North Carolina Jails Free Hundreds of Illegal Immigrant Criminals Wanted by Feds – Judicial Watch

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September 10, 2019 | Judicial Watch

Weeks after Judicial Watch reported that the sheriff of North Carolina’s biggest county released numerous violent illegal immigrant criminals from custody, new federal stats reveal that the problem is statewide. Nearly 500 offenders with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainers have been discharged into communities throughout the Tar Heel State this fiscal year, which doesn’t end until next month so the number is likely to grow. A Charlotte news outlet obtained the latest figures from ICE, which operates under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). In the article a senior DHS source condemns North Carolina law enforcement officials, reminding them that they are obstructing federal law and endangering the American public.

So far 489 illegal aliens with ICE detainers have been discharged from North Carolina jails in the last ten months, including those charged with serious crimes such as homicide, kidnapping, arson and sex offenses. The new data does not break down which county jail the perpetrators were released from, but we know from previous disclosures that Mecklenburg County, the state’s largest, is notorious for protecting illegal aliens from the feds. In fact, when the current sheriff, Garry McFadden got elected in 2018, he immediately ended a program known as 287(g) that notifies ICE of jail inmates in the country illegally. The program enhances the safety and security of communities by creating partnerships with state and local law enforcement agencies to identify and remove aliens who are amenable to removal from the United States. It is a mutually beneficial agreement, ICE says, that identifies, arrests and serves warrants and detainers of incarcerated foreign-born criminals. The program has identified and removed from the U.S. gang members, sex offenders and murderers and has reduced the number of criminal offenders that are released back into communities. “Federal, state and local officers working together provide a tremendous benefit to public safety through increased law enforcement communication and overall community policing effectiveness,” according to ICE.

But Mecklenburg County proudly offers illegal aliens sanctuary and evidently that includes violent offenders. ICE recently disclosed that McFadden’s agency has freed more than 20 serious criminals, including rapists, child molesters, kidnappers, burglars, and those charged with gun-related and drug crimes. Most of the illegal immigrants are from Central America and Mexico, but a few are from India, Afghanistan, Liberia and Sri Lanka. Among them is Oscar Pacheco-Leonardo, a previously deported Honduran charged with rape and child sex offenses. Thankfully, ICE arrested him last month during a targeted enforcement operation because Mecklenburg County law enforcement officials released him from custody despite his violent history. The federal agency accused Mecklenburg County of releasing a serious public safety threat onto the streets of Charlotte where he was free to potentially harm others for nearly two months until his capture by ICE. “The Mecklenburg County sheriff’s decision to restrict cooperation with ICE serves as an open invitation to aliens who commit criminal offenses that Mecklenburg County is a safe haven for persons seeking to evade federal authorities, and residents of Mecklenburg County are less safe today than last year due these policies,” the agency’s regional director said in a statement.

Incredibly, a growing number of local municipalities offer illegal immigrants sanctuary and refuse to cooperate with federal authorities, even when it involves dangerous criminals. Just a few months ago Judicial Watch reported that various California law enforcement agencies released 16 illegal immigrants with criminal records during a three-month period. Some were arrested and released multiple times by the same local law enforcement agency after committing felonies. In all of the cases, ICE issued detainers but local police ignored the federal agency to protect the illegal alien from deportation, instead freeing the perpetrator back into the community. Offenders include Mexican, Honduran and Salvadoran nationals charged with murder, rape, assault with a deadly weapon, spousal abuse, driving under the influence of alcohol, possession of illegal drugs and other serious crimes. One 23-year-old Honduran man was booked and released in San Francisco ten times in less than a year for crimes ranging from burglary, vehicle theft and driving without a license. In each of the arrests, ICE issued a detainer but the San Francisco Police Department disregarded it and let the man go.

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How to remove gel nail polish at home without ruining your nails

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Lilah Nicolaidis
remove gel nail polish Shutterstock A gel manicure is a popular, time-saving procedure that gives you long-lasting, freshly lacquered nails for about two weeks.
But removing gel polish is not as simple as removing regular polish.
It can be damaging to your nails if you don’t take it off properly.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to remove gel nail polish safely and the things you need to do it at home.

