Woman with dementia records “My Way” with caregiver and hits the charts


Chart-topping musicians can come from all backgrounds, but this latest musical sensation is certainly a sweet surprise. Margaret Mackie, an 83-year-old woman with dementia and resident of Northcare Suites Care Home, a senior care facility in in Edinburgh, Scotland, just recorded a heartwarming version of “My Way” with her caregiver – and it’s a certified hit!
Photo by Jamie Lee Morley Music | Facebook

Mackie’s journey to the top of the charts began at her care home’s Christmas party, where she sang the Frank Sinatra song with her caregiver, Jamie Lee Morley. The caregiver and part time musician never thought he would be working in a senior care facility.

But the past few months in the senior care facility and caring for Margaret have been life changing. He posted a video of his duet with Mackie on YouTube, saying “Every day in work we sing this song together and I do whatever I can to brighten her day and all the other residents.”

Looking back, Morley thought he was listening to the radio when he first heard Mackie singing. He was walking past a lounge at the senior care facility when he heard a lovely and on-pitch rendition of Elvis Presley’s “Can’t Help Falling in Love.” “I was stunned,” Morley said. “I’ve loved singing and music since I was a little lad, and I could just tell that Margaret did, too. Her voice is amazing.”
Jamie Lee Morley | YouTube

A former whiskey distillery worker, Mackie rarely remembers one day from the next. Jordan Simpson, manager of the senior care facility, said that while dementia made Mackie forgetful, she still recalls the lyrics of her favorite songs.

Simpson said, “Singing is something that makes Margaret happy. She has a great singing voice. And although she has dementia, she has a great memory for song lyrics. She and Jamie sing together most of the day.”

The caregiver began to use music as part of Mackie’s therapy. “You can just see the change of the look in her face when she starts singing or she hears music that she likes. She comes alive when she sings, and she looks so happy, it is beautiful to see. It is the power of music.”

Mackie’s daughter Mairi Hunter added, “It has brought her back to life. The dementia was taking a hold of her and she was getting sad with it, but this has given her a new lease of life. It’s quite remarkable how she can remember the lyrics. It just seems to come back to her.”

Jamie Lee Morley | YouTube

The song choice for the Christmas party also holds personal meaning for Morley. “For those close to me will know this was my Grandad’s funeral song who our family sadly lost to Alzheimer’s last year. I’ve never really sang this song as it’s a classic, but I knew how much Margaret and her family would love it.”

He recalled being so moved as he sang with Mackie. “But what an amazing few months it has been. Last night I was asked to sing and host the Christmas party for the residents… and I have never been so emotional on stage my entire time of doing what I love.”

After the video of the duet surprisingly, but happily, went viral, Morley took Mackie to a studio to make a professional record of the song. “It was the first time that she’d been in the studio, but was like she had done it a 100 times before. She’s got such an amazing voice. The fact that she can do that while living with dementia is mind-blowing. It’s just crazy,” said Morley.

Photo by Jamie Lee Morley Music | Facebook

Now, not only is Mackie a hit singer in her 80s and famous beyond her senior care facility, the song is also helping others with proceeds going to Dementia UK and Alzheimer’s Society. Morley remarked, “For her to get up on stage at her age and have so much courage and fight and sing so beautifully absolutely blew my mind. This is a moment I will never ever forget. Be more like Margaret and live each day to the full and sing your absolute hearts out!”

Mackie, on the other hand, said she wouldn’t mind recording another song, and even joked that she may record an entire album! She related, “It’s great seeing your face in all those newspapers. It’s nice to have a busy life like that, every now and then.”

The hit single is moving fast on the download charts in the UK, climbing ahead of world-known artists such as Ed Sheeran and James Blunt. The music comes with a video of the duo’s trip to the recording studio.

According to Morley, “This video isn’t about being pitch perfect but it’s about this amazing woman doing what she loves the most, which is singing. I feel so blessed to have been able to get her up to sing with me. A moment in my heart forever.”

Available on Apple, Amazon, and Google Play, the single is an inspiration to people with loved ones afflicted with dementia. “It’s been a very special moment for me and Margaret. The world needs this type of happy stories with all the bad stuff going on in the world.”

Morley added, “For someone with dementia, it fascinates me how amazing music makes her feel. She becomes a different person. It’s just incredible. She has definitely got the music in her blood. She is an inspiration to so many people — especially me! I just love her.”

See the amazing video of the two below:

https://mypositiveoutlooks.com/woman-with-dementia-records-my-way-with-caregiver-and-hits-the-charts/

How to see the ‘elusive planet’ Mercury in the night sky in February

space.com
By Joe Rao 21 hours ago Shares

During the first half of February, Mercury will complete its best evening appearance for mid-northern latitude observers during 2020, climbing higher in the west-southwestern sky every evening.

