Free dolphin study guides

Scholarship for Birders in STEM

Application Period Ends June 18, 2021

Until higher education is accessible, equitable, and free, we will be here to support Black & Latinx Birders in STEM.

Are you a Black birder or Brown birder that lives in the contiguous United States and identifies as Black, African-American, and/or Latinx/e/a/o? Are you also an undergraduate student studying in STEM? Apply for the annual Black and Latinx Birders Scholarship, today!

ELIGIBILITY

Open to undergraduate students 18 and older, in any year of their college studies (full-time undergraduate). Through this scholarship, we seek to increase the number of Black birders and Latinx birders studying in STEM*. Scholarship awards range from a minimum of $2,500 to a maximum of $5,000, depending on funding for the current year. Two students will receive a one-time annual award.

RULES

1. Live in and attend college in the contiguous United States.
2. We want to hear from you!

Tell us about your birding** experience! Please answer these questions:

  • How did you become a birder?
  • How are you involved in the birding community?
  • Why are you pursuing a degree in STEM?
  • How do you plan to bring back your knowledge and skills to your community?

How to tell us:

  • Essay: no longer than two pages double spaced. Get creative! Maybe your essay is a Twitter thread that you started? Perhaps an extended IG post? Or maybe you prefer a standard essay format? Either way, tell us about you and answer the four questions above.
  • YouTube Video: Instead of an essay, send us a video link (two minutes maximum) sharing why you are pursuing your degree and how you plan to share your knowledge with the community.

3. One letter of recommendation to serve as a reference from a current or recent teacher. This can be forwarded to us by you, or sent directly to us.
4. Proof of enrollment at a 2 or 4 year college or university and proof of a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA (high school or college, as appropriate). A letter from the admissions office and a copy of your transcripts are needed.
5. Must be 18 years or older.
6. Interview with the committee via Zoom.

*Note: STEM (Science Technology Engineer Math) includes Science Communications.

**Note: we use the term “birder” in a broad context. Perhaps you’re a lister, volunteer at a nature center and engage your community with live birds, lead bird walks, have worked on or are working on a bird-related conservation project at your school. A birder in this context is someone who is actively engaged in lifestyle, with projects, etc. that are centered around birds, bird advocacy, and/or bird conservation.Apply Today! The application period for the Black and Latinx Birders Scholarship ends June 18, 2021.

Please forward this email to your colleagues, students, and networks. Our scholarship offering has increased this year due to American Bird Conservancy matching donations up to $10K! We need your help to share this scholarship with your networks. Thank you!

For question, please reply to this email, or email hello@amplifythefuture.org.  Apply Today!Copyright © 2021 Amplify the Future, All rights reserved.

https://mailchi.mp/amplifythefuture.org/scholarship-for-birders-in-stem

Tips on Fire Safety for Pets

www.pawboost.com

PawBoost

Tips on Fire Safety for Pets

This article is contributed by guest writer, Dawn C.

Everyone loves their pets, and no one ever wants to see them hurt, especially in a fire. So what can one do to protect their pet? The first thing is to make sure you have operational fire extinguishers and smoke detectors. This is not only to protect the pet but also the entire family. The other way to protect your pet is to train them. Socialization and proper training are some of the basic needs your pet requires. Here are the best tips on safety for pets.

Photo Credit: Chewy via Unsplash

6 ways to keep your pets safe

About 50,000 pets get affected by fire every year, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Pets cause about 1000 house fires and those are reported cases. Most of these fires are caused by open flames such as candles, fireplaces, or stoves. Here are ways to keep your pets safe from fire or other hazards:

1. Don’t leave an unattended open flame

Pets are mostly nosy, and they don’t understand the risks that fire can cause. Dripped grease or fallen candles can end up becoming a tragic blaze, hence, avoid them when you have pets around. For pets like cats, an ignited candle can be a temptation. You can consider flameless candles.

2. Keep the fireplace secure

A stray spark from a fireplace may burn the entire house. A fireplace is a great place for pets and family to gather, but it’s best to avoid putting fabric items near a fireplace. You can also use a glass fireplace shield to keep the sparks in their place.

