VIDEO Puerto Rico Governor Fires Two More Officials Over Hidden Emergency Relief Supplies…

MyLegalHelpUSA

Updating a story we shared last night; and the latest information only makes the situation seem much worse.   To say this story is infuriating would be an understatement.

As an individual with some personal knowledge of how the recovery process works, the actions by these government officials in Puerto Rico are beyond tragic.  There are people in desperate need, and these stupid claims by officials do nothing to ameliorate ongoing suffering.  This is disgusting and heartbreaking at the same time.

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Gov. Wanda Vázquez fired the heads of Puerto Rico’s housing and family departments Sunday in the latest fallout over the discovery of a warehouse filled with emergency supplies dating from Hurricane Maria.

The removal of Housing Secretary Fernando Gil and Department of Family Secretary Glorimar Andújar came a day after the governor fired the director of…

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Saw America as the Solution, Not the Problem

MyLegalHelpUSA

U.S. Dept. of State / Flickr / CC / Cropped

The annual observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day is an occasion for the left to reinforce racial identity and radical politics, and for the right to criticize what the civil rights movement has become in the hands of King’s self-professed successors.

Certainly the Democratic presidential primary has provided material for the latter, as the contenders have rushed to kiss the ring of Al Sharpton — a notorious race-baiter responsible for much of the country’s current division.

It is sad that a day named for a leader whose legacy was a message — a prophecy! — of unity should be observed in such divergent ways. King preached about injustice in America — first racial injustice in the South, enshrined in law; then economic injustice in the North and elsewhere. But — this is crucial — he never…

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UK – Ban the Import and Export of Hunting Trophies Now: Petition

Guardians Of Life

Siobhan Mitchell started this petition to Prime Minister Boris Johnson

We demand an end to the import and export of hunting trophies from Britain, and urge Boris Johnson to follow through on his message of 2019 calling for an end to this barbaric practice.

The Government is currently running a consultation on the import and export of hunting trophies. This petition is to express support for Option 3 in the consultation, which would meana ban on all hunting trophies entering or leaving the UK.

As the director of the Campaign To Ban Trophy Hunting, I’ve long fought for an end to this barbaric practise. Killing animals for ‘trophies’ is cruel, unnecessary, and indefensible for the following reasons:

Studies show that many species targeted by trophy hunters are social, emotional, intelligent beings. Killing them for ‘sport’ goes against basic civilised values. So-called ‘canned hunting’ – breeding animals in captivity and…

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No More Starving Farm Animals: Petition

Guardians Of Life

Farm Animal Rescue started this petition to Managing Director, Meat and Livestock Australia Richard Norton and 1 other

In 2018 the public were mortified by hundreds of images of starving animals on Australian farms in yet another year of drought.

The Bureau of Meteorology has issued a statement to say that they are expecting lower than average rainfall and higher than average temperatures through Spring into early Summer, resulting in a “low chance of recovery for drought-affected areas”.

Despite these forecasts there is no indication from either the meat or dairy industry that breeding programs will be restricted to accommodate much lower feed availability in the coming year. Instead farmers are culling Australian wildlife in a hope that this will allow sufficient pasture to remain.

We call on Meat & Livestock Australia and Dairy Australia to significantly restrict breeding programs to avoid a repeat of the mass starvation of farm…

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China’s new killer virus is mutated SARS & may be one more mutation away from infecting millions. Will it make the lethal leap? | RT World News

Truth2Freedom's Blog

The deadly Chinese virus is turning up in more and more places, and the number of cases tripled over the weekend. But how bad could things get, and is there anything that could stop it before it’s too late?

It seems a bit like the beginning of a Hollywood thriller. An ordinary winter’s day at Wuhan’s seafood and wildlife market. Market traders, stalls packed with meat and fish, trying to flog their wares. The shoppers, handling the produce and trying to find the best deals. But Wuhan is hundreds of miles from the ocean, meaning any ‘fresh’ fish and shellfish for sale was probably anything but.

