavirus, the disease will have had to mutate to enable it to latch on to dog cells. Right now, we don’t know for sure if this is the case, so this example tells us very little.

It’s also important to consider that the genes of dogs are very different from the genes of humans. While it looks as though the coronavirus might have originated in a bat, it’s a mystery how the virus jumped from bats to humans, and if there was another animal in the middle, bridging this gap.

Even if this case does show that the virus can jump to dogs, we don’t know enough at this stage about its possible transmission to other dogs, animals or even back to humans again. Take distemper, canine parvovirus, and heartworms for example – these are all examples of infections that cannot be transmitted from dogs to humans due to the differences in our genetic make-up among other things.

Pets are great companions and they shouldn’t pay the price of our fear by being abandoned or cruelly mistreated. We’re urging people to continue to protect their pets by trying to avoid crowded places for dog walks and keeping their time outdoors to a minimum where possible until we know more about the transmission of the coronavirus. This should also serve as an important reminder to be a responsible pet owner by microchipping, vaccinating and neutering your animals. For pets belonging to a household with COVID-19 infections, we recommend pets are also placed in quarantined facilities where possible or kept isolated from other animals at least.

Our message is clear – we need to look after our animals and not panic. There is no evidence showing that pets can be the source of infection of coronavirus. All around the world, dogs improve and add value to our lives. They keep us company, protect homes and livestock, and can learn to do extraordinary tasks – so let’s make sure we keep them, and ourselves, protected.

https://www.worldanimalprotection.us/blogs/pets-dogs-coronavirus-transmission

Cat Rescued After Escaping from Dogfighting Ring

onegreenplanet.org

By Sharon Vega

Dogfighting is a horrible blood “sport” in which dogs are forced to aggressively and violent fight each other for the entertainment or profit of humans. Horrible people gamble over the suffering and violence between animals. Many dogs suffer tremendously not just when forced to fight, but when used as bait dogs. But dogfighting affects other animals too. Cats and rabbits are also used as bait in dogfighting rings. It’s as horrifying as it sounds.

In order to train dogs to develop a blood lust, part of that involves tying up other animals and painting them red to teach the dog to chase and maul them and tear them apart. It’s sickening and disgusting.

A cat that was going to be used in this appalling way thankfully somehow got away and was rescued!

On Tuesday, February 18th, a UPS driver found a black and white kitten whose white fur had been dyed red. Thankfully, the driver saved the kitten and took him to Southside Animal Shelter nearby.

The shelter explained that among animal rescuers, it’s common knowledge that a cat with fur dyed red means they were being used in dogfighting rings.

News site WTHR also explains: “In dog fighting, many times cats and kittens are dyed different colors with people then betting on which one will be killed by the dog first, put up the best fight or survive the longest.”

The sweet cat has since been named Cosmo. He needs to put on some weight and get neutered, but then he’ll be put up for adoption. We are so glad he somehow got away from the horrible fate that awaited him and that the kind UPS driver was compassionate and caring enough to get him to safety.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/cat-rescued-after-escaping-from-dogfighting-ring/

Experts say hunters are killing eagles

They do the mating call 12 hours a day for weeks

Even Animals Fall in Love ❣️

Live feed of snow goose migration in Lancaster County | fox43.com

HDonTap, in conjunction with the State Game Commission, has a live feed of the snow goose migration. Thousands of birds are gathering there.

Go here to get the live feed of the snow goose migration.

https://www.fox43.com/amp/article/news/local/lancaster-county/watch-live-feed-of-snow-goose-migration-in-middle-creek-wildlife-management-area-in-lancaster-county/521-bf9e9dfd-3071-4d4a-a723-5d6c762582d4?__twitter_impression=true

Stray dogs are beaten to death in china to “stop” spread of coronavirus

dailycolumn.com.au

Footage has emerged of a Chinese community officer savagely beating a defenceless stray dog to death with a large wooden club, claiming to “Prevent the coronavirus from spreading”.

