Free road transport for Ukrainian family pets from Poland

www.animalcouriers.com

Animalcouriers

Animalcouriers is offering free road transport for Ukrainian family pets from Poland to the UK (or to other selected locations on the route, such as Frankfurt, Brussels and Paris).

Our idea is to transport pets for owners who’ve had to leave Ukraine and are making their own way to the UK (or to other destinations on the route).

For all pets, we need to know what veterinary records are available. For dogs, cats and ferrets, we need to know if they have microchips and current rabies vaccinations.

UK entry requirements

To enter the UK, dogs, cats and ferrets will need microchips, current rabies vaccinations and EU pet passports. We can help organise all these steps. Once an EU pet passport is issued, the pet has to wait three weeks before it can enter the UK. We can organise boarding at Calais for those pets, and collect them once their passports become valid for UK entry.

Eurostar doesn’t take pets

Pet owners should be aware that pets aren’t allowed on Eurostar trains. For Ukrainian owners planning to use Eurostar to travel to London, we can offer collection of their pets at continental European locations for onward travel by road to the UK.

Make an enquiry

To enquire about this service, please email courier@animalcouriers.com and put ‘Ukrainian pet travel from Poland’ in the subject line of your email.

https://www.animalcouriers.com/2022/03/04/free-road-transport-for-ukrainian-family-pets-from-poland/

Information for people leaving Ukraine with their pets

www.animalcouriers.com

Animalcouriers

Information for people leaving Ukraine with their pets

The situation for people leaving Ukraine with their pets is evolving. Poland, for example, is allowing all pets into the country, whether or not they have microchips, rabies vaccinations or any form of pet passport.

Other EU countries are accepting pets at border crossings and many are taking the same approach as Poland. They’re making exceptions to their usual rules about dogs, cats and ferrets needing microchips, rabies vaccinations and pet passports. In some cases, the arrival country is microchipping and vaccinating such pets on arrival.

IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, is responding to the situation in Ukraine by providing emergency animal aid to the country. It’s also gathering and verifying resources for pet owners fleeing Ukraine.

Access the IFAW resources page here: https://www.ifaw.org/eu/news/resources-flee-ukraine-pets

Check back regularly as the situation is dynamic and resources may be changed or added.

UK entry requirements

Owners of dogs, cats and ferrets travelling from Ukraine should bear in mind that, to enter the UK, their pets will need microchips, current rabies vaccinations, successful rabies titre tests, and EU pet passports.

Eurostar doesn’t take pets

Pet owners travelling from Ukraine should be aware that Eurostar trains don’t allow any animals on board.

Ask if we can help

Animalcouriers is here to help. Families leaving Ukraine (or their representatives) can contact us for advice about their individual situation and to see whether our road transport services within the EU might be appropriate for their pets.

Please courier@animalcouriers.com and put ‘Ukrainian pet travel’ in the subject line of your email.

https://www.animalcouriers.com/2022/03/06/information-for-people-leaving-ukraine-with-their-pets/

Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Need Endangered Species Act Protections Please Sign Petition

secure.wildearthguardians.org

WildEarth Guardians and our allies scored a major legal victory for gray wolves on February 10, 2022 when a federal court restored Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections for the gray wolf across the lower 48 states after they were eliminated by Trump in 2020.

Unfortunately, the ruling does not apply to wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains because a 2011 Congressional rider stripped this wolf population of ESA protections and even stipulated the rider “shall not be subject to judicial review.”

Guardians and wolf advocates have filed an emergency petition to relist Northern Rocky Mountain gray wolves under the ESA, but the Biden administration has refused to take action. Please write the Biden administration today, then share this action alert with your friends, family, and networks to have the biggest impact for wolves.

