Recalls, Market Withdrawals, & Safety Alerts – Hill’s Pet Nutrition Voluntarily Recalls Select Canned Dog Food for Excessive Vitamin D

fda.gov

Office of Regulatory Affairs

Hill’s Pet Nutrition is voluntarily recalling select canned dog food products due to potentially elevated levels of vitamin D. While vitamin D is an essential nutrient for dogs, ingestion of elevated levels can lead to potential health issues depending on the level of vitamin D and the length of exposure, and dogs may exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss. Vitamin D, when consumed at very high levels, can lead to serious health issues in dogs including renal dysfunction. Pet parents with dogs who have consumed any of the products listed and are exhibiting any of these signs should contact their veterinarian. In most cases, complete recovery is expected after discontinuation of feeding.

In the United States, the affected canned dog foods were distributed through retail pet stores and veterinary clinics nationwide. No dry foods, cat foods, or treats are affected.

Pet parents who purchased the product with the specific lot/date codes listed should discontinue feeding and dispose of those products immediately. To have discarded products replaced at no cost, please contact Hill’s via our website or at 1-800-445-5777.

Hill’s Pet Nutrition learned of the potential for elevated vitamin D levels in some of our canned dog foods after receiving a complaint in the United States about a dog exhibiting signs of elevated vitamin D levels. Our investigation confirmed elevated levels of vitamin D due to a supplier error.

We care deeply about all pets and are committed to providing pet parents with safe and high quality products. Hill’s has identified and isolated the error and, to prevent this from happening again, we have required our supplier to implement additional quality testing prior to their release of ingredients. In addition to our existing safety processes, we are adding our own further testing of incoming ingredients.

For further information, please contact Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Inc. at 1-800-445-5777 Monday-Friday during the hours of 9am-5pm (CST) or at contactus@hillspet.com. Information can also be found at http://www.hillspet.com/productlistdisclaimer icon

This voluntary recall only impacts canned dog food and primarily in the United States. It is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Impacted products outside of the United States will be subject to separate notices on the country-specific website. If you are outside of the United States, please check your own country’s Hill’s website for more information.

SKU and Date Code/Lot Code Locations on Impacted Canned Dog Food Products
Product Name SKU Number Lot Code/Date Code
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® c/d® Multicare Canine Chicken & Vegetable Stew 12.5oz 3384 102020T10
102020T25
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® i/d® Canine Chicken & Vegetable Stew 12.5oz 3389 102020T04
102020T10
102020T19
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® i/d® Canine Chicken & Vegetable Stew 5.5oz 3390 102020T11
112020T23
122020T07
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® z/d® Canine 5.5oz 5403 102020T17
112020T22
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® g/d® Canine 13oz 7006 112020T19
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® i/d® Canine 13oz 7008 092020T30
102020T07
102020T11
112020T22
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® j/d® Canine 13oz 7009 112020T20
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® k/d® Canine 13oz 7010 102020T10
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® w/d® Canine 13oz 7017 092020T30
102020T11
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® z/d® Canine 13oz 7018 102020T04
112020T22
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® Metabolic + Mobility Canine Vegetable & Tuna Stew 12.5oz 10086 102020T05
102020T26
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® w/d® Canine Vegetable & Chicken Stew 12.5oz 10129 102020T04
102020T21
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® i/d® Low Fat Canine Rice, Vegetable & Chicken Stew 12.5oz 10423 102020T17
102020T19
112020T04
Hill’s® Prescription Diet® Derm Defense® Canine Chicken & Vegetable Stew 12.5oz 10509 102020T05
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult 7+ Small & Toy Breed Chicken & Barley Entrée Dog Food 5.8oz 4969 102020T18
Hill’s® Science Diet® Puppy Chicken & Barley Entrée 13oz 7036 102020T12
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult Chicken & Barley Entrée Dog Food 13oz 7037 102020T13
112020T23
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult Turkey & Barley Dog Food 13oz 7038 102020T06
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult Chicken & Beef Entrée Dog Food 13oz 7040 102020T13
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult Light with Liver Dog Food 13oz 7048 112020T19
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult 7+ Chicken & Barley Entrée Dog Food 13oz 7055 092020T31
102020T13
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult 7+ Beef & Barley Entrée Dog Food 13oz 7056 092020T31
112020T20
112020T24
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult 7+ Turkey & Barley Entrée 13oz 7057 112020T19
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult 7+ Healthy Cuisine Braised Beef, Carrots & Peas Stew dog food 12.5oz 10452 102020T14
102020T21
Hill’s® Science Diet® Adult 7+ Youthful Vitality Chicken & Vegetable Stew dog food 12.5oz 10763 102020T04
112020T11

https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm630232.htm

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Endangered sharks sold as food in Britain

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 2014 video says about itself:

In this Shark Academy video, Jonathan Bird explains the biology and behavior of Scalloped Hammerhead sharks with exciting footage shot at Cocos Island and the Galapagos Islands.