As The death toll from the Coronavirus hits 1,019 Chinese citizens throughout mainland China, the fears of the disease spreading by stray and domesticated Animals is manifested.

Horrified citizens in the city of Nanchong, Sichuan Province were witness to a brutal attack which involved a stray dog being brutally beaten to death with a large wooden club by a community officer. Sources claim the stray dog had bitten a resident and caused havoc.

A shocked resident filmed the entire incident which is too graphic to be shown, which shows the officer beating a medium sized dog repeatedly with a large wooden club, the officers actions have been condemned by animal rights groups as being “cruel” and “atrocious”.

The citizens residing the the complex where the incident took place were later instructed by officers to keep their pets indoors and that no pets were allowed outside.

‘As long as [we] see a dog in the complex, no matter if it is on the lead or not, we will beat it to death,’ the officers were quoted saying.

The footage later shows one of the two dogs which was beaten to death being taken away by a man on a scooter.

The WHO (World Health Organisation) has stated that there has been no evidence to suggest the coronavirus can be spread by cats and dogs at this time.

So far the coronavirus epidemics death toll has reached 1,019 lives with 43,140 people in 28 countries and territories around the world infected with the majority of those cases being in China.

https://dailycolumn.com.au/stray-dogs-are-beaten-to-death-in-china-to-stop-spread-of-coronavirus/

Tonight at 9 p.m. Orangutans

Roving band of herpes-ridden monkeys now roaming northeast Florida

monkeysnypost-com.cdn.ampproject.org
By Paula Froelich

February 1, 2020 | 3:43pm
rhesus macaques monkey Florida

A rhesus macaques monkey is pictured in Silver Springs, Fla. in 2017. AP

Forget Florida man, now there’s Florida monkeys.

A roving band of feral, herpes-ridden monkeys is now roaming across northeast Florida.

The STD-addled rhesus macaques had previously been confined to Silver Springs State Park near Ocala, Florida, but are now being spotted miles away in Jacksonville, St. Johns, St. Augustine, Palatka, Welaka and Elkton, Florida according to a local ABC affiliate, First Coast News.

Even more worrying: over a quarter of the 300 feral macaques — an invasive species native to south and southeast Asia — carry herpes B, according to a 2018 survey, National Geographic reported.

The monkeys were introduced to the area in the 1930s by a local cruise operator, Colonel Tooey’s Jungle Cruise, which released 12 monkeys over a series of years onto a man-made island inside Silver Springs State Park. The monkeys swam to freedom and reproduced at alarming rates and are now wandering around residential areas.

“The potential ramifications are really dire,” University of Florida primate scientist Dr. Steve Johnson told First Coast News. “A big male … that’s an extremely strong, potentially dangerous animal.”

In 1984, the then-Florida Game and Freshwater Fish Commission allowed licensed trappers to cull the monkey population by trapping and hunting. Over a thousand of the monkeys ended up in zoos or research facilities — or were simply killed. It was “a program that proved deeply unpopular with the public,” FCN noted. Since 2012 there has been no active management of the monkey population.

Greta Mealey, who works for DuMond Conservancy for Primates & Tropical Forests in Miami, told FCN that the monkeys are not a major threat to humans. “They’re not going to come up to us and interact with us. They would be more fearful.”

But, she added, “It’s not the kind of animal you probably want hanging around.”

Mealey’s grandson, Jason Parks, 8, of Julington Creek, saw one of the monkeys and described it as “being about chest high with ‘sharp claws and stuff. … My sister named him George.’”

https://nypost-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/nypost.com/2020/02/01/roving-band-of-herpes-ridden-monkeys-now-roaming-northeast-florida/amp/?usqp=mq331AQCKAE%3D&amp_js_v=0.1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s&ampshare=https%3A%2F%2Fnypost.com%2F2020%2F02%2F01%2Froving-band-of-herpes-ridden-monkeys-now-roaming-northeast-florida%2F

Coronavirus – Cats and dogs ‘thrown from tower blocks’ in China after fake news rumours animals are causing spread

thesun.co.uk
Coronavirus – Cats and dogs ‘thrown from tower blocks’ in China after fake news rumours animals are causing spread
By Jon Lockett
3-4 minutes
VIRUS PANIC

Graphic Warning

31st January 2020, 3:33 pm

Updated: 1st February 2020, 1:14 pm

PANICKING pet owners are reportedly throwing cats and dogs out of towerblocks following bogus claims deadly coronavirus can be passed on by animals.

