Animal Abuse Legislation: 2019 Year in Review

FIREPAW, Inc.

Animal-Human Abuse LINK LEGISLATION

We look back on 21 new state laws that were enacted in 2019 that address The Link between animal abuse and domestic, child and elder abuse and other crimes, and list 45 new bills that have already been introduced in the young 2020 sessions.

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Source: The National LINK Coalition:  The National Resource Center on The LINK between Animal Abuse and Human Violence

www.NationalLinkCoalition.org


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Tell Mattel: No More Plastic Packaging | Take Action @ The Animal Rescue Site

theanimalrescuesite.greatergood.com
Tell Mattel: No More Plastic Packaging | Take Action @ The Animal Rescue Site

Sponsor: Free The Ocean

Every parent has seen it: the amount of plastic packaging for toys is ridiculous. The consequences for our oceans are dire.

Over 28 BILLION pounds of plastic enters the ocean each year.1 Plastic packaging is the single biggest contributor, representing a massive 42% of the plastic polluting our oceans.

Plastic in our oceans kills over ONE MILLION marine animals each year. Mammals, fish, sharks, turtles, and birds die from entanglement in or ingestion of plastic.2 Sea turtles are especially susceptible as the plastic they consume gets trapped in their stomachs, preventing them from swallowing real food… and they starve.3 This is a serious issue.

Toys are one of the worst offenders when it comes to plastic packaging, and Mattel is one of the world’s largest toy manufacturers.4 The amount of plastic used to package their toys is staggering. Ironically, the kids opening the toys enclosed in plastic packaging are the ones who are going to be impacted the most. If nothing changes, by the time a 5-year old today turns 35, plastic in the oceans will outweigh the fish.5 Let’s not make children choose between toys packaged in plastic and a healthy ocean.

Although there’ll soon be a ‘How2Recycle’ sticker on some of Mattel’s products6, the truth is only 9% of plastic ever actually gets recycled.7 Mattel needs a wake-up call when it comes to the impact created by their plastic packaging. Not only would a change in packaging benefit our environment, the ocean, and marine life – it would also benefit the children who play with Mattel’s toys. We know this can be done, because Hasbro has already committed to phase out plastic in all of its packaging.8

When we speak out together, we can make companies take action. Tell the CEO of Mattel, Ynon Kreiz, to redesign Mattel’s packaging to eliminate plastic!

Plastic Pollution Affects Sea Life Throughout the Ocean
Pew Charitable Trusts, September 24, 2018
For Animals, Plastic Is Turning the Ocean Into a Minefield
National Geographic, June 2018
Just a Few Pieces of Plastic Can Kill Sea Turtles
New York Times, Sept. 13, 2018
The Top 7 Toy Companies Ranked by Market Share
Global Toy News, December 8, 2018
By 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans, study says
Washington Post, January 1, 2016
Mattel Joins How2Recycle
How2Recycle, February 07, 2019
Plastic recycling is a myth: what really happens to your rubbish?
The Guardian, August 17, 2019
Hasbro to Phase Out Plastic from New Toy and Game Packaging
Hasbro, August 20, 2019

The Petition:

To: Ynon Kreiz, CEO of Mattel, Inc.

Plastic packaging is the single biggest contributor to the plastic that ends up in our oceans – which is a staggering 18 billion pounds per year. Plastic pollution kills over 1 million marine animals every year and severely damages the marine ecosystem.

As one of the world’s largest toy manufacturers, Mattel’s product packaging contributes to a massive amount of plastic. I know you’re adding a ‘How2Recycle’ sticker to some of your products but unfortunately, only 9% of all plastic actually gets recycled. The reality is, this won’t meaningfully reduce plastic waste, but using plastic-free alternatives for your packaging will.

It’s estimated that by the time a 5-year-old today, turns 35, plastic in the oceans will outweigh fish. But we can change that. Let’s not give a child the choice between a toy packaged in plastic and a healthy ocean. Ynon, changing Mattel’s packaging would not only benefit the ocean and marine life but would also benefit the children who play with your toys. Please make the right decision and redesign Mattel’s packaging to eliminate plastic.

