Yellowstone plans to ship 600-900 bison to slaughter this winter

Straight from the Horse's Heart

by Brett French as published on The Independent Record

Last year the combination of slaughter and hunting removed 1,171 bison from Yellowstone

Things to come, again?

Last year the combination of slaughter and hunting removed 1,171 bison from Yellowstone. Of that total, 375 were killed by hunters — mostly tribal hunters — and 694 were sent to slaughter. The meat of the animals slaughtered is distributed to participating Indian tribes. Another three bison died in captivity.

The removal of bison is biased to females and young because they are the ones that tend to migrate, White said. That means that the population is trending toward an increase in the number of males, although it’s still deemed within the desired conditions, he explained.

Removing 600 bison would keep the herd numbers stable, based on mathematical calculations by the National Park Service, Deleray said. By removing 900 bison the herd would be…

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How does plutonium affect human health?

nuclear-news

TOXICOLOGICAL PROFILE FOR PLUTONIUM , Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine/Applied Toxicology Branch,  Atlanta, Georgia

” …….Plutonium may remain in the lungs or move to the bones, liver, or other body organs. It generally stays in the body for decades and continues to expose the surrounding tissues to radiation. Lung, liver, and bone cancer You may develop cancer depending on how much plutonium is in your body and for how long it remains in your body. The types of cancers you would most likely develop are cancers of the lung, bones, and liver…….

The risks of mortality and morbidity from bone and liver cancers have also been studied in Mayak workers. Increasing estimated plutonium body burden was associated with increasing liver cancer mortality, with higher risk in females compared to males…….

Cardiovascular Effects. Epidemiological Studies in Humans. Possible associations between exposure to plutonium and…

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Proposed Rule Aims To Curb Public Records Requests As Demand For Documents Increases

Straight from the Horse's Heart

Nate Hegyi as published on Wyoming Public Media

“This appears to be a regulation to figure out some sort of way they can shirk their statutory responsibilities…”

A new rule proposed last week by the U.S. Interior Department could make it harder for news outlets and non-profit organizations to get public information on a range of federal issues.

Once adopted, the regulations would allow the agency to put a cap on the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it processes every month. The proposed rule, which was posted on Dec. 28 in the Federal Register, would also make it tougher for those requests to be filled out quickly for breaking news stories.

“This appears to be a regulation to figure out some sort of way they can shirk their statutory responsibilities,” Jeff Ruch, executive director for the watchdog group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, said.

The Interior Department…

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A horse is a thing of beauty …

Purplerays

 

A horse is a thing of beauty … 
none will tire of looking at him 
as long as he displays himself in his splendor.

– Xenophon

Text & image source: Precious World https://www.facebook.com/ourpreciousworld/

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Rural Nevada residents lash out over tribal horse roundup

Straight from the Horse's Heart

Benjamin Spillman| Reno Gazette Journal

“I kept screaming, ‘Stop, get off my land.’ He didn’t pay any attention to me. He just kept going,” she said. “He scared my horses away and they ran with the wild horses.”

Kate Carlson laments the loss of three horses she cared for on her property in Palomino Valley. The horses were herded away during a Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe feral horse roundup. Carlson said the roundup workers trespassed on her land and she fears the horses will be sent to slaughter.
Benjamin Spillman/RGJ

Before it descended into chaos, Friday was a typical morning in rural Palomino Valley for Kate Carlson.

>A four-year resident of the valley between Sparks and Pyramid Lake, Carlson was outside tending to the dozens of animals she cares for on her 40-acre property.

But whatever sense of calm she felt shattered with the sound of a motorcycle zipping…

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