Success! Cruel Beagle Fungicide Test Ends at Corteva Agriscience | Care2 Causes

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Less than a week after the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) released the disturbing report that 36 beagles were being force-fed a fungicide in a test commissioned by Coreteva Agriscience, a division of Dow DuPont, the company announced it will end this terrible study.

An undercover HSUS investigator at Charles River Laboratories in Michigan discovered that the beagles were being fed Adavelt, a new Coreteva Agriscience fungicide, in gelatin capsules for a year. According to the report released March 12, some of these dogs “were being subjected to very high doses – so high that up to four capsules had to be shoved down their throats.”

All the surviving beagles were scheduled to be euthanized in July. Their organs would then be removed and examined for any damage from the fungicide.

This study is horrible for many reasons. For one thing, it does not replicate how Adavelt would be ingested by humans. Even worse, the United States government hasn’t even required this test for over 10 years, ever since scientists realized it provides no worthwhile information.

Corteva Agriscience said it had to conduct the test—which it admitted was unnecessary—to meet a Brazilian regulatory requirement. However, Brazil’s pesticide authority, ANVISA, told the HSUS it will waive the test for companies that don’t want to conduct it.

At Corteva Agriscience’s request, ANVISA sent a formal, written version of this policy to the entire Brazilian pesticide industry. But Conteva Agriculture refused to stop the test until the industry received confirmation that it was no longer required. If that confirmation took longer than four months, those beagles would die in July.

The HSUS and Humane Society International (HSI) have been working for months to make Corteva Agriscience end its cruel fungicide test and release the beagles, so they can find loving homes. More than 122,000 people signed HSUS’ petition on Care2 making this demand.

On March 18, just six days after the HSUS released its report, Corteva Agriscience announced it had secured a waiver from ANVISA and had immediately ended the test. The company promised it would make “every effort” to rehome the beagles.

We’ve been working to refine, reduce, & replace animal tests for years. Today we’re pleased to announce our efforts resulted in a waiver & we can stop the study. We’ll make every effort to rehome the animals. Please read our full statement. pic.twitter.com/SQc5RJg41M

— Corteva Agriscience™ (@corteva) March 18, 2019

“We applaud Corteva for making the right decision,” Kitty Block, HSUS president and CEO, wrote on her blog. “The company has been a valuable partner to us in the past on important measures to decrease animal testing and we hope that we can work with them on a happy ending for these dogs.”

The surviving beagles owe their lives to the efforts of the HSUS and HSI, as well as everyone around the world who urged Corteva Agriscience to stop the test. Here’s hoping the HSUS is successful again in finding loving homes for every one of these survivors.

Creating a Care2 petition is easy. If you have an issue you care deeply about, why not start your own petition? Here are some guidelines to help you get started, and soon the Care2 community will be signing up to support you.

https://www.care2.com/causes/success-cruel-beagle-fungicide-test-ends-at-corteva-agriscience.html

Photo credit: mus15house

8 comments on “Success! Cruel Beagle Fungicide Test Ends at Corteva Agriscience | Care2 Causes

  1. Pingback: Success! Cruel Beagle Fungicide Test Ends at Corteva Agriscience | Care2 Causes — “OUR WORLD” – straydogsworldwide.wordpress.com

  2. Cruel and unnecessary testing on animals takes place all over the world. Over 60,000 dogs are bred in laboratory breeding facilities purely to be tested upon. They never see grass, smell clean air or play. Some have their vocal cords cut so they cannot cry out. The testing has been proven to be cruel and archaic. Thank you to everyone who steps in, intervenes and contacts organisations including some university facilities to stop testing on animals.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. As a beagle it directly affects my brothers and sisters, along with a host of other sentient creatures who should be treated with more respect, thought and compassion. The testing is revolting in its methods and indeed unnecessary. If it saves more animals, then so much the better.

    Liked by 1 person

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