Police outside the Wuhan fish market where the SARS-like virus epidemic began to spread through Wuhan. ©  NOEL CELIS / AFP

We know that something at the market, perhaps a batch of dodgy crabs or some squawking chickens packed together in cages, was carrying…

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Tiny but mighty

Chinese virus: How worried should we be?

bloombergquint_2020-01_c4e7aa63-6da1-4099-a4d2-02b9361c2b87_3567849411248049331.jpg

Wuhan Image copyright Getty Images
pImage caption The outbreak occurred in the city of Wuhan, south of Beijing

A virus – previously unknown to science – is causing severe lung disease in the Chinese city of Wuhan and has been detected in two other countries.

Three people are known to have died from the virus, which appeared in the city in December.

There are more than two hundred confirmed cases of the virus, but UK experts estimate the figure is closer to 1,700.

A new virus arriving on the scene, leaving patients with pneumonia, is always a worry and health officials around the world are on high alert.

But is this a brief here-today-gone-tomorrow outbreak or the first sign of something far more dangerous?
What is this virus?

Viral samples have been taken from patients and analysed in the laboratory.

And officials in China and the World Health Organization (WHO) have concluded the infection is a coronavirus.

Coronaviruses are a broad family of viruses, but only six (the new one would make it seven) are known to infect people.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars), which is caused by a coronavirus, killed 774 of the 8,098 people infected in an outbreak that started in China in 2002.

“There is a strong memory of Sars, that’s where a lot of fear comes from, but we’re a lot more prepared to deal with those types of diseases,” says Dr Josie Golding, from the Wellcome Trust.
Is it serious?

Coronaviruses can cause symptoms ranging from a mild cold all the way through to death.

This new virus appears to be somewhere in the middle.

“When we see a new coronavirus, we want to know how severe are the symptoms – this is more than cold-like symptoms and that is a concern but it is not as severe as Sars,” says Prof Mark Woolhouse, from the University of Edinburgh.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption There were six coronaviruses known to infect people.
Where has it come from?

New viruses are detected all the time.

They jump from one species, where they went unnoticed, into humans.

“If we think about outbreaks in the past, if it is a new coronavirus, it will have come from an animal reservoir,” says Prof Jonathan Ball, a virologist at the University of Nottingham.

Sars jumped from the civet cat into humans.

And Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers), which has killed 858 out of the 2,494 recorded cases since it emerged in 2012, regularly makes the jump from the dromedary camel.
Which animal?

Once the animal reservoir where the virus normally camps out is detected, the problem becomes much easier to deal with.

The cases have been linked to the South China Seafood Wholesale Market, in Wuhan.

But while some sea-going mammals can carry coronaviruses (such as the Beluga whale), the market also has live wild animals, including chickens, bats, rabbits, snakes, which are more likely to be the source.
Why China?

Prof Woolhouse says it is because of the size and density of the population and close contact with animals harbouring viruses.

“No-one is surprised the next outbreak is in China or that part of the world,” he says.

How easily does it spread?

Chinese officials say there have been cases of the virus spreading from one person to another.

The WHO has said it believes there has been “some limited human-to-human transmission occurring between close contacts”.

This is a concern with new viruses that infect the lungs, as coughs and sneezes are a highly effective way for a virus to spread.

It is too soon know how many people might become ill.
How fast is it spreading?

The outbreak was thought to be limited, but new cases have been reported since it started in December.

While the outbreak is centred on Wuhan, there have been two cases in Thailand, one in Japan and another in South Korea. Those people travelled from Wuhan recently.

Experts say there could be more cases going undetected.

A report by the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College London suggested there could be more than 1,700 infections.

“It is likely that the Wuhan outbreak of a novel coronavirus has caused substantially more cases of moderate or severe respiratory illness than currently reported,” said the report.

There are concerns that the virus could be spread by the hundreds of millions of people travelling for Chinese New Year later this month.

Singapore and Hong Kong have been screening air passengers from Wuhan and US authorities announced similar measures starting on Friday at three major airports in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York.
How have Chinese authorities responded?

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Temperature screening can help identify people who have been infected

Infected people have been treated in isolation to minimise the risk of the bug spreading.

Extra checks such as temperature scans have been put in place to screen travellers.

And the seafood market was closed for cleaning and disinfection.

The US and most Asian countries have stepped up screenings of travellers from Wuhan and the WHO has warned hospitals worldwide that a wider outbreak is possible.
How worried are the experts?

