Petition: Ban exports of live animals

www.sosvox.org

Ban exports of live animals

What has happened in recent months with cows adrift in the Mediterranean should teach us all a lesson. Banning the exports of live animals violates the European Union’s free trade rules, so the change has to be much more profound, not only has to be a decision of the Spanish Government, but also of the European Parliament.

Every year, several million farm animals (calves, cows, sheep, pigs, goats, horses, etc.) are forced to endure trips of thousands of miles, only to be slaughtered on arrival or fattened in often inhumane conditions.

Animals transported alive suffer a lot due to overcrowding, lack of water and dehydration due to the high temperatures that they must suffer when confined in small places, often without adequate ventilation, the stress of travel, and problems such as accidents that can cause death.

SIGN AND SHARE THIS PETITION

https://www.sosvox.org/en/petition/ban-exports-of-live-animals.html

Petition: Do not sacrifice animals adrift in front of Spain!

www.sosvox.org

More than 2,500 cows and calves have been found on two boats adrift for three months, and many more have already died during the trip. They are adrift as they were on their way to their final destination and they detected that they were ill and were refused entry, so they continue to circle the ship throughout the Mediterranean. Imagine that it is no way to live for an animal, locked up for months in two boats being rejected by everyone, waiting for death. Something has to be done so that animals are not slaughtered and also to prohibit long-distance transport of animals, each one of those trips is torture.

The suffering of these animals locked up in a boat for so long, waiting for them to be slaughtered now, after so much mistreatment, is completely unnecessary. It is not fair to animals that have to go through this. Do something but don’t kill them!

SIGN AND SHARE THIS PETITION

https://www.sosvox.org/en/petition/do-not-sacrifice-animals-adrift-in-front-of-spain.html?fl

Help set them free!

The Dolphin Project

If you’re a coffee lover and collect mugs like me, this is a great one to add to your collection

Texas frigid weather is over… 🐢

Types of Finches: All Finch Species in the United States and Canada

abcbirds.org

There are 17 North American finch species. These include crossbills, Evening and Pine Grosbeaks, redpolls, and siskins. Birds in the Fringillidae family all have compact bodies, conical bills, and short necks with large jaw muscles. They also have relatively pointed wings, notched tails, and distinctive flight calls.

These small to medium-sized birds seem unassuming at first. However, when looked at more closely, their true beauty emerges. From the striking plumages of the three goldfinch species to the unusual and spectacular bills of crossbills and grosbeaks, finches really do have it all.

While these social birds are relatively conspicuous, they should not be taken for granted: More than half of North America’s finch species are in decline. New Hampshire, for example, is at risk of losing its state bird, the Purple Finch, as rising temperatures are expected to lead to a loss of 99 percent of this bird’s summer range in the state. Brown-capped and Black Rosy-Finches are also in danger and are on Partners in Flight’s (PIF’s) Red Watch List, and only an estimated 6,000 Cassia Crossbills remain.

Hazards like window collisions, outdoor cats, and pesticide use pose a threat to finches. Habitat loss from deforestation and other forms of land conversion are also major threats. But the effects of climate change seem to have taken the largest toll on finch populations.

To help these birds and many others, American Bird Conservancy and other organizations are taking a multipronged approach by promoting bringing cats indoors, working to decrease glass collisions, and educating the public about sustainable habitat managementand protecting birds from pesticides.

Our List

For the purposes of this U.S.-based list, we’ve used PIF population and conservation data exclusive to the United States and Canada. In many cases, these population estimates do not reflect global numbers. Cassia Crossbill information comes from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Our list is organized taxonomically and includes all regularly occurring finch species in  the continental United States and Canada.

Evening Grosbeak
Evening Grosbeak

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 3.4 Million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat: Northern and montane forests
Threats: Deforestation, disease, loss of food sources due to pesticides 
Conservation Status: PIF Yellow Watch List
Note: The Evening Grosbeak does not have a complex song, but rather draws from a repertoire of simple calls, including sweet, piercing notes and burry chirps.

Pine Grosbeak
Pine Grosbeak

U.S./Canada Population Estimate:  4.4 million
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat:
Open boreal forest
Threats: Possibly climate change
Note: 
The Pine Grosbeak can be so tame and slow-moving that locals in Newfoundland affectionately call them “mopes.” Pine Grosbeaks declined by 2.4 percent per year between 1966 and 2015, resulting in a cumulative decline of 70 percent.

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 200,000
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat: Alpine tundra
Threats: Climate change
Note: 
The Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch has little fear of humans and will allow people to closely approach.

Black Rosy-Finch
Black Rosy-Finch

U.S. Population Estimate: 20,000
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat: Alpine tundra
Threats: Climate change 
Conservation Status: PIF Red Watch List
Note: The Black Rosy-Finch nests in crevices along cliffs in alpine areas that are rarely visited by people.

Brown-capped Rosy-Finch
Brown-capped Rosy-Finch

U.S. Population Estimate: 45,000
Population Trend: Decreasing
Habitat: Alpine tundra
Threats: Climate change
Conservation Status:
PIF Red Watch List
Note:
This is the most sedentary rosy-finch.Unlike the Black Rosy-Finch, this species is known to sometimes nest in abandoned buildings.

