93-year-old war veteran dies with no one to carry casket – then six teens show up in uniform

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There is no doubt that if there is anyone who deserves our utmost respect, it is no other than our honorable veteran heroes who risked their life for ours. The admirable courage and inspiring selflessness that the veterans displayed while they were in duty deserves to live on our memories.

Thomas Hunter, a veteran army who served in battlefield from the year 1942-1949, risked his life in the largest amphibious assault in our history. His dedicated his then young life to protect our country during the D-Day invasion of World War II.

After serving in the army by the end of 1949, Mr. Thomas Hunter lead a normal life. However, the war veteran did not get married. It seemed that he was already happy in the company of his 11 siblings.

Sadly, on the 12th day of September, Mr. Thomas Hunter took his last breath. At the ripe age of 93, the World War II veteran passed away, leaving a few nieces behind.

But since Mr. Hunter managed to outlive his 11 siblings, none of his immediate family is left to carry his casket. During the planning of his funeral, his surviving nieces did not know who they could ask to carry Mr. Thomas Hunter’s casket.

Fortunately, the funeral director at Southern Funeral Homes in Winnfield, Louisiana knew what to do. Bryan Price, the director, reached out to the local football coach, Lyn Bankston to ask for help.

The local football coach then asked if any of the young men he knew would be willing to carry the casket of a war veteran. Knowing that these young men do not only possess strong leadership skills but an admirable kind heart as well, he knew they would be more than willing to lend a hand.

He asked Brett Jurek, Justin Lawson, Matthew Harrell, T.J. Homan, Lee Estay, and Christian Evans if they would be willing to help out the deceased war veteran. Not disappointing the expectation of the local coach, they immediately agreed to help knowing about Mr. Thomas Hunter’s story.

“These are all young men who are leaders in our program and our community. They know the sacrifice Mr. Hunter made and it meant something to them.” Lyn Bankston explained.

The young men even asked whether it would be okay for them to wear their football jerseys.
“The kids asked if it was appropriate for them to wear their jerseys, and I said absolutely it was because you and this program stand for exactly what Mr. Hunter stood for when he was serving this country.” Coach Bankston shared.

Photo | USA TODAY

To honor the priceless services Mr. Thomas Hunter rendered to our country during the World War II, the 6 young football men carried his casket with pride. They sent the war veteran on a somber and solemn ceremony.

To acknowledge the efforts of the 6 young athletes, U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham praised the kind gesture of the football players during his speech on the House floor.

“They didn’t know this man, but they knew that every veteran deserves to die with dignity and be honoured for the sacrifices he made in defence of this nation.” U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham said. “I think the actions of these young men speak volumes about what’s truly important – country, community, family, God.” The house representative added.

Meanwhile, Coach Bankston could not be even more proud of the kind gesture his players displayed.

“One of the things we try to teach our young people is to value history and to recognize that so many people sacrificed so they could have the life they have.” Coach Bankston proudly shared.

Kudos to the young football players, the war veteran who served our country was not sent off on his own. After all, no war veteran of any generation deserves to be forgotten, because if not for the life they have risked, we wouldn’t be here today.

Watch the heartwarming video below and may their story remind us not to forget about the heroes who stood up for our country.

 

Video | USA TODAY

https://positiveoutlooksblog.com/war-veteran-dies-with-no-one-to-carry-casket-six-teens-uniform/

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