Dr Golding says: “At the moment, until we have more information, it’s really hard to know how worried we should be.

“Until we have confirmation of the source, that’s always going to make us uneasy.”

Prof Ball says: “We should be worried about any virus that explores humans for the first time, because it’s overcome the first major barrier.

“Once inside a [human] cell and replicating, it can start to generate mutations that could allow it to spread more efficiently and become more dangerous.

“You don’t want to give the virus the opportunity.”

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51048366

Online campaign grows to save sick and starving lions in Sudan park | Sudan

amp.theguardian.comOne of the malnourished lions sits in her cage at the Al-Qureshi park in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum. Photograph: Ashraf Shazly/AFP via Getty ImagesSudan

Park officials and vets say some of the five cats have lost almost two-thirds of their body weight

Agence France-Presse

Sun 19 Jan 2020 19.58 EST

Online calls to help save five “malnourished and sick” African lions at a park in Sudan’s capital grew on Sunday.

The lions are in cages at Khartoum’s Al-Qureshi park, which is in an upmarket area of the city, and have not had enough food and medicine for weeks.

Many people have demanded they be moved.

Osman Salih launched a Facebook campaign, Sudananimalrescue, and wrote: “I was shaken when I saw these lions at the park … Their bones are protruding from the skin.

“I urge interested people and institutions to help them.”

Park officials and vets said the lions’ conditions had deteriorated over the past few weeks. Some had lost almost two-thirds of their body weight.

“Food is not always available so often we buy it from our own money to feed them,” said Essamelddine Hajjar, a manager at the park, which is managed by the Khartoum municipality but is partly funded by private donors.

Sudan is in the middle of an economic crisis led by soaring food prices and a shortage of foreign currency.

On Sunday residents, volunteers and journalists visited the park to see the lions after their photographs went viral on social media networks.

One of the five cats was tied with a rope and was fed fluids through a drip as it recovered from dehydration, an AFP reporter who toured the park wrote.

Chunks of rotten meat covered in flies lay scattered near the cages.

The condition of the park was also affecting the animals’ health, another official at the park said.

“They are suffering from severe illnesses,” a caretaker, Moataz Mahmoud, said. “They are sick and appear to be malnourished.”

It is unclear how many lions are in Sudan but several are at the Dinder park along the border with Ethiopia.

African lions are classified as a “vulnerable” species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Their population dropped 43% between 1993 and 2014, with only about 20,000 alive today.

https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2020/jan/20/online-campaign-grows-to-save-sick-and-starving-lions-in-sudan-park?__twitter_impression=true

New China virus: Cases triple as infection spreads to Beijing and Shanghai

www-bbc-com.cdn.ampproject.org

The BBC spoke to people in Beijing who seemed largely unconcerned about the virus.

The number of people infected with a new virus in China tripled over the weekend, with the outbreak spreading from Wuhan to other major cities.

There are now more than 200 cases, mostly in Wuhan, though the respiratory illness has also been detected in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen.

Three people have died. Japan, Thailand and South Korea have reported cases.

The new strain of coronavirus, which causes a type of pneumonia, can pass from person to person, China confirmed.

The sharp rise comes as millions of Chinese prepare to travel for the Lunar New Year holidays.

Although the outbreak is believed to have originated from a market, officials and scientists are yet to determine exactly how it has been spreading.

Mystery Chinese virus: How worried should we be?
New Chinese virus ‘preventable and controllable’

The outbreak has revived memories of the Sars virus – also a coronavirus – that killed 774 people in the early 2000s across dozens of countries, mostly in Asia. Analysis of the genetic code of the new virus shows it is more closely related to Sars than any other human coronavirus.

Experts in the UK told the BBC the number of people infected could still be far greater than official figures suggest, with estimates closer to 1,700.

What we know about the virus

2019-nCoV, as it’s been labelled, is understood to be a new strain of coronavirus that has not previously been identified in humans
Coronaviruses are a broad family of viruses, but only six (the new one would make it seven) are known to infect people
Scientists believe an animal source is “the most likely primary source” but that some human-to-human transmission has occurred
Signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties
People are being advised to avoid “unprotected” contact with live animals, thoroughly cook meat and eggs, and avoid close contact with anyone with cold or flu-like symptoms

Source: World Health Organization

Who has been infected?