Chilling pictures coming out of crisis-hit China are said to show the bloodied corpses of animals lying in the road after being hurled to their death.

Chilling pictures coming out of crisis-hot China are said to show the bloodied corpses of animals lying in the road

AsiaWire
Chilling pictures coming out of China are said to show the bloodied corpses of animals lying in the road

One dog was found dead after allegedly being thrown from one block of flats in Tianjin City in Hebei Province – home to the outbreak epicentre Wuhan.

Five cats were also thrown to death in Shanghai, with locals apparently saying they were pets as they had smooth and clean fur, say unconfirmed reports.

Local media stated the pooch was thrown from the upper floors of a tower block at 4am and smashed into the sunroof of a car before ending up on the ground.

Reports state the noise of the dog hitting the car woke sleeping locals as it sounded like a tyre explosion.

Sickened families then found the poor pet lying dead on the ground with its blood staining surrounding bricks.

It’s reported mulitple pets were killed following bogus claims they could spread coronavirus

AsiaWire
It’s reported multiple pets were killed following bogus claims they could spread coronavirus

The shocking incidents were sparked after Dr Li Lanjuan said on Chinese state TV said : “If pets come into contact with suspected patients, they should be quarantined.”

However, a local media outlet then reportedly tweaked her words into “cats and dogs can spread the coronavirus”.

The false rumour spread quickly after Zhibo China posted it on social media platform Weibo.

In a bid to put and end to the false claims, China Global Television Network posted a quote from the World Health Organisation.

It read: “There is no evidence showing that pets such as cats and dogs can contract the novel coronavirus, the World Health Organisation said on Wednesday.”

PETA Asia press officer for China, Keith Guo, said: “We hope the police can find the cold-blooded guardians of those poor animals as soon as possible.

“In fact, it’s the filthy factory farms, slaughterhouses, and meat markets that threaten the health of every human being on the planet by providing a breeding ground for deadly diseases like coronavirus, SARS, bird flu, and more.”

On Thursday we reported how dog owners in China were rushing to buy face masks for their pooches as experts warn pets could also catch the deadly virus.

One online seller from Beijing told Mail Online he is selling more special masks than ever before.

Zhou Tianxiao, 33, started selling special masks for dogs in 2018 to help protect them from air pollution.

But since the deadly new outrbreak, he has gone from selling 150 masks a month to at least 50 a day.

The killer bug has now spread to every region of China and 22 other countries including the UK.

The death toll has reached 213, with almost 10,000 people infected in what the WHO has called a global health emergency.

China’s first coronavirus hospital opens as empty building is rapidly converted in just TWO days into 1,000-bed unit

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10863349/coronavirus-cats-and-dogs-thrown-to-death/amp/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sharebarweb&__twitter_impression=true

These contests need to stop!

Tiny but mighty

Don’t forget to make the popcorn!

“Top 5 Animal Superpowers! | BBC Earth”

Petition: Insurance Should Cover Diabetic Alert Dogs | Take Action @ The Diabetes Site

diabetic-alert-dogs

thediabetessite.greatergood.com
Insurance Should Cover Diabetic Alert Dogs | Take Action @ The Diabetes Site
Sponsor: The Diabetes Site

These dogs can save lives, but prohibitive costs keep many from acquiring them. Insurance companies should cover them!

These dogs can save lives, but prohibitive costs keep many from acquiring them. Insurance companies should cover them!

