Defenders of Wildlife | Urge the FWS to prevent more tragic manatee deaths from starvation and pollution!

Mother Manatee and Calf (c) Sam Farkas/NOAA

Photo Credit: Mother Manatee and Calf (c) Sam Farkas/NOAA

Over 670 manatee deaths has shocked scientists and wildlife lovers alike – we must act immediately to save Florida’s state marine mammal!

This has been one of the deadliest winters ever recorded for threatened manatees. Pollution is destroying the seagrass they depend on for survival, causing hundreds of manatees to turn up dead across the central and south Atlantic coast of Florida, many with signs of starvation.  

This crisis needs an immediate and powerful response. We’re calling on the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to protect manatees and their habitat to save manatees right now and to prevent similar crises from happening in the future.  

Urge the FWS to protect and restore manatee habitat – click here to add your signature!

Message

Dear U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: As a member of Defenders of Wildlife and an advocate for imperiled species, I’m asking the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to prioritize safeguarding and securing manatee habitat to prevent further unprecedented loss of manatees. The past few months have been some of the deadliest on record for manatees. In just three months, over 670 manatees have died, with many showing signs of starvation as the seagrass habitats they depend on for survival have disappeared, leaving them with nothing to eat. I urge you to work with the state of Florida to address excessive runoff from various sources, including agricultural,residential and industrial uses, that is polluting our waterways and leading to widespread manatee deaths. Runoff into our precious waterways is fueling algal blooms that have shaded out and killed tens of thousands of acres of seagrasses. Sediment washing into the water from agriculture and land development can also damage seagrass beds by smothering the seagrass and blocking sunlight. Waterbodies around the state, including Indian River Lagoon, the St. Lucie River estuary, Biscayne Bay, Florida Bay, Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay, are all experiencing devastating impacts from pollution generated by agriculture, development and industry. In addition to comprising a primary food source for manatees, seagrass meadows are one of the most productive ecosystems in Florida. They provide food and shelter to a biologically diverse community of species, from seahorses and commercially important fish, to sea turtles, marine mammals, and birds. The greatest long-term threat to the manatee is lack of warm-water habitat that they need to survive. Coastal development continues to degrade natural habitat, like rivers and springs. Manatees become susceptible to cold stress, which is often lethal, at water temperatures below ~68F. Due to habitat loss, more than 60% of the manatee population depends on warm-water outfalls at electric power plants to survive cold winter days — an unsustainable situation. Restoring natural warm water winter habitat, such as the Great Florida Riverway, is essential to ensuring the long-term recovery of the species. FWS must coordinate with Florida Power & Light to convene a meeting that focuses on establishing and securing regional networks of natural warm water where manatees can take refuge in cold weather that have healthy, adequate food sources nearby. As the number of manatee deaths continues to rise, FWS must ensure that all protections for manatees remain in place and are expanded as necessary. I’m asking you to please take urgent steps to protect manatees and their habitat before the future of this species is once again in jeopardy. Sincerely,

Defenders of Wildlife leads the pack when it comes to protecting wild animals and plants in their natural communities © 2021 Defenders of Wildlife

https://act.defenders.org/page/28132/action/1?supporter.appealCode=3WDW2100ZEXX1&en_og_source=FY21_Social_Action&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=action-manateeUSFWS-040221

Petition · PAKISTAN Abusive Camel Weightlifting Competition · Change.org

Maheen Z started this petition to Information Ministry Fawad Choudry and 3 others

Abusive barbaric CAMEL weight lifting competitions are being held in Pakistan on an annual basis. Camels are forced to lift tons and tons of heavy bricks and sacks so that their owners can win monetary cash prizes at the end of these atrocious so called competitions! 

PETA director Elisa Allen said: ‘If anyone wishes to enter a weight-lifting contest, they should train and have to go at it, but leave the animals out of it.

‘Camels are intelligent, sensitive individuals, and treating them as living cranes for human amusement adds to the many types of abuse, including their eventual slaughter.

