Stop oil and gas development from harming Alaska’s wildlife – Defenders of Wildlife

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Stop oil and gas development from harming Alaska’s wildlife
Spotted Seal (c) Jay Verhoef (NOAA)

Alaska’s wildlife is in jeopardy. A newly proposed development by oil giant ConocoPhilips would build a huge oil field with hundreds of oil wells that would impact critical polar bear habitat and protected lands in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) recently released their Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the development, but they’re rushing through the process to open up leasing as quickly as possible, with little regard for the harm this development could bring to local wildlife.

Tell the BLM: Don’t turn a blind eye to wildlife!

Dear BLM State Director Chad Padgett,

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    I am writing to you with significant concerns about BLM’s Willow Master Development Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) regarding the proposed Willow oil and gas development located in the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska (NPR-A). In particular, I am concerned about the Willow development’s proposed size and proximity to some of the most valuable wildlife habitat in America’s Arctic found adjacent in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area and Arctic Ocean, and its impacts to polar bear critical habitat. I am also concerned that the analyses and decision-making around this very significant development is happening virtually in tandem with BLM revising its overall management plan for the NPR-A, the Integrated Activity Plan, where the size and protections of established Special Areas may be changed.

ConocoPhillips has proposed developing a major industrialized zone, including up to five drill sites of up to 50 wells each, a central processing facility, an operations center pad, miles of gravel and ice roads, pipelines (including under the Colville River), a gravel mine just west of the community of Nuiqsut, and a gravel island in Harrison Bay. This human-made, modular island just off-shore and north-east of the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area would impact polar bear critical habitat and likely would also impact to threatened ice seals and whales. These species are already experiencing significant effects from climate change and other oil and gas activities in the Alaskan Arctic. The DEIS understates impacts to polar bears and seals, and completely omits impacts to cetaceans including listed bowhead and beluga whales.

I urge BLM to slow this analysis process down to make sure that the agency is getting sufficient public input; properly analyzing issues raised by a cross-section of stakeholders; and especially sufficiently analyzing impacts to imperiled polar bears, ice seals, whales and other wildlife.

Sincerely,
https://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=3552&s_src=3WDW2000PWX5X&s_subsrc=tw-deiswillow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=deiswillow

Sign Petition: Two of this Zoo’s Three Elephants Have Died in Less Than One Year.

by: Care2 Team
recipient: Commerford Zoo

If you type in RW Commerford & Sons in Google Maps, it will take you to a small zoo in Connecticut. The park has a horrific rating of 1.5 stars and once you do a little digging it isn’t hard to see why. The zoo has been cited by the USDA for several animal welfare violations over the years and has earned the ire of animal rights advocates for its treatment of three elephants in their custody – Karen, Beulah, and Minnie.

At least they did have three elephants. Several outlets reported that two of their three pachyderms have died in less than a year. Now the infamous traveling circus just has one. Karen, died earlier this year and Beulah, the famous 54-year-old female which had been held captive by the Commerford family for more than 40 years passed away in September.

Beulah, without even knowing it, had been at the forefront of the fight for rights for elephants in the state of Connecticut where lawyers were working to earn her and other elephants’ legal personhood.

The elderly elephant died as she lived, a prisoner and a tool for the Commerford Zoo to line their pockets of money made by making her suffer. She collapsed at the Big E Fair in neighboring Massachusetts. Now Minnie is the last elephant at the Commerford Zoo and it is only a matter of time until she too passes away without ever knowing freedom.

The owners of the Commerford Zoo should be ashamed of themselves. Elephants are intelligent, sentient beings that have no business in zoos. Nor do other animals for that matter because captivity is cruel.

It’s time to stand up and say enough is enough. Sign the petition and demand that R.W. Commerford & Sons give Minnie a fighting chance at a happy life. Tell them to give her to a reputable animal sanctuary where she can be free.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/553/363/364/?TAP=1732