Photo Credit: Jenna Hamra via Pexels

3. Secure electrical cords

Pets can sometimes mistake an electronic cord for a chewing toy. The electric wires can be bound in various creative ways to secure and keep them from being visible. Beginning your pet’s training helps in teaching them good behavior, and not to tamper with cables in the house.

4. Know your pet’s hiding spots

This is essential, especially when you need to evacuate out of your home quickly. Pets mostly hide, especially if they sense danger. You can begin training your pet by crating it in advance to make it easier so that they don’t run when you try pulling them from their crate during any emergency.

5. Rehearse escape routes

Make sure your entire family knows the plan of where to go. If your pet is left behind, it may become exposed to many hazards or get trapped. The American Red Cross informs that it’s essential to decide where you’ll take your pet ahead of time. You can contact a veterinarian to get a list of favorite facilities and kennels. You can also ask for foster care or emergency shelter in a local animal shelter. You can also identify hotels or motels that accept pets.

Photo Credit: Pixabay via Pexels

6. Train your pet

Another way to ensure its safety is beginning your pet’s training. It may seem a bit overwhelming at first, especially if it’s a new pet. When you take it step by step, you’ll find it far less hectic. Here are the guidelines on how to get started:

Begin with obedience Before beginning your pet’s training, you can set a basic foundation. There should be positive reinforcement to lay a great foundation. The method involves giving a pet a reward to encourage it to behave the way you want.

Train your dog in self-control – This technique teaches your pet that nothing comes for free. It needs to earn things like attention, and food through being obedient.

Conclusion

Emergencies tend to happen at any time and can come in a ton of ways. While one may not be able to prevent them from happening, one can prepare their pet and themselves in advance. Training your pet is a way to prevent them from causing or engaging in any danger.

https://www.pawboost.com/blog/tips-on-fire-safety-for-pets/

Get Ready For The Most Painful Inflation Since The Jimmy Carter Years Of The 1970s — The Economic Collapse

Boy do I remember… You could only get gas on the days of the week according to the last number on your license plate, I remember filling up my tank before work and coming out of work and my gauge said it was empty, I thought there was something wrong with my car, nope…somebody siphon all the gas out of my car, my brother was a mechanical engineer who designed the control systems at Boeing and a work friend bought locking gas caps and he bought me one… The friend was sitting in line waiting to get gas and a woman cut in front of him, he went up to confront her but she ignored him and turned up the radio real loud, he was so angry when he realized his cap would fit on her car, so he took the locking cap off of his car and snuck up and put it on her car, when she got up to get gas the guy asked her for the key and she didn’t know what he was talking about and they couldn’t fill the tank and she had to leave without getting any gas…😂😂😂

Truth2Freedom's Blog

If you are too young to have been alive during the 1970s, you might want to read up on that decade, because current economic conditions are starting to become eerily similar to what we experienced back then. In the 1970s, an energy crisis caused tremendously long lines at gas stations all over the country. In 2021, we don’t have a shortage of gasoline, but shortages of other key products are starting to cause very serious problems. In fact, as you will see below, even the Biden administration is publicly admitting that there will be “supply chain disruptions” in the months ahead. The 1970s also featured extremely painful inflation, and I certainly don’t need to tell you that prices have been rising very aggressively lately. In fact, Bloomberg is using the term“skyrocketing”to describe the “upward trajectory” of commodity prices…

The prices of raw materials used to make almost everything…

View original post 1,008 more words

Why this Frenchman regrets buying an electric car

www.iceagenow.info

Mayday! Mayday!!  A Miller’s tale from La Belle France !!  Allez le diesel !!!

Here’s a guy who bought an electric car! (Article from the Spectator).

He starts out really enjoying his new car, but then…
____________

Why I regret buying an electric car

I bought an electric car and wish I hadn’t. It seemed a good idea at the time, albeit a costly way of proclaiming my environmental virtuousness. The car cost 44,000 Euros, less a 6,000 Euro subsidy courtesy of French taxpayers, the overwhelming majority poorer than me. Fellow villagers are driving those 20-year-old diesel vans that look like garden sheds on wheels.