Many people love gel manicures. Gel polish’s glossy finish is practically indestructible and that just-left-the-salon look can last for two weeks or more. But eventually, you will notice a tiny chip, and then another and another until you’ve got to remove the polish.

As anyone who’s ever had a gel manicure can confirm, that’s easier said than done. Gel polish is not like regular nail polish. Its ingredients are stronger than your traditional lacquer, which is part of why it’s so resistant to the normal wear-and-tear that destroys your average manicure in a matter of days. Gel polish is also cured under a UV or LED lamp, whereas regular polish sets under less extreme conditions.

Another reality of the gel manicure is that it can weaken your nails. Removing gel polish is not like removing regular polish, either. It takes a few steps whether you choose to go back to the salon or do it at home, and the process can be especially damaging to your nail bed if you try to peel or pick it off yourself. With that in mind (and because we’re trying to save you a few bucks), we’re going to explain how to remove a gel manicure at home.

Here’s what you need to remove a gel manicure:

Nail file: ClassyLady Professional Glass Nail File

Cuticle cream: Deborah Lippman Nail Cuticle Repair Cream

Cotton balls: Jumbo Cotton Balls

Acetone nail polish remover: OPI Nail Polish Remover

Aluminum foil: Standard Aluminum Foil

Wooden nail sticks: Adecco Nail Art Orange Wood Sticks

There are also removal kits available, like this Red Carpet Manicure version and these nail polish remover soak off foils, but these options can be pricier than having your gel polish removed at the salon.

Once you’ve gathered your ingredients, carve out about 30 minutes for the whole process, since you’ll need to soak and file your nails. Find a well-ventilated place, either near an open window or a fan so you don’t breath in too much acetone. Finally, settle in with your favorite podcast and get started.

How to remove gel nail polish at home

File your nails: The point of this step is to gently penetrate the surface of the gel polish so the acetone can soak in more easily. You don’t need to do more than gently sand the surface to remove the shine. We recommend the ClassyLady Professional Glass Nail File.
Protect your skin and cuticles: Acetone is extremely drying, so take the extra time to coat the area around your nails with a thick cream or oil to protect your skin. You don’t need to go overboard, just a drop will do. We like the Deborah Lippman Nail Cuticle Repair Cream.
Soak the cotton balls: Fill a small bowl with OPI’s Nail Polish Remover and soak 10 cotton balls in it.
Wrap your nails in aluminum foil: Tear 10 3-inch squares of aluminum foil, one for each finger. Then take a soaked cotton ball and wrap your fingertips. This can be tricky, so we suggest wrapping your non-dominant hand first to make it easier. Now, sit back and relax for about 15 minutes.
Check your progress: Peek inside one of the foil wrappers. If the gel looks loosened and falling off the nail you’re ready to move on to the next step. If not, wrap the foil back up and wait another 5 to 10 minutes.
Removal: Remove the foil and apply slight pressure to the nail. The gel should slide off easily with the cotton ball, and any residue can be removed with a wooden nail stick. We recommend Adecco’s Nail Art Orange Wood Sticks.
Hydrate your nails: Don’t skip this important step! Your nails will be dry after the gel polish comes off, so wash them, and then either soak them for a few minutes in a hydrating oil or reapply the cuticle cream over your nail beds. The only reason not to do this is if you’re polishing again immediately, but experts suggest giving your nails some time to recover between manicures.

Buy the ClassyLady Professional Glass Nail File on Amazon for $9.96

Buy the Deborah Lippman Nail Cuticle Repair Cream at Sephora for $24

Buy Jumbo Cotton Balls at target for $1.89

Buy OPI Nail Polish Remover on Amazon for $5.65

Buy Standard Aluminum Foil at Target for $2.59

Buy Adecco Nail Art Orange Wood Sticks on Amazon for $5.99

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