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There’s no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don’t more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn’t be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.’s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors’ recommend them.
The Petition:

To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation’s most prominent health insurance providers, I’m asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,
https://thediabetessite.greatergood.com/clicktogive/dbs/petition/diabetic-alert-dogs?utm_source=dbs-reminder&utm_medium=email&utm_term=01122020&utm_content=reminder-A0&utm_campaign=diabetic-alert-dogs&oidp=0x4a568a63ec7cab2cc0a82937

Building a more just world for everyone in 2020

And Counting

If You Have a Facebook Account…. Please go Over and Help!

The Voice for Wolves

Do not allow Michael Vick to be honored in the 2020 NFL Pro Bowl

change.org

joanna lind started this petition to NFL

Just saw this on Facebook and was absolutely disgusted. When is the NFL going to take any responsibility for the behavior of it’s current and former players? To honor a man who had zero regard for animals is unacceptable and I would like your help to make sure he is NOT honored at the 2020 NFL Pro Bowl.

Elizabeth Marie 14 hrs
Just heard that the NFL announced Michael Vick will be one of four “legends captains” at the 2020 Pro Bowl. Does anyone else find it exhausting that the NFL constantly ignores their players criminal behavior?!

Below is a snippet of The Lost Dogs: Michael Vick’s Dogs and Their Tale of Rescue and Redemption.

“And then there was one last body that stood out from the rest. It had signs of of bruising on all four ankles and all along its side. Brownie had said that all the dogs that didn’t die from being hanged were drowned, except one.
As that dog lay on the ground fighting for air, Quanis Phillips grabbed its front legs and Michael Vick grabbed its hind legs. They swung the dog over their head like a jump rope then slammed it to the ground. The first impact didn’t kill it. So [they] slammed it again. The two men kept at it, alternating back and forth, pounding the creature against the ground, until at last, the little red dog was dead.”

https://www.change.org/p/nfl-do-not-allow-michael-vick-to-be-honored-in-the-2020-nfl-pro-bowl

14600 Sheep are in this cargo ship that capsized in the Black Sea off the coast of Romania

Mark the date on your calendar

Photographer Documented The Friendship Between A Grey Wolf And A Brown Bear

whatzviral.com
By. Ran

Finnish photographer Lassi Rautiainen captured the amazing sight of a female grey wolf and a male brown bear. The unlikely friendship was documented over the course of ten days in 2013. The duo was captured walking everywhere together, hunting as a team and sharing their spoils.

Each evening after a hard of hunting the pair shared a convivial deer carcass meal together at the dusk in the wilderness.

Image Credit & More Info: kesava | wildfinland.org.

They hung out together for at least 10 days.

“It’s very unusual to see a bear and a wolf getting on like this” Finnish photographer Lassi Rautiainen, told the Daily Mail in 2013 when he took these surprising photos. “From what I could find, it’s actually the first time, at least in Europe, where such a friendship was developed.”

“No-one can know exactly why or how the young wolf and bear became friends,” Lassi continued. “I think that perhaps they were both alone and they were young and a bit unsure of how to survive alone…It is nice to share rare events in the wild that you would never expect to see.”

Lassi’s guess is as good as any, as there are no scientific studies on the matter, and it is very hard to find such cases – especially in the wild.

“It seems to me that they feel safe being together,” Lassi adds.

The duo comes from two species that are meant to scare everything the meet. However, this male bear and female wolf clearly see each other as friends, focusing on the softer side in one another and eat dinner together.

The two friends were also seeing playing!

The heart touching pictures of the unusual duo was captured by nature photographer Lassi Rautiainen, in the wilderness of northern Finland.

Rare pictures depict the bear and the wolf sharing a meal in leisure!

The friendship looks like something straight out of a Disney movie.

Nature never ceases to amaze us. While scientists are baffled by the unusual friendship, the pair seems to be enjoying each other’s company.

“No one can know exactly why or how the young wolf and bear became friends,” said Lassi. “I think that perhaps they were both alone and they were young and a bit unsure of how to survive alone”.