I order the car in May 2018. It’s promised in April 2019. No later, promises the salesman at the local Hyundai dealer. April comes and goes. No car. I phone the dealership. No explanation. The car finally arrives two months late, with no effort by Hyundai to apologise. But I Iove it. It’s quiet, quick and with the back seats down, practical with plenty of room for the dogs. It does insist on sharply reminding me to keep my hands on the steering wheel, even when they’re on it. And once alarmingly slamming on the brakes for no discernible reason.

I’ve installed a charger in my driveway so I plug the car in. It works first time! Then the boss turns on the kettle and every fuse in the house trips. The car is chargeable, but only if you don’t cook, wash clothes or turn on the dishwasher at the same time.

First road trip. Off to the centre of France with the horse-obsessed boss to watch a three-day equestrian event. I consult an app that promises an high-speed charger half way to my destination. We arrive and hunt and ultimately find the charger. It doesn’t work. Range anxiety? More like a panic attack.

We make it to the next charger on the motorway with the battery practically empty and my marriage in peril. It works! But subsequently, EDF, the French electric utility, simply shuts down its entire motorway network after discovering the chargers are not just unreliable but dangerous. In Britain, meanwhile, the Department for Transport has, I read, granted an exclusive contract to install rapid chargers at motorway service areas to a company glorying in the name Ecotricity. These turn out to be equally unreliable and very costly to use. Social networks are rapidly bombarded with complaints.

Back in France, after a two-month wait, EDF upgrades my home electricity supply. Rejoice! We can finally cook dinner and charge the car simultaneously. The little Kona is still mostly performing well. It’s fast. I could beat a sports car from a traffic light, except we have none in my corner of La France Profonde. It’s eerily quiet. But much as I attempt to defend my choice, I’m having doubts.

I meet a British couple in the supermarket car park, down for the summer, loading groceries into their electric Nissan. How was the trip down? I ask. “A nightmare” of broken charging points, they reply, bitterly. A 10-hour trip took 18 hours, with lengthy stops at low-speed chargers, often miles off the highway.

The Hyundai Kona Electric

Given the impossibility of driving much farther than the airport with the motorway charging network still shut down, I resign myself to renting cars for trips beyond a limited radius from the house.

Next, a story appears that a Kona Electric identical to mine has spontaneously combusted in a garage in Montreal, totally destroying the car and the garage itself. The battery, made of lithium, burns for hours. Still no communication from Hyundai, which is said to be investigating, according to Canadian media.

Soon, Konas are bursting into flames all over the world. Continuing silence from Hyundai other than a disingenuous recall notice for a software update. A morning at the dealership waiting for an update to the battery management software. This consists of reducing the range of the car, although that isn’t explained. But it doesn’t work since recalled Konas are continuing to explode. Meanwhile, a second recall. The cars are not just auto-carbonising but the brakes are apparently susceptible to unpredictable total failure.

New press reports from Korea say Hyundai finally admits there is a hardware problem with the Kona and it is going to replace the batteries in 80,000 of them. But continuing silence from Hyundai France and it’s the same story across Europe. I read that owners in North America are being warned not to park in the garage. Hundreds have filed a class action demanding compensation.

Complaining to Hyundai on Twitter provokes a predictable response. Please direct message us so we can assist you. Translation: please stop posting messages in public so we can try to appease you quietly. I decline to play that game.

Hyundai’s latest stunt is to announce that it’s joined the new Ionity rapid recharge network and will offer a discount to owners. I call Ionity to find out how. They tell me to call my Hyundai dealer. I talk to someone who knows nothing but promises to call me back. I’m still waiting.

The problem with electric cars is that one must suffer to be a pioneer. It’s possibly like buying a petrol car at the beginning of the 20th century except instead of a man walking in front with a red flag, you need a fire marshal in a diesel with a tow rope.

Written by Jonathan Miller

Jonathan Miller is the author of France, a Nation on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (Gibson Square). Twitter: @lefoudubaron

https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/why-i-regret-buying-an-electric-car

Thanks to Lyn Jenkins for this link

https://www.iceagenow.info/why-this-frenchman-regrets-buying-an-electric-car/