Photo Credit: Gray wolf photo by Jacob W. Frank/NPS; graphic element added by Gus O’Keefe

Recipients

  • President Joseph ‘Joe’ R. Biden
  • Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
  • Martha Williams, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

https://secure.wildearthguardians.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1196

Fish and Wildlife Service denies federal protection for Sonoran desert tortoise

Sonoran desert tortoise. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

wildearthguardians.org

Lack of action puts the Sonoran desert tortoise on a collision course with extinction

TUCSON, ARIZONA—The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that the iconic Sonoran desert tortoise does not warrant the protection of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Conservation groups remain concerned that the habitat of Sonoran desert tortoise is degraded by invasive species, livestock grazing, increase fire risk, housing developments, off-road vehicles, habitat fragmentation, and increased predation facilitated by human activities. Residential development has created artificial barriers to the tortoise’s movement and its natural genetic mixing. Continuous overgrazing in the desert has depleted the vegetation on which the species depends. Cattle are also known to trample and crush tortoises in their burrows.

“A decision to forego ESA listing must be based on the best available science, and we will make sure the Service complied with that duty here,” said Joe Bushyhead, Endangered Species Policy Advocate for WildEarth Guardians.

“It’s hopeful news that the Service thinks the future is rosy for the Sonoran desert tortoise based on the agency’s modeling scenarios, and we certainly hope they are right,” said Cyndi Tuell, the Arizona and New Mexico director for Western Watersheds Project. Tuell expressed her concerns about the 12-month finding that the tortoise is not warranted for protection. “For those of us who have visited Arizona’s public lands, we can clearly see that the species’ habitat is still gravely threatened by livestock grazing, off-road vehicles, abandoned mines, invasive species, and fires.”

The Service’s announcement asserts that  29 percent of the species’ range in Arizona is on publicly-owned lands managed specifically “for the benefit of wildlife.” This includes the Sonoran Desert National Monument where the Bureau resisted conducting a thorough or adequate analysis of the impacts of livestock grazing on natural values, including the tortoise, and simply forged ahead to authorize expanded livestock use in 2020. The Service failed to acknowledge the many uses of most public lands that will continue to affect the species habitat. The Service also relied on predictive modeling and other information not yet available to the public.

More than 8,500 square miles (over 5 million acres) of tortoise habitat is managed by the Bureau of Land Management for livestock grazing and over 77 percent of those grazing allotments have 10 year permits that have been renewed at least once without any analysis of the impacts to species like the tortoise. “We worry that the Service has put the tortoise on a collision course with extinction by minimizing the threats from livestock grazing throughout the tortoise’s habitat,” said Tuell.

Timeline of Sonoran desert tortoise protection efforts:

  • 2008 Western Watersheds Project (WWP) and WildEarth Guardians (Guardians) file a petition to list the species under the Endangered Species Act
  • 2009 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issues a 90-day finding that the tortoise should be considered as a Distinct Population Segment (DPS)
  • 2010 Service determines that listing is warranted as a DPS, but precluded by higher priority species
  • 2011 Service reaffirms this finding
  • 2012 Service reaffirms this finding and determines the Sonoran desert tortoise is a separate species, which moves it up the priority list for the Service
  • 2013 Service reaffirms this finding
  • 2014 Service reaffirms this finding and starts preparing the proposed listing rule (formal process for listing the species under the Endangered Species Act)
  • 2015 Service enters into a voluntary “candidate conservation agreement” with state and federal agencies to theoretically protect the tortoise and reaffirms in this agreement that the tortoise warrants listing under the Endangered Species Act
  • 2015 Service uses a “very coarse model” based on elevation, vegetation type, and slope to assess the status of the tortoise.
  • 2015 Service reverses its previous findings and issued a “not warranted” determination on the petition to list the tortoise and concludes the tortoise does not qualify for listing under the Endangered Species Act.
  • 2019 WWP and WildEarth Guardians file a lawsuit seeking to overturn the “not warranted” determination as arbitrary and capricious and for failing to use the best available science in violation of the Endangered Species Act.
  • 2020 Service agrees to revisit the 2015 “not warranted” determination.
  • 2022 Service issues a “not warranted” determination for Sonoran desert tortoise.

https://wildearthguardians.org/press-releases/fish-and-wildlife-service-denies-federal-protection-for-sonoran-desert-tortoise/