House Finch
House Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 31 million
Population Trend:
Increasing
Habitat:
Generalist
Threats: 
House Finch conjunctivitis (mycoplasmal conjunctivitis)
Note: 
House Finches are native to the western United States and Mexico but were introduced in the eastern United States when illegal cagebirds were released in New York in 1939. This one of the most well-studied bird species.

Purple Finch
Purple Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 5.9 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Mixed northern, montane, and boreal forests
Threats: 
Competition with the House Finch over food and breeding grounds, possibly climate change
Note: 
Purple finches sometimes imitate other birds in their songs, including Barn Swallows, American Goldfinches, Eastern Towhees, and Brown-headed Cowbirds. Populations decreased by almost 1.5 percent per year between 1966 and 2014.

Cassin’s Finch
Cassin's Finch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 3 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Western forests
Threats:
Additional studies are needed to determine the factors causing declines in populations.
Conservation Status:
PIF Yellow Watch List
Note:
Both sexes tend to show more of a peaked head and longer, straighter bill than the House and Purple Finch. Cassin’s Finch populations have declined 69 percent since 1970.

Common Redpoll
Common Redpoll

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 38 million
Population Trend: Unknown
Habitat: Sub-Arctic forests and tundra 
Threats: Vehicle collisions, salmonella infections from bird feeders, possibly climate change
Note: During winter, Common Redpolls are known to tunnel into the snow to stay warm during the night. To keep redpolls and other birds safe at feeders, it is recommended that you clean your feeders with a diluted bleach solution several times a week, and make sure feeders are dry before filling them with seed. This helps prevent salmonella and other infections.

Hoary Redpoll
Hoary Redpoll

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 10 million
Population Trend:
Unknown
Habitat: 
Arctic tundra
Threats: 
Possibly climate change
Note: 
Many Hoary Redpolls overwinter in areas that are entirely dark, or nearly so, during the winter.

Red Crossbill
Red Crossbill

U.S./Canada Population Estimate:  7.8 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Coniferous forests
Threats: 
Deforestation, vehicle collisions, possible chemical poisoning
Note: 
The crossbill’s odd bill shape helps it get into tightly closed cones. The crossed tips of the bill push up scales, exposing the seeds inside.

Cassia Crossbill
Cassia Crossbill

U.S. Population Estimate: 6,000
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Lodgepole Pine forests, other coniferous forests
Threats:
Forestfires, infestations of Mountain Pine Bark Beetle, possibly climate change
Note: 
Prior to 2017, the Cassia Crossbill was considered one of ten types of the Red Crossbill. However, researchers discovered that it doesn’t breed with other crossbills, has a thicker bill, and isn’t nomadic. Its name comes from Cassia County, Idaho.

White-winged Crossbill
White-winged Crossbill

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 35 million
Population Trend: 
Increasing
Habitat: 
Boreal forest
Threats:
 Habitat loss and fragmentation, possible chemical poisoning
Note: 
White-winged Crossbills with lower mandibles crossing to the right are approximately three times more common than those with lower mandibles crossing to the left.

Pine Siskin
Pine Siskin

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 35 million
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat:
Northern and montane forests
Threats: 
Domestic cats and other predators, salmonella infections from feeders, pesticide poisoning
Conservation Status:
Common Bird in Steep Decline
Note: 
Pine Siskins can speed up their metabolic rate roughly 40 percent higher than a “normal” songbird their size to stay warm. Pine Siskin populations have declined by 80 percent since 1970.

Lesser Goldfinch
Lesser Goldfinch

U.S. Population Estimate: 4.7 million
Population Trend:
Increasing
Habitat:
Brushy areas, forest edges, gardens
Threats: 
Loss of riparian habitat
Note:
The Lesser Goldfinch is most common in California and Texas, with pockets of local populations throughout the rest of its U.S. range. It also occurs widely from Mexico to northern South America. This species’ range is increasing with urbanization.

Lawrence’s Goldfinch
Lawrence's Goldfinch

U.S. Population Estimate: 240,000
Population Trend:
Decreasing
Habitat: 
Chaparral, dry areas near water
Threats: 
Habitat loss, introduction of invasive species
Note: 
The Lawrence’s Goldfinch is nomadic, present in large numbers in a locality one year and absent the next.

American Goldfinch
American Goldfinch

U.S./Canada Population Estimate: 43 million
Population Trend:
Increasing
Habitat: 
Open habitats, fields, forest edges, open woodlands
Threats: 
Cat predation, glass collisions
Note:
 Goldfinches have an almost entirely plant-based diet, only swallowing the occasional insect.

How Can I Help?

We all can do our part to protect North America’s finches.

American Bird Conservancy and our Joint Venture partners have improved conservation management on 6.4 million acres of U.S. bird habitat — an area larger than the state of Maryland — over the last ten years. This is a monumental undertaking, requiring the support of many, and you can help by making a gift today.

Policies enacted by Congress and federal agencies, such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have a huge impact on America’s birds. You can help shape these rules for the better by telling lawmakers to prioritize birds, bird habitat, and bird-friendly measures. To get started, visit ABC’s Action Center.

https://abcbirds.org/blog21/finch-species-united-states/