Babies, Cleaning Chemicals and Childhood Asthma Link Uncovered

Chemical Free Life

A new first of its kind study suggests infants who are exposed to cleaning products are more likely to develop asthma and wheeze later in life than their unexposed counterparts.

Study overview

Researchers used the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Cohort Study to determine the levels of cleaning product exposure for 2,022 Canadian infants in the first three months of their lives.  The researchers then assessed the children at the age of three to determine if they had developed asthma, wheeze or allergies.

Findings overview

The researchers found an association between early exposure to cleaning products and a risk of asthma and wheeze.  (There appeared to be no such connection between cleaning chemical exposure and allergies.)

Why would infant exposure to cleaning product chemicals trigger asthma later in childhood?

The researchers believe chemicals in these products can trigger the inflammatory pathways of the immune system and…

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Solutions: DIY Nontoxic Household Cleaning Products

Chemical Free Life

Clean Your House Without Dangerous Chemicals

Many homemade cleaning recipes and  “green” products have been shown to be as effective as the commercial chemical products you have under your sink.  And that is good news because the American Lung Association recommends against the use of cleaning products with volatile organic compounds, scents and other irritants.

“…to make your own cleaning products, you’ll need vinegar, baking soda, lemon juice, washing soda (Borax), olive oil and hydrogen peroxide. The latter is especially good to use on mold and mildew in bathrooms. Olive oil (or soy bean oil) makes good furniture polish.”

 

CFL Graphic-DIY cleaning foods

DIY Natural, Non-Toxic Cleaners

Ditch those expensive, toxic commercial cleaners and DIY it with these multitasking food items from right inside your cupboards!

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Food items as powerful cleaners

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Walnuts…rub it along any small scratches in your wood furniture. Rub your finger along the scratch to warm…

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Shoppers slam Amazon packaging after Bezos pledges $10 billion to fight climate change

msn.com

Mary Hanbury 9 hrs ago

Jeff Bezos may have pledged $10 billion to fight climate change, but critics are slamming the billionaire for not making changes closer to home first and reducing the amount of packaging used to send out Amazon parcels.

“Could he please start with his ridiculous packaging that he leaves on our doorstep??? Perhaps the amazon delivery could collect the significant waste left behind,” one Amazon shopper wrote on Twitter.

“If #Bezos wants to do something for the world, he can start with his excessive packaging. Amazon shipping is the most wasteful of any retailer out there. Is junking up the world with plastics part of #BezosEarthFund?” another wrote.

Bezos announced his $10 billion pledge in an Instagram post on Monday. The money will be donated via a new initiative called the Bezos Earth Fund.

Related video: More about Bezos’ pledge (provided by CNBC)

Amazon has frequently been called out for its tendency to use large amounts of packaging to send out small items and there are numerous posts documenting this habit on social media with shoppers sharing images of giant boxes used to house one relatively small item:

@AmazonUK You just delivered to me a slim 1m long boom pole in this massive 1.5x1m box! Gobsmacked by this shocking waste of resources on a planet that is already suffocating. As a huge contributor to packaging waste how can you justify this? #amazon #packaging #waste pic.twitter.com/saC5pwBArgDRD8tMLW4AIoz2R
— matt pelly (@mattpelly) December 15, 2017

@amazon you’ve gotta be kidding me with this packaging!!!! What a collosal waste. pic.twitter.com/08hPhOVFbXEQ7wpgGXkAAPOpd
— Samantha (@SamCo2889) February 16, 2020

Ordered 3x peelers from @AmazonUK last night (because it was a minimum order quantity)… So why did you have to pack them in 3 separate pieces of packaging?! #excessivepackaging #packingwaste #amazon #waste pic.twitter.com/0U1ThOqMU5EQ58jdMXsAIGZvz
— Rob O’Hagan (@Rob_OHagan) February 16, 2020

@amazon you should probably look into whoever is in charge of packaging. All this box for 1 tiny little pack of lightbulbs the size of a AAA battery. I get boxes like this all the time. EQdtUY-WAAAn-tMImagine the profits going to waste here. pic.twitter.com/X1NIm3EeN3
— Justin (@flik623) February 11, 2020

In some cases, Amazon customer service agents have responded to customer’s complaints on Twitter, saying that they will look into it:

@amazon you guys must really hate the environment. This is ridiculous. A huge box for a tiny bottle of nail polish? The packaging probably cost more than the nail polish. How do you make money? This should be your corporate initiative this year. Reduce packaging waste. EAMgJoIUcAEAqYbpic.twitter.com/saD3Lz7QD8
— Apextroll (@Apextroll2) July 23, 2019

A spokesperson for Amazon did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s request for comment on this.

Bezos said that the $10 billion will be used to fund the work done by scientists, activists, and NGOs among others “to help preserve and protect the natural world.”

“Climate change is the biggest threat to our planet,” he wrote on Instagram. “I want to work alongside others both to amplify known ways and to explore new ways of fighting the devastating impact of climate change on this planet we all share.” The grants will be issued from this summer onward.

His announcement comes after mounting pressure from Amazon employees to do more to fight climate change as one of the world’s largest retailers.

In January, more than 350 employees signed a petition that called out the company’s climate change practices and urged Bezos to invest more money into fighting this cause rather than putting it toward his space exploration company, Blue Origin, for example.