During the first half of February, Mercury will complete its best evening appearance for mid-northern latitude observers during 2020, climbing higher in the west-southwestern sky every evening.

Mercury is often cited as the most difficult of the naked-eye planets to see. Because it’s the closest planet to the sun, it is usually obscured by the light from our star.

“Mercury has been known since very early times, but it is never very conspicuous, and there are many people who have never seen it at all,” legendary British astronomer Sir Patrick Moore wrote in “The Boy’s Book of Astronomy,” (Roy Publishers, 1958). “The reason for this is that it always seems to keep close to the sun in the sky, and can never be observed against a dark background.”

Although that’s mostly true, there are times during the year when Mercury can be surprisingly easy to spot. And we are in just such a period right now.

Mercury is called an “inferior planet” because its orbit is nearer to the sun than Earth’s is. Therefore, Mercury always appears, from our vantage point (as Moore wrote), to be in the same general direction as the sun. That’s why relatively few people have set eyes on it. There is even a rumor that Nicolaus Copernicus — who, in the early 1500s, formulated a model of the universe that placed the sun, rather than Earth, at the center of the solar system — never saw it.

Yet Mercury is not really hard to see. You simply must know when and where to look, and find a clear horizon.

For those living in the Northern Hemisphere, a great “window of opportunity” for viewing Mercury in the evening sky opened up in late January. That window will remain open through Feb. 17, giving you a number of chances to see this so-called elusive planet with your own eyes.

When and where to look

Currently, Mercury is visible about 35 to 40 minutes after sunset, very near to the horizon, about 25 degrees south of due west. Your clenched fist held at arm’s length measures roughly 10 degrees, so approximately 2.5 “fists” to the left of due west, along the horizon, will bring you to Mercury.

On the evening of Monday, Feb. 10, Mercury (orbit shown as red curve) will reach its widest separation, 18 degrees east of the sun. With Mercury sitting above a nearly vertical evening ecliptic, this will be the best appearance of the planet in 2020 for Northern Hemisphere observers. The optimal viewing times fall between 6 and 7 p.m. local time. Viewed in a telescope (inset), the planet will exhibit a waning half-illuminated phase.

On the evening of Monday, Feb. 10, Mercury (orbit shown as red curve) will reach its widest separation, 18 degrees east of the sun. With Mercury sitting above a nearly vertical evening ecliptic, this will be the best appearance of the planet in 2020 for Northern Hemisphere observers. The optimal viewing times fall between 6 and 7 p.m. local time. Viewed in a telescope (inset), the planet will exhibit a waning half-illuminated phase. (Image credit: Starry Night)

You can also use brilliant Venus as a benchmark. Just look the same distance — 25 degrees — to Venus’ lower right, and you’ll come to Mercury. If your sky is clear and there are no tall obstructions (like trees or buildings), you should have no trouble seeing Mercury as a very bright “star” shining with a trace of a yellowish-orange tinge. Tonight (Jan. 31), Mercury will be shining at magnitude -1.0, which means that only three other objects in the sky will appear brighter: the moon, Venus and Sirius (the brightest star in Earth’s night sky).

In the evenings that follow, Mercury will slowly diminish in brightness, but it will also slowly gain altitude as it gradually moves away from the sun’s vicinity.

It will be at greatest elongation, 18.2 degrees to the east of the sun, on Feb. 10. Look for it about 45 minutes to an hour after sundown, still about 25 degrees to the lower right of Venus. Shining at magnitude -0.5 (just a smidge dimmer than the second-brightest star in the sky, Canopus, in the constellation Carina), it sets more than 90 minutes after the sun, making this Mercury’s best evening apparition of 2020.

While viewing circumstances for Mercury are quite favorable north of the equator, that is not so for those in the Southern Hemisphere, where this rocky little world will hang very low to the horizon while deeply immersed in bright twilight, making the planet very difficult to see. Southern Hemisphere observers will get their chance to spot Mercury in late March and early April, when the elusive planet will appear to soar high into the eastern sky at dawn.

Mercury, like Venus and the moon, appears to go through phases. Soon after it emerged into the evening sky in January, Mercury was a nearly full disk, which is why it currently appears so bright. By the time it arrives at its greatest elongation, or its greatest separation from the sun, on Feb. 10, it will appear nearly half-illuminated. The amount of the planet’s surface illuminated by the sun will continue to decrease in the days to come. When Mercury begins to turn back toward the sun’s vicinity after Feb. 10, it will fade at a rather rapid pace. By Feb. 14, it will dim to magnitude +0.2, nearly as bright as the star Rigel, in the constellation Orion.