Thank you!

Free the Ocean

https://theanimalrescuesite.greatergood.com/clicktogive/ars/petition/fto-mattel-plastic?utm_source=ars-ta-animals&utm_medium=email&utm_term=01152020&utm_content=takeaction-f&utm_campaign=fto-mattel-plastic&oidp=0x4a568a63ec7cab2cc0a82937

Petition: Save Globally Important Arctic Habitat | Audubon

Yellow-billed Loons nest in the wetlands around Teshekpuk Lake.

In 2013, Audubon and supporters like you submitted comments to help protect 11 million acres of globally important Arctic bird habitat within the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska. The resulting land management plan safeguarded one of the world’s most important Arctic wetlands, Teshekpuk Lake—the home for hundreds of thousands of shorebirds, nesting loons, and vulnerable molting geese—while allowing for energy development in less-sensitive areas. It also recognized the importance of areas along the Colville River where raptors nest, such as Rough-legged Hawks, Arctic Peregrine Falcons, Golden Eagles, and Gyrfalcons.

But now, the Bureau of Land Management is rewriting this plan, seeking to overturn protections for these irreplaceable wetlands and making them available for sale to the oil industry. In a place experiencing the effects of climate change at an accelerated rate, opening additional areas to oil production is irresponsible. Please send public comments to oppose drilling in the special Teshekpuk Lake wetlands and maintain recognition of the Colville River.

Note: Your name, city, state, and comment will become part of the public record.

Photo: Tom Wilberding/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

To Bureau of Land Management:

Personalize your message
I oppose increasing oil and gas development in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A). The NPR-A contains world-class wilderness areas and wildlife habitat, including the globally-significant Teshekpuk Lake wetlands complex. For the past forty years, Teshekpuk Lake and its surrounding wetlands have been recognized and protected for its extraordinary wildlife values. A new land management plan in the NPR-A should continue to exclude oil and gas development in and around Teshekpuk Lake and consider the additional effects development would have on a changing landscape that is already feeling the impacts from climate change.

The Teshekpuk Lake wetlands comprise one of the premiere habitats in the entire circumpolar Arctic. The wetlands are a haven for molting geese. The coastline north of the lake provides denning habitat for polar bears. More than half a million shorebirds nest around Teshekpuk Lake. South of the lake, loons and ducks find optimal breeding conditions. The Teshekpuk Caribou Herd gives birth to calves, forages, and winters in habitat around the lake. The sheer number of so many birds and wildlife make Teshekpuk a place that merits stronger, not weaker, protections.

The cliffs along the Colville River provide important nesting habitat for several species of raptors, including Rough-legged Hawks, Arctic Peregrine Falcons, Golden Eagles, and Gyrfalcons. In an otherwise flat tundra landscape, the relatively tall cliffs provide both safety and better vantage points for hunting for these predators.

The oil industry is already undertaking a program of exploration and development in areas nearby at an accelerated rate. Rapid climate change in the Arctic means that oil and gas development should be curtailed, not expanded, in the NPR-A. Maintaining the decades-long protections to the Teshekpuk Lake wetlands and the recognition of the Colville River Special Area demonstrates a core principle of responsible Arctic management for this and future administrations.
Sincerely,

https://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/UoQuuwIkVkyJpcqUiqpDNg2?ms=policy-adv-email-ea-x-advocacy_20200115_npra_alert&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=advocacy_20200115_npra_alert&emci=0e479e6b-a137-ea11-a1cc-2818784d084f&emdi=920d910c-d137-ea11-a1cc-2818784d084f&ceid=89005&contactdata=Lg5I5eGYk6bmD%2fXotf2jjBhqklw1L0ssVR8%2fBLafjOHa5oqGSOb0L15a37JeaW1LY4O%2bVh%2f83bfRma%2bFNAQNyaa76mCghUB%2fsj%2fT9iqxdeEffwOrDjaZ1Kjke3jHVZBL7bsuITvd7zkmCIv59bbrhDyOIG70gIAHEWalkzbSZvU%3d

Copyright 2019 National Audubon Society, Inc.

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