“Amazon, the Earth is our only home. Spend more money on fighting Climate Change than on space exploration!” one Amazon employee wrote in the Medium post, which was reported by Business Insider’s Isobel Hamilton.

© Justin Sullivan / Getty

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Nearly 40 cents out of every retail dollar Americans spend online now go to Amazon—the company commands a full 4% of U.S. retail as a whole. Three-quarters of a million workers earn a living through Amazon, and more than 100 million Prime subscribers consider Amazon their online home base. Although they’ve long enjoyed free two-day shipping, Prime members now also get a massive library of entertainment, e-books, grocery services, cloud storage, and gaming. The early investors who bought into the company when it first went public rode a wave of nearly unprecedented growth—those who made an initial investment of just $1,000 are now millionaires. Amazon is ranked among the five biggest corporations in America, and its founder is the richest human being on Earth. It’s responsible for starting a trend that cracked the foundations of traditional retail and changed the way things are bought and sold. Former giants like Sears and Toys “R” Us have crumbled under the pressure of e-commerce, a revolution that Amazon stoked more than any other single entity—but it wasn’t always that way. When Jeff Bezos founded Amazon in his garage in 1994, the company he launched wouldn’t be profitable for years to come. It was part of an avalanche of new tech startups riding a wave of new and uncertain technology—most of them would quickly go bust. It started with an idea to let people browse and buy books from their computers instead of going into physical bookstores and choosing from the limited selection they found inside. It was a revolutionary idea, and Amazon soon became the world’s biggest bookstore. Then it became the “Everything Store.” Later it became a wealth-generating machine, with tentacles reaching everywhere from electric vehicles and cloud computing to production studios and grocery stores. It’s heavily scrutinized and controversial—plans to open new headquarters recently sparked both ferocious bidding wars and fierce political blowback at the same time. Stacker compiled a list of key moments in Amazon’s history and its current business from a variety of sources. Here’s a look at the events that turned an online bookstore into a global conglomerate and a self-made entrepreneur into the world’s richest man.

From the dawn of e-commerce in 1994 to today, Amazon evolved from an online bookstore to a global corporate powerhouse.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/shoppers-slam-amazon-packaging-after-bezos-pledges-dollar10-billion-to-fight-climate-change/ar-BB107m7i
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Wisdom from a dog…No matter what happens keep going and have fun

A pigeon that can’t fly befriended a puppy that can’t walk. Yes, it’s as cute as it sounds

fox43.com
Author: CNN Wire

Meet Herman and Lundy, recent cuddle buddies and rescue animals.

The two are an unlikely pair: Herman, a pigeon, suffered neurological damage more than a year ago. He can’t fly. Little Lundy, a newborn chihuahua puppy, can’t use his back legs.

But stick them together, and the two will snuggle up as though they were members of the same litter — or nest.

The two met through the Mia Foundation, a rescue organization in Rochester, New York, that rehabilitates animals with birth defects and physical deformities. Sue Rogers, the nonprofit’s founder, sends most of her rescues to foster homes around the US but keeps a few of them for school programs about bullying.

Their interspecies friendship has inspired scores of supporters to donate to the foundation. And the animals, Rogers said, make each other better.

Two rough beginnings

Herman was found over a year ago in a car dealership parking lot, where he sat on the pavement, unmoving, for three whole days. Eventually his rescuers realized the poor pigeon couldn’t fly.

Neighboring wildlife rescues said he couldn’t be rehabilitated and would need to be euthanized, so Rogers took care of him herself.

He now rests in a baby crib for some of the day, but she takes him outside daily to stimulate him.

Little Lundy, an infant chihuahua, is a new arrival. His breeders in South Carolina sent him to Rogers because he had trouble using his hind legs, a condition known as swimmers syndrome.

At just 6 ounces, he was small enough to fit in a shirt pocket. Rogers said she suspects Lundy’s difficulty walking is due to damage to his teeny spinal cord.

When Lundy met Herman

The two were bound to meet eventually. Rogers set them together while attending to Lundy and saw the way the two snuggled up almost immediately — Herman didn’t peck, and Lundy didn’t nibble.

Rogers snapped some pictures of their cuddles. The “oohs” and “ahhs” followed soon after.

People from every corner of the world flooded Rogers’ inbox with donations, messages of support and, naturally, pleas to adopt Lundy or the other cute pups in her care.

“I was blown away,” she said.

And the donations keep coming — the foundation raised $6,000 in two days, she said. That’s enough to cover the high-end cost of a veterinary surgery that many of her rescue animals require.

Lundy needs to get stronger to be adoptable

Herman will likely stay in Rogers’ care for the rest of his life. She’s hopeful Lundy stays strong and survives.

“With animals born with defects, there’s a chance we could lose them,” she said. “So we don’t want to make anyone really excited. But now I think we’ve gotten a thousand emails asking, ‘Please, don’t ever separate those two!'”

One of Lundy’s rescuers fell in love with him while traveling with him to Rochester, so he may already have a new home lined up. The question, then, is if Herman will ask to tag along too.

https://www.fox43.com/article/news/dog-pigeon-friends-animals/521-14a5e73f-4f1e-4c83-8d1d-dd569d29d4e5