If you like hammerheads, check out the Jonathan Bird’s Blue World episode on Scalloped Hammerheads:

From the University of Exeter in England:

Endangered sharks being eaten in UK

January 31, 2019

Endangered species of hammerhead and dogfish are among the sharks being sold as food in the UK, researchers have revealed.

University of Exeter scientists sampled shark products from fishmongers and chip shops, as well as shark fins from an Asian food wholesaler in the UK.

The majority of chip shop samples (usually sold under generic names like huss, rock salmon and rock eel) were spiny dogfish — a species “endangered” in Europe and “vulnerable” worldwide.

The fin samples included scalloped hammerheads —…

View original post 373 more words

Sad but true……

Purplerays

 

No other animal has brought more shame to the animal kingdom than man. 

– A.D. Williams

Text & image source: Precious World https://web.facebook.com/ourpreciousworld/

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#PolarVortex Hits State of Emergency called in some parts as at least 8-people have died in US Midwest with temperatures hitting -53-degrees in Chicago and residents are advised to keep in doors and not spend more than 10-minutes outside and avoid breathing deeply as many flights are cancelled and hospitals treating a number cases of frostbite #AceNewsDesk reports

(CAPE TOWN, S.A.) #ClimateChange Country is used of dry season and limited rainfall but this year Kamfers Da m in the Northern Cape, is one of only three breeding grounds for the famously pink birds in Southern Africa , say its its ‘ Drought Stricken ‘ as rescuers try to move the birds from their breeding gro und #AceNewsDesk reports

Petition · Jay Inslee: Ban styrofoam and single use plastics in Washington State · Change.org

S. Carpenter started this petition to Governor Jay Inslee and 2 others

From our beautiful coasts, to our rainforests, our mountains, our farmlands and deserts: Washington State is rich in natural beauty. It’s time to take bold measures to protect it for future generations. We urge you to pass legislation that will ban the sale and use of styrofoam and single use plastics in WA State.

Styrofoam and single use plastics are relatively new products of convenience and are not critical consumer goods. There are less harmful alternatives, and we need to legislate this switch away from harmful fossil fuel-based disposable goods to keep the economic impact equitable across businesses statewide.

It is time we commit to phasing out these environmentally harmful products in order to protect our fields, streams, coasts, wildlife and reduce the legacy of environmental degradation that our kids will inherit.

https://www.change.org/p/jay-inslee-ban-styrofoam-and-single-use-plastics-in-washington-state/sign?utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa_sign_human&utm_campaign=482716&utm_content=&sfmc_tk=HN59zdK007tLL%2bIgCs05Zbxnw24U7asrmAoJB5jQ%2ftxpDnpaqlN3QePbzXPCaKOI&j=482716&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=66250603&mid=7233053&jb=363

© 2019, Change.org, PBCCertified B Corporation

New Study Finds MicroPlastics in Every Sea Creature Tested

firepaw.org

Published by firepawinc View all posts by firepawinc

The disturbing results from a new study revealed plastic in every sea creature tested…

A Hundred Percent of Dolphins, Whales and Seals Tested had Microplastics in their Bodies.

A team analyzed a total of 50 animals across 10 species for their research published in the journal Scientific Reports. Microplastics were defined in the study as fragments measuring up to 5 millimeters (0.2 inches).

The samples used in the study were taken from 50 animals by members of the Scottish Marine Animal Strandings Scheme (SMASS) and the Cetacean Stranding Investigation Programme. Both projects are based in the U.K.

Of the plastics found in the sea creatures, 84 percent were synthetic fibres which generally originate from products such as clothing and fishing nets. The remainder of the contaminants were what the scientists described as fragments, likely to come from food and drink packaging.

A separate piece of research by scientists at the University of Plymouth, U.K., found billions of nanoparticles contaminated shellfish exposed after six hours. The research was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Journal Reference: Nelms, S.E., et al. (2019). Microplastics in marine mammals stranded around the British coast: ubiquitous but transitory? Scientific Reports, 9, Article number: 1075.

https://firepaw.org/2019/01/31/new-study-finds-microplastics-in-every-sea-creature-tested/

How often should you clean your water bottle?

treehugger.com
By MelissaBreyer January 30, 2019

An infectious disease physician dishes the dirt on water bottles.