Sheezada ( camel) lifted 1.7tons to win the contest, the equivalent of a small car

we request Imran Khan and Government of Pakistan to ban such competitions and strictly enforce the law so that such merciless brutal events are not arranged illegally

Source: Peta and  Siasat.pk

https://www.siasat.pk/forums/threads/outcry-over-pakistan-weight-lifting-contest-for-camels-that-forces-the-animals-to-lift-loads-as-heavy-as-a-car.683328/

https://www.change.org/p/pakistan-abusive-camel-weightlifting-competition?original_footer_petition_id=&grid_position=&pt=

Types of Hummingbirds: All Hummingbird Species in the U.S. | ABC

abcbirds.org

Kathryn Stonich 10 – 13 minutes

The Americas are home to 365 species of hummingbirds. Fifteen types of hummingbirds can be found living in the United States, along with nine vagrant species that occasionally wander inside our borders.

Even though hummingbirds might weigh less than your pocket change, don’t let their tiny size fool you! These small birds can be feisty and were even considered to be the reincarnations of warriors by the Aztecs. Take Rufous Hummingbirds, for example: They are known to stand their ground against much larger birds and will even chase chipmunks away from their nests.

Our List

For the purposes of this list, we’ve used Partners in Flight (PIF) population and conservation data exclusive to the United States and Canada, which do not reflect global numbers for many of these species, along with data from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Our taxonomic list includes all regularly occurring types of hummingbirds in the continental United States and Canada.

Rivoli's Hummingbird are one of the many types of hummingbirds found in the United States
Rivoli’s  Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: <5,000
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat:  Pine-oak forest
Threats: Habitat loss, possibly climate change
Note: 
At 420 to 1,200 beats per minute, the Rivoli’s Hummingbird has one of the highest vertebrate heartrates on record.

Blue-throated Mountain-gem are one of the many types of hummingbirds found in the United States
Blue-throated Mountain-gem

U.S. Population Estimate: <2,000
Population Trend: UnknownHabitat:  Pine-oak forest
Threats: Habitat loss, invasive species
Note:
The Blue-throated Mountain-gem is the largest nesting hummingbird in the U.S. and Canada; it weighs about three times more than the Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

Lucifer Hummingbird in flight
Lucifer Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: <5,000
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:  Desert scrub
Threats: Habitat loss, possibly climate change
Conservation Status: PIF Yellow Watchlist 
Note:
Male Lucifer Hummingbirds visit females during the breeding season, performing courtship displays at the females’ nests. This is in contrast to many other hummingbirds that perform courtship displays away from nests.

Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 34 million
Population Trend: Increasing
Habitat:  Eastern forest
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have become accustomed to urbanization and have been known to nest in surprising locations, including loops of extension cords, wires, and chains.

Black-chinned hummingbirds are one of many hummingbirds found in the United States.
Black-chinned Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 7.7 million
Population Trend: Increasing
Habitat:  Western forest
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
The Black-chinned Hummingbird’s eggs are smaller than jellybeans!

Anna's Hummingbird
Anna’s Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 8.2 million
Population Trend: Increasing
Habitat:  Chaparral shrubland
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
The breeding range for the Anna’s Hummingbird was originally exclusive to northern Baja California and southern California; however, this bird’s range has expanded thanks to the planting of exotic flowering trees. It now nests north to southern British Columbia.

Costa's Hummingbird
Costa’s Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: 1.6 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:  Desert scrub
Threats: Habitat loss, cat predation
Note:
They breed in the Southwest, but Costa’s Hummingbirds have been spotted several times in the Pacific Northwest and have even ventured as far as Alaska and British Columbia.

Broad-tailed Hummingbird
Broad-tailed Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: 7.6 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:  Western forest
Threats: Cat predation, possibly climate changeNote: Like many hummingbirds of mountainous areas, the Broad-tailed Hummingbird can enter torpor, a slowed metabolic state, on cold nights in order to maintain a body temperature of roughly 54° Fahrenheit.

Rufous Hummingbirds are one of the many types of hummingbirds found in the United States
Rufous Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 19 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:  Western forest
Threats: Habitat loss, possibly climate changeConservation Status: PIF Yellow Watchlist 
Note:
The Rufous Hummingbird breeds as far north as southeastern Alaska — the northernmost breeding range of any hummingbird.