The friends were seen meeting up every night for 10 days straight.

https://whatzviral.com/photographer-documented-the-friendship-between-a-grey-wolf-and-a-brown-bear/

This Guy Stayed in the Animal shelter for 72 hours

Photography collective takes a stand against wildlife crime

theartnewspaper.com
Tom Seymour

Neil Aldridge’s image of a blindfolded young white rhino, which was sedated for transport to preserve it from poachers, features in the book. The price of rhino horn on the black market is more valuable by weight than gold, diamonds or cocaine, according to a study NEIL ALDRIDGE/photographersagainstwildlifecrime.com

At the beginning of the 20th century, half a million rhinos roamed Africa. Today, there are fewer than 5,000. In 2007, 13 rhinos were poached; since 2013, more than 1,000 have been killed each year. Overwhelmingly, their horns end up on the Chinese and Vietnamese market, where a burgeoning elite views rhino products as an elixir for all manner of ills, or as an ornamental trinket—the ultimate status symbol.

Rhinos are the most iconic of a host of endangered species driven to extinction by such rampant black markets. Pangolins, the only mammal with scales, are frequently found roasted and served in restaurants across East Asia. Black bears are farmed for their bile, which is extracted for use in traditional medicines, while shark fins and turtles are turned into soup. More than 6,000 tigers are held in captivity in China today—before their skeletons are soaked in rice wine and sold to the elite.

This has posed a challenge to some of the world’s most celebrated wildlife photographers. Should their practice and livelihood change as the animals they spend their careers capturing teeter on the brink of extinction?

“Magazines shy away from publishing such imagery. It doesn’t sell well”

Bigeye Thresher Shark Caught in Net by Brian Skerry (2012) © Brian Skerry

A new collective, Photographers Against Wildlife Crime, has formed to address this question and to confront the nation primarily connected to this horrific rise in poaching: China. Co-founded by the award-winning photographer Britta Jaschinski, the group includes some of the most renowned wildlife photographers in the world, including Adrian Steirn, Brent Stirton and Brian Skerry. It was formed in part due to wildlife crime’s lack of visibility in Western publications, Jaschinski says.

“Millions of animals are caught and harvested from the wild and sold in China as food, pets, tourist curios, trophies and for use in traditional Chinese medicine,” she says, adding that the issue doesn’t get the column inches it deserves. “The subject is so upsetting for a lot of people that magazines shy away from publishing such imagery,” Jaschinski adds. “It doesn’t sell well.”
Reaching the target audience

Together, Jaschinski and her colleagues crowdfunded and self-published a collection of their photographs alongside contemporary reporting on the issues behind wildlife crime. The book was initially published in English and quickly sold out. “But we realised we weren’t reaching the target audience that really mattered,” Jaschinski says.

Working in conjunction with a Chinese printer based in London, Jaschinski and her team have translated the book into Mandarin. After months of negotiating with the authorities, they are now in the process of distributing the book across the Chinese mainland.

The book is the first of its kind to be created specifically for a Chinese audience, and explicitly sets out to end the demand for wildlife products in China. It will be launched across the country in July and August, actively targeting the Chinese wildlife consumer market, the trading nucleus for one of the biggest black markets in the world.

Frozen pangolins by Paul Hilton © Paul Hilton

The illegal wildlife trade is the world’s fourth biggest criminal trade after drug smuggling, illegal firearms trade and human trafficking. The price of rhino horn on the black market, Jaschinski points out, is more valuable by weight than gold, diamonds or cocaine, according to a study by Science Advances. Rhino horn is estimated to fetch up to $60,000 per pound on the black market, and the illicit industry as a whole is estimated to be worth $20bn. Andrea Crosta, the director of the Elephant Action League, has called ivory the “white gold of jihad”, pointing out that al-Shabaab, an Islamic terrorist organisation, is funded directly by the illicit ivory and rhino horn trade in China.
Ban is barely enforced

In 2017, the Chinese authorities announced that all trade in ivory and its products would be made illegal. But the ban was barely enforced, Jaschinki says. The trade in rhino and tiger has been prohibited since 1993, but in October 2018, China alarmed conservationists by announcing that products from captive animals are authorised “for scientific, medical and cultural use”.