Authorities in Wuhan, a central Chinese city of 11 million that has been at the heart of the outbreak, on Monday said 136 new cases had been confirmed over the weekend, with a third person dying of the virus. There had previously been only 62 confirmed cases in the city.

As of late Sunday, officials said 170 people in Wuhan were still being treated in hospital, including nine in critical condition.

Beijing also confirmed its first cases, with five people infected. Shanghai confirmed its first case on Monday – a 56-year-old woman who came from Wuhan

.
Image copyright AFP Temperature scanning equipment at Narita airport
Image caption Airports including Narita in Tokyo have been screening passengers

In the city of Shenzhen, a major tech hub close to Hong Kong, officials said a 66-year-old man showed symptoms of the virus following a trip to visit relatives in Wuhan.

State media reported 14 other cases in Guangdong province.

Four cases have been confirmed abroad – two in Thailand, one in Japan and one in South Korea – all of them involving people who are either from Wuhan or have visited the city.

In South Korea, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said a 35-year-old Chinese woman was suffering from a fever and respiratory problems after travelling there from Wuhan. She was put into isolation and treated at a local hospital.

The World Health Organization said it was currently not recommending restrictions on travel or trade, but was providing guidance to countries preparing for any outbreak.

Airports in Singapore, Hong Kong and the Japanese capital Tokyo have been screening air passengers from Wuhan, and US authorities last week announced similar measures at three major airports in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York.
What are the Chinese authorities saying?

How China is responding to the outbreak is under close scrutiny, given that it was widely criticised for initially covering up the Sars crisis in late 2002 and early 2003.

On Monday, Chinese President Xi Jinping for the first time publicly addressed the outbreak, saying that the virus must be “resolutely contained”.

The foreign ministry, meanwhile, said China was providing “timely information about the disease” and would “work with all parties to deal with the virus”.

China’s National Health Commission on Monday confirmed that two cases in China were due to human-to-human transmission, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

The commission had earlier said there had been no such cases, but that the virus had instead crossed the species barrier and come from infected animals at a seafood and wildlife market in Wuhan.

Image copyright AFP Picture shows the shutters of the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in the city of Wuhan

Image caption Health officials have been analysing the seafood market where they believe the virus originated

The WHO also said it believed there had been “some limited human-to-human transmission occurring between close contacts”.

“As more… cases are identified and more analysis undertaken, we will get a clearer picture of disease severity and transmission patterns,” it wrote on Twitter.

It noted that the rise in cases in China was a result of “increased searching and testing for [the virus] among people sick with respiratory illness”.

Coronavirus feared to have infected more than initially thought according to scientists

Video caption Coronavirus feared to have infected more than initially thought according to scientists
What impact could Lunar New Year have?

From Friday, most Chinese will begin their week-long Lunar New Year holidays.

It’s a time when hundreds of millions travel around China to visit family, raising fears that authorities will not be able to adequately monitor further spread of the disease.

Wuhan is a transport hub and authorities there have for nearly a week been using temperature scanners at airports, and train and bus stations. Those showing signs of fever have been registered, given masks and taken to hospitals and clinics.
Image copyright AFP A woman wears a blue face mask as she wheels luggage
Image caption Chinese companies shut down for Lunar New Year, with hundreds of millions of people travelling

Authorities say they will now also be screening everyone leaving the city.

At Beijing’s central railway station, some travellers donned masks but did not appear overly concerned about the virus.

“Watching the news, I do feel a little worried. But I haven’t taken precautionary measures beyond wearing regular masks,” Li Yang, a 28-year-old account manager travelling to the region of Inner Mongolia, told the AFP news agency.

But the tone in Chinese social media, where the outbreak has been a top trending topic, was different.

“Who knows how many people who have been to Wuhan may be unaware that they have already been infected?” one Weibo user said.

https://www-bbc-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-asia-china-51171035?usqp=mq331AQCKAE%3D&amp_js_v=0.1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s&ampshare=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbc.com%2Fnews%2Fworld-asia-china-51171035