Here’s a curious thing about modern humans. We went for most of history without needing to carry a bottle of water around with us everywhere we went. But now, many of us find it hard to manage without constant and immediate access to hydration. Since the rise of the now-ubiquitous single-use water bottle in the 1970s, we’ve become unusually attached to portable water. Now that plastic water bottles have become such an untenable source of pollution, at least we’re seeing the light and increasingly moving on to reusable versions.

The only thing is, unlike a water glass at home that gets washed on a somewhat regular basis, the water bottle may get a bit neglected in the washing department. I mean, it’s filled with water, how dirty can it get?

Writer Hana Asbrink at Food52 wondered the same thing and decided to explore the question of how often one should wash their reusable water bottle. She reached out to Dr. Brian Chow, an infectious disease physician at Tufts Medical Center, who told her:

“Ideally once per day. Or have a few bottles that you rotate through, and clean them all at once.”

Of the bacteria found on bottles, his take is similar to what I discovered when writing about whether or not day old water is safe to drink:

“They are bacteria that live in our mouth and throat that our bodies know, and they don’t make us sick. However, if you share bottles with someone else, they may not be used to your bacteria or viruses. The germs that cause strep throat, mononucleosis, colds and the flu, and even bacterial meningitis can be spread by sharing bottles.”

That said, if you are not washing your bottle daily, don’t fret. “In most cases, people with healthy immune systems will be okay going a day or two between washing bottles,” says Chow … as he goes on to explain that actually, there are germs everywhere that can end up on your bottle that you then drink out of. Thus:

“A quick wash and scrub at the end of the day and letting the bottle dry overnight is an easy step to keep you healthy while you stay hydrated.”

“Water that is hot to the touch is best,” says Chow. “While it may not kill all the germs directly, it does help dissolve the residue that allow germs to live on plastic and metal. Using soapy water and a scrub brush are as important (this removes the dirt and grime), and also dislodges the germs if they are stuck to the bottle.”

At my house we rinse all the water bottles in hot water at the end of the day and let them dry over night, and we seem to have survived, and without too many bouts of illness. That said, I may now start introducing some dish soap and a scrub brush every once in a while.

Importantly, check with the maker of your bottle to see what they advise for washing. Some can take the dishwasher, many can not. I did a little digging on some popular brands, which you can read below.

SIGG
You’re going to want to start by rinsing out the bottle and bottle top with hot water after every use. Leave open to dry and always store with the top off.

Our best tip is to fill your SIGG halfway with hot water. But be sure to be careful because the bottle can heat up quickly. Add one teaspoon of unscented dish soap and shake. Let sit for a few minutes then rinse with lukewarm water until the soapy water runs clear.

Remember to always make sure that the lip of the bottle is thoroughly cleaned in the same way as the bottle as this is the part that comes in the most contact with your mouth.

S’well
S’well products should be cleaned regularly—we recommend washing your bottle with warm water and soap after every use and drying and storing it with the top off. Our S’well Bottle Brush is a great tool to ensure your bottle stays thoroughly clean. Avoid submerging your bottle and cap in water for long periods of time as this will interfere with the vacuum seal. S’well bottles are NOT dishwasher safe! Running a S’well through the dishwasher can cause paint to chip and the vacuum seal to become ineffective. After washing your S’well, we recommend that you dry your beverage container by airing it out upside down and storing it with the lid off. This will help keep your S’well looking and smelling fresh.

Soma
Hand-wash with warm, soapy water or wash on the top-rack of your dishwasher. Do not remove the sleeve. Store with the cap off. Cap: Hand-wash only. Do not place in the dishwasher.

CamelBak
Cleaning Vacuum Insulated Stainless Steel Vessels: The Chute, eddy and KickBak stainless steel vessels can be easily cleaned with a bottle brush using warm water and mild soap.

Bottle caps, spout caps, tethers and bite valves can all be cleaned in the top rack of the dishwasher or by hand with warm, soapy water. Remove the cap, spout cap, tether or bite valve from the vessel before washing.

For a deeper cleaning, add a drop of mild soap or tablespoon of bleach to a clean glass jar filled with water. Drop the bite valve, straw and cap into the solution, and tightly close the jar’s lid. Shake the mixture around for 30 seconds, and then let the parts soak for about 15 minutes. Rinse and shake dry.

https://www.treehugger.com/health/how-often-should-you-clean-your-water-bottle.html?utm_source=TreeHugger+Newsletters&utm_campaign=fae7d0fd73-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_11_16_2018_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_32de41485d-fae7d0fd73-243719061