Allen's Hummingbird
Allen’s Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: 1.7 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:  Chaparral shrubland
Threats: Habitat loss, cat predation, possibly climate changeConservation Status: PIF Yellow Watchlist 
Note: 
Even though the Allen’s Hummingbird only breeds in a narrow strip along coastal Oregon and California, there are two subspecies; Selasphorus sasin sasin and Selasphorus sasin sedentarius. S. s. sasin winters in Mexico, while S. s. sedentarius (as its name suggests) remains in the U.S.

Calliope hummingbirds are one of the many types of hummingbirds found in the United States
Calliope Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 4.5 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:  Western forest
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
The Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest type of hummingbird in the United States and Canada. It weighs roughly the same as a ping pong ball. 

Broad-billed hummingbird
Broad-billed Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: 200,000
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat:  Dry forest
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
During courtship, male Broad-billed Hummingbirds fly in a pendulum-like arc to impress females.

Buff-bellied Hummingbird
Buff-bellied Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: 100,000
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat:  Dry forest
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions, possibly habitat loss in breeding areas
Note:
Even though their U.S. breeding ground is in South Texas, Buff-bellied Hummingbirds regularly venture toward the northeast, a behavior unique to the species.

Violet-crowned hummingbird
Violet-crowned Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: <200
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat:  Dry forest
Threats: Habitat loss, cat predation, possibly climate change
Note:
The Violet-crowned Hummingbird was first spotted nesting in the U.S. in 1959.

White-eared hummingbird
White-eared Hummingbird

U.S. Population Estimate: <200
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat: Pine-oak forest
Threats: Habitat loss, cat predation
Note:
White-eared Hummingbirds have been beloved summer visitors to Arizona since the 1890s. They will sometimes remain near well-maintained feeders for weeks at a time.

Our weekly bird profiles provide an inside look at captivating species with video, birds calls, and fast facts dashboards.

Vagrants

A number of hummingbird species can be spotted in the United States and Canada on occasion, outside of their normal range in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. These vagrants can be exciting to see; however, their presence could possibly be linked to climate change.

The following list is a taxonomic catalog of vagrant types of hummingbirds that have been spotted in the United States.

The Mexican Violetear is one of the many species of hummingbirds that can be spotted as vagrants in the United states.
Mexican Violetear

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/AGlobal Population Trend: StableHabitat: Montane forest clearings
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
The Mexican Violetear is known to move nomadically. They have been recorded more than 90 times in Texas and have even been observed as far north as Canada.

Green-breasted Mango
Green-breasted Mango

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Forest edge and open areas with scattered tall trees
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
There have been at least 20 sightings of the Green-breasted Mango in Texas. This species has been known to venture as far north as Wisconsin.

The Plain-capped Starthroat is one of many vagrant hummingbird species that visits the United States.
Plain-capped Starthroat

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Arid to semiarid forest and forest edge, thorn forest, and semi-open areas with scattered trees
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions
Note: 
The Plain-capped Starthroat can appear quite dull; this bird’s brilliantly colored throat feathers are only visible under the right light conditions.

Amethyst-throated Mountain-Gem
Amethyst-throated Mountain-gem

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Humid evergreen and pine-oak forest in mountainous areas
Threats: Cat predation, glass collisions, possible habitat loss
Note:
The first recorded sighting of an Amethyst-throated Mountain-gem in the United States occurred in Texas in 2016.

Bahama Woodstar
Bahama Woodstar

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Wooded and scrubby habitats, including gardens
Threats: Glass collisions, cat predation
Note: The Bahama Woodstar does not usually migrate; however, it has been observed in southeastern Florida.

Bumblebee hummingbird
Bumblebee Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Humid evergreen forests in mountains; favors shrubby clearings with banks of flowers
Threats: Possible habitat loss, glass collisions, cat predation
Note:
The Bumblebee Hummingbird is the second-smallest bird in the world, after Cuba’s Bee Hummingbird.

Xantus's Hummingbird
Xantus’s Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat:  Scrubby woodland, pine-oak woods in mountains, desert scrub
Threats: Possible habitat loss, glass collisions, cat predation
Note:
Xantus’s Hummingbird breeds in the southern portion of Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, but has been spotted along the Pacific Coast far north as British Columbia.

