Quintana Roo prohibits bullfights, cockfights, sets rules for owning pets

Published on Friday, June 28, 2019

The Quintana Roo Congress has passed a new animal protection law that bans both bullfighting and cockfights in the state.

The Congress said in a statement that the Animal Protection and Welfare Law incorporates proposals made by the public and prohibits acts that involve suffering or harm to animals such as bullfighting and cockfights.

The law also establishes new regulations for the breeding, rearing, sale and exhibition of animals as well as for the capture of lost or abandoned animals.

In addition, it limits the number of animals that can be kept in shelters and establishes requirements for owning a pet.

Quintana Roo becomes the fourth state to outlaw bullfighting after Sonora, Guerrero and Coahuila, and the second to prohibit cockfights after Veracruz.

In contrast, bullfighting is considered intangible cultural heritage in the states of Aguascalientes, Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Michoacán, Querétaro, Tlaxcala and Zacatecas.

Several states, including Puebla, México and Tlaxcala, have also afforded the same status to cockfighting.

In Mexico City, lawmakers have presented several bills that sought to ban bullfighting but as yet none has been approved.

Most recently, Morena party lawmaker Leticia Varela argued that the blood sport must be outlawed because Mexico City already guarantees dignified treatment for all living beings.

“We’re obliged to comply with what the supreme law of the country’s capital establishes,” she said.

The deputy’s proposal was referred to Congress committees for analysis.

The environment committee of the lower house of the federal Congress is also examining the issue and planning to present a bill to ban bullfighting.

“Although some people think that bullfighting is tradition and culture, it can’t be considered in that way because it doesn’t cultivate the spirit or the intellectual faculties of those who practice it, and for those who attend [the fights], even less so,” said federal deputy Pilar Lozano.

https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/quintana-roo-prohibits-bullfights-cockfights/?fbclid=IwAR1hOrmIHZvxR2A63_cJWF8-vn-vsk4PrhT2bEaR2n2Yrd68tYvNU_yvLLA

Source: Infobae (sp)

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Breaking! Golden Eagle Chicks Found In Southern California Mountains For The 1st Time In 30 Years – World Animal News

By WAN –
June 27, 2019
Photos By National Park Service
A pair of golden eagle chicks, a fully protected species in the state of California, have been found in a nest in a remote area of Southern California.
As per the National Park Service (NPS), the last time a nest was confirmed in this remote area of Southern California was in the late 1980s.

The chicks, a 12-week-old male and female, were located several weeks ago when a consultant conducting bird surveys on private property identified the golden eagle pair and notified park biologists. NPS biologists working with biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Bloom Biological Inc., confirmed the nest location and activity and tagged them in early May.
Each chick received two bands; one colored and one numbered. The bands are part of the USGS Bird Banding Laboratory to help scientists monitor the status, trends and ecology of resident and migratory bird populations. Biologists also took blood from the chicks for genetic testing.
Loss of habitat for nesting and hunting has reduced their range in much of the state, according to Katy Delaney, an ecologist with the National Park Service.
Delaney is worried about these majestic raptors.
“Humans are the greatest threat to golden eagles,” Delaney said in a statement. “In the past, they were trapped and shot throughout their range, and today, they are vulnerable to habitat loss. Like their mammalian carnivore counterparts, they can die from eating poisoned prey, as well as from lead poisoning, electrocution on power lines and collisions with wind turbines.”
“We haven’t seen them in so many years, though they could have been around and staying away from people.” continued Delaney. “We just went through a huge fire and drought, and we are also not going to experience a decrease in urban development. We not only have mountain lions here, but we have golden eagles, as well.”
Although the chicks recently left the nest, their parents are not total empty nesters, yet. For the next several months, they will continue to rely on the more experienced birds until they learn to successfully hunt on their own, which may be around late fall.
These birds of prey typically feed on rabbits and squirrels, but also take a diverse array of prey species from small birds and snakes, up to mule deer fawns and coyote pups. Carrion is also an important component of their diet. In the case of this family, western gulls were the prey item of choice at the time of banding. There were seven gull wings found in the nest located in a large cave.
Interestingly, golden eagles are thought to form strong pair bonds and exhibit high mate and territory fidelity, meaning they will likely stay with the same partner and return to the same nest each breeding season. Some Southern California adult golden eagles remain on or close to their nest territory throughout the year while others move great distances several counties away. After gaining independence, young eagles generally disperse out of their parents breeding territory traveling between 20 to 1,200 miles away, but usually return when they are four to five years of age to establish their own area for nesting.
The golden eagle, one of the largest birds in North America, is a cousin of the bald eagle. Sightings are extremely rare and both are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Biologists believe the population may be declining in the United States, especially in California.
The golden eagle is one of 11 raptors, birds that hunt and feed on other animals. The most common raptor in the mountains is the western screech owl but red-tailed hawks are seen more often. Dark-colored red-tailed hawks are often mistaken for golden eagles by inexperienced observers.
According to the Chumash Indians, golden eagles had a deep historical connection to Boney Mountain but the last known confirmed nesting there occurred in the early 1800s.
You can help all animals by choosing compassion on your plate. #GoVeg

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-golden-eagle-chicks-found-in-the-santa-monica-mountains-for-the-1st-time-in-30-years/

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Riverbanks Zoo In South Carolina Is Closing Their Elephant Exhibit Which Landed On In Defense of Animals’ “Worst Zoo” List – World Animal News

By Karen Lane –
June 27, 2019

In Defense of Animals has welcomed the recent announcement by Riverbanks Zoo and Garden in Columbia, South Carolina, that it will be closing its elephant exhibit.
In 2017, the facility was placed on In Defense of Animals’ annual list of the 10 Worst Zoos for Elephants In North America, following the death of two elephants within six months of each other. Petunia was euthanized at age 44 in December of 2016 after she was found in her exhibit unable to stand. A second elephant, 37-year-old Penny, died at the zoo in May 2017.
Two remaining elephants at Riverbanks Zoo, Belle and Robin, will be sent to a new location which has reportedly not yet been determined. In Defense of Animals is calling for the elephants to be retired to a sanctuary.
“We are overjoyed that Riverbanks Zoo and Garden has finally acknowledged that its elephant exhibit is not suitable for remaining elephants Belle and Robin,” Marilyn Kroplick M.D., President of In Defense of Animals, said in a statement. “When two relatively young elephants die within six months of each other, there is clearly a problem. Riverbanks Zoo is making the right decision to close its elephant exhibit, and we urge the Zoo to send Belle and Robin to an accredited sanctuary where they can enjoy peace, privacy and a more natural environment than zoos can provide.”
“This is a victory for elephants and for members of the public who have become aware that captive facilities are no place for wild animals,” stated Laura Bridgeman, Director of In Defense of Animals’ elephant campaign.

https://worldanimalnews.com/riverbanks-zoo-in-south-carolina-is-closing-the-elephant-exhibit-that-landed-it-on-in-defense-of-animals-worst-zoo-list-in-2017/

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TAGS:Animal News,Animal Protection,Animal Welfare,,ElephantsSouth Carolina zoo

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