“I’ve worked on wildlife crime for 25 years—and I don’t distinguish between legal and illegal wildlife crime,” Jaschinski says. “China is becoming the economic leader of the world; I wanted to look at the horrendous treatment of animals and nature in the country, and especially at the link between poaching and trade in the country, and the mistreatment of animals in captivity in China.”

Bruno D’Amicis’s image of a Fennec fox pup offered for sale to a tourist after being caught in the desert in Tunisia. (Kebili Governorate, Tunisia, May 2012) © Bruno D’Amicis

While the images are often appalling, they have artistic merit, for each photographer involved has approached the subject from a different perspective, and by employing a different style. In the introduction to the book, Roz Kidman Cox, the chair of the Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year jury, writes: “Some set out to highlight injustice through statement art, creating images that are unforgettable through their power—fury expressed beautifully. Others take dismembered beauty and reincarnate it in a haunting arrangement, turning evidence into art. Or they use the iconography of classical art to give their compositions human resonance, echoing a crucifixion, a deathbed repose or the spoils of war.”

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Fascinating Facts about Animals…From Birds to Wales

Its Hot In That Car

Guardians Of Life

If you need to take your companion animals with you. Then you need to leave the A.C. on in the car with water for them to drink. Otherwise, leave them at home and out of the heat. Too many times I have seen people leaving their companions in a hot car. Too many times I have had to call cops while busting the window open to save a dog’s life.

People need to understand if it’s too hot for them then it’s really too hot for their companions.

If you yourself see an animal in a hot car. You need to alert the local authorities, and let them know you had to break the window to save a life. This goes for young kids as well. Do not leave kids in the car on hot days either. Hot cars are death sentences.

Please be vigilant this summer and take precautions…

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Dog Dies During a Post–Baseball Game Fireworks Show | PETA

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peta.org
By Zachary Toliver
Published June 4, 2019

Fireworks explosions are more than terrifying for animals—they can be fatal.

A Toledo, Ohio, baseball team has announced that it will no longer host dog-friendly events in conjunction with fireworks shows after a dog named Stella died during a recent display.

The death occurred during the Toledo Mud Hens’ “Paws and Pints” promotional night, which encourages families to bring their companion animals to the ballgame. A fireworks show followed the game at Fifth Third Field. While no official cause of death has been released, dogs have been known to suffer heart attacks during these loud, frightening displays.

Many online commenters have pointed out that the minor league baseball team should have known that fireworks make dogs anxious and even petrified. In a statement, the Toledo Mud Hens admitted that it fell short in hosting a safe, friendly event for all family members. The team also stated that it will be “making a memorial contribution to an animal charity” of the grieving family’s choice.
Whether they’re set off on the Fourth of July, on New Year’s Eve, or at any other raucous celebration, fireworks are terrifying for animals.

Many dogs and cats flee in fear from the deafening blasts. They become confused and panicked, and animal shelters see a spike in the number of admissions after fireworks displays.

Our Animal Companions Depend on Us to Keep Them Safe

Simply keeping animals indoors during fireworks displays may not be enough. It’s important for frightened animals to have their guardians nearby. They may flee their homes when trying to escape the startling and confusing blasts. It’s not uncommon for dogs to break through a window or screen door or to dig under a fence in panic. Prepare your home and animal companions before the event:

Distract your cats and dogs by giving them lots of love and attention.
Play some soothing background music or turn on the TV.
Close the curtains or blinds.
Make sure that all your animals are wearing collars with current identification tags and that they’re microchipped.

As popular as fireworks displays are, animals don’t understand that the bursts of light and deafening explosions are just for fun. For more ways to keep animals safe, check out our feature below.

 

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