By the evening of Feb. 17, Mercury’s brightness will drop to magnitude +1.6 — about as bright as the star Castor, in the constellation Gemini, but only about 9% as bright as it appears now. In telescopes, Mercury will appear as a narrowing crescent. This, in all likelihood, will be your last view of the elusive planet this month, for the combination of its lowering altitude and its descent into the brighter sunset glow will finally render Mercury invisible in the evenings that follow. It will arrive at inferior conjunction, meaning it will pass between Earth and the sun, on Feb. 25. It will reappear in the morning sky in late March and early April.
Swift, with a dual identity

In ancient Roman mythology, Mercury was the swift-footed messenger of the gods. The planet is well named, for it is the closest planet to the sun and the swiftest of the solar system. Averaging about 30 miles per second (48 kilometers per second), Mercury makes a journey around the sun in only 88 Earth days. Interestingly, it takes Mercury 59 Earth days to rotate once on its axis, so all parts of its surface experience long periods of intense heat and extreme cold. Although its mean distance from the sun is only 36 million miles (58 million km), Mercury experiences by far the greatest range of temperatures: 800 degrees Fahrenheit (426 degrees Celsius) on its day side, and minus 280 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 173 degrees Celsius) on its night side.

In the pre-Christian era, this speedy planet actually had two names, as astronomers did not realize that it could alternately appear on one side of the sun and then the other. The planet was called Mercury when it was in the evening sky, but it was known as Apollo when it appeared in the morning. It is said that Pythagoras, in about the fifth century B.C., pointed out that they were one and the same.

Rare Mercury transit, the last until 2032, thrills skywatchers around the world
The most enduring mysteries of Mercury
Surprise! Dust ring discovered in Mercury’s orbit

Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers’ Almanac and other publications. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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Coronavirus – Cats and dogs ‘thrown from tower blocks’ in China after fake news rumours animals are causing spread

thesun.co.uk
Coronavirus – Cats and dogs ‘thrown from tower blocks’ in China after fake news rumours animals are causing spread
By Jon Lockett
3-4 minutes
VIRUS PANIC

Graphic Warning

31st January 2020, 3:33 pm

Updated: 1st February 2020, 1:14 pm

PANICKING pet owners are reportedly throwing cats and dogs out of towerblocks following bogus claims deadly coronavirus can be passed on by animals.

Chilling pictures coming out of crisis-hit China are said to show the bloodied corpses of animals lying in the road after being hurled to their death.

Chilling pictures coming out of crisis-hot China are said to show the bloodied corpses of animals lying in the road

AsiaWire
Chilling pictures coming out of China are said to show the bloodied corpses of animals lying in the road

One dog was found dead after allegedly being thrown from one block of flats in Tianjin City in Hebei Province – home to the outbreak epicentre Wuhan.

Five cats were also thrown to death in Shanghai, with locals apparently saying they were pets as they had smooth and clean fur, say unconfirmed reports.

Local media stated the pooch was thrown from the upper floors of a tower block at 4am and smashed into the sunroof of a car before ending up on the ground.

Reports state the noise of the dog hitting the car woke sleeping locals as it sounded like a tyre explosion.

Sickened families then found the poor pet lying dead on the ground with its blood staining surrounding bricks.

It’s reported mulitple pets were killed following bogus claims they could spread coronavirus

AsiaWire
It’s reported multiple pets were killed following bogus claims they could spread coronavirus

The shocking incidents were sparked after Dr Li Lanjuan said on Chinese state TV said : “If pets come into contact with suspected patients, they should be quarantined.”

However, a local media outlet then reportedly tweaked her words into “cats and dogs can spread the coronavirus”.

The false rumour spread quickly after Zhibo China posted it on social media platform Weibo.

In a bid to put and end to the false claims, China Global Television Network posted a quote from the World Health Organisation.

It read: “There is no evidence showing that pets such as cats and dogs can contract the novel coronavirus, the World Health Organisation said on Wednesday.”

PETA Asia press officer for China, Keith Guo, said: “We hope the police can find the cold-blooded guardians of those poor animals as soon as possible.

“In fact, it’s the filthy factory farms, slaughterhouses, and meat markets that threaten the health of every human being on the planet by providing a breeding ground for deadly diseases like coronavirus, SARS, bird flu, and more.”

On Thursday we reported how dog owners in China were rushing to buy face masks for their pooches as experts warn pets could also catch the deadly virus.

One online seller from Beijing told Mail Online he is selling more special masks than ever before.

Zhou Tianxiao, 33, started selling special masks for dogs in 2018 to help protect them from air pollution.

But since the deadly new outrbreak, he has gone from selling 150 masks a month to at least 50 a day.

The killer bug has now spread to every region of China and 22 other countries including the UK.

The death toll has reached 213, with almost 10,000 people infected in what the WHO has called a global health emergency.

China’s first coronavirus hospital opens as empty building is rapidly converted in just TWO days into 1,000-bed unit

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