Berylline Hummingbird
Berylline Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Mountain forests
Threats: Habitat loss
Note:
Berylline Hummingbirds were first spotted in the U.S. in 1964. They have since become consistent summer visitors to the mountains of southeastern Arizona, and have even been observed nesting there several times.

Cinnamon Hummingbird sticking out its tongue
Cinnamon Hummingbird

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: N/A
Global Population Trend: Stable
Habitat: Dry, tropical lowlands
Threats: Habitat loss, possibly climate change
Note:
Like types of hummingbirds, the Cinnamon Hummingbird is known to be aggressive near feeding areas and will defend its territory.

How can I help?

We all can do our part to protect North America’s hummingbirds.

American Bird Conservancy and our Joint Venture partners have improved conservation management on 6.4 million acres of U.S. bird habitat — an area larger than the state of Maryland — over the last ten years. This is a monumental undertaking, requiring the support of many, and you can help by making a gift today.

Policies enacted by Congress and federal agencies, such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have a huge impact on America’s birds. You can help shape these rules for the better by telling lawmakers to prioritize birds, bird habitat, and bird-friendly measures. To get started, visit ABC’s Action Center.

Finally, don’t overlook the impact you can have at home. Living a bird-friendly life can have an immediate impact on the birds around you. Doing so can be as easy as adding native plants to your garden, avoiding pesticides, and keeping cats indoors. To learn more, visit our Bird-Friendly Life page.


Kathryn Stonich teaches English for the Community College of Baltimore County and Bryant & Stratton College online. She is an avid backyard birder and advocate for pigeon and dove rescue.

https://abcbirds.org/blog21/types-of-hummingbirds/

I can lift you higher

Vegan Brownie Ice Cream Sandwiches [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Vegan Brownie Ice Cream Sandwiches
[Vegan, Gluten-Free]

www.onegreenplanet.org

By Liv King 4 – 5 minutes

5 hours ago

Vegan Brownie Ice Cream Sandwiches [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Warm weather is here and that means ice cream for dessert! Finally. Nothing better than delicious Gluten-Free Vegan Brownie Ice Cream Sandwiches on a hot summer day. Rich, chocolatey, and soft dark chocolate brownies filled with creamy vanilla bean ice cream! Who wouldn’t love that?!

Vegan Brownie Ice Cream Sandwiches [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/2 cup Cocoa Powder
  • 2 teaspoons Instant Coffee
  • 1/4 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Oil
  • 2oz Dark Chocolate Chips
  • 1 cup Organic Brown Sugar
  • 1/4 cup Unsweetened Almond Milk
  • 2 teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Ground Flaxseed
  • 1/4 cup Water
  • More Chocolate Chips, if desired
  • 2 Pints Vegan Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F and line two 8×8 baking pans with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl mix together the gluten-free flour, cocoa powder, instant coffee, and salt.
  3. Whisk together the flaxseed and the water. Let sit for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the coconut oil and 2oz of dark chocolate to a small pot on medium heat. Once melted and smooth, turn off heat. Add this mixture to the dry mixture along with the brown sugar, almond milk, apple cider vinegar, and flax eggs. Mix until just combined.
  5. Divide the batter evenly into the two 8×8 baking pans. Sprinkle on more chocolate chips if desired. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until it’s just set on top. Be sure not to over-bake. Let cool completely. If you have the time, place in freezer overnight.
  6. Mix the two pints of vanilla ice cream until soft and add on top of 1 layer of the brownie. Keep the brownie in the baking pan. Add the second brownie on top and place in fridge overnight or until completely set. Cut in to 8 or more bars and serve! Enjoy.

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About The Author

Liv King

See My Recipes

Hi, I’m Liv! I’m a 23 year old living in New York City. I have been vegan for over 9 years now & one of my biggest passions in life is sharing ho… w fun being vegan can be through food! On Liv Vegan Strong I share comfort food, healthy meals, desserts, drinks, & so much more. I am so excited to share with you all my favorite foods made VEGAN. OK, Let’s eat   Load More

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-recipe/vegan-brownie-ice-cream-sandwiches-vegan-gluten-free/